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Sample records for advanced colorectal neoplasia

  1. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced

  2. Incidence of advanced neoplasia during surveillance in high- and intermediate-risk groups of the European colorectal cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cubiella, Joaquín; Carballo, Fernando; Portillo, Isabel; Cruzado Quevedo, José; Salas, Dolores; Binefa, Gemma; Milà, Núria; Hernández, Cristina; Andreu, Montse; Terán, Álvaro; Arana-Arri, Eunate; Ono, Akiko; Valverde, María José; Bujanda, Luis; Hernández, Vicent; Morillas, Juan Diego; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni

    2016-11-01

    Background and study aims: The European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening have established high-risk (≥ 5 adenomas or an adenoma ≥ 20 mm) and intermediate-risk (3 - 4 adenomas or at least one adenoma 10 - 19 mm in size, or villous histology, or high grade dysplasia) groups with different endoscopic surveillance intervals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in the incidence of advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma or CRC) between the two risk groups. Patients and methods: This retrospective group study included patients meeting high- or intermediate-risk criteria for adenomas detected in CRC screening programs and the COLONPREV study before European guidelines were adopted in Spain (June 2011) with a 3-year surveillance recommendation according to Spanish guidelines. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of advanced neoplasia in patients undergoing surveillance. The secondary outcome measure was the CRC incidence. We used an adjusted proportional hazards regression model to control confounding variables. Results: The study included 5401 patients (3379 intermediate risk, 2022 high risk). Endoscopic surveillance was performed in 65.5 % of the patients (2.8 ± 1 years). The incidence of advanced neoplasia in the high- and intermediate-risk groups was 16.0 % (59.0 cases/1000 patient-years) and 12.3 % (41.2 cases/1000 patient-years), respectively. The CRC incidence was 0.5 % (1.4 cases/1000 patient-years) and 0.4 % (1 case/1000 patient-years), respectively. The advanced neoplasia and CRC attributable risk to the high risk group was of 3.7 % and 0.1 %, respectively. In the proportional hazards analysis, the risk of advanced neoplasia was greater in the high-risk group (hazard ratio [HR] 1.5, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.2 - 1.8), with no significant differences in the CRC incidence (HR 1.6, 95 %CI 0.6 - 3.8). Conclusions: Patients meeting high-risk criteria

  3. The Your Disease Risk Index for colorectal cancer is an inaccurate risk stratification tool for advanced colorectal neoplasia at screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroy, Paul C; Coe, Alison M; Mylvaganam, Shamini R; Ahn, Lynne B; Lydotes, Maria A; Robinson, Patricia A; Davis, Julie T; Chen, Clara A; Ashba, Jacqueline; Atkinson, Michael L; Colditz, Graham A; Heeren, Timothy C

    2012-08-01

    Tailoring the use of screening colonoscopy based on the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) could optimize the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Our goal was to assess the accuracy of the Your Disease Risk (YDR) CRC risk index for stratifying average risk patients into low- versus intermediate/high-risk categories for ACN. The YDR risk assessment tool was administered to 3,317 asymptomatic average risk patients 50 to 79 years of age just before their screening colonoscopy. Associations between YDR-derived relative risk (RR) scores and ACN prevalence were examined using logistic regression and χ(2) analyses. ACN was defined as a tubular adenoma ≥1 cm, tubulovillous or villous adenoma of any size, and the presence of high-grade dysplasia or cancer. The overall prevalence of ACN was 5.6%. Although YDR-derived RR scores were linearly associated with ACN after adjusting for age and gender (P = 0.033), the index was unable to discriminate "below average" from "above/average" risk patients [OR, 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-1.37]. Considerable overlap in rates of ACN was also observed between the different YDR risk categories in our age- and gender-stratified analyses. The YDR index lacks accuracy for stratifying average risk patients into low- versus intermediate/high-risk categories for ACN.

  4. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, EM; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, MA; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. Objective: The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in “medium risk” individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). Methods and Results: We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were “medium risk” individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In “medium risk” individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in “medium risk” individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. Discussion: NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in “medium risk” individuals. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non

  5. Validity of APCS score as a risk prediction score for advanced colorectal neoplasia in Chinese asymptomatic subjects: A prospective colonoscopy study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Jianyu; Wu, Yongdong; Lu, Di; Zhao, Haiying; Wang, Zhenjie; Xu, Tianming; Yang, Hong; Qian, Jiaming; Li, Jingnan

    2016-10-01

    The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score is a risk-stratification tool that helps predict the risk for advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in asymptomatic Asian populations, but has not yet been assessed for its validity of use in Mainland China.The aim of the study was to assess the validity of APCS score in asymptomatic Chinese population, and to identify other risk factors associated with ACN.Asymptomatic subjects (N = 1010) who underwent colonoscopy screening between 2012 and 2014 in Beijing were enrolled. APCS scores based on questionnaires were used to stratify subjects into high, moderate, and average-risk tiers. Cochran-Armitage test for trend was used to assess the association between ACN and risk tiers. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed with ACN as the outcome, adjusting for APCS score, body mass index, alcohol consumption, self-reported diabetes, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as independent variables.The average age was 53.5 (standard deviation 8.4) years. The prevalence of ACN was 4.1% overall, and in the high, moderate, and average-risk tiers, the prevalence was 8.8%, 2.83%, and 1.55%, respectively (P < 0.001). High-risk tier had 3.3 and 6.1-fold increased risk of ACN as compared with those in the moderate and average-risk tiers, respectively. In univariate analysis, high-risk tier, obesity, diabetes, and alcohol consumption were associated with ACN. In multivariate analysis, only high-risk tier was an independent predictor of ACN.The APCS score can effectively identify a subset of asymptomatic Chinese population at high risk for ACN. Further studies are required to identify other risk factors, and the acceptability of the score to the general population will need to be further examined.

  6. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer in individuals with previous colorectal neoplasia: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dulai, Parambir S; Marquez, Evelyn; Khera, Rohan; Prokop, Larry J; Limburg, Paul J; Gupta, Samir; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the comparative efficacy and safety of candidate agents (low and high dose aspirin, non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, alone or in combination) for prevention of advanced metachronous neoplasia (that is, occurring at different times after resection of initial neoplasia) in individuals with previous colorectal neoplasia, through a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, Web of Science, from inception to 15 October 2015; clinical trial registries. Study selection Randomized controlled trials in adults with previous colorectal neoplasia, treated with candidate chemoprevention agents, and compared with placebo or another candidate agent. Primary efficacy outcome was risk of advanced metachronous neoplasia; safety outcome was serious adverse events. Data extraction Two investigators identified studies and abstracted data. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed and relative ranking of agents was assessed with surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) probabilities (ranging from 1, indicating that the treatment has a high likelihood to be best, to 0, indicating the treatment has a high likelihood to be worst). Quality of evidence was appraised with GRADE criteria. Results 15 randomized controlled trials (12 234 patients) comparing 10 different strategies were included. Compared with placebo, non-aspirin NSAIDs were ranked best for preventing advanced metachronous neoplasia (odds ratio 0.37, 95% credible interval 0.24 to 0.53; SUCRA=0.98; high quality evidence), followed by low-dose aspirin (0.71, 0.41 to 1.23; SUCRA=0.67; low quality evidence). Low dose aspirin, however, was ranked the safest among chemoprevention agents (0.78, 0.43 to 1.38; SUCRA=0.84), whereas non-aspirin NSAIDs (1.23, 0.95 to 1.64; SUCRA=0.26) were ranked low for safety. High dose aspirin was comparable with low dose aspirin in efficacy (1.12, 0.59 to 2.10; SUCRA=0.58) but

  7. Male pattern baldness and risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Keum, N; Cao, Y; Lee, D H; Park, S M; Rosner, B; Fuchs, C S; Wu, K; Giovannucci, E L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Male pattern baldness is positively associated with androgens as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin, all of which are implicated in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia. Methods: From 1992 through 2010, we prospectively followed participants in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Hair pattern at age 45 years was assessed at baseline with five image categories (no baldness, frontal-only baldness, frontal-plus-mild-vertex baldness, frontal-plus-moderate-vertex baldness, and frontal-plus-severe-vertex baldness). Cancer analysis included 32 782 men and used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Restricted to men who underwent at least one endoscopy over the study period, adenoma analysis included 29 770 men and used logistic regressions for clustered data to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs. Results: Over the mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 710 cases of colorectal cancer (478 for colon, 152 for rectum, and 80 unknown site) developed. Significantly increased risks associated with frontal-only baldness and frontal-plus-mild-vertex baldness relative to no baldness were observed for colon cancer with respective HR being 1.29 (95% CI, 1.03–1.62) and 1.31 (95% CI, 1.01–1.70). Over the 19-year study period, 3526 cases of colorectal adenoma were detected. Evidence for an increased risk of colorectal adenoma relative to no baldness was significant with frontal-only baldness (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06–1.26) and borderline insignificant with frontal-plus-severe-vertex baldness (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.98–1.33). Conclusions: Subtypes of male pattern baldness at age 45 years were positively associated with colorectal neoplasia. Future studies are warranted to confirm our results and to determine the predictive value of male pattern baldness to identify those at high risk for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:26757425

  8. Chemoprevention for advanced CR neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Shapira, Shiran; Arber, Nadir

    2011-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern worldwide. In 2011 1,200,000 new cases are predicted and half of them are going to die from the disease. CRC carcinogenesis is a multi-step process that spans over 10-20 years, providing a window of opportunity for effective intervention. CRC can be prevented by life style modification and screening program. However, although these strategies are standard clinical practice, their impact is limited due to low adherence. The number of deaths due to CRC remains alarming high, and makes CRC prevention a paramount. Chemoprevention interferes with the carcinogenesis process by targeting key molecular pathways. It involves the use of a variety of natural or chemical compounds that can delay, prevent or even reverse the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Numerous chemopreventive agents have been studied but the most efficient are the NSAID group of agents. Much of their efficacy and toxicity has been attributed to their potent inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Chemoprevention has the potential to represent a cost-effective intervention, particularly when targeted at intermediate-risk populations, ages 61-70, following polypectomy. Chemoprevention in this setting is as very important as polyp recurrence in this population can be as high as 50%, even with surveillance colonoscopy every 1-3 years. The most challenging task is to find the proper place for these interventions in the entire effort of general wellbeing. Subjects are likely to be more adherent to prescribed regimens if cancer prevention may be combined with a cardiovascular and Alzheimer prophylaxis. Subjects with a normal colon or non advanced adenomas can be safely monitored with surveillance colonoscopy every 5-10 years. The ideal chemopreventive agent remains to be discovered with great emphasis on the need not to harm. Possibly, combinations of agents will maximize effectiveness while limiting drug toxicity. Finally, personalized approaches would

  9. Association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia in Puerto Rican Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Cristina; Lopez, Maritza; Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Correa, Marcia Cruz

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Epidemiological studies show that a high calcium intake reduces the risk of colon cancer. The objective was to study the association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia in a clinic-based sample of Hispanics adults from Puerto Rico. As part of this cross-sectional study, a total of 433 subjects were recruited from surgery and gastroenterology clinics at the University of Puerto Rico. Calcium intake was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) of calcium rich foods. Socio-demographics, health history and colonoscopy results were obtained from the primary study. Chi square and odds ratios (OR) for colorectal neoplasia (adenomas and/or adenocarcinoma) were calculated for total calcium, dietary calcium and for calcium supplement use. In total, 312 (72%) from 433 participants completed the FFQ and had available colonoscopy results; from these, 196 (62.5%) were free of neoplasia and 117 (37.5%) had colorectal neoplasia. Colorectal neoplasia subjects were older, a lower proportion were females and less educated than those without neoplasia (p<0.01). Total calcium intake (median 1180 mg/d) was greater in those free of neoplasia compared to colorectal neoplasia subjects (median 1036 mg/d; p<0.05). A high total calcium intake and the use of calcium supplements significantly reduced the OR (crude and age adjusted) for colorectal neoplasia; although these associations lost statistical significance after additionally adjusting for gender and educational level. In conclusion, a high calcium intake and the use of calcium supplements may be protective against colorectal neoplasia, although a greater sample may be required to observe significant associations in a multivariate model. PMID:21866684

  10. Dietary habits of colorectal neoplasia patients in comparison to their first-degree relatives

    PubMed Central

    Kajzrlikova, Ivana Mikoviny; Vitek, Petr; Chalupa, Josef; Dite, Petr

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare the dietary habits between colorectal neoplasia patients, their first-degree relatives, and unrelated controls. METHODS: From July 2008 to April 2011, we collected epidemiological data relevant to colorectal cancer from patients with colorectal neoplasias, their first-degree relatives, and also from a control group consisting of people referred for colonoscopy with a negative family history of colorectal cancer and without evidence of neoplasia after colonoscopic examination. The first-degree relatives were divided into two groups following the colonoscopic examination: (1) patients with neoplasia or (2) patients without neoplasia. Dietary habits of all groups were compared. A χ2 test was used to assess the association between two dichotomous categorical variables. RESULTS: The study groups consisted of 242 patients with colorectal neoplasias (143 men, 99 women; mean age: 64 ± 12 years) and 160 first-degree relatives (66 men, 94 women; mean age: 48 ± 11 years). Fifty-five of the first-degree relatives were found to have a neoplastic lesion upon colonoscopy, while the remaining 105 were without neoplasia. The control group contained 123 individuals with a negative family history for neoplastic lesions (66 men, 57 women; mean age: 54 ± 12 years). Two hypotheses were tested. In the first, the dietary habits of first-degree relatives with neoplasia were more similar to those of patients with neoplasia, while the dietary habits of first-degree relatives without neoplasia were similar to those of the control group. In the second, no sex-related differences in dietary habits were expected between the particular groups. Indeed, no significant differences were observed in the dietary habits between the groups of patients, controls and first-degree relatives with/without neoplastic lesions. Nevertheless, statistically significant sex-related differences were observed in all groups, wherein women had healthier dietary habits than men. CONCLUSION: In all

  11. Folate-genetics and colorectal neoplasia: What we know and need to know next

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of folate involves a complex network of polymorphic enzymes that may explain a proportion of the risk associated with colorectal neoplasia. Over 60 observational studies primarily in non-Hispanic White populations have been conducted on selected genetic variants in specific genes, MTH...

  12. Aspirin in the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Arber, Nadir; Burn, John; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Elwood, Peter; Hull, Mark A.; Logan, Richard F.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Schrör, Karsten; Baron, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in addition to its well-established benefits in the prevention of vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have consistently observed an inverse association between aspirin use and risk of CRC. A recent pooled analysis of a long-term post-trial follow-up of nearly 14,000 patients from 4 randomized, cardiovascular disease prevention trials showed that daily aspirin treatment for about 5 years was associated with a 34% reduction in 20-year CRC mortality. A separate meta-analysis of nearly 3,000 patients with a history of colorectal adenoma or cancer in 4 randomized adenoma prevention trials demonstrated that aspirin reduced the occurrence of advanced adenomas by 28% and any adenoma by 17%. Aspirin has also been shown to be beneficial in a clinical trial of patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary CRC syndrome; in those treated with aspirin for at least 2 years, there was a ≥ 50% reduction in the risk of CRC commencing 5 years after randomization and after aspirin had been discontinued. A few observational studies have shown an increase in survival among patients with CRC who use aspirin. Taken together, these findings strengthen the case for consideration of long-term aspirin use in CRC prevention. Despite these compelling data, there is a lack of consensus about the balance of risks and benefits associated with long-term aspirin use, particularly in low-risk populations. The optimal dose to use for cancer prevention and the precise mechanism underlying aspirin’s anticancer effect require further investigation. PMID:22084361

  13. Biomarkers of Risk for Colorectal Neoplasia (Team Project #2) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project is to evaluate biomarkers in normal colonic mucosa to determine their relationship to the occurrence of short- and long-term colorectal neoplasia. Candidate markers have been proposed by participating investigators based on promising preliminary data. The purpose of this team project is to evaluate these markers in a common, tissue-based reference set, under a uniform, structured protocol.

  14. Management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Aytac, Erman; Ozuner, Gokhan; Isik, Ozgen; Gorgun, Emre; Stocchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience on management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period (< 6 mo), between 8/1997 and 4/2013, in our department were reviewed. Patient characteristics, operations, fetal health and follow-up during pregnancy, type of delivery and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: Eight patients met our study criteria. Median age at the time of diagnosis of colorectal cancer was 31 years. Median follow-up after surgery was 36 mo. Median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 wk. Three patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy and underwent surgery prior to delivery. None of the patients received adjuvant treatment during pregnancy. Five patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer within a median of 2.1 mo after delivery and underwent surgery. No adverse neonatal outcomes were noted. All deliveries were at term (2 cesarean sections) except for one preterm delivery following low anterior resection on the 34th week of pregnancy. CONCLUSION: There has been a significant delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer which is probably due to overlap of symptoms and signs between these tumors and a normal pregnancy. Surgery for colorectal cancer during pregnancy can be performed safely without compromising maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:27559434

  15. A new insight into fecal hemoglobin concentration-dependent predictor for colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Wang, Po-En; Lin, Sheng-Che; Chen, Yao-Der; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Yeh, Yen-Po; Lee, Yi-Chia; Chiu, Han-Mo; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2014-09-01

    We sought to assess how much of the variation in incidence of colorectal neoplasia is explained by baseline fecal hemoglobin concentration (FHbC) and also to assess the additional predictive value of conventional risk factors. We enrolled subjects aged 40 years and over who attended screening for colorectal cancer with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in Keelung community-based integrated screening program. The accelerated failure time model was used to train the clinical weights of covariates in the prediction model. Datasets from two external communities were used for external validation. The area under curve (AUC) for the model containing only FHbC was 83.0% (95% CI: 81.5-84.4%), which was considerably greater than the one containing only conventional risk factors (65.8%, 95% CI: 64.2-67.4%). Adding conventional risk factors did not make significant additional contribution (p = 0.62, AUC = 83.5%, 95% CI: 82.1-84.9%) to the predictive model with FHbC only. Males showed a stronger linear dose-response relationship than females, yielding gender-specific FHbC predictive models. External validation confirms these results. The high predictive ability supported by a dose-dependent relationship between baseline FHbC and the risk of developing colorectal neoplasia suggests that FHbC may be useful for identifying cases requiring closer postdiagnosis clinical surveillance as well as being an early indicator of colorectal neoplasia risk in the general population. Our findings may also make contribution to the development of the FHbC-guided screening policy but its pros and cons in connection with cost and effectiveness of screening should be evaluated before it can be applied to population-based screening for colorectal cancer.

  16. Prostaglandin E2-induced colonic secretion in patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis for colorectal cancer remains unresolved. A growing body of evidence suggests a direct correlation between cyclooxygenase enzyme expression, prostaglandin E2 metabolism and neoplastic development. Thus further understanding of the regulation of epithelial functions by prostaglandin E2 is needed. We hypothesized that patients with colonic neoplasia have altered colonic epithelial ion transport and express functionally different prostanoid receptor levels in this respect. Methods Patients referred for colonoscopy were included and grouped into patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Patients without endoscopic findings of neoplasia served as controls. Biopsy specimens were obtained from normally appearing mucosa in the sigmoid part of colon. Biopsies were mounted in miniaturized modified Ussing air-suction chambers. Indomethacin (10 μM), various stimulators and inhibitors of prostanoid receptors and ion transport were subsequently added to the chamber solutions. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current and slope conductance) were recorded. Tissue pathology and tissue damage before and after experiments was assessed by histology. Results Baseline short circuit current and slope conductance did not differ between the two groups. Patients with neoplasia were significantly more sensitive to indomethacin with a decrease in short circuit current of 15.1 ± 2.6 μA·cm-2 compared to controls, who showed a decrease of 10.5 ± 2.1 μA·cm-2 (p = 0.027). Stimulation or inhibition with theophylline, ouabain, bumetanide, forskolin or the EP receptor agonists prostaglandin E2, butaprost, sulprostone and prostaglandin E1 (OH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Histology was with normal findings in both groups. Conclusions Epithelial electrogenic transport is more sensitive to indomethacin in normal colonic mucosa from patients with previous or present colorectal neoplasia compared to colonic mucosa from

  17. Diagnosis by Endoscopy and Advanced Imaging of Barrett's Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Swager, Anne-Fré; Curvers, Wouter L; Bergman, Jacques J

    Evaluation of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) using dye-based chromoendoscopy, optical chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence imaging, or confocal laser endomicroscopy does not significantly increase the number of patients with a diagnosis of early neoplasia compared with high-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) with random biopsy analysis. These newer imaging techniques are not more effective in standard surveillance of patients with BE because the prevalence of early neoplasia is low and HD-WLE with random biopsy analysis detects most cases of neoplasia. The evaluation and treatment of patients with BE and early stage neoplasia should be centralized in tertiary referral centers, where procedures are performed under optimal conditions, by expert endoscopists. Lesions that require resection are almost always detected by HD-WLE, although advanced imaging techniques can detect additional flat lesions. However, these are of limited clinical significance because they are effectively eradicated by ablation therapy. No endoscopic imaging technique can reliably assess submucosal or lymphangio invasion. Endoscopic resection of early stage neoplasia in patients with BE is important for staging and management. Optical chromoendoscopy can also be used to evaluate lesions before endoscopic resection and in follow-up after successful ablation therapy.

  18. APC polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal neoplasia: a HuGE review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Lin, Chunqing; Hu, Fulan; Wang, Fan; Zhu, Lin; Yao, Xiaoping; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yashuang

    2013-06-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) polymorphisms may influence the risk for colorectal neoplasia. However, results thus far have been inconclusive. We performed a systematic literature search of the Medline, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, and HuGE databases and reviewed the references of pertinent articles through May 2012. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to estimate the association between 3 APC polymorphisms (D1822V, E1317Q, and I1307K) and colorectal neoplasia. In total, 40 studies from 1997 to 2010 were included in this meta-analysis, and individuals with the D1822V variant homozygote VV genotype had a slight decrease in the risk for colorectal neoplasia compared with the wild-type homozygote DD genotype (pooled odds ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 0.99). There was a small association between the APC E1317Q polymorphism and a risk for colorectal neoplasia (variant vs. wild-type: pooled odds ratio = 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.14, 1.76), particularly for colorectal adenomas (variant vs. wild-type: odds ratio = 2.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.83, 4.56). Compared with those who carried the wild-type I1307K, Ashkenazi Jews who carried the I1307K variant were at a significantly increased risk for colorectal neoplasia, with a pooled odds ratio of 2.17 (95% confidence interval: 1.64, 2.86). Our study suggests that APC is a candidate gene for colorectal neoplasia susceptibility.

  19. Screening for colorectal neoplasia: physicians' adherence to complete diagnostic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, R E; Balshem, A M; Wolf, T A; Ross, E A; Millner, L

    1993-01-01

    This prospective study was done in a health maintenance organization colorectal cancer screening program to determine whether 166 persons found to have abnormal fecal occult blood test results typically underwent complete diagnostic evaluation (i.e., either colonoscopy or barium enema x-ray plus flexible sigmoidoscopy). Chart audit data show that 137 (82%) subjects contacted a physician to discuss follow-up. A complete diagnostic evaluation was recommended to only 52 (38%) patients who talked with a physician. Forty-two (81%) patients who were advised to get a complete diagnostic evaluation actually complied. Significant differences in clinical findings were observed for patients who did and did not have a complete diagnostic evaluation. PMID:8238690

  20. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024). The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2. PMID:22734885

  1. Targeted therapy of colorectal neoplasia with rapamycin in peptide-labeled pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles.

    PubMed

    Khondee, Supang; Rabinsky, Emily F; Owens, Scott R; Joshi, Bishnu P; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Thomas D

    2015-02-10

    Many powerful drugs have limited clinical utility because of poor water solubility and high systemic toxicity. Here, we formulated a targeted nanomedicine, rapamycin encapsulated in pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles labeled with a new ligand for colorectal neoplasia, LTTHYKL peptide. CPC;Apc mice that spontaneously develop colonic adenomas were treated with free rapamycin, plain rapamycin micelles, and peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles via intraperitoneal injection for 35days. Endoscopy was performed to monitor adenoma regression in vivo. We observed complete adenoma regression at the end of therapy. The mean regression rate for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles was significantly greater than that for plain rapamycin micelles, P<0.01. On immunohistochemistry, we observed a significant reduction in phospho-S6 but not β-catenin expression and reduced tumor cell proliferation, suggesting greater inhibition of downstream mTOR signaling. We observed significantly reduced renal toxicity for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles compared to that of free drug, and no other toxicities were found on chemistries. Together, this unique targeted micelle represents a potential therapeutic for colorectal neoplasia with comparable therapeutic efficacy to rapamycin free drug and significantly less systemic toxicity.

  2. Advanced colonic neoplasia in the first degree relatives of colon cancer patients: A colonoscopy-based study.

    PubMed

    Salimzadeh, Hamideh; Bishehsari, Faraz; Amani, Mohammad; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Delavari, Alireza; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2016-11-15

    We aimed to determine the risk of advanced neoplasms among a cohort of asymptomatic first degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) compared with matched controls. Data for patients with a diagnosis of CRC made between September 2013 and August 2014 were obtained from a population-based cancer registry system in Tehran. Screening colonoscopies were done for 342 FDRs and the findings were compared to those from 342 age- and gender-matched healthy controls without a family history of CRC. We reported the association as conditional Odds Ratio (OR) using Mantel Hazel and Logistic regression. The prevalence of advanced neoplasia was 13.2% among FDRs and 3.8% in controls (matched OR [mOR], 4.0, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1 - 7.6; p < 0.001). In FDRs aged 40-49 years, the prevalence of advanced neoplasia was significantly higher than in their matched controls (mOR, 6.8, 95% CI, 1.5-31.4; p = 0.01). Family history of CRC in at least one FDR was the strongest predictor of advanced neoplasia (adjusted OR, 4.0, 95% CI: 2.1-7.6; p < 0.001). The age of the index case at diagnosis did not predict the presence of advanced colonic neoplasms in their FDRs. Our study indicates a high risk of advanced neoplasia in FDRs of CRC cases, where only eight colonoscopies are needed to detect one advanced neoplasia. Our data suggest that all FDRs, regardless of the age of CRC diagnosis in their index case, should be considered for a targeted early screening.

  3. How significant is the association between metabolic syndrome and prevalence of colorectal neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Suchanek, Stepan; Grega, Tomas; Ngo, Ondrej; Vojtechova, Gabriela; Majek, Ondrej; Minarikova, Petra; Brogyuk, Nagyija; Bunganic, Bohus; Seifert, Bohumil; Dusek, Ladislav; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been rising in developed countries. The association between these two diseases has been widely studied and reported. Less evidence is available about the relationship between MS and CRC precancerous lesions (adenomatous polyps, adenomas). The aim of this paper is to present an overview of our scientific understanding of that topic and its implication in clinical practice. One of the principal goals of current CRC secondary prevention efforts is to detect and remove the precancerous lesions in individuals with an average CRC risk to prevent the development of invasive cancer. MS is not currently considered a high-risk CRC factor and is therefore not included in the guidelines of organized screening programs. However, in light of growing scientific evidence, the approach to patients with MS should be changed. Metabolic risk factors for the development of adenomas and cancers are the same - obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Therefore, the key issue in the near future is the development of a simple scoring system, easy to use in clinical practice, which would identify individuals with high metabolic risk of colorectal neoplasia and would be used for individual CRC secondary prevention strategies. Currently, such scoring systems have been published based on Asian (Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening Score; APCS) and Polish populations. PMID:27688652

  4. Applications and Advancements in the use of High-Resolution Microendoscopy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Justin S.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) is a novel imaging modality that allows real-time epithelial imaging at subcellular resolution. Used in concert with any standard endoscope, this portable, low cost, ‘optical biopsy’ technology has the ability to provide images of cellular morphology during a procedure. This technology has been the subject of a number of studies investigating its use in screening and surveillance of a range of gastrointestinal neoplasia, including esophageal adenocarcinoma(EAC), esophageal squamous cell cancer(ESCC), colorectal neoplasia(CRC) and anal neoplasia. These studies have shown that HRME is a modality that consistently provides high specificity, negative predictive value, and accuracy across different diseases. In addition, they have illustrated that HRME users can be relatively easily trained in a short period of time and that users have demonstrated solid inter-rater reliability. These features make HRME a potential complement to high definition white light imaging, narrow band imaging and other ‘red flag technologies’ in facilitating real-time clinical diagnosis, endoscopic therapy and margin determination. Further clinical validation is needed to determine whether this translates to reduced procedure times, pathology costs, and follow up procedures. Finally, the HRME has a relatively simple design compared to other similar technologies, making it portable, simple to maintain, and low cost. This may allow the HRME device to function in both advanced care settings as well as in places with less resources and specialized support systems. As a whole, the HRME device has shown good performance along with low-cost and portable construction, and its application in different conditions and settings has been promising. PMID:25108219

  5. CAHM, a long non-coding RNA gene hypermethylated in colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Mitchell, Susan M; Graham, Lloyd D; McEvoy, Aidan; Thomas, Melissa L; Baker, Rohan T; Ross, Jason P; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ho, Thu; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    The CAHM gene (Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HyperMethylated), previously LOC100526820, is located on chromosome 6, hg19 chr6:163 834 097–163 834 982. It lacks introns, encodes a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and is located adjacent to the gene QKI, which encodes an RNA binding protein. Deep bisulphite sequencing of ten colorectal cancer (CRC) and matched normal tissues demonstrated frequent hypermethylation within the CAHM gene in cancer. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to characterize additional tissue samples. With a threshold of 5% methylation, the CAHM assay was positive in 2/26 normal colorectal tissues (8%), 17/21 adenomas (81%), and 56/79 CRC samples (71%). A reverse transcriptase-qPCR assay showed that CAHM RNA levels correlated negatively with CAHM % methylation, and therefore CAHM gene expression is typically decreased in CRC. The CAHM qMSP assay was applied to DNA isolated from plasma specimens from 220 colonoscopy-examined patients. Using a threshold of 3 pg methylated genomic DNA per mL plasma, methylated CAHM sequences were detected in the plasma DNA of 40/73 (55%) of CRC patients compared with 3/73 (4%) from subjects with adenomas and 5/74 (7%) from subjects without neoplasia. Both the frequency of detection and the amount of methylated CAHM DNA released into plasma increased with increasing cancer stage. Methylated CAHM DNA shows promise as a plasma biomarker for use in screening for CRC. PMID:24799664

  6. Increased risk of colorectal neoplasia in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis of 16 observational studies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han-Han; Jiang, Xue-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) carry an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer), whereas the association between PSC and the development of colorectal neoplasia in Crohn's disease (CD) is controversial. A meta-analysis was carried out to compare the risk of this neoplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with and without PSC. A systematic research of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed to identify studies that compared the risk of colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer) in patients with IBD with and without PSC. Quality assessment was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using the random-effects model by STATA 12.0. A total of 16 studies (four cohort studies, 12 case-control studies; nine prospective studies and seven retrospective studies) were selected for further study. These studies included 13 379 IBD patients, of whom 1022 also had PSC. Patients with IBD and PSC were at an increased risk of colorectal dysplasia and cancer compared with patients with IBD alone [OR 3.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.14-4.90]. This increased risk was present even when the risk of colorectal cancer alone was analysed (OR 3.41; 95% CI: 2.13-5.48). Data only from patients with UC showed that PSC was associated with an increased risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia and cancer in patients with UC (OR 2.98; 95% CI: 1.54-5.76) (OR 3.01; 95% CI: 1.44-6.29), but there were high heterogeneity among studies (I=76.9 and 62.8%, respectively). Heterogeneity of the studies was affected by the study design (prospective or retrospective). The OR of colorectal neoplasia was 2.32 (95% CI: 0.70-7.70, P=0.133) and that of cancer was 2.91 (95% CI: 0.84-10.16, P=0.388) for patients with CD and concurrent PSC. Patients with IBD and PSC have a markedly higher risk for the development of colorectal

  7. THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINATED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER TO MALE F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINA TED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING W A TER TO MALE F344/N RA TS.

    Abstract:

    The THMs are the most widely distributed and concentrated of the chlorine disinfection by-products (D...

  8. Colon adenoma features and their impact on risk of future advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H; Lasser, Karen E; Roy, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review the evidence on the association between specific colon adenoma features and the risk of future colonic neoplasia [adenomas and colorectal cancer (CRC)]. METHODS We performed a literature search using the National Library of Medicine through PubMed from 1/1/2003 to 5/30/2015. Specific Medical Subject Headings terms (colon, colon polyps, adenomatous polyps, epidemiology, natural history, growth, cancer screening, colonoscopy, CRC) were used in conjunction with subject headings/key words (surveillance, adenoma surveillance, polypectomy surveillance, and serrated adenoma). We defined non-advanced adenomas as 1-2 adenomas each < 10 mm in size and advanced adenomas as any adenoma ≥ 10 mm size or with > 25% villous histology or high-grade dysplasia. A combined endpoint of advanced neoplasia included advanced adenomas and invasive CRC. RESULTS Our search strategy identified 592 candidate articles of which 8 met inclusion criteria and were relevant for assessment of histology (low grade vs high grade dysplasia, villous features) and adenoma size. Six of these studies met the accepted quality indicator threshold for overall adenoma detection rate > 25% among study patients. We found 254 articles of which 7 met inclusion criteria for the evaluation of multiple adenomas. Lastly, our search revealed 222 candidate articles of which 6 met inclusion criteria for evaluation of serrated polyps. Our review found that villous features, high grade dysplasia, larger adenoma size, and having ≥ 3 adenomas at baseline are associated with an increased risk of future colonic neoplasia in some but not all studies. Serrated polyps in the proximal colon are associated with an increased risk of future colonic neoplasia, comparable to having a baseline advanced adenoma. CONCLUSION Data on adenoma features and risk of future adenomas and CRC are compelling yet modest in absolute effect size. Future research should refine this risk stratification. PMID:28035253

  9. Advances in minimally invasive neonatal colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bandi, Ashwath S; Bradshaw, Catherine J; Giuliani, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, advances in laparoscopic surgery and minimally invasive techniques have transformed the operative management of neonatal colorectal surgery for conditions such as anorectal malformations (ARMs) and Hirschsprung’s disease. Evolution of surgical care has mainly occurred due to the use of laparoscopy, as opposed to a laparotomy, for intra-abdominal procedures and the development of trans-anal techniques. This review describes these advances and outlines the main minimally invasive techniques currently used for management of ARMs and Hirschsprung’s disease. There does still remain significant variation in the procedures used and this review aims to report the current literature comparing techniques with an emphasis on the short- and long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27830038

  10. Colonoscopy uptake for high-risk individuals with a family history of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ingrand, Isabelle; Defossez, Gautier; Richer, Jean-Pierre; Tougeron, David; Palierne, Nicolas; Letard, Jean-Christophe; Beauchant, Michel; Ingrand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Colonoscopic screening is recommended for first-degree relatives of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) or colorectal adenomatous polyps (CAP) before the age of 60 years. This has the potential to reduce CRC-related morbidity and mortality, but uptake is currently inadequate. Methods: The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of standard information versus a nurse-led tailored intervention designed to promote uptake of colonoscopy screening by siblings of CRC or CAP patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Digestive surgeons and gastroenterologists recruited index patients who developed CRC or CAP before the age of 60 years. All index patients received standard screening information for their siblings, in keeping with current guidelines. Centrally computerized randomization of index patients resulted in allocating all their siblings to the same group, intervention or control. The tailored intervention targeted the index patient first, to help them convey information to their siblings. The nurse then provided the siblings with tailored information based on their answers to a self-questionnaire which explored health behaviors, derived from psychosocial models of prevention. Then the siblings were given a personalized information leaflet to hand to their regular physician. The primary endpoint was the rate of documented colonoscopy performed in siblings within 1 year after diagnosis of the index patient. The intent-to-treat analysis included siblings who refused to participate in the study. Statistical analysis was adjusted for intrafamilial correlation. Results: A total of 304 siblings of 125 index patients were included: 160 in the intervention group and 144 in the control group. The rate of colonoscopy uptake among siblings was 56.3% in the intervention group and 35.4% in the control group (P = 0.0027). The respective rates after exclusion of refusals were 69.2% and 37.0% (P < 0.0001). More lesions were

  11. Surveillance colonoscopy after endoscopic treatment for colorectal neoplasia: From the standpoint of the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takahisa; Chiu, Han-Mo; Sano, Yasushi; Fujii, Takahiro; Ono, Akiko; Saito, Yutaka

    2016-04-01

    Colonoscopy is considered the gold standard to detect and remove colorectal neoplasia. The efficacy of colonoscopy with polypectomy to reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality has been demonstrated. Recently, post-polypectomy surveillance colonoscopy has become a necessary intervention in daily practice not only in Western countries but also in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, it is crucial to establish new clinical practice guidelines to reduce the number of unnecessary surveillance colonoscopies in order to create space for screening colonoscopy. The Asia-Pacific Consensus group recommended that surveillance colonoscopy interval should be tailored according to risk level of index colonoscopy. However, precise guidelines on interval of surveillance cannot be given because of a lack of prospective data. According to Korean and Australian guidelines, surveillance intervals after index colonoscopy of 5 years for low-risk subjects and 3 years for high-risk subjects are recommended in Asia-Pacific regions at present. Prospective data including long-term outcomes from the Japan Polyp Study, which is a multicenter randomized control trial, would be useful to establish the Asia-Pacific consensus in the near future.

  12. Xenobiotic metabolizing genes, meat-related exposures, and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Leah M.; Cross, Amanda J.; Gunter, Marc J.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Mayne, Susan T.; Ma, Xiaomei; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Graubard, Barry I.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Sinha, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Carcinogenic action of meat-related exposures, such as heterocyclic amines (HCAs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and N-nitroso compounds (NOCs), might explain positive associations between red and processed meat and colorectal neoplasia. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) genes could alter activation/detoxfication of these compounds. Methods We evaluated interactions between several XME genes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTM2, GSTT1, NAT1, NAT2, NQO1, SULT1A1, and SULT1A2) and meat-related exposures using a pathway-based approach in 720 advanced colorectal adenoma cases of the distal colon or rectum and 746 controls from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Using meat-related databases, we estimated intake of the HCAs, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), the PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and nitrate/nitrite, as NOC precursors. Results There were possible interactions between PhIP and CYP1B1 (Pinteraction=0.019) and NQO1 (Pinteraction=0.007), B[a]P and CYP1B1 (Pinteraction=0.005) and CYP3A4 (Pinteraction=0.021), and nitrate/nitrite and CYP1A1 (Pinteraction=0.022) in relation to colorectal adenoma. However, none of these interactions were statistically significant using a false discovery rate threshold of 0.20. Conclusions Common variants in XME genes may modify the association of HCAs, PAHs, and nitrate/nitrite with advanced colorectal adenoma, but investigation in other populations is required, especially within consortia. PMID:20436251

  13. Genetic variation in the bioactivation pathway for polycyclic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines in relation to risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansong; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Caberto, Christian; Saltzman, Barbara; Decker, Robert; Vogt, Thomas M.; Yokochi, Lance; Chanock, Stephen; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2011-01-01

    Animal work implicates chemical carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) as contributing to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). The epidemiologic evidence, however, remains inconsistent possibly due to intra-individual variation in bioactivation of these compounds. We conducted a case–control study of colorectal adenoma (914 cases, 1185 controls) and CRC (496 cases, 607 controls) among Japanese Americans, European Americans and Native Hawaiians to investigate the association of genetic variation in the PAH and HAA bioactivation pathway (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, AHR and ARNT) identified through sequencing with risk of colorectal neoplasia, as well as their interactions with smoking and intakes of red meat and HAAs. The A allele for ARNT rs12410394 was significantly inversely associated with CRC [odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GG, AG and AA genotypes: 1.00, 0.66 (0.48–0.89), 0.54 (0.37–0.78), Ptrend = 0.0008] after multiple comparison adjustment. CYP1A2 rs11072508 was marginally significantly associated with CRC, where each copy of the T allele was associated with reduced risk (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58–0.88, Ptrend = 0.0017). No heterogeneity of genetic effects across racial/ethnic groups was detected. In addition, no significant interaction was observed after adjusting for multiple testing between genetic variants and pack-years of smoking, intake of red meat or HAAs (PhIP, MeIQx, Di-MeIQx or total HAAs) or NAT2 genotype (Rapid versus Slow or Intermediate). This study suggests that the genomic region around ARNT rs12410394 may harbor variants associated with CRC. PMID:21081473

  14. Germline Variants and Advanced Colorectal Adenomas: Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib Trial Genomewide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiping; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Zauber, Ann G.; Kubo, Michikai; Matsuda, Koichi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard S.; Sieber, Oliver; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Young, Joanne; Baird, Paul N.; Ratain, Mark J.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Weiss, Scott T.; Tomlinson, Ian; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of advanced colorectal adenomas. Experimental Design Discovery Phase: 1,406 Caucasian patients (139 advanced adenoma cases and 1,267 controls) from the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial were included in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify variants associated with post-polypectomy disease recurrence. Genome-wide significance was defined as false discovery rate < 0.05, unadjusted p=7.4×10−7. Validation Phase: Results were further evaluated using 4,175 familial colorectal adenoma or CRC cases and 5,036 controls from patients of European ancestry (COloRectal Gene Identification consortium, Scotland, Australia and VQ58). Results Our study identified eight SNPs associated with advanced adenoma risk in the APC trial (rs2837156, rs7278863, rs2837237, rs2837241, rs2837254, rs741864 at 21q22.2, and rs1381392 and rs17651822 at 3p24.1, at p<10–7 level with odds ratio – OR>2). Five variants in strong pairwise linkage disequilbrium (rs7278863, rs2837237, rs741864, rs741864 and rs2837241, r2=0.8–1) are in or near the coding region for the tight junction adhesion protein, IGSF5. An additional variant associated with advanced adenomas, rs1535989 (minor allele frequency 0.11; OR 2.09; 95% confidence interval 1.50–2.91), also predicted CRC development in a validation analysis (p=0.019) using a series of adenoma cases or CRC (CORGI study) and 3 sets of CRC cases and controls (Scotland, VQ58 and Australia, N=9,211). Conclusions Our results suggest that common polymorphisms contribute to the risk of developing advanced adenomas and might also contribute to the risk of developing CRC. The variant at rs1535989 may identify patients whose risk for neoplasia warrants increased colonoscopic surveillance. PMID:24084763

  15. Colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis is associated with early-stage colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, John; Aitchison, Alan; Dixon, Liane; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a toxin-producing bacteria thought to possibly promote colorectal carcinogenesis by modulating the mucosal immune response and inducing epithelial cell changes. Here, we aim to examine the association of colonic mucosal colonization with ETBF and the presence of a range of lesions on the colonic neoplastic spectrum. Methods Mucosal tissue from up to four different colonic sites was obtained from a consecutive series of 150 patients referred for colonoscopy. The presence and relative abundance of the B. fragilis toxin gene (bft) in each tissue sample was determined using quantitative PCR, and associations with clinicopathological characteristics were analysed. Findings We found a high concordance of ETBF between different colonic sites (86%). Univariate analysis showed statistically significant associations between ETBF positivity and the presence of low-grade dysplasia (LGD), tubular adenomas (TA), and serrated polyps (P-values of 0.007, 0.027, and 0.007, respectively). A higher relative abundance of ETBF was significantly associated with LGD and TA (P-values of < 0.0001 and 0.025, respectively). Increased ETBF positivity and abundance was also associated with left-sided biopsies, compared to those from the right side of the colon. Conclusion Our results showing association of ETBF positivity and increased abundance with early-stage carcinogenic lesions underlines its importance in the development of colorectal cancer, and we suggest that detection of ETBF may be a potential marker of early colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:28151975

  16. Advanced endoscopic imaging in gastric neoplasia and preneoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonathan W J; Lim, Lee Guan; Yeoh, Khay Guan

    2017-01-01

    Conventional white light endoscopy remains the current standard in routine clinical practice for early detection of gastric cancer. However, it may not accurately diagnose preneoplastic gastric lesions. The technological advancements in the field of endoscopic imaging for gastric lesions are fast growing. This article reviews currently available advanced endoscopic imaging modalities, in particular chromoendoscopy, narrow band imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy, and their corresponding evidence shown to improve diagnosis of preneoplastic gastric lesions. Raman spectrometry and polarimetry are also introduced as promising emerging technologies. PMID:28176895

  17. Colorectal cancer: the first neoplasia found to be under immunosurveillance and the last one to respond to immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Zitvogel, Laurence; Fridman, Wolf Hervé

    2015-01-01

      The first study demonstrating that human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is under robust immunosurveillance was published a decade ago. Today, it is clear that CRC patients with Stage III lesions abundantly infiltrated by effector memory T cells have a better prognosis than subjects with Stage I neoplasms exhibiting no or poor immune infiltration. Thus, immunological parameters have a superior prognostic value for CRC patients than TNM staging or the Dukes classification. In spite of the fact that CRC is the first neoplasia found to be under immunological control, most attempts made so far to cure this malignancy with immunotherapy have failed. With the exception of a minority of lesions characterized by microsatellite instability (MSI), CRC seems to be insensitive to the blockade of immunological checkpoints with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1) and the PD-1 ligand CD274 (best known as PD-L1). Thus, CRC stands in contrast with an increasing number of malignancies that respond to checkpoint blockers. Efforts should therefore be dedicated to the development of strategies to (re)instate immunosurveillance in patients with MSI- CRC, perhaps based on the identification of novel, locally relevant immunological checkpoints. PMID:26140250

  18. In-vivo classification of colorectal neoplasia using high-resolution microendoscopy: improvement with experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil D.; Perl, Daniel; Lee, Michelle H.; Chang, Shannon S; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Zhou, Elinor; Mitcham, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a novel, low-cost “optical biopsy” technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The study aim was to evaluate the learning curve of HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. Methods In a prospective cohort fashion, a total of 162 polyps from 97 patients at a single tertiary care center were imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). Histopathology was the gold standard for comparison. Diagnostic accuracy was examined at three intervals over time throughout the study; the initial interval included the first 40 polyps, the middle interval included the next 40 polyps examined, and the final interval included the last 82 polyps examined. Results Sensitivity increased significantly from the initial interval (50%) to the middle interval (94%, p = 0.02) and the last interval (97%, p = 0.01). Similarly, specificity was 69% for the initial interval but increased to 92% (p = 0.07) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.02) in the last interval. Overall accuracy was 63% for the initial interval and then improved to 93% (p = 0.003) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.0007) in the last interval. Conclusions In conclusion, this in-vivo study demonstrates that an endoscopist without prior colon HRME experience can achieve greater than 90% accuracy for identifying neoplastic colorectal polyps after 40 polyps imaged. HRME is a promising modality to complement white-light endoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. PMID:25753782

  19. Efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic resections of colorectal neoplasia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Passera, Roberto; Migliore, Marco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Galloro, Giuseppe; Manta, Raffaele; Morino, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections for colorectal lesions not suitable for endoscopic resection. Summary background data The combined laparo-endoscopic approach has been proposed for large colorectal lesions unsuitable for endoscopic resection, in order to reduce morbidity of common laparoscopic resection. However, data on the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections are still controversial. Methods An Embase search of papers published during the period 1985–2014 was performed. Published studies that evaluated laparo-endoscopic resections for colorectal lesions were assessed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations by two authors. Forest plots on primary (per-lesion rate of further surgery, including surgery for complications and surgery for oncologic radical treatment) and secondary outcomes were produced based on fixed and random effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Risk for within-study bias was ascertained with QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) system. Results A total of 11 studies provided data on 707 lesions treated with a combined laparo-endoscopic approach. A variety of techniques were reported. The overall per-lesion rate of further surgery was 9.5%, while per-lesion rate of further surgery for oncologic treatment was 7.9%, per-lesion rate of further surgery for complications treatment was 3.5%, incidence of adenocarcinoma was 10.5%, incidence of overall complications was 7.9%, incidence of conversion to open surgery 4.3% and incidence of recurrence was 5.4%. Conclusions Despite laparo-endoscopic approach ensures limited invasiveness, it is affected by a consistent rate of complications and oncologic inadequacy that often requires further surgical treatment. PMID:26668744

  20. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  1. Early identification of cervical neoplasia with Raman spectroscopy and advanced methods for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Phillip R. T.; Smith, Daniel D. W.; Mazilu, Michael; Cormack, Iain; Riches, Andrew C.; Herrington, C. Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-02-01

    Early detection of malignant tumours, or their precursor lesions, can dramatically improve patient outcome. High risk human Papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV16, infection can lead to the initiation and development of uterine cervical neoplasia. Bearing this in mind the identification of the effects of HPV infection may have clinical value. In this manuscript we investigate the application of Raman microspectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV in cultured cells when compared with normal cells. We also investigate the effect of sample fixation, which is a common clinical practice, on the ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV. Raman spectra were acquired from Primary Human Keratinocytes (PHK), PHK expressing the E7 gene of HPV 16 (PHK E7) and CaSki cells, an HPV16 containing cervical carcinoma derived cell line. The average Raman spectra display variations, mostly in peaks relating to DNA and proteins, consistent with HPV gene expression and the onset of neoplasia in both live and fixed samples. Principle component analysis was used to objectively discriminate between the cells types giving sensitivities up to 100% for the comparison between PHK and CaSki. These results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between cell lines representing different stages of cervical neoplasia. Furthermore Raman spectroscopy was able to identify cells expressing the HPV 16 E7 gene suggesting the approach may be of value in clinical practice. Finally this technique was also able to detect the effects of the virus in fixed samples demonstrating the compatibility of this technique with current cervical screening methods. However if Raman spectroscopy is to make a significant impact in clinical practice the long acquisition times must be addressed. In this report we examine the potential for beam shaping and advanced to improve the signal to noise ration hence subsequently facilitating a reduction in acquisition time.

  2. BRAF mutations and phosphorylation status of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the development of flat and depressed-type colorectal neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Konishi, K; Takimoto, M; Kaneko, K; Makino, R; Hirayama, Y; Nozawa, H; Kurahashi, T; Kumekawa, Y; Yamamoto, T; Ito, H; Yoshikawa, N; Kusano, M; Nakayama, K; Rembacken, B J; Ota, H; Imawari, M

    2006-01-30

    Although some molecular differences between flat-depressed neoplasias (FDNs) and protruding neoplasias (PNs) have been reported, it is uncertain if the BRAF mutations or the status of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) are different between theses two groups. We evaluated the incidence of BRAF and KRAS mutations, high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), and the immunohistochemical status of p-MAPK in the nonserrated neoplasias (46 FDNs and 57 PNs). BRAF mutations were detected in four FDNs (9%) and none of PNs (P=0.0369 by Fisher's exact test). KRAS mutations were observed in none of FDNs and in 14 PNs (25%; P=0.0002 by Fisher's exact test). MSI-H was detected in seven out of 44 FDNs (16%) and in one out of 52 of PNs (2%) (P=0.022 by Fisher's exact test). Type B and C immunostaining for p-MAPK was observed in 34 out of 46 FDNs (72%), compared with 24 out of 55 PNs (44%; P=0.0022 by chi(2) test). There was no significant difference in the type B and C immunostaining of p-MAPK between FDNs with and without BRAF mutations. BRAF and KRAS mutations are mutually exclusive in the morphological characteristics of colorectal nonserrated neoplasia. Abnormal accumulation of p-MAPK protein is more likely to be implicated in the tumorigenesis of FDNs than of PNs. However, this abnormality in FDNs might occur via the genetic alteration other than BRAF or KRAS mutation.

  3. Neoplasia: The Second Decade

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2008-01-01

    This issue marks the end of the 10-year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth in both number of submitted and published articles in Neoplasia. Neoplasia was first published in 1999. During the past 10 years, Neoplasia has dynamically adapted to the needs of the cancer research community as technologies have advanced. Neoplasia is currently providing access to articles through PubMed Central to continue to facilitate rapid broad-based dissemination of published findings to the scientific community through an Open Access model. This has in part helped Neoplasia to achieve an improved impact factor this past year, demonstrating that the manuscripts published by Neoplasia are of great interest to the overall cancer research community. This past year, Neoplasia received a record number of articles for review and has had a 21% increase in the number of published articles. PMID:19048110

  4. Neoplasia: the second decade.

    PubMed

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2008-12-01

    This issue marks the end of the 10-year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth in both number of submitted and published articles in Neoplasia. Neoplasia was first published in 1999. During the past 10 years, Neoplasia has dynamically adapted to the needs of the cancer research community as technologies have advanced. Neoplasia is currently providing access to articles through PubMed Central to continue to facilitate rapid broad-based dissemination of published findings to the scientific community through an Open Access model. This has in part helped Neoplasia to achieve an improved impact factor this past year, demonstrating that the manuscripts published by Neoplasia are of great interest to the overall cancer research community. This past year, Neoplasia received a record number of articles for review and has had a 21% increase in the number of published articles.

  5. Treatment advances in liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R; Poston, Graeme J

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several decades advances in the management and treatment of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) has changed a disease with a dismal prognosis to one with a potential for cure in some patients. Advances have been made through coordinated management of patients by surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, and other health care professionals coupled with advances in treatment options. Although these advances have clearly impacted patient outcomes, it is clear that the benefit of traditional surgical approaches and the use of cytoxic chemotherapy are reaching a plateau. Continued research to develop new and more active therapies, including targeted or biologic agents, is needed. This review discusses the advances made in management of patients with liver-limited metastatic disease.

  6. CpG Island Methylator Phenotype-High Colorectal Cancers and Their Prognostic Implications and Relationships with the Serrated Neoplasia Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ye-Young; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was first introduced by Toyota and Issa to describe a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs) with concurrent hypermethylation of multiple CpG island loci. The concept of CIMP as a molecular carcinogenesis mechanism was consolidated by the identification of the serrated neoplasia pathway, in which CIMP participates in the initiation and progression of serrated adenomas. Distinct clinicopathological and molecular features of CIMP-high (CIMP-H) CRCs have been characterized, including proximal colon location, older age of onset, female preponderance, and frequent associations of high-level microsatellite instability and BRAF mutations. CIMP-H CRCs arise in sessile or traditional serrated adenomas and thus tend to display the morphological characteristics of serrated adenomas, including epithelial serration, vesicular nuclei, and abundant cytoplasm. Both the frequent association of CIMP and poor prognosis and different responses of CRCs to adjuvant therapy depending on CIMP status indicate clinical implications. In this review, we present an overview of the literature documenting the relevant findings of CIMP-H CRCs and their relationships with the serrated neoplasia pathway. PMID:27885175

  7. Surgical treatment of advanced colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Antonio; Zbar, Andrew P; Bertani, Emilio; Biffi, Roberto; Luca, Fabrizio; Pace, Ugo; Viale, Giuseppe; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Orecchia, Roberto; Lazzari, Roberta; Biella, Francesca; Grassi, Carmine; Zampino, Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Della Vigna, Paolo; Andreoni, Luca; Andreoni, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the short and long-term outcomes of older and younger colorectal cancer patients with advanced disease resected with a curative intent. Six hundred and ninety-two patients were analysed. Four hundred and seventy-nine patients were younger than 70 years (Group 1), and 213 were 70 years of age or above (Group 2). The overall perioperative mortality rate in the younger group was 0.8% (n = 7), as against 1.4% (n = 3) in the elderly group (p = NS). The morbidity rates were 35% and 42%, respectively (p = NS). At univariate analysis, the elderly patients had a worse overall survival compared to the younger group, when only patients undergoing postoperative chemo-radiotherapy were considered (54% vs 67% overall survival at 5 years; p = 0.03). Using logistic regression analysis, tumour stage (p < 0.0001) and radicality of surgery (p < 0.0001) correlated significantly with overall survival rates in the elderly. Colorectal surgery for malignancy can be performed safely in the elderly with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates and long-term survival.

  8. An integrated psychological strategy for advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Patrizia; Perrone, Maria; Nisi, Enrica; Garufi, Carlo; Giannarelli, Diana; Bottomley, Andrew; Terzoli, Edmondo

    2006-01-01

    Background There is evidence regarding the usefulness of psychosocial intervention to improve health related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult cancer patients. The aim of this report is to describe an integrated approach and to evaluate its feasibility in routine clinical practice in 98 advanced colorectal cancer (ACC) patients during chronomodulated chemotherapy. Methods A prospective non-randomised design was developed and applied in a cancer out-patient setting. The intervention consisted of an integrated approach, whereby the psycho-oncologist had an active role in the health care team with the physician and routinely included psychological understanding in the medical treatment program. The psychological evaluation assessed: a) adaptation, awareness, psychopathological disorders through a psychodynamic interview; b) anxiety and depression using the HAD scale; c) subjective perception of care quality through a structured interview and d) HRQOL evaluation assessment with the EORTC QLQ C30. Outcomes data were collected before and after 18 weeks of chemotherapy. Results After 18 weeks of chemotherapy a significant improvement of adaptation and awareness was observed. The HADs results showed a significant decrease in anxiety when compared to pre-treatment. The structured interview showed a significant increase of patients who positively experienced the impact of medical treatment on HRQOL, anxiety, depression, interpersonal relationships, free-time and who positively experienced the care quality. Indeed, a majority of patients positively experienced the team relationship modality during the whole treatment. All scales on the EORTC questionnaire remained unchanged during the entire treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that it is feasible to carry out an integrated approach during chemotherapy. These results seem to support the integrated approach as a tool in aiding advanced colorectal cancer patients' ability to cope with their diagnosis and treatment although

  9. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  10. Stromal expression of 72 kda type IV collagenase (MMP-2) and TIMP-2 mRNAs in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsom, R.; Pignatelli, M.; Stetler-Stevenson, W. G.; Liotta, L. A.; Wright, P. A.; Jeffery, R. E.; Longcroft, J. M.; Rogers, L.; Stamp, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    We undertook an in situ hybridization study to localize the mRNAs for the 72 kda type IV collagenase (MMP-2) and its specific inhibitor (TIMP-2) in 12 colorectal carcinomas, 3 adenomas, and 4 uninvolved resection margins to see how their distributions correlated with that of the reported distribution of MMP-2 protein. Labeling for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs was detectable in 10 of 12 carcinomas and in 2 of 3 adenomas. Unexpectedly, we found much stronger signals for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs within the mesenchymal cells in the desmoplastic stroma, of endothelial and/or (myo)fibroblastic nature, rather than in tumor epithelial cells in which localization of MMP-2 was anticipated. Our data indicate that stromal cells may have the ability to synthesize a metalloproteinase that degrades basement membrane, and may together with the neoplastic epithelial cells participate actively in the tissue remodeling and disruption of the basement membrane integrity which is characteristic of invasive tumors. Images Figure 1 to 6 PMID:1323219

  11. Advanced oxidation protein products and total antioxidant activity in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Avinash, S S; Anitha, M; Vinodchandran; Rao, Gayathri M; Sudha, K; Shetty, Beena V

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and percent hemolysis (that indirectly indicates the degree of membrane damage secondary to lipid peroxidation) in colorectal carcinoma. Glutathione (GSH), total thiols and albumin were measured to determine the antioxidant status. Considering the dynamic interaction between various antioxidants in the body, we measured the total antioxidant activity (AOA). Globulin was measured to assess the inflammatory response secondary to oxidative stress. Investigations were conducted in 45 cases of recently diagnosed primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. As control, 45 age and sex matched healthy persons were chosen. GSH was estimated in whole blood, percent hemolysis in RBC suspension and other parameters in plasma. We observed a very high significant increase (P<0.001) in AOPP, percent hemolysis and a highly significant increase (P<0.01) in globulin in colorectal carcinoma. We observed a very high significant decrease (P<0.001) in whole blood GSH, total thiols, albumin, AOA and a significant decrease (P<0.05) in plasma GSH in colorectal carcinoma. A very high significant negative correlation between percent hemolysis and AOA and an apparent negative correlation between total thiols and AOPP was seen in colorectal carcinoma. This demonstrated oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant status and secondary inflammatory response in colorectal carcinoma.

  12. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  13. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  14. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  15. Evaluation of serum nucleoside diphosphate kinase A for the detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; De Chiara, Loretta; Barcia-Castro, Leticia; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2016-01-01

    We previously described the over-expression of nucleoside diphosphate kinase A (NDKA) in tumours and serum from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, suggesting its use as biomarker. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum NDKA to detect advanced neoplasia (CRC or advanced adenomas). Furthermore, the performance of NDKA was compared with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT). The study population included a case-control cohort and a screening cohort (511 asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT). Serum NDKA was elevated in CRC patients in the case-control cohort (p = 0.002). In the screening cohort, NDKA levels were higher for advanced adenomas (p = 0.010) and advanced neoplasia (p = 0.006) compared to no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated NDKA was associated with severe characteristics of adenomas (≥3 lesions, size ≥ 1 cm or villous component). Setting specificity to 85%, NDKA showed a sensitivity of 30.19% and 29.82% for advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia, respectively. NDKA combined with FIT (100 ng/mL cut-off) detected advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia with 45.28% and 49.12% sensitivity, with specificity close to 90%. The combination of serum NDKA and FIT can improve the detection of advanced neoplasia, mainly for lesions located on the proximal colon, in asymptomatic individuals with CRC family-risk. PMID:27222072

  16. Recent Advances in Chemotherapy and Surgery for Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Guillaume; Soubrane, Olivier; Giuliante, Felice; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Goéré, Diane; Yamashita, Suguru; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background The liver is the most common site of metastases for colorectal cancer, and combined resection with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy for survival. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive summary on four hot topics related to chemotherapy and surgery for colorectal liver metastases (CLM), namely: (1) chemotherapy-related liver injuries: prediction and impact, (2) surgery for initially unresectable CLM, (3) the emerging role of RAS mutations, and (4) the role of hepatic arterial infusion of chemotherapy (HAIC). Summary and Key Messages (1) The use of chemotherapy before liver resection for CLM leads to drug-specific hepatic toxicity, which negatively impacts posthepatectomy outcomes. (2) Curative liver resection of initially unresectable CLM following conversion chemotherapy should be attempted whenever possible, provided that a safe future liver remnant volume is achieved. (3) For CLM, RAS mutation status is needed to guide the use of targeted chemotherapy with anti-epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) agents, and is a major prognostic factor that may contribute to optimize surgical strategy. (4) HAIC agents increase the rate of objective response and the rate of complete pathological response. PMID:27995091

  17. Curative effect of the recent photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO; LI, WEI; LIU, NING

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer has a high mortality rate and conventional treatments have poor therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recent curative effect and adverse reaction of photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had accepted semiconductor laser photodynamic adjuvant treatment were selected as the observation group. In addition, 30 patients who had accepted concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy during the same period served as the control group. The observation group received photofrin (2 mg/kg) intravenously in 100 ml of 5% glucose, followed by the introduction of the endoscopic optical fiber to deliver laser radiation with an intensity of 630 nm wavelength pulse power. After 2 days, necrotic tissues were removed and irradiation of the original or new tumor lesions was performed and necrotic tissues were removed. The total effective rate and survival time was higher and the length of hospital stay was shorter in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of patients in the control and observation groups with symptoms of hematochezia, change in bowel habit, intestinal stimulation and incomplete intestinal obstruction were reduced. Additionally, the reduced ratio of the observation group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). The adverse reaction rate of the observation group was lower than that of the control group and this difference was also statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of photodynamic treatment for young patients with advanced colorectal cancer can effectively improve the clinical symptoms and reduce complications. PMID:26998124

  18. Advances in the endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J.Q.; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus is a well-recognised precursor of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma is continuing to rise in the Western world with dismal survival rates. In recent years, efforts have been made to diagnose Barrett’s earlier and improve surveillance techniques in order to pick up cancerous changes earlier. Recent advances in endoscopic therapy for early Barrett’s cancers have shifted the paradigm away from oesophagectomy and have yielded excellent results. PMID:26918175

  19. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1-14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  20. Dietary patterns of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carla M M; Lieffers, Jessica R; Bergsten, Gabriella; Mourtzakis, Marina; Baracos, Vickie E; Reiman, Tony; Sawyer, Michael B; McCargar, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify dietary patterns among patients with advanced cancer. Differences between cancer groups are described, and food groups contributing higher proportions to overall caloric intake are identified. Patients with advanced cancer (n=51) were recruited from a regional cancer centre and completed a three-day dietary record. Food items were categorized according to macronutrient content. After adjustment for body weight, substantial variation in energy intake was observed (range: 13.7 to 55.4 kcal/kg/day). For 49% of patients, protein intake was below recommendations. Overall, patients consumed the largest proportion of their calories from meat (16%), other foods (11%), dessert (9%), fruit (9%), white bread (7%), and milk (7%). Only 5% of patients consumed meal replacement supplements. The results of this descriptive study provide important insights into the dietary habits of patients with advanced cancer. These insights could be translated into the development of effective recommendations for maintaining or improving health and quality of life.

  1. Polymorphisms in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and advanced colorectal adenoma risk.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui-Lee; Peters, Ulrike; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi; Schatzkin, Arthur; Bresalier, Robert S; Velie, Ellen M; Brody, Lawrence C

    2010-09-01

    While germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene cause the hereditary colon cancer syndrome (familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)), the role of common germline APC variants in sporadic adenomatous polyposis remains unclear. We studied the association of eight APC single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), possibly associated with functional consequences, and previously identified gene-environment (dietary fat intake and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use) interactions, in relation to advanced colorectal adenoma in 758 cases and 767 sex- and race-matched controls, randomly selected from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Cases had at least one verified advanced adenoma of the distal colon; controls, a negative sigmoidoscopy. We did not observe an association between genotypes for any of the eight APC SNPs and advanced distal adenoma risk (P(global gene-based)=0.92). Frequencies of identified common haplotypes did not differ between cases and controls (P(global haplotype test)=0.97). However, the risk for advanced distal adenoma was threefold higher for one rare haplotype (cases: 2.7%; controls: 1.6%) (odds ratio (OR)=3.27; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-9.88). The genetic association between D1822V and advanced distal adenoma was confined to persons consuming a high-fat diet (P(interaction)=0.03). Similar interactions were not observed with HRT use. In our large, nested case-control study of advanced distal adenoma and clinically verified adenoma-free controls, we observed no association between specific APC SNPs and advanced adenoma. Fat intake modified the APC D1822V-adenoma association, but further studies are warranted.

  2. Scoring of Prognostic Parameters in Patients with Unresectable Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeguchi, Masahide; Shimoda, Ryugo; Yamamoto, Manabu; Maeta, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Keigo; Saito, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Suitable chemotherapy is needed to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. We scored the periodical changes of several prognostic markers during chemotherapy in patients with this type of cancer to discern the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent combination chemotherapy with oxaliplatin or irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum albumin (ALB) were compared between the two periods (before chemotherapy and 3 months after it was started) in each patient. The scoring system was as follows: points are added when a patient shows a decrease of NLR, CRP and CEA and an increase of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of +4. On the other hand, points are reduced if a patient shows an elevation of NLR, CRP and CEA and a decrease of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of −4. Results At 3 months after the start of first line chemotherapy, 13 patients showed positive scores but 7 patients showed zero or minus scores. According to our scoring system, we found the mean survival time (MST) of the 13 patients with plus scores was 34 months and this was significantly better than that of the 7 patients who showed zero or minus scores (P = 0.0008). Conclusion Our new scoring system is useful but when we find that first line chemotherapy is ineffective, we need to change it to second line chemotherapy as soon as possible. That may be the best treatment for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24179314

  3. Advanced laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease: NOTES/NOSE or single port?

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Cahill, Ronan A

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease is an evolving, dynamic subject undergoing constant adaptation. Hence there are significant ongoing advances in technique and technology as has been seen with the emergence of single port and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic operations with already considerable ramifications for many aspects of minimal access surgery. Most recently single port technologies and expertise have synergized with Transanal Endoscopic (TEM/TEO) experience to allow their convergence out of their respective niches so that pelvic surgery can be laparoendoscopically performed from both its abdominal and perineal aspects. Distinct from wound-related benefits, such capacity for high resolution and multi-dimensional imaging relates significant benefit to the operating team and patient. This state of the art review demonstrates the crucial perspective that advanced practices and performance capabilities are intrinsically complimentary rather than competitive. All surgeons need therefore to participate in adapting their practice styles to allow technical step-advance across the discipline.

  4. In Vivo Biomarkers for Targeting Colorectal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Wang, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Summary Colorectal carcinoma continues to be a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality despite widespread adoption of screening methods. Targeted detection and therapy using recent advances in our knowledge of in vivo cancer biomarkers promise to significantly improve methods for early detection, risk stratification, and therapeutic intervention. The behavior of molecular targets in transformed tissues is being comprehensively assessed using new techniques of gene expression profiling and high throughput analyses. The identification of promising targets is stimulating the development of novel molecular probes, including significant progress in the field of activatable and peptide probes. These probes are being evaluated in small animal models of colorectal neoplasia and recently in the clinic. Furthermore, innovations in optical imaging instrumentation are resulting in the scaling down of size for endoscope compatibility. Advances in target identification, probe development, and novel instruments are progressing rapidly, and the integration of these technologies has a promising future in molecular medicine. PMID:19126961

  5. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-11-07

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient's quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient's outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient's compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer.

  6. [The usefulness and adverse events of bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy against advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Oga, Junichi; Sakata, Makiko; Sato, Sumito; Matsumura, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Toshiyuki; Nagayama, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Osamu; Ishida, Yasuo; Hataya, Kiyoshi

    2010-06-01

    We examined clinical results of 35 patients on bevacizumab(BV)combined with chemotherapy at our hospital. The subjects were 35 patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer who received BV combined with chemotherapy for approximately 2 years. Their median age was 66 years(41 to 86 years), PS was 2 or less for all; it was first-line therapy in 21 patients, second-line in 12 patients and thirdline in 2 patients. The concomitant chemotherapy was mFOLFOX 6 in 24 / patients, 5-FU/LV in 8 patients and FOLFIRI in 3 patients. Therapeutic efficacy was CR in 2 patients, PR in 10 patients, and the overall response rate was 35%. There were 7 adverse events of Grade 3 or higher, among which 4 events were leucopenia. Neither overall survival nor any concomitant chemotherapy reached the median periods. Moreover, the median periods of / progression-free survival in mFOLFOX6/FOLFIRI were 191 days. BV combined with chemotherapy should be actively introduced as first-line therapy against advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer because of its high therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  8. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor-1 expression on survival of advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bendardaf, Riyad; El-Serafi, Ahmed; Syrjänen, Kari; Collan, Yrjö; Pyrhönen, Seppo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colorectal cancer is third leading cause of cancer mortality. About 60% of patients had already developed metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is crucial for the development of neovascularization and hence metastasis. This study aimed at investigating the relation between the expression of VEGF in biopsies from surgically dissected colon cancer and the survival of those patients. Biopsies were collected from 86 patients with advanced colon cancer and sections were stained by immunohistochemistry for VEGF. Patients received chemotherapy after the operation and were followed up for disease progression and survival. The clinical data were statistically analyzed with respect to the immunohistochemistry results. The survival of the patients was significantly longer in the patients for whom biopsies showed negative or weak expression of VEGF in comparison to those with moderate to high expression (p-value = 0.04). The expression of VEGF was more frequent in the patients who died as a consequence of the disease in comparison to the 10-year survivors. In conclusion, VEGF could be related to the survival of the patients with colorectal carcinoma and should be considered as a predictor of the prognosis. PMID:28245709

  9. Recent Advances in Targeting the EGFR Signaling Pathway for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Suyama, Koichi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-02

    Outcomes for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have been improved by treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies, particularly when combined with predictive biomarkers to select patients lacking RAS mutations. New technologies such as liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing have revealed that potential mechanisms of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies act through acquired mutations of KRAS and the EGFR ectodomain. Mutations in cross-talking molecular effectors that participate in downstream EGFR signaling are also negative predictors for anti-EGFR therapy. In the current review, we describe recent advances in anti-EGFR therapy and discuss new treatment strategies to target downstream RAS-MAPK signaling in mCRC.

  10. Capecitabine and irinotecan with and without bevacizumab for advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Moehler, Markus; Sprinzl, Martin F; Abdelfattah, Murad; Schimanski, Carl C; Adami, Bernd; Godderz, Werner; Majer, Klaus; Flieger, Dimitri; Teufel, Andreas; Siebler, Juergen; Hoehler, Thomas; Galle, Peter R; Kanzler, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of cape-citabine plus irinotecan ± bevacizumab in advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer patients. METHODS: Forty six patients with previously untreated, locally-advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) were recruited between 2001-2006 in a prospective open-label phase II trial, in German community-based outpatient clinics. Patients received a standard capecitabine plus irinotecan (CAPIRI) or CAPIRI plus bevacizumab (CAPIRI-BEV) regimen every 3 wk. Dose reductions were mandatory from the first cycle in cases of > grade 2 toxicity. The treatment choice of bevacizumab was at the discretion of the physician. The primary endpoints were response and toxicity and secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and overall survival. RESULTS: In the CAPIRI group vs the CAPRI-Bev group there were more female than male patients (47% vs 24%), and more patients had colon as the primary tumor site (58.8% vs 48.2%) with fewer patients having sigmoid colon as primary tumor site (5.9% vs 20.7%). Grade 3/4 toxicity was higher with CAPIRI than CAPIRI-Bev: 82% vs 58.6%. Partial response rates were 29.4% and 34.5%, and tumor control rates were 70.6% and 75.9%, respectively. No complete responses were observed. The median progression-free survival was 11.4 mo and 12.8 mo for CAPIRI and CAPIRI-Bev, respectively. The median overall survival for CAPIRI was 15 mo (458 d) and for CAPIRI-Bev 24 mo (733 d). These differences were not statistically different. In the CAPIRI-Bev, group, two patients underwent a full secondary tumor resection after treatment, whereas in the CAPIRI group no cases underwent this procedure. CONCLUSION: Both regimens were well tolerated and offered effective tumor growth control in this outpatient setting. Severe gastrointestinal toxicities and thromboembolic events were rare and if observed were never fatal. PMID:19152449

  11. Alpha-interferon does not increase the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Thirion, P; Piedbois, P; Buyse, M; O'Dwyer, P J; Cunningham, D; Man, A; Greco, F A; Colucci, G; Köhne, C H; Di Constanzo, F; Piga, A; Palmeri, S; Dufour, P; Cassano, A; Pajkos, G; Pensel, R A; Aykan, N F; Marsh, J; Seymour, M T

    2001-03-02

    Two meta-analyses were conducted to quantify the benefit of combining alpha-IFN to 5FU in advanced colorectal cancer in terms of tumour response and survival. Analyses were based on a total of 3254 individual patient data provided by principal investigators of each trial. The meta-analysis of 5FU +/- LV vs. 5FU +/- LV + alpha-IFN combined 12 trials and 1766 patients. The meta-analysis failed to show any statistically significant difference between the two treatment groups in terms of tumour response or survival. Overall tumour response rates were 25% for patients receiving no alpha-IFN vs. 24% for patients receiving alpha-IFN (relative risk, RR = 1.02), and median survivals were 11.4 months for patients receiving no alpha-IFN vs. 11.5 months for patients receiving alpha-IFN (hazard ratio, HR = 0.95). The meta-analysis of 5FU + LV vs. 5FU + alpha-IFN combined 7 trials, and 1488 patients. This meta-analysis showed an advantage for 5FU + LV over 5FU + alpha-IFN which was statistically significant in terms of tumour response (23% vs. 18%; RR = 1.26;P = 0.042), and of a borderline significance for overall survival (HR = 1.11;P = 0.066). Metastases confined to the liver and primary rectal tumours were independent favourable prognostic factors for tumour response, whereas good performance status, metastases confined to the liver or confined to the lung, and primary tumour in the rectum were independent favourable prognostic factors for survival. We conclude that alpha-IFN does not increase the efficacy of 5FU or of 5FU + LV, and that 5FU + alpha-IFN is significantly inferior to 5FU + LV, for patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  12. Angiogenic inhibitors for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Does the age hold the stage?

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Caterina; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Ferrari, Laura; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Rosati, Gerardo; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with the employment of antiangiogenic agents, several questions remain on the use of these drugs in older patients. Since cardiovascular, renal and other comorbidities are common in the elderly, an accurate assessment of the patients’ conditions should be performed before a treatment decision is made. Since most CRC patients enrolled in clinical trials testing antiangiogenic drugs were aged < 65 years, the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in elderly patients has not been adequately explored. Data suggest that patients with advanced CRC derive similar benefit from bevacizumab treatment regardless of age, but the advantage of other antiangiogenic drugs in the same class of patients appears more blurred. Literature data suggest that specific antiangiogenic-related toxicities such as hypertension or arterial thromboembolic events may be higher in the elderly than in the younger patients. In addition, it should be emphasized that the patients included in the clinical studies discussed herein were selected and therefore may not be representative of the usual elderly population. Advanced age alone should not discourage the use of bevacizumab. However, a careful patients’ selection and watchful monitoring of toxicities are required to optimize the use of antiangiogenics in this population. PMID:23847406

  13. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lines, K.E.; Stevenson, M.; Thakker, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  14. An AXIN2 Mutant Allele Associated With Predisposition to Colorectal Neoplasia Has Context-Dependent Effects on AXIN2 Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Serina M; Petty, Elizabeth M; Stoffel, Elena M; Fearon, Eric R

    2015-05-01

    Heterozygous, germline nonsense mutations in AXIN2 have been reported in two families with oligodontia and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition, including an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation. Somatic AXIN2 mutations predicted to generate truncated AXIN2 (trAXIN2) proteins have been reported in some CRCs. Our studies of cells from an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation carrier showed that the mutant transcripts are not significantly susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay and, thus, could encode a trAXIN2 protein. In transient transfection assays, trAXIN2 was more abundant than wild-type AXIN2 protein, and in contrast to AXIN2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition did not increase trAXIN2 levels. Like AXIN2, the trAXIN2 protein interacts with β-catenin destruction complex proteins. When ectopically overexpressed, trAXIN2 inhibits β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent reporter gene activity and SW480 CRC cell colony formation. These findings suggest the trAXIN2 protein may retain some wild-type functions when highly expressed. However, when stably expressed in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells, the trAXIN2 protein did not match AXIN2's activity in inhibiting Wnt-mediated induction of Wnt-regulated target genes, and SW480 cells with stable expression of trAXIN2 but not AXIN2 could be generated. Our data suggest the AXIN2 1989G>A mutation may not have solely a loss-of-function role in CRC. Rather, its contribution may depend on context, with potential loss-of-function when AXIN2 levels are low, such as in the absence of Wnt pathway activation. However, given its apparent increased stability in some settings, the trAXIN2 protein might have gain-of-function in cells with substantially elevated AXIN2 expression, such as Wnt pathway-defective CRC cells.

  15. An AXIN2 Mutant Allele Associated With Predisposition to Colorectal Neoplasia Has Context-Dependent Effects on AXIN2 Protein Function1

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Serina M.; Petty, Elizabeth M.; Stoffel, Elena M.; Fearon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous, germline nonsense mutations in AXIN2 have been reported in two families with oligodontia and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition, including an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation. Somatic AXIN2 mutations predicted to generate truncated AXIN2 (trAXIN2) proteins have been reported in some CRCs. Our studies of cells from an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation carrier showed that the mutant transcripts are not significantly susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay and, thus, could encode a trAXIN2 protein. In transient transfection assays, trAXIN2 was more abundant than wild-type AXIN2 protein, and in contrast to AXIN2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition did not increase trAXIN2 levels. Like AXIN2, the trAXIN2 protein interacts with β-catenin destruction complex proteins. When ectopically overexpressed, trAXIN2 inhibits β-catenin/T-cell factor–dependent reporter gene activity and SW480 CRC cell colony formation. These findings suggest the trAXIN2 protein may retain some wild-type functions when highly expressed. However, when stably expressed in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells, the trAXIN2 protein did not match AXIN2’s activity in inhibiting Wnt-mediated induction of Wnt-regulated target genes, and SW480 cells with stable expression of trAXIN2 but not AXIN2 could be generated. Our data suggest the AXIN2 1989G>A mutation may not have solely a loss-of-function role in CRC. Rather, its contribution may depend on context, with potential loss-of-function when AXIN2 levels are low, such as in the absence of Wnt pathway activation. However, given its apparent increased stability in some settings, the trAXIN2 protein might have gain-of-function in cells with substantially elevated AXIN2 expression, such as Wnt pathway–defective CRC cells. PMID:26025668

  16. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  17. Efficacy of prophylactic anti-diarrhoeal treatment in patients receiving Campto for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffour, J; Gourgou, S; Seitz, J F; Senesse, P; Boutet, O; Castera, D; Kramar, A; Ychou, M

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of combined prophylactic and curative anti-diarrhoeal medication in advanced colorectal patients treated by irinotecan. Thirty-four pre-treated eligible patients were evaluated. There were 44% women, the median age was 65 and 38% of the patients had a 0 performance status. The patients received sucralfate(4g/d) and nifuroxazide(600 mg/d) prophylactic treatment on days 0-7. In the case of severe diarrhoea, preventive treatment was replaced by loperamide(12 mg/d) and diosmectite (9 g/d). Grade 3 delayed diarrhoea occurred in 18% of patients (90% CI: [9.5-28.9]) and 4.6% of cycles. No grade 4 delayed diarrhoea was observed. Twenty-nine patients (85%) received the preventive treatment at cycle 1, while 14% (90% CI: [6.2-25.7]) experienced grade 3 delayed diarrhoea in 3.7% of cycles for a median 4.5 days. The objective response rate was 8% (90% CI [1.4-23.1]) among the 25 assessable patients. Preventive combined treatment is effective in reducing the incidence of severe delayed diarrhoea, and it should be proposed to patients treated with mono-therapy Campto(r) and evaluated in poly-chemotherapy protocols.

  18. The influence of fluorouracil outcome parameters on tolerance and efficacy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Capitain, O; Boisdron-Celle, M; Poirier, A-L; Abadie-Lacourtoisie, S; Morel, A; Gamelin, E

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine simple genetic factors helpful to tailor 5-FU administration and determine strategy in first-line chemotherapy of advanced colorectal cancer. In 76 patients initially treated by 5-FU, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase germinal polymorphisms, dihydrouracil/uracil plasma ratio and 5-FU plasma clearance were investigated and correlated for tolerance (10.5% grade 3 and 4 toxicity) and efficacy (32.9% objective response rate and 20 months median overall survival time). Toxicity was linked to performance status >2 (P=0.004), low UH2/U ratio, 2846 A>T, IVS 14+1G>A for DPD (P=0.031), and homozygoty C/C for MTHFR 1298 A>C (P=0.0018). The overall survival of the patients with a 3R/3R TS genotype associated with C/C for 677 C>T or A/A for 1298 A>C was statistically shorter (log-rank test P=0.0065). Genetic factors permit the tailoring of 5-FU treatment. They should occupy center stage in future clinical trials for specifically designing treatment for patients with a given biologic feature.

  19. Irreversible electroporation in the treatment of locally advanced pancreas and liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wichtowski, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Kocur, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Irreversible electroporation is a new, non-thermal ablation technique in the treatment of parenchymal organ tumors which uses short high voltage pulses of electricity in order to induce apoptosis of targeted cells. In this paper the application of this method of treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and liver cancer is analyzed. Material and methods Between 04.2014 and 09.2014 two patients with LAPC and one with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) were qualified for treatment with irreversible electroporation. Both patients remained under constant observation and control. PubMed/Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched and eight original reports on irreversible electroporation of pancreatic and liver tumors based on the biggest groups of patients were found. Results Two patients with LAPC and one with CRLM were qualified for ablation with irreversible electroporation. In all three patients a successful irreversible electroporation (IRE) procedure of the whole tumor was conducted. In the minimum seven-month follow-up 100% local control was achieved – without progression. In the literature review the local response to treatment ranged from 41% to 100%. The event-free survival rate in six-month observation was 94%. Conclusions Ablation with irreversible electroporation is a new non-thermal ablation technique which has been demonstrated, both in the previously published studies and in the cases described in this paper, as a safe and efficient therapeutic method for patients with LAPC and CRLM. PMID:27095938

  20. [New Classification for Advanced Colorectal Cancer Using CancerPlex®Genomic Tests].

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Takii, Yasumasa; Okuda, Shujiro; Ling, Yiwei; Izutsu, Hiroshi; Kodama, Keisuke; Nakada, Mitsutaka; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-11-01

    Recently, targeted drugs have been developed for the treatment of colorectal cancer(CRC). Among targets, it is well known that KRAS mutations are associated with resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)monoclonal antibodies. However, response rates using anti-EGFR monotherapy for CRC were less than 20-30% in previous clinical studies. Thus, because the RAS/MAP2K/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways are associated with CRC resistance to chemotherapy, we analyzed gene mutations in Stage IV CRC patients using a genomic test(CancerPlex®). Medical records were reviewed for 112 patients who received treatment for CRC between 2007 and 2015 in Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital or Niigata Cancer Center Hospital. There were 66 male and 46 female patients, and their median age was 62.5(range, 30-86) years. Cluster analyses were performed in 110 non-hypermutated Japanese CRC patients using Euclidean distance and Ward's clustering method, and 6 typical groups were identified. Among these, patients with all wild-type actionable genes benefited from anti-EGFR therapies. The expense of targeted drugs warrants consideration of cost-effectiveness during treatment decision-making for advanced CRC patients. To this end, based on the genetic information on CRC, it is possible to develop precision medicine using CancerPlex®.

  1. Dual specificity phosphatase 5 is a novel prognostic indicator for patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuebing; Liu, Liguo; Li, Hao; Huang, Linsheng; Yin, Mingming; Pan, Cheng; Qin, Huanlong; Jin, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5) is a negative regulator of Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and has recently been identified as a tumor suppressor in several human malignancies. However, its clinical significance in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential utility of DUSP5 as a novel biomarker for progression indication and chemotherapy benefit in CRC patients. Through quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction and western blot, we determined that DUSP5 expression is dramatically lower in CRC tissues than that in matched normal tissues. The statistical analysis based on immunohistochemistry revealed that DUSP5 expression is significantly correlated with tumor differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis. For the whole study cohort, patients with high DUSP5 expression had a better CRC-specific and disease-free survival than those with low DUSP5 expression and DUSP5 expression is an independent prognostic factor for patient survival. In subgroup analysis, DUSP5 has no prognostic significance in low-risk stage II patients, but could predict treatment response in high-risk stage II and stage III/IV patients who received standard FOLFOX chemotherapy scheme. Finally, the correlation analysis suggested that DUSP5 expression is associated with Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) phenotype in CRC tissues, suggesting that downregulated DUSP5 may contribute to poor prognosis partly by involving EMT. Taken together, our study proposes that DUSP5 is a promising biomarker for predicting CRC progression and advanced patients with high DUSP5 expression appear to benefit from standard FOLFOX chemotherapy scheme. PMID:27822421

  2. Colorectal cancer: update on recent advances and their impact on screening protocols.

    PubMed Central

    Briskey, E. N.; Pamies, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    As the third leading cause of cancer cases and deaths in the United States, colorectal cancer has been an area of intense interest. The objectives of this article are, through a review of the literature published between 1995 to 1998, to examine current trends in the epidemiology of colorectal cancer, new information on genetic, dietary, and other risk factors; to evaluate the effectiveness of current screening guidelines for various populations; to review information on chemoprevention; and finally to examine new concepts on the horizon in the area of colorectal cancer research. Much of the recent research in the field has focused on etiology, dietary, and other risk factors. Many genetic factors have been discovered, which serve to elucidate the mechanism of pathogenesis of colorectal cancer as well as offer possible targets for treatment strategies. Dietary and risk factors for colorectal cancer may pave the way for chemoprevention. In light of the most recent information on colorectal cancer, one is able to more accurately assess current screening guidelines for their effectiveness in all populations based on epidemiologic data, as well as evaluate more novel screening strategies for their possible utility in the future. In addition to a review of the most up-to-date literature, the authors also provide their recommendations for screening based on the evidence in which the review of the literature provides. Finally, current and future treatment options are discussed. It is our hope that the physicians will find this review useful in the evaluation and care of patients at risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:10881471

  3. High dry bean intake and reduced risk of advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence among participants in the polyp prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl J; Albert, Paul S; Shields, Rusty; Slattery, Martha; Caan, Bette; Paskett, Electra; Iber, Frank; Kikendall, James Walter; Lance, Peter; Daston, Cassandra; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2006-07-01

    Adequate fruit and vegetable intake was suggested to protect against colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas; however, several recent prospective studies reported no association. We examined the association between fruits and vegetables and adenomatous polyp recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT). The PPT was a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit, and vegetable dietary intervention trial of adenoma recurrence, in which there were no differences in the rate of adenoma recurrence in participants in the intervention and control arms of the trial. In this analysis of the entire PPT trial-based cohort, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced and nonadvanced adenoma recurrence within quartiles of baseline and change (baseline minus the mean over 3 y) in fruit and vegetable intake, after adjustment for age, total energyy intake, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, BMI, and gender. There were no significant associations between nonadvanced adenoma recurrence and overall change in fruit and vegetable consumption; however, those in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake (greatest increase) compared with those in the lowest had a significantly reduced OR for advanced adenoma recurrence (OR = 0.35; 95% CI, 0.18-0.69; P for trend = 0.001). The median in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake was 370% higher than the baseline intake. The PPT trial-based cohort provides evidence that dry beans may be inversely associated with advanced adenoma recurrence.

  4. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, Timothy D.

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  5. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. METHODS We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40’s and 50’s age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. RESULTS We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P < 0.005). Literature review disclosed 17 relevant studies. As expected, in both Asian and Western populations, the risks for overall adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher in the 50's age group as compared to the 40's age group in a similar fashion. The result of the current study were similar to previous studies on Western populations. A substantially higher rate of adenoma, was observed in studies conducted among Asian populations in both age groups. CONCLUSION The higher rate of colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population. PMID:27621582

  6. Development and validation of a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Di Maso, Marianna; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma (ACA) recurrence after endoscopic polypectomy. METHODS: Out of 3360 patients who underwent colon polypectomy at University of Foggia between 2004 and 2008, data of 843 patients with 1155 ACAs was retrospectively reviewed. Surveillance intervals were scheduled by guidelines at 3 years and primary endpoint was considered 3-year ACA recurrence. Baseline clinical parameters and the main features of ACAs were entered into a Cox regression analysis and variables with P < 0.05 in the univariate analysis were then tested as candidate variables into a stepwise Cox regression model (conditional backward selection). The regression coefficients of the Cox regression model were multiplied by 2 and rounded in order to obtain easy to use point numbers facilitating the calculation of the score. To avoid overoptimistic results due to model fitting and evaluation in the same dataset, we performed an internal 10-fold cross-validation by means of bootstrap sampling. RESULTS: Median lesion size was 16 mm (12-23) while median number of adenomas was 2.5 (1-3), whereof the number of ACAs was 1.5 (1-2). At 3 years after polypectomy, recurrence was observed in 229 ACAs (19.8%), of which 157 (13.5%) were metachronous neoplasms and 72 (6.2%) local recurrences. Multivariate analysis, after exclusion of the variable “type of resection” due to its collinearity with other predictive factors, confirmed lesion size, number of ACAs and grade of dysplasia as significantly associated to the primary outcome. The score was then built by multiplying the regression coefficients times 2 and the cut-off point 5 was selected by means of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In particular, 248 patients with 365 ACAs fell in the higher-risk group (score ≥ 5) where 3-year recurrence was detected in 174 ACAs (47.6%) whereas the remaining 595 patients with 690 ACAs were included in the low-risk group (score < 5) where 3

  7. Prognostic significance of USP33 in advanced colorectal cancer patients: new insights into β-arrestin-dependent ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongda; Zhang, Qun; Li, Kangshuai; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Zhaochen; Xu, Yunfei; Swaney, Mary Hannah; Xiao, Kunhong; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer (CRCLM) have a poorer prognosis compared to colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in local stage. Evaluating the recurrence and overall survival of advanced patients is critical in improving disease treatment and clinical outcome. Here we investigated the expression pattern of USP33, a deubiquitinating enzyme, in both primary CRC tissues and liver metastases tissues. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that low expression of USP33 in CRCLM tissues indicated high recurrence risk and poor overall prognosis. Overexpression of USP33 can significantly inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, USP33 knock-down promoted cell proliferation and invasion under SDF-1 stimulation; whereas dynasore (an internalization inhibitor) pretreatment in USP33 silencing cells showed a distinct antipromoting effect, revealing the participation of CXCR4 internalization in regulating tumor progress. Further results verified that USP33 can deubiquitinate β-arrestin2, subsequently block the internalization of SDF-1-stimulated CXCR4, and disrupt β-arrestin-dependent ERK activation. The existence and functions of β-arrestin-dependent signaling have been previously determined in several Gs-coupled receptors, such as β2-adrenergic receptor and angiotensin receptor subtype 1a; however, little is known about this in Gi-coupled receptors. Our study not only established USP33 as a novel prognosis biomarker in advanced CRCLM patients, but also highlighted the significance of β-arrestin-dependent ERK signaling in cancer development. PMID:27835898

  8. The association of nutritional assessment criteria with health-related quality of life in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, L; Frykholm, G; Lydersen, S; Ulveland, H; Baracos, V; Birdsell, L; Falkmer, U

    2012-07-01

    Health-related quality of life (QoL) is a goal in nutritional oncology but the association between nutritional status and QoL is rarely explored. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of nutritional assessment criteria with QoL in 50 patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. A second aim was to investigate changes in body weight and QoL during a 3-month follow-up. Muscle mass, nutritional risk, malnutrition and cachexia according to three different criteria were assessed, as well as health-related QoL. At inclusion, 36 patients experienced weight loss, 10 patients sarcopenia, 25 were at nutritional risk, 16 were malnourished and 11, 14 and 31 patients had cachexia according to different criteria. All nutritional assessment criteria discriminated between groups of patients with worse or better QoL to varying degrees. Malnutrition and cachexia defined by the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative and adjusted for recent gain or stabilisation of body weight discriminated on most QoL scores. Weight loss at follow-up was associated with a decrease in several QoL scores. Recognition of weight loss as well as diagnosing malnutrition and cachexia should be the first steps in an interventional pathway to enhance nutritional status and QoL in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Comparison of cost-effectiveness of regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet for treating advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Go, Makiko; Teramachi, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimens are standard third-line or later treatments for advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer with no significant difference in efficacy. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of using regorafenib vs. the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The expected cost was calculated based on data from patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer who were treated with regorafenib or trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The median survival time (MST) from the CORRECT and the RECOURSE study was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the regimens. The cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated from the expected cost and MST for the two regimens. The expected cost per patient for the regorafenib and the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen was ¥705,330.3 and ¥371,198.7, respectively, and the cost-effectiveness ratio was ¥110,207.9/MST and ¥52,281.5/MST, respectively. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrated that the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen is more cost-effective compared with the regorafenib regimen. PMID:27900102

  10. Apoptosis and APC in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, P J; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1996-01-01

    Tumors result from disruptions in the homeostatic mechanisms that regulate cell birth and cell death. In colon cancer, one of the earliest manifestation of this imbalance is the formation of polyps, caused by somatic and inherited mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene in both humans and mice. While the importance of APC in tumorigenesis is well documented, how it functions to prevent tumors remains a mystery. Using a novel inducible expression system, we show that expression of APC in human colorectal cancer cells containing endogenous inactive APC alleles results in a substantial diminution of cell growth. Further evaluation demonstrated that this was due to the induction of cell death through apoptosis. These results suggest that apoptosis plays a role not only in advanced tumors but also at the very earliest stages of neoplasia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755583

  11. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  12. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  13. Assessing Individual Risk for High-Risk Colorectal Adenoma at First-Time Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A.; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective U.S. studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio[OR]=9.41), and 6.6% vs 2.1% for women (OR=3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the U.S. population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  14. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening.

  15. Current targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Andrew; O’Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, John; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Treatment strategies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have undergone dramatic changes in the past decade and despite improved patient outcomes, there still exist areas for continued development. The introduction of targeted agents has provided clinicians with additional treatment options in mCRC, however, results have been mixed at best. These novel therapies were designed to interfere with specific molecules involved in the cellular carcinogenesis pathway and ultimately deliver a more focused treatment. Currently, their use in mCRC has been limited primarily as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy regimens. This review explores the relevant cell-signaling networks in colorectal cancer, provides focus on the current targeted agent armamentarium approved for use in mCRC and explores the usefulness of predictive mCRC biomarkers. PMID:27482287

  16. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes By Patricia A. Daly, MD, University of Virginia;Front Royal Internal Medicine, VA ; Lewis Landsberg, MD, Northwestern University NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click ...

  17. Clinical features of colorectal cancer patients in advanced age: a population-based approach.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Stefania; Colantoni, Alessandra; Kaleci, Shaniko; Benatti, Piero; Tesini, Ester; de Leon, Maurizio Ponz

    2016-03-01

    In the immediate future, the number of geriatric patients will continue to rise; consequently we should expect an increase of colorectal cancer, a disease of the elderly population. Through the data of a Cancer Registry, we examined (a) the effect of ageing on the main features of colorectal cancer; (b) changes in management, especially for individuals older than 80 years; and (c) changes in prognosis and survival in subgroups of patients with different age. The Registry provided information on colorectal cancer up to 2010 (27 years). A total of 5293 patients were registered; these were divided into three groups: A (0-64 years), B (65-79) and C (80 or more). Three periods of observation were chosen: 1 (1984-1992), 2 (1993-2001) and 3 (2001-2010). Group A included 1571 patients (29 %), Group B 2539 (48 %) and Group C 1183 (22.3 %). The fraction of old individuals increased during the 27 years of the investigation. In these patients, tumours were predominantly localized to the right colon (42.6 %). The rate of surgery and ratio between curative and palliative approaches were similar among the three groups (p < 0.38). There was disparity (p < 0.002) in the administration of chemotherapy (5.8 % of the elderly vs 34.4 % in remaining patients). Survival increased over time in all three groups. In the elderly, average 5-year survival was 31 % in period 1 and 55 % in period 3. These data show that in Western countries, the standard of care for colorectal cancer diagnosed in geriatric patients has improved over the last 30 years.

  18. Colorectal Stents: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Mi

    2015-01-01

    A self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is an effective and safe method for the decompression of colon obstruction. Based on recent evidence, colorectal SEMS is now recommended for the palliation of patients with colonic obstruction from incurable colorectal cancer or extracolonic malignancy and also as a bridge to surgery in those who are a high surgical risk. Prophylactic SEMS insertion in patients with no obstruction symptoms is not recommended. Most colorectal SEMS are inserted endoscopically under fluoroscopic guidance. The technical and clinical success rates of colorectal SEMS are high, and the complication rate is acceptable. Advances in this technology will make the insertion of colorectal SEMS better and may expand the indications of colorectal SEMS in the future. PMID:26064818

  19. A multicenter phase II study of irinotecan in patients with advanced colorectal cancer previously treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Miguel; Salut, Antonieta; García-Girón, Carlos; Navalon, Marta; Diz, Pilar; García López, Maria José; España, Pilar; de la Torre, Ascensión; Martínez del Prado, Purificación; Duarte, Isabel; Pujol, Eduardo; Arizcun, Alberto; Cruz, Juan Jesús

    2003-11-01

    This multicenter, open-label, phase II study was performed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of irinotecan 350 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) previously treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The study enrolled 115 patients and a total of 558 cycles (median, 6 per patient) were administered. The overall objective response rate on an intent-to-treat basis was 18% (with 1 complete response and 20 partial responses), whereas 42 patients (37%) showed stable disease. Median time to progression was 4.8 months and median survival was 13.6 months. Grade 3/4 toxicities included delayed diarrhea (19.1%), nausea/vomiting (10.4%), and neutropenia (8.7%). There were 2 toxic deaths, 1 from delayed diarrhea and 1 from hemorrhage and grade 4 mucositis. In conclusion, the present study confirms the antitumor efficacy of irinotecan monotherapy in patients with CRC pretreated with 5-FU.

  20. A Phase I Study of EKB-569 in Combination with Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laheru, Dan; Croghan, Gary; Bukowski, Ronald; Rudek, Michelle; Messersmith, Wells; Erlichman, Charles; Pelley, Robert; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross; Boni, Joseph; Abbas, Richat; Martins, Patricia; Zacharchuk, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), characterize the principal toxicities, and assess the pharmacokinetics of EKB-569, an oral selective irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, in combination with capecitabine in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Experimental Design Patients were treated with EKB-569 daily for 21days and capecitabine twice daily for14 days of a 21-day cycle. The dose levels of EKB-569 (mg/day) and capecitabine (mg/m2 twice daily) assessed were 25/750, 50/750, 50/1,000 and 75/1,000. An expanded cohort was enrolled at the MTD to better study toxicity and efficacy. Samples of plasma were collected to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the agents. Treatment efficacy was assessed every other cycle. Results A total of 37 patients, the majority of whom had prior chemotherapy, received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. Twenty patients were treated at the MTD, 50 mg EKB-569, daily and 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea and rash. No patients had complete or partial responses but 48% had stable disease. The conversion of capecitabine to 5-fluorouracil was higher for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine (321 ± 151 ng*h/mL) than for capecitabine alone (176 ± 62 ng*hours/mL; P = 0.0037). Conclusion In advanced colorectal cancer, 50 mg EKB-569 daily can be safely combined with 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice a day. A statistically significant increase in plasma levels of 5-fluorouracil for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine may be due to the single-dose versus multiple-dose exposure difference, variability in exposure or a potential drug interaction. PMID:18765554

  1. Recent advances in the link between physical activity, sedentary behavior, physical fitness, and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Namasivayam, Vikneswaran; Lim, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent studies have characterized physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, and cardiorespiratory fitness as distinct, interrelated constructs that influence the risk of CRC and related outcomes. PA levels required to confer protection against CRC may be higher than previously thought. Sedentary behavior, defined as time spent sitting, increases CRC risk independent of PA and may require novel interventions distinct from those targeting PA. Finally, cardiorespiratory fitness is inversely associated with CRC risk and mortality and may provide a potential tool for risk stratification and intervention. PMID:28344777

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  3. Germline variation in NCF4, an innate immunity gene, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Bríd M; Zanetti, Krista A; Robles, Ana I; Schetter, Aaron J; Goodman, Julie; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi; Gunter, Mark J; Yeager, Meredith; Burdette, Laurie; Berndt, Sonja I; Harris, Curtis C

    2014-03-15

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal adenoma and cancer; however, few key inflammatory genes mediating this relationship have been identified. In this study, we investigated the association of germline variation in innate immunity genes in relation to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Our study was based on the analysis of samples collected from the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We investigated the association between 196 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 20 key innate immunity genes with risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer in 719 adenoma cases, 481 cancer cases and 719 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After Bonferroni correction, the AG/GG genotype of rs5995355, which is upstream of NCF4, was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.73-3.39; p < 0.0001). NCF4 is part of the NAPDH complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and the innate immune response. While not definitive, our analyses suggest that the variant allele does not affect expression of NCF4, but rather modulates activity of the NADPH complex. Additional studies on the functional consequences of rs5995355 in NCF4 may help to clarify the mechanistic link between inflammation and colorectal cancer.

  4. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  5. Current companion diagnostics in advanced colorectal cancer; getting a bigger and better piece of the pie

    PubMed Central

    Loree, Jonathan M.; Raghav, Kanwal P. S.

    2017-01-01

    While the treatment of colorectal cancer continues to rely heavily on conventional cytotoxic therapy, an increasing number of targeted agents are under development. Many of these treatments require companion diagnostic tests in order to define an appropriate population that will derive benefit. In addition, a growing number of biomarkers provide prognostic information about a patient’s malignancy. As we learn more about these biomarkers and their assays, selecting the appropriate companion diagnostic becomes increasingly important. In the case of many biomarkers, there are numerous assays which could provide the same information to a treating physician, however each assay has strengths and weaknesses. Institutions must balance cost, assay sensitivity, turn-around time, and labor resources when selecting which assay to offer. In this review we will discuss the current state of companion diagnostics available in metastatic colorectal cancer and explore emerging biomarkers and their assays. We will focus on KRAS, BRAF, HER2, and PIK3CA testing, as well as microsatellite stability assessment and multigene panels. PMID:28280626

  6. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Tortolina, Lorenzo; Duffy, David J; Maffei, Massimo; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Carmody, Aimée M; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N; De Ambrosi, Cristina; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-03-10

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis.We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions.Starting from an initial "physiologic condition", the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model.Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal.

  7. The potential of statins for individualized colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rutger J; Kodach, Liudmila L; Hardwick, James C H

    2011-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death by cancer in the western world. Despite major progress, even new chemotherapeutic regimens have had relatively little impact on long term survival in the approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease at presentation meaning that prevention is the only realistic way to reduce the burden of this disease. Many countries have implemented population-based screening methods to prevent colorectal cancer by the physical removal of its precursor lesion the adenoma, or to detect cancer at an earlier stage when it is amenable to surgical cure. However these programs have only been shown to reduce colorectal cancer deaths by 30% in those screened and therefore new or complimentary approaches are needed. One such approach is chemoprevention. A number of compounds have shown potential in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Most widely known are NSAIDs but recently inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, also known as statins, commonly prescribed medications that lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence. A critical issue in chemoprevention is the weighing of benefits against risks. In chemoprevention this balance is likely to be unfavourable when used in a wide unselected population even for the safest of compounds. Therapy should therefore be tailored to the individual patient. The balance will be more favourable in high risk groups such as individuals especially susceptible to neoplasia because of environmental risk factors, patients with inflammatory bowel disease, those with a hereditary predisposition and patients with a previous history of colorectal cancer or polyps. Furthermore colorectal cancer is not one disease but a heterogeneous group of diseases with different underlying molecular mechanisms. It is likely that both prevention and therapy will need to be tailored to the molecular subtype of the cancer in question. This may explain

  8. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in colorectal cancer: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the western world. Even with the significant improvement in traditional chemotherapy, there remain limitations with this treatment. One of the most promising new targets in the treatment of CRC is the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). Agents that inhibit the EGFR have demonstrated clinical activity as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy and the most promising of these agents is cetuximab, which blocks the binding of EGF and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) to EGFR. Thus, the finding that monoclonal antibodies against EGFR caused a response in patients, and reversed resistance to chemotherapy, was exciting news. However, expression of EGFR did not correlate with clinical benefit. Clearly, the search for markers of response to treatment against EGFR must go on.

  9. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    procedure. Efforts to improve the practice of colonoscopy will be described. Another limitation of the current practice is the inability to detect polypoid neoplasia that is hidden from view under white light imaging by the natural folds that occur within the colon. A device to overcome this limitation will also be described. Efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening (and thereby decrease the death rate of this second leading cause of cancer death in the United States) are progressing in many arenas. The researcher, basic or clinical, should maintain an up to date overview of the field and how each new technological advance is likely to have a role in the screening and early detection of colorectal cancer.

  10. Pulmonary preinvasive neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, K

    2001-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology have increased our knowledge of the biology of preneoplastic lesions in the human lung. The recently published WHO lung tumour classification defines three separate lesions that are regarded as preinvasive neoplasia. These are (1) squamous dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (SD/CIS), (2) atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), and (3) diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH). SD/CIS is graded in four stages (mild, moderate, severe, and CIS), based upon the distribution of atypical cells and mitotic figures. Most airways showing SD/CIS demonstrate a range of grades; many epithelia are hard to assess and the reproducibility of this complex system remains to be established. Detailed criteria are, however, welcome and provide an objective framework on which to compare various molecular changes. Alterations in gene expression and chromosome structure known to be associated with malignant transformation can be demonstrated in CIS, less so in dysplasias, but also in morphologically normal epithelium. The changes might be sequential, and their frequency and number increase with atypia. Less is known of the "risk of progression" of SD/CIS to invasive "central" bronchial carcinoma. It may take between one and 10 years for invasion to occur, yet the lesion(s) may be reversible if carcinogen exposure ceases. AAH may be an important precursor lesion for peripheral "parenchymal" adenocarcinoma of the lung: the "adenoma" in an adenoma–carcinoma sequence. There is good morphological evidence that AAH may progress from low to high grade to bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC; a non-invasive lesion by definition). Invasion then develops within BAC and peripheral lung adenocarcinoma evolves. The molecular events associated with this progression are not well understood and studies are hampered by a lack of clear criteria to distinguish high grade AAH from BAC. Nonetheless, as with SD/CIS, the patterns of expression of tumour

  11. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Results Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network

  12. Serum 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D and Survival in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wesa, Kathleen M.; Segal, Neil H.; Cronin, Angel M.; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Jacobs, Gria N.; Coleton, Marci I.; Fleisher, Martin; Dnistrian, Ann M.; Saltz, Leonard B.; Cassileth, Barrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Higher serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are associated with decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence. In this retrospective study of stage IV CRC patients, we evaluate whether 25(OH)D levels at diagnosis correlate with survival. Methods Stored sera from carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) measurements obtained between February 2005 and March 2006 were screened. The first 250 patients with CEA ±30 days of stage IV CRC diagnosis were included. Serum 25(OH)D levels were determined and categorized as adequate ≥30 ng/mL, or deficient <30 ng/mL. Multivariable Cox regression models controlling for albumin and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were used to investigate whether higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with prolonged survival. Results A total of 207 patients (83%) were vitamin D-deficient (median, 21 ng/mL), with deficiencies significantly more likely among non-Hispanic black patients (P=0.009). Higher levels were associated with prolonged survival in categorical variable analysis: adequate vs deficient, hazard ratio 0.61, 95% CI 0.38–0.98, P=0.041. Conclusions A majority of newly diagnosed stage IV CRC patients are vitamin D-deficient. Our data suggest that higher 25(OH)D levels are associated with better overall survival. Clinical trials to determine whether aggressive vitamin D repletion would improve outcomes for vitamin D-deficient CRC patients are warranted. PMID:25646565

  13. Multitarget stool DNA tests increases colorectal cancer screening among previously noncompliant Medicare patients

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Mark; Lester, Lynn; Chiniwala, Rupal; Berger, Barry

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the uptake of noninvasive multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) in a cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening non-compliant average-risk Medicare patients. METHODS This cross sectional primary care office-based study examined mt-sDNA uptake in routine clinical practice among 393 colorectal cancer screening non-compliant Medicare patients ages 50-85 ordered by 77 physicians in a multispecialty group practice (USMD Physician Services, Dallas, TX) from October, 2014-September, 2015. Investigators performed a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective review of electronic health records to identify mt-sDNA use in patients who were either > 10 years since last colonoscopy and/or > 1 year since last fecal occult blood test. Test positive patients were advised to get diagnostic colonoscopy and thereafter patients were characterized by the most clinically significant lesion documented on histopathology of biopsies or excisional tissue. Descriptive statistics were employed. Key outcome measures included mt-sDNA compliance and diagnostic colonoscopy compliance on positive cases. RESULTS Over 12 mo, 77 providers ordered 393 mt-sDNA studies with 347 completed (88.3% compliance). Patient mean age was 69.8 (50-85) and patients were 64% female. Mt-sDNA was negative in 85.3% (296/347) and positive in 14.7% (51/347). Follow-up colonoscopy was performed in 49 positive patients (96.1% colonoscopy compliance) with two patients lost to follow up. Index findings included: colon cancer (4/49, 8.2%), advanced adenomas (21/49, 42.9%), non-advanced adenomas (15/49, 30.6%), and negative results (9/49, 18.4%). The positive predictive value for advanced colorectal lesions was 51.0% and for any colorectal neoplasia was 81.6%. The mean age of patients with colorectal cancer was 70.3 and all CRC's were localized Stage I (2) and Stage II (2), three were located in the proximal colon and one was located in the distal colon. CONCLUSION Mt-sDNA provided

  14. Prognostic Value of the Combination of Preoperative Hemoglobin, Lymphocyte, Albumin, and Neutrophil in Patients with Locally Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui-hong; Li, A-jian; Tang, Er-jiang; Xu, Dan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Min; Xiao, Yi-hua; Deng, Xia-xing; Li, Hua-guang; Lin, Mou-bin

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammatory response and nutritional status are important to the prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of the combination of preoperative hemoglobin, lymphocyte, albumin, and neutrophil (HLAN) in patients with locally advanced CRC (LACRC). Material/Methods We performed a retrospective analysis in 536 LACRC patients undergoing radical surgery. The value of HLAN was defined as follow: HLAN=Hemoglobin (g/L)×Lymphocyte (/L)×Albumin (g/L)/Neutrophil (/L)/100. The X-tile program was used to determine the optimal cut-point of HLAN, and the prognostic value of HLAN for overall survival (OS) was evaluated with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results The cut-point of HLAN was set at 19.5. Compared with the high-HLAN group, the low-HLAN group had a 1.50-fold (95% confidence interval 1.09–2.05) increased risk of death and a significantly lower OS rate (P<0.001). Furthermore, the risk stratification model based on HLAN (AUC=0.72) displayed better accuracy in OS prediction than the TNM system (AUC=0.61). Conclusions HLAN is a valuable prognostic marker for patients with LACRC. PMID:27990014

  15. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; English, J.; Colston, K. W.; Menday, P.; Moller, S.; Coombes, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:9662243

  16. Tumor deposits counted as positive lymph nodes in TNM staging for advanced colorectal cancer: a retrospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yang, Shengke; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Hao; Du, Feng; Yin, Jie; Liu, Sai; Li, Ci; Xing, Shasha; Yuan, Jiatian; Lv, Bo; Fan, Jun; Leng, Shusheng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of counting tumor deposits (TDs) as positive lymph nodes (pLNs) in the pN category and evaluated its prognostic value for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. A new pN category (npN category) was calculated using the numbers of pLNs plus TDs. The npN category included 4 tiers: npN1a (1 tumor node), npN1b (2-3 tumor nodes), npN2a (4-6 tumor nodes), and npN2b (≥7 tumor nodes). We identified 4,121 locally advanced CRC patients, including 717 (11.02%) cases with TDs. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the disease-free and overall survival (DFS and OS) for npN and pN categories. Multivariate analysis showed that the npN and pN categories were both independent prognostic factors for DFS (HR 1.614, 95% CI 1.541 to 1.673; HR 1.604, 95% CI 1.533 to 1.679) and OS (HR 1.633, 95% CI 1.550 to 1.720; HR 1.470, 95% CI 1.410 to 1.532). However, the npN category was superior to the pN category by Harrell's C statistic. We conclude that it is thus feasible to consider TDs as positive lymph nodes in the pN category when evaluating the prognoses of CRC patients, and the npN category is potentially superior to the TNM (7th edition) pN category for predicting DFS and OS among advanced CRC patients. PMID:26934317

  17. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gulliford, T; English, J; Colston, K W; Menday, P; Moller, S; Coombes, R C

    1998-07-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

  18. Advanced Colorectal Adenomas in Patients Under 45 Years of Age Are Mostly Sporadic

    PubMed Central

    Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Watson, Rao; Goodwin, Jonathan; Safar, Elyas; Chokshi, Reena V.; Azar, Riad R.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of advanced adenomas in younger individuals is a criterion for Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the utility of screening advanced adenomas for loss of mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression to identify suspected LS remains unclear. Aims Determine the prevalence of MMR defects to understand whether these patients harbor a defined genetic risk for CRC. Methods The study cohort included adult patients ≤45 years of age with advanced adenomas (villous histology, ≥1 cm in diameter, ≥3 polyps of any size) endoscopically removed between 2001 and 2011. Clinical records were reviewed along with detailed pathological review and immunohistochemical MMR analysis. Results A total of 76 (40.1 % male, age 40.6 ± 5.4 years) patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Indications for colonoscopy were gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding 39 (51.3 %), CRC in a first-degree relative 17 (22.4 %) and somatic GI symptoms 20 (26.3 %). Index colonoscopy revealed a median of 1 adenoma (range 1–4), mean diameter of 12.9 ±7.1 mm, 40 (52.6 %) with villous histology. The mean follow-up duration was 3.3 ± 2 years. Recurrent adenomas developed in 24 (31.6 %), of which 8 (10.5 %) were advanced adenomas; none of these patients developed CRC. One of 66 (1.5 %) adenomas available for immunohistochemical (IHC) testing revealed loss of MLH1 and PMS2. Conclusions IHC screening of advanced adenomas from patients younger than 45 years of age identified potential LS in one of 64 patients. The low yield of IHC screening in this population suggests that universal IHC screening of advanced adenomas from patients younger than 45 years of age for MMR defects is not an efficient strategy for identifying LS subjects. PMID:24925148

  19. Colorectal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Giovanni; Messerini, Luca; Gafà, Roberta; Risio, Mauro

    2011-03-01

    Epithelial colorectal tumors are common pathologic entities. Their histology report should be comprehensive of a series of pathologic parameters essential for the correct clinical management of the patients. Diagnostic histologic criteria of adenomatous, serrated, inflammatory, and hamartomatous polyps and of polyposis syndromes are discussed. In addition, the pathologic features of early and advanced colorectal cancer are described and a checklist is given. Finally, molecular prognostic and predictive factors currently employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer are discussed.

  20. Clinical effects of autologous dendritic cells combined with cytokine-induced killer cells followed by chemotherapy in treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Song, Chun; Chuo, Dong-Yu; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer (DC-CIK) cell-based immunotherapy combined with chemotherapy on the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer. We prospectively included patients with advanced colorectal cancer and assessed the efficacy of DC-CIK cell-based immunotherapy combined with chemotherapy compared to treatment with chemotherapy alone. T cell subtypes, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and adverse events were evaluated in each group. In total, 134 patients were included in the DC-CIK group and 121 patients were included in the control group. No significant differences were observed in the percentages of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), and NK cells after DC-CIK cell-based immunotherapy compared to before chemotherapy in the DC-CIK group. The median PFS and OS in the DC-CIK treatment group were 8.8 months (95 % CI 8.4-9.1) and 14.7 months (95 % CI 13.9-15.5), respectively, which were significantly improved compared to the PFS and OS in the control group. The frequencies of grade III and IV leukopenia (8.2 vs. 19.0 %, P = 0.011), grade III and IV anemia (3.0 vs. 9.1 %, P = 0.039), and grade III and IV thrombocytopenia (3.7 vs. 10.7 %, P = 0.029) were significantly lower in the DC-CIK group compared to the control group. DC-CIK cell-based immunotherapy could induce an immune response against colorectal cancer and prolong PFS and OS. DC-CIK cell-based immunotherapy combined with chemotherapy had a significant benefit in terms of survival in patients with colorectal cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: multiple endocrine neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 4 Genomics Education Programme (UK): Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 Genomics Education Programme (UK): Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2A MalaCards: multiple endocrine ...

  2. Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi; Keku, Temitope O.; Martin, Christopher; Galanko, Joseph; Woosley, John T.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Satia, Jessie A.; Halabi, Susan; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The association between obesity and colorectal neoplasia may be mediated by inflammation. Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are elevated in the obese. Adipose tissue can produce and release the inflammatory cytokines that are potentially procarcinogenic. We examined circulating levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in relation to risk factors and the prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Plasma levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α were quantified in 873 participants (242 colorectal adenoma cases and 631 controls) in a colonoscopy-based cross-sectional study conducted between 1998 and 2002. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate associations between levels of inflammatory cytokines, colorectal adenomas, and known risk factors. Several known risk factors for colorectal neoplasia were associated with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines such as older age, current smoking, and increasing adiposity. The prevalence of colorectal adenomas was associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, and to a lesser degree, with CRP. For IL-6, adjusted odds ratios for colorectal adenomas were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18–2.68) for the second highest plasma level, and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.24– 2.74) for the highest level compared with the reference level. A similar association was found with TNF-α, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.54 (95% CI: 1.02–2.33) and 1.65 (95% CI: 1.09–2.50), respectively. Our findings indicate that inflammation might be involved in the early development of colorectal neoplasia, and suggest that systemic inflammatory cytokines might be an indicator of obesity and other risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:18172326

  3. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  4. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pont, Allan

    1980-01-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes consist of three distinct disease entities. They have in common adenomatous, carcinomatous or hyperplastic involvement of a variety of endocrine glands, and an autosomal dominant inheritance. MEN I includes hyperparathyroidism, islet cell and pituitary tumors. The components of MEN IIa are hyperparathyroidism, medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma. MEN IIb includes multiple neuromas, medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma. Effective tests are available for the early detection of components of the syndromes in potentially affected patients. Screening can lead to therapeutic intervention before clinical sequelae ensue. PMID:6247851

  5. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  6. Validation of Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma (GLNE 010) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We propose a Phase 2 (large cross-sectional) PRoBE-compliant validation trial of stool-based and serum-based tests for the detection of colorectal neoplasia (1). The trial is powered to detect early stage colorectal adenocarcinoma or high grade dysplasia. This is the most stringent, conservative approach to the early diagnosis of colonic neoplasia and addresses the most important endpoint of identifying individuals with curable, early stage cancer and those with very high risk non-invasive neoplasia (high grade dysplasia).

  7. CNP. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, T.

    1995-05-17

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  8. Effect of combined folic acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 on colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) act in concert in the one-carbon metabolism and may protect against colorectal neoplasia. We examined the effect of combined B-vitamin treatment on the occurrence of colorectal adenoma. The Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study was a rand...

  9. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  10. A Phase I Trial to Evaluate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity of Cetuximab and Lenalidomide in Advanced Colorectal and Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Erin M; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Mo, Xiaokui; Trikha, Prashant; Davis, Melanie; Paul, Bonnie; Grever, Michael; Carson, William E; Otterson, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    mAbs can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) via the innate immune system's ability to recognize mAb-coated cancer cells and activate immune effector cells. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent with the capacity to stimulate immune cell cytokine production and ADCC activity. This phase I trial evaluated the combination of cetuximab with lenalidomide for the treatment of advanced colorectal and head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). This trial included patients with advanced colorectal cancer or HNSCC. Treatment consisted of cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) i.v. every two weeks with lenalidomide given orally days 1-21 on a 28-day cycle. Three dose levels of lenalidomide were evaluated (15, 20, 25 mg). Correlative studies included measurement of ADCC, FcγRIIIA polymorphism genotyping, measurement of serum cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of immune cell subtypes. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (19 colorectal cancer, 3 HNSCC). Fatigue was the only dose-limiting toxicity. One partial response was observed and 8 patients had stable disease at least 12 weeks. The recommended phase II dose is cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) with lenalidomide 25 mg daily, days 1-21. Correlative studies demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in natural killer cytotoxic activity with increasing doses of lenalidomide. Cetuximab and lenalidomide were well tolerated. There was a lenalidomide dose-dependent increase in ADCC with higher activity in patients enrolled in cohort 3 than those enrolled in cohorts 1/2. Although response was not a primary endpoint, there was evidence of antitumor activity for the combination therapy. Further investigation of lenalidomide as an immunomodulator in solid tumors is warranted. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2244-50. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 in colorectal cancer family-risk population screening

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Chiara, Loretta De; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Castro, Inés; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is related to tumour development and progression in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its utility as biomarker has been suggested. The aim of our study was to measure serum MMP-9 in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients, and to analyse its diagnostic accuracy for the detection of advanced neoplasia (AN: advanced adenomas and CRC). Additionally, we compared its diagnostic capability with the most used non-invasive faecal immunochemical test (FIT). Serum MMP-9 was quantified by ELISA in 516 asymptomatic individuals that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT. MMP-9 levels were significantly related to age and gender and therefore the concentration was corrected by these confounders. Corrected MMP-9 (cMMP-9) levels were higher in individuals with advanced adenomas (AA; p-value = 0.029) and AN (p-value = 0.056) compared to individuals with no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated cMMP-9 concentration was associated with more severe characteristics of adenomas (number of lesions, size and histology). Nevertheless, the diagnostic accuracy of cMMP-9 was considerably lower than that of FIT for identifying AA (22.64% vs. 47.17% sensitivity, 90% specificity) or AN (19.30% vs. 52.63% sensitivity, 90% specificity). According to our results, serum MMP-9 cannot be considered of utility for the diagnosis of AN in CRC family-risk population screening. PMID:26264519

  12. Design and endpoints of clinical and translational trials in advanced colorectal cancer. a proposal from GROUP Español Multidisciplinar en Cancer Digestivo (GEMCAD).

    PubMed

    Carrera, Gemma; Garcia-Albeniz, Xabier; Ayuso, Juan Ramón; Aparicio, Jorge; Castells, Antoni; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Feliu, Jaime; Fuster, David; Gallego, Rosa; Pagés, Mario; Torres, Ferran; Maurel, Joan

    2011-05-01

    Meta-analytic reviews of Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) have reached contradictory conclusions regarding the benefit of medical interventions in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ACRC). Surrogate markers of survival benefit, such as response rate (RR) and progression free-survival (PFS) often show contradictory and highly variable correlations. These contradictions can be due to differences in 1) the studies analysed (sources), 2) the quality of clinical trials (intrinsic bias in the design, biased data analysis, heterogeneous PFS definitions) and 3) the second-line strategies between arms. PFS is a more vulnerable target than overall survival (OS), but the latter can also be affected by different biases and additional medical interventions such as secondary resection of metastases or second-line therapies. Therefore the correlation between PFS and survival must be clearly stated if PFS is to be considered as a primary endpoint. Of the differences between studies, only the quality of clinical trials can be improved by a deeper knowledge of both the area of study (i.e. colorectal cancer) and the methodology needed (i.e., clinical and translational trials). The aim of this manuscript is to offer the basic resources to develop experimental trials in ACRC. To this end, techniques for diagnosis and for response assessment are discussed, prognostic factors and treatment standards are critically exposed, and notes about how to design useful translational studies are provided.

  13. Dysregulation of MALAT1 and miR-619-5p as a prognostic indicator in advanced colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Gu; Zhang, Xiu-Bing; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Pei-Long; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Ye; Dai, Shi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the expression of metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) and microRNA (miR)-619-5p in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and to evaluate the significance of MALAT1 and miR-619-5p expression in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of CRC. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect MALAT1 and miR-619-5p expression in 120 colorectal carcinoma and 120 adjacent normal tissue samples. The expression levels of MALAT1 and miR-619-5p were significantly different between colorectal carcinoma and adjacent normal tissues (P<0.05). MALAT1 exhibited an average 2.52-fold increase in colorectal adenoma when compared with adjacent normal tissues, while miR-619-5p exhibited an average 5.79-fold decrease in colorectal adenoma when compared with adjacent normal tissues. There was a significant difference between the MALAT1 expression in CRC tissues obtained from men and women (P=0.027), and in tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage II and stage III lesions (P=0.019). MALAT1 expression was associated with lymphovascular invasion (P=0.047) and perineural invasion (P=0.012). In addition, miR-619-5p expression was also significantly different between men and women (P=0.032), and between TNM stage II and stage III lesions (P=0.012). miR-619-5p expression was also associated with lymphovascular invasion (P=0.023) and perineural invasion (P=0.009). Patients with high expression of MALAT1 and low expression of miR-619-5p demonstrated significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.002) and overall survival (OS) times (P=0.004) compared with patients with low MALAT1 expression and high miR-619-5p expression. Patients with perineural invasion demonstrated significantly shorter DFS (P=0.001) and OS times (P=0.003) compared with patients without perineural invasion. In addition, there was a negative correlation between MALAT1 expression and miR-619-5p expression (r=−0.415, P=0.004) in CRC tissues. In conclusion, MALAT1 and mi

  14. Colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    In the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, several clinical studies were presented that aimed to evaluate the various colorectal cancer screening strategies, although most assessed the various aspects of faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and colonoscopy. Data were presented from consecutive FIT-based screening rounds, confirming the importance of adherence to consecutive screening rounds, achieving a similar or superior diagnostic yield to endoscopic studies. There was confirmation of the importance of not delaying endoscopic study after a positive result. Participants with a negative FIT (score of 0) had a low risk for colorectal cancer. Several studies seemed to confirm the importance of high-quality colonoscopy in colorectal cancer screening programmes. The implementation of high-quality colonoscopies has reduced mortality from proximal lesions and reduced interval cancers in various studies. Finally, participants with a normal colonoscopy result or with a small adenoma are at low risk for developing advanced neoplasms during follow-up.

  15. Neoplasia: An Anniversary of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2007-01-01

    This issue marks the 10th year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth on the impact that Neoplasia has had on cancer research worldwide. Neoplasia was founded in 1999 at which time manuscripts were accepted through e-mail. In 2000, Neoplasia became the first journal to offer web-based online manuscript submission and peer-review using a custom-designed application JournalSoft. Now, the use of web-based manuscript processing has become an industry standard as it provides authors with a rapid and useful dialog exchange for improving the quality of the science and the overall speed of the review process. Moreover, during the past 10 years, the Internet has experienced a massive growth of a complex global grid of now over an estimated 1.2 billion Internet users which have resulted in a major shift in the medium of scientific communication for scholarly publishing. Neoplasia continues to evolve with the technology and has implemented a rapid time-to-publication schedule to continue dissemination of published cancer research findings quickly to the scientific community.

  16. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  17. [Multidisciplinary therapy of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Kahán, Z; Maráz, A; Mikó, T; Nagy, F; Palkó, A; Thurzó, L; Tiszlavicz, L

    2001-03-18

    A multidisciplinary program for the treatment of colorectal cancer is described. The main objective of the authors has been to define uniform up to date guidelines based on recent progress in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Preoperative diagnostic procedures are summarized which advance determination of clinical stage and prognosis. These information essentially determine care. Sequences of surgical methods, preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy and medical treatments are discussed according to tumor stages. Guidelines for surveillance following active treatment and recommendation for the screening of population at high risk for colorectal cancer are presented.

  18. Surgical site infections following colorectal cancer surgery: a randomized prospective trial comparing common and advanced antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver was found effective in reducing surgical-site infection in a preliminary study of colorectal cancer elective surgery. We decided to test this finding in a randomized, double-blind trial. Methods Adults undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery at two university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to have the surgical incision dressed with Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing or a common dressing. To blind the patient and the nursing and medical staff to the nature of the dressing used, scrub nurses covered Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber with a common wound dressing in the experimental arm, whereas a double common dressing was applied to patients of control group. The primary end-point of the study was the occurrence of any surgical-site infection within 30 days of surgery. Results A total of 112 patients (58 in the experimental arm and 54 in the control group) qualified for primary end-point analysis. The characteristics of the patient population and their surgical procedures were similar. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was lower in the experimental group (11.1% center 1, 17.5% center 2; overall 15.5%) than in controls (14.3% center 1, 24.2% center 2, overall 20.4%), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.451), even with respect to surgical-site infection grade 1 (superficial) versus grades 2 and 3, or grade 1 and 2 versus grade 3. Conclusions This randomized trial did not confirm a statistically significant superiority of Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing in reducing surgical-site infection after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00981110 PMID:22621779

  19. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  20. Colonic perforation with intraluminal stents and bevacizumab in advanced colorectal cancer: retrospective case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Imbulgoda, Amal; MacLean, Anthony; Heine, John; Drolet, Sebastien; Vickers, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are increasingly used in the treatment of malignant large bowel obstruction in the setting of inoperable colorectal cancer. Perforation is a well-known complication associated with these devices. The addition of the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor bevacizumab is suspected to increase the rate, but the extent of the increase is not known. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients receiving SEMS in tertiary hospitals in Calgary, Alta., between October 2001 and January 2012. Results We reviewed the records of 87 patients with inoperable colorectal cancer who received SEMS during our study period. Nine perforations occurred in total: 4 of 30 (13%) patients who received no chemotherapy, 3 of 47 (6%) who received chemotherapy but no bevacizumab, and 2 of 10 (20%) who received chemotherapy and bevacizumab. These two patients received bevacizumab with FOLFIRI after SEMS placement, and they had peritoneal disease. Conclusion Our case series and other studies suggest that bevacizumab may increase the risk of colonic perforation in the setting of SEMS. Caution should be used when combining these therapies. PMID:25799132

  1. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  2. The Microbiome and Colorectal Neoplasia – Environmental Modifiers of Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, L.E.; Bresalier, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of colon cancer is complex, yet it is undoubtedly impacted by intestinal microbiota. Whether the contribution to colon carcinogenesis is generated through the presence of an overall dysbiosis or by specific pathogens is still a matter for debate. However, it is apparent that interactions between microbiota and the host are mediated by a variety of processes including signaling cascades, the immune system, host metabolism, and regulation of gene transcription. To fully appreciate the role of microbiota in colon carcinogenesis it will be necessary to expand efforts to define populations in niche environments, such as colonic crypts, explore cross talk between the host and the microbiota, and more completely define the metabolomic profile of the microbiota. These efforts must be pursued with appreciation that dietary substrates and other environmental modifiers mediate changes in the microbiota as well as their metabolism and functional characteristics. PMID:23949252

  3. Phase 1 Study of ABT-751 in Combination With CAPIRI (Capecitabine and Irinotecan) and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudek, Michelle A; Dasari, Arvind; Laheru, Daniel; He, Ping; Jin, Runyan; Walker, Rosalind; Taylor, Gretchen E; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross C; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A; Purcell, W Thomas

    2016-08-01

    ABT-751 is an orally bioavailable sulfonamide with antimitotic properties. A nonrandomized phase 1 dose-escalation study of ABT-751 in combination with CAPIRI (capecitabine and irinotecan) and bevacizumab was conducted to define the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and pharmacokinetics in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Patients were treated with ABT-751 daily for 7 days (alone) and then began 21-day cycles of treatment with ABT-751 daily and capecitabine twice daily for 14 days plus irinotecan on day 1 intravenously. Bevacizumab was added as standard of care at 7.5 mg/kg on day 1 after the first 2 dose levels. Because of intolerance to the regimen, a reduced dose of ABT-751 was also explored with reduced-dose and full-dose CAPIRI with bevacizumab. ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics, ABT-751 glucuronidation, and protein binding were explored. Twenty-four patients were treated over 5 dose levels. The maximum tolerated dose was ABT-751 125 mg combined with full-dose CAPIRI and bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg on day 1. DLTs were hypokalemia, elevated liver tests, and febrile neutropenia. ABT-751 is metabolized by UGT1A8 and to a lesser extent UGT1A4 and UGT1A1. Irinotecan and APC exposure were increased, SN-38 exposure was similar, and SN-38 glucuronide exposure was decreased. Clinically relevant alterations in ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics were not observed. Despite modest efficacy, the combination of ABT-751, CAPIRI, and bevacizumab will not be studied further in colorectal cancer.

  4. Malignant Neoplasia of the Sex Skin in 2 Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Amanda P; Magden, Elizabeth R; Buchl, Stephanie J; Baze, Wallace B

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous malignant neoplasia within the sex skin of aged female chimpanzees. In both cases, the initial presentation resembled nonhealing traumatic wounds to the sex skin, with different degrees of infection, ulceration, and tissue necrosis. Histopathology of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in one case and of adenocarcinoma with metastasis in the other. Advanced age and previous trauma likely contributed to the development of the neoplasias in both cases; long-term sun exposure may also have contributed to the development of the squamous cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, these 2 cases represent the first reports of sex skin neoplasia in chimpanzees. PMID:27053571

  5. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your provider can order a colonoscopy or other screening tests : These tests help prevent colon cancer by ... on Colorectal Cancer. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after screening and polypectomy: a consensus update by the US ...

  6. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  7. [Surgery in complicated colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kreisler, Esther; Biondo, Sebastiano; Martí-Ragué, Joan

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer continues to have a serious social impact. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer will undergo emergency surgery for a complicated tumor, with a high risk of mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. The most frequent complications are obstruction and perforation, while massive hemorrhage is rare. The curative potential of surgery, whether urgent or elective, depends on how radical the resection is, among other factors. In the literature on the management of urgent colorectal disease, there are few references to the oncological criteria for resection. Uncertainly about the optimal treatment has led to wide variability in the treatment of this entity. The present article aims to provide a critical appraisal of the controversies surrounding the role of surgery and its impact on complicated colorectal cancer.

  8. Outcome of "indefinite for dysplasia" in inflammatory bowel disease: correlation with DNA flow cytometry and other risk factors of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Tak; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Wang, Dongliang; Westerhoff, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Dysplasia that develops in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease precedes colorectal cancer (CRC). The category of "indefinite for dysplasia (IND)" is used often in equivocal cases, but its clinical significance remains unclear. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content (aneuploidy) has shown some promise in stratifying patients into low or high risk of CRC, but there are few reports that have specifically evaluated the outcome of IND. As such, we analyzed a series of 84 IND inflammatory bowel disease patients seen at the University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers from 2003 to 2013 to determine the outcome of IND. Hospital electronic medical records were further reviewed to correlate outcome with the type of lesion (flat versus polypoid), primary sclerosing cholangitis, active inflammation in the area of IND, and DNA flow cytometric data. The data show that 13% of IND cases were found to have low-grade dysplasia, whereas only 2% of IND cases showed advanced neoplasia (high-grade dysplasia or CRC) after a mean follow-up of 28 months. The risk of neoplasia was not significantly associated with the type of lesion (P = .94 from log-rank test), primary sclerosing cholangitis (P = .94), or active inflammation (P = .41) in this cohort. However, the finding of DNA aneuploidy at baseline IND was predictive of subsequent detection of neoplasia (P = .037). IND patients with abnormal DNA flow cytometric results may warrant more careful follow-up, but conversely, IND in the setting of normal DNA content may require less frequent surveillance colonoscopy.

  9. Measurement of serum antibodies against NY-ESO-1 by ELISA: A guide for the treatment of specific immunotherapy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yu; Huang, Qian-Rong; Zheng, Guang-Shun; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2014-10-01

    NY-ESO-1 has been identified as one of the most immunogenic antigens; thus, is a highly attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. The present study analyzed the expression of serum antibodies (Abs) against NY-ESO-1 in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), with the aim of guiding the treatment of NY-ESO-1-based specific-immunotherapy for these patients. Furthermore, the present study was the first to evaluate the kinetic expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs and investigate the possible influencing factors. A total of 239 serum samples from 155 pathologically confirmed patients with advanced CRC (stages III and IV) were collected. The presence of spontaneous Abs against NY-ESO-1 was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results demonstrated that 24.5% (38/155) of the investigated patients were positive for NY-ESO-1-specific Abs. No statistically significant correlations were identified between the expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs and clinicopathological parameters, including age and gender, location, grading, local infiltration, lymph node status, metastatic status and K-ras mutation status (P>0.05). In 59 patients, the kinetic expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs was analyzed, of which 14 patients were initially positive and 45 patients were initially negative. Notably, 16/59 (27.1%) patients changed their expression status during the study period, and the initially positive patients were more likely to change compared with the initially negative patients (85.7 vs. 8.8%; P<0.001). Therefore, monitoring serum Abs against NY-ESO-1 by ELISA is an easy and feasible method. The high expression rate of NY-ESO-1-specific Abs in CRC patients indicates that measuring the levels of serum Abs against NY-ESO-1 may guide the treatment of NY-ESO-1-based specific immunotherapy for patients with advanced CRC.

  10. Surgery for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O; Keep, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the most common pre-malignant lesion. Atypical squamous changes occur in the transformation zone of the cervix with mild, moderate or severe changes described by their depth (CIN 1, 2 or 3). Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is treated by local ablation or lower morbidity excision techniques. Choice of treatment depends on the grade and extent of the disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of alternative surgical treatments for CIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to April 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of alternative surgical treatments in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risks of bias. Risk ratios that compared residual disease after the follow-up examination and adverse events in women who received one of either laser ablation, laser conisation, large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ), knife conisation or cryotherapy were pooled in random-effects model meta-analyses. Main results Twenty-nine trials were included. Seven surgical techniques were tested in various comparisons. No significant differences in treatment failures were demonstrated in terms of persistent disease after treatment. Large loop excision of the transformation zone appeared to provide the most reliable specimens for histology with the least morbidity. Morbidity was lower than with laser conisation, although the trials did not provide data for every outcome measure. There were not enough data to assess the effect on morbidity when compared with laser ablation. Authors’ conclusions The evidence

  11. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  12. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  13. A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Biologic Agents in the First Line Setting for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumachev, Alexander; Yan, Marie; Berry, Scott; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Martinez, Maria C. R.; Shah, Keya; Chan, Kelvin K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRis) and bevacizumab (BEV) are used in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have directly compared their relative efficacy on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Methods We conducted a systematic review of first-line RCTs comparing (1) EGFRis vs. BEV, with chemotherapy in both arms (2) EGFRis + chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone, or (3) BEV + chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone, using Cochrane methodology. Data on and PFS and OS were extracted using the Parmar method. Pairwise meta-analyses and Bayesian network meta-analyses (NMA) were conducted to estimate the direct, indirect and combined PFS and OS hazard ratios (HRs) comparing EGFRis to BEV. Results Seventeen RCTs contained extractable data for quantitative analysis. Combining direct and indirect data using an NMA did not show a statistical difference between EGFRis versus BEV (PFS HR = 1.11 (95% CR: 0.92–1.36) and OS HR = 0.91 (95% CR: 0.75–1.09)). Direct meta-analysis (3 RCTs), indirect (14 RCTs) and combined (17 RCTs) NMA of PFS HRs were concordant and did not show a difference between EGFRis and BEV. Meta-analysis of OS using direct evidence, largely influenced by one trial, showed an improvement with EGFRis therapy (HR = 0.79 (95% CR: 0.65–0.98)), while indirect and combined NMA of OS did not show a difference between EGFRis and BEV Successive inclusions of trials over time in the combined NMA did not show superiority of EGFRis over BEV. Conclusions Our findings did not support OS or PFS benefits of EGFRis over BEV in first-line mCRC. PMID:26474403

  14. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal cancer is almost as common among women ... colorectal cancer. Myth: Colorectal cancer cannot be prevented. Truth: In many cases, colorectal cancer can be prevented. ...

  15. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  16. New concepts in neoplasia as applied to diagnostic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Fenoglio-Preiser, C.M.; Weinstein, R.S.; Kaufman, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Cellular Aspects of Neoplasia; Oncogenes and Cancer; Chromosome and Oncogene Rearrangements in Leukemia and Lymphoma; Ionizing Radiation and Neoplasia; and Papillomaviruses and Neoplasia in Man.

  17. The biology of incipient, pre-invasive or intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Grizzle, William E.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Manne, Upender

    2012-01-01

    pre-invasive neoplasia”, seems to best describe these putative pre-invasive lesions. Thus, terms such as incipient neoplasia should be abandoned. The term “intra-epithelial neoplasia” with an associated grade, which has been developed for pre-invasive neoplastic lesions of the cervix, i.e. cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), seems to be a terminology that adds consistency across epithelial organs. Thus, adoption of these terms for the additional organ sites of pancreas (PanIN) and prostate (PIN) seems accepted. Less descriptive terms such as the degrees of dysplasia of the oral cavity and bronchopulmonary system and actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease of the skin might be better designated as oral intraepithelial neoplasia (OIN), pulmonary intraepithelial neoplasia (PulIN) and dermal intraepithelial neoplasia (DIN). The etiology of pre-invasive neoplasia is the etiology of the matching cancers. Some obvious initiating factors include exposure to the whole range of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, tobacco abuse and a broad range of other carcinogens (e.g., benzene). A frequent initiation factor is the setting of long standing continuing damage, inflammation and repair (LOCDIR) which leads to early molecular features associated with neoplasia after about one year. An excellent example of this is ulcerative colitis (UC) in which dysregulation of microsatellite repair enzymes have been documented one year following diagnosis of UC. While the nomenclature, description, diagnosis and etiology of pre-invasive neoplasia has advanced, approaches to therapy of such lesions have not progressed adequately even though it has been identified that, for example, removal of polyps periodically from the colorectum, DCIS from the breast, and high grade CIN from the cervix, results in a reduction in the development of cancers of the colorectum, breast, and cervix, respectively. With the development of more molecularly targeted therapy with fewer side effects, preventive therapies may be

  18. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and gastrointestinal stromal cancers: European group on tumor markers 2014 guidelines update.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M J; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Nicolini, A; Kalousová, M; Holubec, L; Sturgeon, C

    2014-06-01

    Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and management of patients with several different types of gastrointestinal cancer, especially colorectal, gastric, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) adenocarcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of this article is to provide updated and evidence-based guidelines for the use of biomarkers in the different gastrointestinal malignancies. Recommended biomarkers for colorectal cancer include an immunochemical-based fecal occult blood test in screening asymptomatic subjects ≥50 years of age for neoplasia, serial CEA levels in postoperative surveillance of stage II and III patients who may be candidates for surgical resection or systemic therapy in the event of distant metastasis occurring, K-RAS mutation status for identifying patients with advanced disease likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapeutic antibodies and microsatellite instability testing as a first-line screen for subjects with Lynch syndrome. In advanced gastric or GOJ cancers, measurement of HER2 is recommended in selecting patients for treatment with trastuzumab. For patients with suspected GIST, determination of KIT protein should be used as a diagnostic aid, while KIT mutational analysis may be used for treatment planning in patients with diagnosed GISTs.

  19. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  20. [Colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Colonoscopies play a vital role in population screening programs, either for initial examinations or as a test carried out after a positive result from a fecal occult blood test or sigmoidoscopy. Colonoscopies, and ancillary techniques such as polipectomies, must comply with basic quality criteria that must be reflected in the quality standards of screening programs. A quality colonoscopy is absolutely vital to avoid the occurrence of interval cancers. It is extremely important to detect any proximal lesions during a colonoscopy, especially those which are serrated, because they are difficult to identify and due to the increased risk of colorectal cancer. Regarding follow-up programs for resected colorectal polyps, current evidence of the relationship between the risk of neoplasia and certain variables (age, sex, smoker, BMI, diabetes, etc.) must allow for individualized risk and algorithms for screening and follow-up frequency to be developed for these patients. However, initial endoscopic exploration in a screening colonoscopy is essential to establishing the optimum interval and ensuring follow-up. Despite poor adherence to follow-up programs, mostly due to their overuse, follow-up colonoscopies 3 years after resection of all polypoid lesions detect clinically significant lesions as effectively as colonoscopies at one year.

  1. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  2. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jack S

    2008-03-01

    Although there are several methods available for colon cancer screening, none is optimal. This article reviews methods for screening, including fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, and double contrast barium enema. A simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and relatively sensitive screening test is needed to identify people at risk for developing advanced adenomas or colorectal cancer who would benefit from colonoscopy. It is hoped that new markers will be identified that perform better. Until then we fortunately have a variety of screening strategies that do work.

  3. Mapping of multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) to proximal chromosome 18 of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Luongo, C.; Gould, K.A.; Moser, A.R. ); Su, Likuo; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. ); Dietrich, W.; Lander, E.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia) mutation of the mouse has been mapped by analyzing the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in progeny from two intraspecific crosses segregating for the Min mutation. Min, a mutant allele of Apc, the mouse homo- log of the human APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene, maps to proximal chromosome 18. The synteny between Apc and Mcc, the mouse homolog of the human MCC (mutated in colorectal cancer) gene, is conserved between mouse and human, although the gene order in the Apc to Mcc interval is different from that in the APC to MCC interval. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current “gold-standard” surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett’s surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett’s mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  5. Preoperative Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer. An Independent Prognostic Factor Still Reliable

    PubMed Central

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Rubino, Antonio Salvatore; Latino, Rosalia; Giannone, Fabio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Scilletta, Beniamino; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether, in a sample of patients radically treated for colorectal carcinoma, the preoperative determination of the carcinoembryonic antigen (p-CEA) may have a prognostic value and constitute an independent risk factor in relation to disease-free survival. The preoperative CEA seems to be related both to the staging of colorectal neoplasia and to the patient's prognosis, although this—to date—has not been conclusively demonstrated and is still a matter of intense debate in the scientific community. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. A total of 395 patients were radically treated for colorectal carcinoma. The preoperative CEA was statistically compared with the 2010 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging, the T and N parameters, and grading. All parameters recorded in our database were tested for an association with disease-free survival (DFS). Only factors significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the DFS were used to build multivariate stepwise forward logistic regression models to establish their independent predictors. A statistically significant relationship was found between p-CEA and tumor staging (P < 0.001), T (P < 0.001) and N parameters (P = 0.006). In a multivariate analysis, the independent prognostic factors found were: p-CEA, stages N1 and N2 according to AJCC, and G3 grading (grade). A statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) was evident between the DFS of patients with normal and high p-CEA levels. Preoperative CEA makes a pre-operative selection possible of those patients for whom it is likely to be able to predict a more advanced staging. PMID:25875542

  6. The positive predictive value of guaiac faecal occult blood test in relation to the number of positive squares in two consecutive rounds of colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Sylvain; Philip, Julie; Campillo, Boris; Piette, Christine; Durand, Gerard; Riou, Françoise; Bretagne, Jean François

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to define the positive predictive values of a positive guaiac faecal occult blood test according to the number of positive squares, in two consecutive rounds of colorectal cancer mass screening in a French region. A total of 4172 colonoscopies were analyzed. Sex, age, number of positive squares, and colonoscopic and histopathologic findings were studied. In the results obtained, 76.6% of positive tests were positive with one or two squares. The number of positive squares was not related to sex, age and rank of participation. The positive predictive value for cancers and adenomas increased significantly with age, sex (male) and number of positive squares from 6.6% (one to two squares) to 27.6% (five to six squares) and from 15.2% to 22.2%, respectively. Cancer was diagnosed 211 times (54.1%) and advanced neoplasia was diagnosed 696 times (65.3%) following positive tests with one to two squares. The TNM stage of cancer increased significantly with the number of positive squares: 85.8% of stages 0-1-2 for one to two positive squares and 66.3% for five to six positive squares (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of cancer and advanced neoplasia for male patients and aged persons. The number of positive squares significantly increased the risk of cancer (odds ratio=4.6 for five to six positive squares) and the risk of advanced neoplasia (odds ratio=2.9). Age, sex and number of positive squares were independent predictive factors of positive guaiac faecal occult blood test. The proportion of TNM stages 3-4 was significantly higher in those with five to six positive squares. Performing a complete colonoscopy in every individual having a positive test, especially aged men with a high number of positive squares, should be a priority in any screening programme.

  7. A case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome associated with high-grade intramucosal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ru-Ying; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare, inherited autosomal dominant disease characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the rare case of a 64-year-old female patient with pigmentation on her lips and extremities for over 63 years and intermittent abdominal pain and, diarrhea for 3 years. The presence of intestinal and colorectal hamartomatous polyps was confirmed. The removal and characterization of her rectal polyp showed it to be a typical hamartomatous polyp with a portion of it being an adenoma with high-grade intramucosal neoplasia. A survey of the patient's family identified 9 people in the family with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and three of them have already died from colorectal cancer. This case study serves as an example of how imperative it is to survey the patient about their family history in order to detect early cancerous lesions.

  8. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized by variable penetrance of medullary thyroid carcinoma(MTC), pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). MEN2 consists of two clinical subtypes, MEN2A and MEN2B. Familial medullary thyroid cancer is now viewed as a phenotypic variant of MEN2A with decreased penetrance for PHEO and PHPT rather than a distinct entity. All subtypes are caused by gain-of-function mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. Recognition of the clinical entity in individuals and families at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation is crucial for the management and prevention of associated malignancies. Recent guidelines released by the American Thyroid Association regarding the management of MTC will be summarized in this chapter.

  9. Dietary fibre and colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, H J

    1979-01-01

    Dietary plant fibre, or plantix, is thought to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer in humans. It is a complex polymeric substance that has several distinct components resistant to hydrolysis by the digestive enzymes of humans. These components include cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, lignin, gums, mucilages and, in certain instances, algal polysaccharides. These polymers have different physicochemical properties, and recent evidence from experimental studies in animals treated with carcinogens suggests that some may exert protective effects in the intestine and others may enhance colon carcinogenesis. This review synthesizes information on the chemical composition, methods of analysis and physicochemical properties of dietary plant fibre and reviews available studies examining the role of fibre in colonic neoplasia in animals and humans. PMID:466603

  10. Local management of rectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Touzios, John; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of rectal neoplasia, whether benign or malignant, challenges the surgeon. The challenge in treating rectal cancer is selecting the proper approach for the appropriate patient. In a small number of rectal cancer patients local excision may be the best approach. In an attempt to achieve two goals-cure of disease with a low rate of local failure and maintenance of function and quality of life-multiple approaches can be utilized. The key to obtaining a good outcome for any one patient is balancing the competing factors that impact on these goals. Any effective treatment aimed at controlling rectal cancer in the pelvis must take into account the disease in the bowel wall itself and the disease, or potential disease, in the mesorectum. The major downside of local excision techniques is the potential of leaving untreated disease in the mesorectum. Local management techniques avoid the potential morbidity, mortality, and functional consequences of a major abdominal radical resection and are thus quite effective in achieving the maintenance of function and quality of life goal. The issue for the transanal techniques is how they fare in achieving the first goal-cure of the cancer while keeping local recurrence rates to an absolute minimum. Without removing both the rectum and the mesorectum there is no completely accurate way to determine whether a rectal cancer has moved outside the bowel wall, so any decision on local management of a rectal neoplasm is a calculated risk. For benign neoplasia, the challenge is removing the lesion without having to resort to a major abdominal procedure.

  11. Colorectal cancer and self-reported tooth agenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in APC and AXIN2 are both associated with colon neoplasia as well as anomalous dental development. We tested the hypothesis that congenitally missing teeth may occur more commonly in individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer than in individuals without this diagnosis. Methods Via a survey conducted on 1636 individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) and 2788 individuals with no colorectal cancer from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, self-reported information on congenitally missing teeth was collected. The frequency of missing teeth between cases and controls was compared using Pearson’s chi-squared test or Fisher’s exact test. Results 4.8% of cases and 5.7% of controls reported having at least one missing tooth (p = 0.20). When we stratified by recruitment site, gender, and mutation status where available, frequency of missing teeth was not statistically significantly different between cases and controls. Conclusions This study did not provide support for there being a general predisposition to missing teeth among a large cohort of CRC patients. The study neither addresses nor excludes the possibility, however, that individuals presenting with notable hypodontia/oligodontia might still have an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:24607150

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (≈180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV≥106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia.

  13. A combination of gefitinib and FOLFOX-4 as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer patients. A GISCAD multicentre phase II study including a biological analysis of EGFR overexpression, amplification and NF-kB activation

    PubMed Central

    Cascinu, S; Berardi, R; Salvagni, S; Beretta, G D; Catalano, V; Pucci, F; Sobrero, A; Tagliaferri, P; Labianca, R; Scartozzi, M; Crocicchio, F; Mari, E; Ardizzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    Interesting activity has been reported by combining chemotherapy with cetuximab. An alternative approach for blocking EGFR function has been the development of small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinase domain such as gefitinib. We designed a multicentre phase II study in advanced colorectal cancer combining gefitinib+FOLFOX in order to determine the activity and to relate EGFR expression and gene amplification and NF-kB activation to therapeutic results. Patients received FOLFOX-4 regimen plus gefitinib as first-line treatment. Tumour samples were analysed for EGFR protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis and for EGFR gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) and NF-kB activation. Forty-three patients were enrolled into this study; 15 patients experienced a partial response (response rate=34.9%), whereas other 12 (27.9%) had a stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7.8 months and median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. We did not find any relationship with EGFR overexpression, gene amplification, while NF-kB activation was associated with a resistance to therapy. Gefitinib does not seem to increase the activity of FOLFOX in advanced colorectal cancer even in patients overexpressing EGFR or with EGFR amplification. Furthermore, while NF-kB activation seems to predict resistance to chemotherapy as demonstrated ‘in vitro' models, gefitinib does not overcome this mechanism of resistance, as reported for cetuximab. PMID:18059397

  14. Treatment with bevacizumab and FOLFOXIRI in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: presentation of two novel trials (CHARTA and PERIMAX) and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than half of patients with colorectal cancer will develop metastatic disease either evident at the time of initial diagnosis or during their course of disease. Besides multidisciplinary management further treatment intensification is warranted to improve the still limited prognosis. Methods/design In these two multi-centre, randomized phase II trials, conducted in Germany, 380 patients with R0-resectable colorectal liver metastases (PERIMAX) and with unresectable, metastatic colorectal cancer (CHARTA) will be recruited. Patients previously untreated for metastatic disease with either synchronous or metachronous metastases are randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to resection of colorectal liver metastases followed by postoperative FOLFOX for 6 months or perioperative FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab for 3 months pre- and postoperative and resection (PERIMAX), or to induction chemotherapy with FOLFOX and bevacizumab +/− irinotecan for a maximum of 6 months followed by maintenance treatment with fluoropyrimidine and bevacizumab. The primary objective of these trials is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Primary endpoint is failure free survival rate at 18 months in the PERIMAX trial and progression free survival rate at 9 months in CHARTA. Secondary objectives include efficacy, safety and tolerability. Discussion The CHARTA and PERIMAX trials are designed to evaluate the benefits and limitations of a highly active four-drug regimen in distinct treatment situations of metastatic CRC. Eligible patients are classified into resectable liver metastases to be randomized to perioperative treatment with FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab or postoperative FOLFOX in the PERIMAX, or unresectable metastatic CRC to be randomized between FOLFOX and bevacizumab with or without irinotecan, stratified for clinical groups according to disease and patients’ characteristics in the CHARTA trial. Trial registration

  15. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I.

    PubMed

    Beukes, E; Dent, D M; De Villiers, J C; Miller, J L

    1985-08-17

    During the 13-year period 1970-1983 only 7 cases of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I) were seen at Groote Schuur Hospital, suggesting that the associated gene is rare in this area. Only 1 of these patients was black. Endocrine associations were as follows: hyperparathyroidism--6 cases, pituitary hypersecretion--6 cases (3 each involving growth hormone and prolactin), and pancreatic hypersecretion--3 cases (2 of gastrinoma and 1 of insulinoma). The presenting features were predictably diverse and depended on the component which manifested first. There was little difficulty in reaching a diagnosis on routine investigation. All patients with hyperparathyroidism underwent a 3 1/2-gland parathyroidectomy as the first treatment procedure, normocalcaemia being achieved in 5 cases, but persistent hypercalcaemia in the 6th suggested a supernumerary gland. A pituitary adenoma was removed in 4 cases, but persistent prolactinaemia necessitated bromocriptine therapy in 3. Successful distal pancreatectomy was undertaken in a patient with insulinoma and a patient with gastrinoma, and a further patient with gastrinoma awaits surgery. The overall prognosis in cases of MEN I appears to depend on the most aggressive component, often the pancreatic lesion; our patients have run a surprisingly benign course with only 1 late death, from hypertensive heart disease.

  16. [Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2012-04-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndrome (MEN-2) is a rare hereditary cancer syndrome with autosomal dominant trait of inheritance. The most characteristic feature of this syndrome is a complete penetrance of medullary thyroid cancer. On the basis of differences in variable expression of pheochromocytomas, hyperparathyroidism, and other clinical features, MEN-2 is divided into three clinical variants, referred to as MEN-2A, MEN-2B and familial medullary thyroid cancer. In the most frequent variant, MEN-2A syndrome, apart from thyroid carcinoma, this syndrome includes also unilateral or bilateral pheochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism. In less common MEN-2B, medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma occur together with complex nervous and skeletal abnormalities. Familial medullary thyroid cancer is a variant of MEN-2 in which individuals affected develop only this neoplasm without other manifestations of MEN-2. It is well known that MEN-2 is caused by mutations of different codons of the RET proto-oncogene. The identification of mutations associated with this syndrome has led to genetic testing to identify patients at risk for MEN-2. There is a significant genotype-phenotype correlation, which allows a more individualised approach to the timing of prophylactic thyroidectomy. In this paper, we review the current views on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of MEN-2.

  17. From dinosaurs to DNA: a history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Hugh E; Hyland, John; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P

    2003-05-01

    The roots of colorectal cancer date back to antiquity. In this short history of colorectal cancer we trace its clinical and research origins from ancient times through the dark ages, middle ages, to the scientific and medical advances of the seventeenth to twentieth centuries and into the twenty-first century.

  18. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, an ancient disease: new light and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Alazzam, Mo'iad; Tidy, John; Hancock, Barry W; Powers, Hilary

    2010-02-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia is a rare malignancy, which can occur after any type of pregnancy. The incidence varies according to the geographical location and ethnic origin. Although most patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are cured by conventional chemotherapy and surgery, some suffer resistant disease and may die. New therapeutic agents are needed to reduce the toxicity associated with conventional chemotherapy and treat those with resistant or refractory disease. Molecular targeted treatment provides an exciting avenue, however, the biology of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia is not well understood. This review briefly summarises the recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis and molecular biology of this group of diseases and sheds light on molecules that could provide potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Vitamins B2, B6 and B12 and Risk of New Colorectal Adenomas in a Randomized Trial of Aspirin Use and Folic Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Jane C.; Levine, A. Joan; Grau, Maria V.; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per M.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Tsang, Shirley; Munroe, David; Ali, Iqbal; Haile, Robert W.; Sandler, Robert S.; Baron, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Folate, other vitamin B cofactors, and genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) all may play important roles in colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the associations between dietary and circulating plasma levels of vitamins B2, B6 and B12 and risk colorectal adenomas. Methods The Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study is a randomized clinical trial of folic acid supplementation and incidence of new colorectal adenomas in individuals with a history of adenomas (n=1,084). Diet and supplement use were ascertained through a food-frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Blood collected at baseline was used to determine plasma B-vitamin levels. We used generalized linear regression to estimate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) as measures of association. Results We found a borderline significant inverse association with plasma B6 (pyridoxal 5′phosphate, PLP) and adenoma risk (adjusted RR Q4 vs. Q1=0.78, 95% CI=0.61-1.00, p-trend=0.08). This association was not modified by folic acid supplementation or plasma folate. However, the protective association of PLP with adenoma risk was observed only among subjects who did not drink alcohol (p-interaction=0.03). Plasma B2 (riboflavin) was inversely associated with risk of advanced lesions (adjusted RR Q4 vs. Q1=0.51; 95% CI=0.26-0.99, p-trend=0.12). No significant associations were observed between adenoma risk and plasma vitamin B12 or dietary intake of vitamin B2 and B6. When we examined specific gene-B-vitamin interactions, we observed a possible interaction between MTHFR-C677T and plasma B2 on risk of all adenomas. Conclusion Our results suggest that high levels of PLP and B2 may protect against colorectal adenomas. PMID:18708408

  20. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  1. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Falchetti, Alberto; Monte, Francesca Del; Sala, Silvia Carbonell; Gozzini, Alessia; Luzi, Ettore; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours) within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions) is recommended. PMID:17014705

  2. Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia: a therapeutical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Frega, Antonio; Sopracordevole, Francesco; Assorgi, Chiara; Lombardi, Danila; DE Sanctis, Vitaliana; Catalano, Angelica; Matteucci, Eleonora; Milazzo, Giusi Natalia; Ricciardi, Enzo; Moscarini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN) represents a rare and asymptomatic pre-neoplastic lesion. Its natural history and potential evolution into invasive cancer are uncertain. VaIN can occur alone or as a synchronous or metachronous lesion with cervical and vulvar HPV-related intra epithelial or invasive neoplasia. Its association with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is found in 65% of cases, with vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia in 10% of cases, while for others, the association with concomitant cervical or vulvar intraepithelial neoplasias is found in 30-80% of cases. VaIN is often asymptomatic and its diagnosis is suspected in cases of abnormal cytology, followed by colposcopy and colposcopically-guided biopsy of suspicious areas. In the past, high-grade VaIN and multifocal VaIN have been treated by radical surgery, such as total or partial upper vaginectomy associated with hysterectomy and radiotherapy. The need to maintain the integrity of reproductive capacity has determined the transition from radical therapies to conservative ones, according to the different patients' characteristics.

  3. Lipidome in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Understanding its pathophysiology is essential for developing efficient strategies to treat this disease. Lipidome, the sum of total lipids, related enzymes, receptors and signaling pathways, plays crucial roles in multiple cellular processes, such as metabolism, energy storage, proliferation and apoptosis. Dysregulation of lipid metabolism and function contributes to the development of CRC, and can be used towards the evaluation of prognosis. The strategies targeting lipidome have been applied in clinical trails and showed promising results. Here we discuss recent advances in abnormal lipid metabolism in CRC, the mechanisms by which the lipidome regulates tumorigenesis and tumor progression, and suggest potential therapeutic targets for clinical trials. PMID:26967051

  4. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  5. Characterization of Colorectal Cancer Development in Apcmin/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Blanc, Valerie; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2016-01-01

    The Apcmin/+ mouse provides an excellent experimental model for studying genetic, environmental, and therapeutic aspects of intestinal neoplasia in humans. In this chapter, we will describe techniques for studying colon cancer development in Apcmin/+ mice on C57BL/6J (B6) background, focusing on the roles of environmental modifiers, including Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS), high fat diet, and bile acid supplementation in the context of experimental colorectal cancer. This chapter also includes protocols describing extraction and purification of DSS-contaminated RNA, as well as sampling, harvesting, and tissue processing. The common pathologic lesions encountered in these animals are described in detail. PMID:27246043

  6. Anterior Segment Imaging in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Gargi K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anterior segment imaging have transformed the way ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is diagnosed and monitored. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) has been reported to be useful primarily in the assessment of intraocular invasion and metastasis. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) shows enlarged and irregular nuclei with hyperreflective cells in OSSN lesions and this has been found to correlate with histopathology findings. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) demonstrates thickened hyperreflective epithelium with an abrupt transition between abnormal and normal epithelium in OSSN lesions and this has also been shown to mimic histopathology findings. Although there are limitations to each of these imaging modalities, they can be useful adjunctive tools in the diagnosis of OSSN and could greatly assist the clinician in the management of OSSN patients. Nevertheless, anterior segment imaging has not replaced histopathology's role as the gold standard in confirming diagnosis. PMID:27800176

  7. Uterine cervical neoplasia prevention in Parque Indigena do Xingu.

    PubMed

    Speck, N M de Góis; Pereira, E R; Schaper, M; Tso, F K; de Freitas, V G; Ribalta, J C L

    2009-01-01

    Results of preventive health measures, diagnosis and treatment applied to Parque Indigena do Xingu native women were studied. Thirty-seven cases of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions and invasive neoplasias were treated in the local villages without referral to an advanced medical center. LEEPs were carried out in 32 women, three cold knife conizations, one vaginal hysterectomy and one Wertheim Meigs procedure. Results of 53.1% of LEEP surgical procedures did not have margin involvement by the lesions. Bleeding complications were seen in 15.6%. Regular follow-up with two or three cytologic and colposcopic tests in 32 women was carried out. All cases were negative for lesions. Five women were not followed-up due mainly to logistical reasons. Health endeavors adopted in the period 2005-2007 brought about a significant reduction of precursor lesions in this native aboriginal population without screening resources.

  8. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  9. Phase II study of the oxygen saturation curve left shifting agent BW12C in combination with the hypoxia activated drug mitomycin C in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Levitt, N C; O'Byrne, K; Braybrooke, J P; Talbot, D C; Ganesan, T S; Thompson, C H; Rajagopalan, B; Littlewood, T J; Dixon, R M; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    BW12C (5-[2-formyl-3-hydroxypenoxyl] pentanoic acid) stabilizes oxyhaemoglobin, causing a reversible left-shift of the oxygen saturation curve (OSC) and tissue hypoxia. The activity of mitomycin C (MMC) is enhanced by hypoxia. In this phase II study, 17 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) received BW12C and MMC. BW12C was given as a bolus loading dose of 45 mg kg−1over 1 h, followed by a maintenance infusion of 4 mg kg−1h−1for 5 h. MMC 6 mg m−2was administered over 15 min immediately after the BW12C bolus. The 15 evaluable patients had progressive disease after a median of 2 (range 1–4) cycles of chemotherapy. Haemoglobin electrophoresis 3 and 5 h after the BW12C bolus dose showed a fast moving band consistent with the BW12C-oxyhaemoglobin complex, accounting for approximately 50% of total haemoglobin. The predominant toxicities – nausea/vomiting and vein pain – were mild and did not exceed CTC grade 2. Liver31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of patients with hepatic metastases showed no changes consistent with tissue hypoxia. The principle of combining a hypoxically activated drug with an agent that increases tissue hypoxia is clinically feasible, producing an effect equivalent to reducing tumour oxygen delivery by at least 50%. However, BW12C in combination with MMC for 5-FU-resistant colorectal cancer is not an effective regimen. This could be related to drug resistance rather than a failure to enhance cytotoxicity. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839290

  10. Adenomatous polyposis coli-deficient zebrafish are susceptible to digestive tract neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Haramis, Anna-Pavlina G; Hurlstone, Adam; van der Velden, Yme; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Clevers, Hans C

    2006-04-01

    Truncation of the tumour suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) constitutively activates the Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathway. This event constitutes the primary transforming event in sporadic colorectal cancer in humans. Moreover, humans or mice carrying germline truncating mutations in APC develop large numbers of intestinal adenomas. Here, we report that zebrafish that are heterozygous for a truncating APC mutation spontaneously develop intestinal, hepatic and pancreatic neoplasias that are highly proliferative, accumulate beta-catenin and express Wnt target genes. Treatment with the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene accelerates the induction of these lesions. These observations establish apc-mutant zebrafish as a bona fide model for the study of digestive tract cancer.

  11. [Chemical or immunological tests for the detection of fecal occult blood in colorectal cancer screening?].

    PubMed

    Quintero, Enrique

    2009-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) can be prevented by screening programs in the population at average risk (men and women aged between 50 and 74 years) and at high risk (first degree relatives, CRC hereditary syndromes and chronic inflammatory bowel disease). Early CRC (with submucosal invasion) and advanced adenomas (size > or =10mm, with severe dysplasia or >20% villous component) produce intermittent microscopic blood losses that can be detected through chemical and immunological testing for fecal occult blood (C-FOBT and I-FOBT). Among the screening strategies in the population at average risk, annual or biannual fecal occult blood testing is the most widely used due to its non-invasiveness and low cost. Four randomized clinical trials have shown that annual or biannual screening with guaiac-based tests (C-FOBT) reduces overall mortality due to CRC by 16% and CRC incidence by 20% and 17% respectively. However, these tests have major drawbacks, especially their low sensitivity in detecting early CRC and advanced adenoma, their lack of specificity in detecting human hemoglobin (Hb), and their high fecal Hb detection threshold (>300microgHb/gfeces). In the last few years, major developments have occurred in immunological tests (I-FOBT), based on an antigen-antibody reaction that specifically detects human Hb, and these tests are currently available as an alternative to C-FOBT. Their main advantages are as follows: firstly, I-FOBT specifically detect human Hb in stools and at much lower levels (40-300microgHb/gfeces) than C-FOBT; secondly, automated analysis avoids subjectivity in reading qualitative tests and allows large population groups to be studied in a short time, making I-FOBT ideal for population-based screening; thirdly, I-FOBT fairly accurately selects individuals for colonoscopy so that approximately half of patients with an I-FOBT test show clinically significant colorectal neoplasia (advanced adenoma or invasive CRC); fourthly, the cut-off point for fecal Hb

  12. Histiocytoses: emerging neoplasia behind inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Rollins, Barret J; Donadieu, Jean; Charlotte, Frédéric; Idbaih, Ahmed; Vaglio, Augusto; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Emile, Jean-François; Amoura, Zahir

    2017-02-01

    Histiocytoses are disorders characterised by inflammation and the accumulation of cells derived from the monocyte and macrophage lineages, which results in tissue damage. Although they are often considered rare disorders with protean clinical manifestations, considerable advances in the understanding of their genetics have led to increased clinical recognition of these conditions, and fuelled further insights into their pathogenesis. In this Review, we describe insights into the cells of origin, molecular pathology, clinical features, and treatment strategies for some of the most common histiocytic disorders, including Langerhans cell histiocytosis, Erdheim-Chester disease, and Rosai-Dorfman disease. With the discovery of recurrent mutations affecting the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mTOR-AKT pathways in some of these histiocytoses, our understanding of these diseases has now evolved from the concept of a primary inflammatory condition to that of a clonal neoplastic disease. This understanding has led to the development of effective mechanism-based therapeutic strategies for patients with histiocytic diseases.

  13. Determinants of metastatic competency in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauriello, Daniele V F; Calon, Alexandre; Lonardo, Enza; Batlle, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancer types and represents a major therapeutic challenge. Although initial events in colorectal carcinogenesis are relatively well characterized and treatment for early-stage disease has significantly improved over the last decades, the mechanisms underlying metastasis - the main cause of death - remain poorly understood. Correspondingly, no effective therapy is currently available for advanced or metastatic disease. There is increasing evidence that colorectal cancer is hierarchically organized and sustained by cancer stem cells, in concert with various stromal cell types. Here, we review the interplay between cancer stem cells and their microenvironment in promoting metastasis and discuss recent insights relating to both patient prognosis and novel targeted treatment strategies. A better understanding of these topics may aid the prevention or reduction of metastatic burden.

  14. Infection and Cervical Neoplasia: Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Smith, John HF

    2009-01-01

    Whilst there is strong evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal aetiological agent in cervical neoplasia, some other sexually transmitted agents may either contribute or protect against cervical carcinogenesis, such as the herpes virus family (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Epidemiological studies suggest that HSV may have a role in cervical neoplasia, but there is no clear supportive experimental evidence. Serological studies have also failed to reveal a difference in the prevalence of antibodies to CMV and EBV between patients with cervical cancer and controls. However, longitudinal seroepidemiological studies have provided evidence that CT is an independent risk factor for the development of cervical squamous carcinoma and this association is serotype specific. The increased risk of cervical neoplasia in patients infected with HIV has been recognised for over a decade and HIV may interact with HPV either by alternating HPV gene transcription or by immunosuppression. Finally extensive experimental and limited epidemiological evidence suggests that adeno-associated viruses (AAV) may have antioncogenic activity in man and may protect against the development of cervical cancer. At present the mechanism of this action is unclear but may relate to AAV-induced regulation of HPV gene expression and the HPV life cycle. In this review we summarize the current literature relating to the associations and mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by each of these infectious microorganisms. PMID:18830380

  15. CDH1 (E-cadherin) in testicular germ cell neoplasia: suppressed translation of mRNA in pre-invasive carcinoma in situ but increased protein levels in advanced tumours.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Si B; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Nielsen, John E; Herlihy, Amy S; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Almstrup, Kristian; Daugaard, Gedske; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Leffers, Henrik; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    E-cadherin (CDH1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein involved in cellular adhesion. In our recent microarray studies of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) and the common precursor carcinoma in situ (CIS), CDH1 mRNA was highly expressed in CIS and embryonal carcinoma. It has previously been reported that the CDH1 protein is not expressed in CIS. To resolve the discrepancy, we performed a detailed analysis of the expression of CDH1 mRNA and protein in a series of normal and neoplastic testes. High expression of CDH1 mRNA in CIS was confirmed by real-time PCR and in situ hybridisation. At the protein level, however, CDH1 was only detected with one of three tested antibodies, but Western blotting analysis with this antibody showed additional bands, suggesting unspecific staining. The levels of a CDH1 protein fragment in serum samples from 58 patients with TGCTs were analysed by ELISA; we found significantly higher levels in patients with advanced disease (stage II/III) when compared to healthy individuals and patients with stage I TGCT. In conclusion, despite high mRNA levels, the CDH1 protein is not expressed in CIS, suggesting translational suppression of CDH1 protein expression. CDH1 serum levels may be a serological marker for staging of TGCT patients.

  16. Colorectal clinical trials: what is on the horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H; Goldberg, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of colorectal cancer, where more effective therapies have led to improved outcomes in patients with advanced disease. However, the 5-year overall survival rate remains poor. Genomic sequencing has allowed us to understand that colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, where tumor-specific variants affect the prognosis and outcomes in patients. This has shaped the future directions of treatment and the development of clinical trials, including the incorporation of novel targeted therapies and investigations into the role of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26777152

  17. Effect of monoclonal antibody 17-1A and GM-CSF in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma--long-lasting, complete remissions can be induced.

    PubMed

    Ragnhammar, P; Fagerberg, J; Frödin, J E; Hjelm, A L; Lindemalm, C; Magnusson, I; Masucci, G; Mellstedt, H

    1993-03-12

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is considered to be one of the effector functions of unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in tumor therapy. The antitumor activity of MAbs might therefore be augmented if the cytotoxic capability of the effector cells could be increased. In an in vitro system, the killing capacity of MAb was significantly enhanced by pre-treatment of the effector cells with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Based on these findings, the therapeutic effect of the combination of mouse MAb 17-1A (IgG2a) and GM-CSF was evaluated in 20 patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The patients received GM-CSF for 10 days and a single i.v. infusion of MAb 17-1A on day 3 of the cycle. Four cycles were given at 1-monthly intervals. There was a continuous increase in blood monocytes and lymphocytes during all 4 GM-CSF cycles. Neutrophils and eosinophils were also significantly augmented but in a biphasic manner and the cell counts on day 10 of cycle IV were significantly lower than in cycles I and II. GM-CSF-related side-effects were of no major clinical importance. During the third cycle, an immediate-type allergic reaction (ITAR) against MAb 17-1A occurred in most patients, necessitating reduction of the MAb dose as well as of the infusion rate. Two patients achieved complete remission. One patient had a minor response, and 3 other patients were considered to have stable disease > 3 months.

  18. Aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Arends, M J; Buckley, C H; Wells, M

    1998-01-01

    Early epidemiological studies of cervical neoplasia suggested a causal relation with sexual activity and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have emerged as prime suspects as venerally transmitted carcinogens. HPVs fall into two broad camps: low risk types, associated with cervical condylomas and CIN 1; and high risk types (mostly 16 and 18), found in 50-80% of CIN 2 and CIN 3 lesions, and 90% of cancers. This association with cancer is very strong, with odds ratios of > 15 (often much higher) in case-control studies that are methodologically sound. An infrequently detected third group of intermediate risk type HPVs is associated with all grades of CIN and occasionally with cancers. HPVs have also been detected in a wide range of asymptomatic controls, indicating that other events are required for development of neoplasia such as viral persistence and/or altered expression of viral genes, often following integration of the viral genome. This leaves the two major viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, directly coupled to viral enhancers and promoters, allowing their continued expression after integration. High risk HPV E7 proteins bind and inactivate the Rb protein, whereas E6 proteins bind p53 and direct its rapid degradation. A range of putative cofactors has been implicated in progression: HLA type, immunosuppression, sex steroid hormones, and smoking; most of these cofactors appear to influence progression to CIN 3. The natural history includes progression to CIN 3 in 10% of CIN 1 and 20% of CIN 2 cases, whereas at least 12% of CIN 3 cases progress to invasive carcinoma. Cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) often coexists with squamous CIN, and the premalignant potential of high grade CGIN is not in doubt, but the natural history of low grade CGIN remains uncertain. A high proportion of CGIN lesions and adenocarcinomas are HPV positive, and HPV18 has been implicated more in glandular than in squamous lesions. A strong clinical case for the application of HPV

  19. Colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. PMID:28111691

  20. Piecemeal Versus En Bloc Resection of Large Rectal Adenomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Colorectal Adenoma With Mild Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenoma With Severe Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenomatous Polyp; Colorectal Low Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Colorectal High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia

  1. Sequence of molecular genetic events in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Laurent-Puig, P; Blons, H; Cugnenc, P H

    1999-12-01

    Intensive screening for genetic alteration in colorectal cancer led to the identification of two types of colorectal tumours that are distinct by their carcinogenesis processes. The first group, named LOH (for loss of heterozygosity)-positive, is characterized by hyperploidy and allelic losses involving preferentially chromosome 18q and chromosome 17p. More than two-thirds of colorectal cancers belong to this group. The second group, called multiple microsatellite loci (MSI)-positive cancers, is characterized by genetic instability at microsatellite loci. Although colorectal cancer cells are characterized by specific microsatellite alterations, the same four different signalling pathways, WNT/Wingless pathway, K-ras pathway, transforming growth factor (TGF)beta pathway and p53 pathway, could be implicated in tumour progression. The WNT/Wingless pathway could be altered in two different ways according to whether the cancer cells belong to the group of LOH-positive or MSI-positive tumours. LOH-positive tumours activate the WNT/Wingless signalling pathway through an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation, whereas the MSI-positive tumours activate this pathway through a beta-catenin stabilizing mutation. Beta-catenin and APC mutations were observed as early as the adenomatous stage of colorectal neoplasia. In TGFbeta pathways LOH-positive tumours inactivated SMAD2 (similar to mother against decapentaplegic drosophilia) or SMAD4, whereas in MSI-positive tumours the TGFbeta type II receptor is frequently deleted. Alteration of these genes correlated closely with the progression of the adenoma to cancer. In the p53 pathway LOH-positive tumours showed frequent p53 mutation, whereas MSI-positive tumours demonstrated BAX (BCL-2-associated X protein)-inactivating mutation. These alterations contribute to the adenoma-carcinoma transition.

  2. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of a novel endoscopic fluorescence imaging modality using oral 5-aminolevulinic acid for colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruki, Eriko So; Saito, Yutaka; Abe, Seiichiro; Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Taku; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Sekine, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Five-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is being increasingly used for photodynamic diagnosis and therapy of various types of tumors including brain, urologic, and other neoplasias. The use of 5-ALA to treat Barrett’s carcinomas has been documented, but its clinical effectiveness for diagnosis of gastrointestinal tumors, particularly early cancers, remains unknown. Patients and methods: The aim of our feasibility study was to evaluate the visibility of colorectal tumors using endoscopic fluorescence imaging (EFI) after oral administration of 5-ALA. The lesions identified by direct visualization and by the spectrums produced using EFI modality with 5-ALA were compared to the clinicopathologic features of resected specimens. Results: Twenty-three patients with a total of 27 known colorectal lesions were enrolled in the study. The median tumor size was 30 mm (range 10 – 75). Eleven of the lesions were flat or depressed lesions and 16 were sessile. Red fluorescence was observed in 22 out of 27 lesions. Red fluorescence was negative in 4 out of 11 flat or depressed lesions. In comparison with histopathologic findings, the rates of red fluorescence visibility were 62.5 % in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, 77.8 % in high-grade neoplasia, and 100 % in submucosal carcinoma. Red fluorescence visibility increased with the degree of dysplasia. There were no significant adverse events identified in this study. Conclusions: This feasibility study using EFI with 5-ALA demonstrated high visibility of superficial colorectal neoplasia. EFI with 5-ALA appears to be a novel, safe technique for improving real-time colorectal tumor imaging. PMID:26793782

  3. Spontaneous neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus).

    PubMed

    Khoii, Mina K; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Burns, Roy B; Carmichael, K Paige; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

    2008-09-01

    Little information is available about diseases and pathology of species within the family Tenrecidae, including the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus), a Madagascan insectivore. This report summarizes necropsy and histopathologic findings of neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs. Although only four animals are included in this report, neoplasia seems to be a common and significant source of morbidity and mortality in greater hedgehog tenrecs. Types of neoplasia identified include a thyroid follicular-solid carcinoma, two urinary bladder transitional cell carcinomas, uterine endometrial polyps, and multicentric B-cell lymphoma. Due to small sample size, no etiology could be determined, but genetics, viral infection, pesticide treatment, nutrition, or other environmental factors might contribute to the development of neoplasia in this species. This is the first report of neoplasia in greater hedgehog tenrecs.

  4. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... inspire those touched by colorectal cancer. Watch Videos Join us on the hill Attend our annual advocacy ... We always need volunteers. Browse our opportunities. Volunteer Join the Movement We have many ways to fight ...

  5. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  6. Thyroid neoplasia in captive raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephanie L; Allender, Matthew C; Bohling, Mark; Ramsay, Edward C; Morandi, Federica; Newkirk, Kimberly M

    2010-03-01

    Two adult, spayed, female raccoons were diagnosed with thyroid neoplasia. One raccoon had a palpable, left-sided, nonfunctional thyroid adenocarcinoma which was treated with a thyroidectomy twice with local recurrence both times. After the second recurrence, pulmonary metastases were identified. A third thyroidectomy was performed, and a vascular access port was placed for administration of intravenous doxorubicin. The raccoon developed pancytopenia and became anorexic after chemotherapy, and the owner elected humane euthanasia. The second raccoon had nonpalpable, bilateral, functional follicular thyroid adenomatous hyperplasia and was treated with a right thyroidectomy and a partial left thyroidectomy, leaving behind the grossly normal portion of the left thyroid. However, the animal was still hyperthyroid after surgery and was then successfully managed with topical methimazole gel. Thyroid pathology has been documented in raccoons in Europe, but is not reported in the United States. Thyroid neoplasia in raccoons can occur as a nonfunctional adenocarcinoma, as is commonly reported in dogs, or as a functional adenoma, as is commonly reported in cats. Raccoons with adenocarcinomas should be evaluated for pulmonary metastasis. Methimazole gel may be a viable treatment option for raccoons with hyperthyroidism.

  7. Fc gamma receptor IIIa polymorphisms in advanced colorectal cancer patients correlated with response to anti-EGFR antibodies and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies have shown efficacy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). One of the mechanism is the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in which Fc region of the antibody binds to the Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) expressed by immune cells. The present study investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIa and clinical outcome in mCRC treated with anti-EGFR antibodies. Methods Seventy-four consecutive patients with mCRC were analyzed. The genotypes for FcγRIIa-131 histidine (H)/arginine (R), FcγRIIIa-158 valine (V)/phenylanaline (F) polymorphisms were evaluated by directly sequencing. Multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was performed for FcγRIIIa-158 valine (V)/phenylanaline (F). Correlations between FcγR polymorphisms, baseline patient and tumor features were studied by contingency tables and the chi-square test. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was applied to the progression-free survival (PFS) curves. Univariate analysis was performed with the log-rank test. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to analyze the effect of multiple risk factors on PFS. Results FcγRIIIa polymorphisms were significantly associated with response to anti-EGFR-based therapy in 49 patients with kras wt tumors (p=0.035). There was not association with response for FcγRIIa polymorphisms. Furthermore, obtained results suggested that prognosis is particularly unfavorable for patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158F/F genotype (median PFS V/V, V/F, F/F: 18.2 vs 17.3 vs 9.4 months). No prognostic ability was identified for FcγRIIa polymorphisms. Conclusions In mCRC patients the presence of FcγRIIIa-F can predict resistance to anti-EGFR therapy and unfavorable prognosis. PMID:23171437

  8. Adiponectin and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Otani, Kensuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an obesity-related malignancy. Adiponectin is an adipokine produced exclusively by adipose tissue, and its concentration in the serum is reduced in obesity. A low serum level of adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer. These facts suggest that the epidemiological link between obesity and cancer may have a significant association with adiponectin. Although numerous studies of colorectal cancer have been reported, the results are conflicting about the anti-cancer effect of adiponectin, and how adiponectin affects carcinogenesis or cancer development remains controversial. Because adiponectin has multiple systemic effects and exists as a high serum concentration protein, the main role of adiponectin should be regulation of homeostasis, and it would not likely act as an anti-cancerous hormone. However, as epidemiological evidence shows, a low adiponectin level may be a basic risk factor for colorectal cancer. We speculate that when the colonic epithelium is stimulated or damaged by another carcinogen under the condition of a low adiponectin level, carcinogenesis is promoted and cancer development is facilitated. In this report, we summarize recent findings of the correlation between adiponectin and colorectal cancer and investigate the effect of adiponectin on colorectal cancer.

  9. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  10. Altered tissue metabolites correlate with microbial dysbiosis in colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Julia L; McCoy, Amber N; Addamo, Cassandra J; Jia, Wei; Sandler, Robert S; Keku, Temitope O

    2014-04-04

    Several studies have linked bacterial dysbiosis with elevated risk of colorectal adenomas and cancer. However, the functional implications of gut dysbiosis remain unclear. Gut bacteria contribute to nutrient metabolism and produce small molecules termed the "metabolome", which may contribute to the development of neoplasia in the large bowel. We assessed the metabolome in normal rectal mucosal biopsies of 15 subjects with colorectal adenomas and 15 nonadenoma controls by liquid chromatography and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure abundances of specific bacterial taxa. We identified a total of 274 metabolites. Discriminant analysis suggested a separation of metabolomic profiles between adenoma cases and nonadenoma controls. Twenty-three metabolites contributed to the separation, notably an increase in adenoma cases of the inflammatory metabolite prostaglandin E2 and a decrease in antioxidant-related metabolites 5-oxoproline and diketogulonic acid. Pathway analysis suggested that differential metabolites were significantly related to cancer, inflammatory response, carbohydrate metabolism, and GI disease pathways. Abundances of six bacterial taxa assayed were increased in cases. The 23 differential metabolites demonstrated correlations with bacteria that were different between cases and controls. These findings suggest that metabolic products of bacteria may be responsible for the development of colorectal adenomas and CRC.

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  12. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  13. High Resolution Microendoscopy for Quantitative Diagnosis of Esophageal Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongsuk

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the esophagus account for 3.8% of all cases of cancers, with approximately 482,300 new cases reported in 2008 worldwide. In the United States alone, it is estimated that approximately 18,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 2013, and 15,210 deaths are expected. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation therapy, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often at an advanced and incurable stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective methods for early detection of esophageal neoplasia are needed. Here, quantitative classification algorithms for high resolution miscroendoscopic images were developed to distinguish between esophageal neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. A clinical study in 177 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the classification algorithm in collaboration with the Mount Sinai Medical Center in the United States, the First Hospital of Jilin University in China, and the Cancer Institute and Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science in China. The study reported a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 92%, respectively, in the training set, 87% and 97%, respectively, in the test set, and 84% and 95%, respectively, in an independent validation set. Another clinical study in 31 patients with Barrett's esophagus resulted in a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85%. Finally, a compact, portable version of the high resolution microendoscopy (HRME) device using a consumer-grade camera was developed and a series of biomedical experimental studies were carried out to assess the capability of the device.

  14. Intermittent chemotherapy plus either intermittent or continuous cetuximab for first-line treatment of patients with KRAS wild-type advanced colorectal cancer (COIN-B): a randomised phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Wasan, Harpreet; Meade, Angela M; Adams, Richard; Wilson, Richard; Pugh, Cheryl; Fisher, David; Sydes, Benjamin; Madi, Ayman; Sizer, Bruce; Lowdell, Charles; Middleton, Gary; Butler, Rachel; Kaplan, Richard; Maughan, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Advanced colorectal cancer is treated with a combination of cytotoxic drugs and targeted treatments. However, how best to minimise the time spent taking cytotoxic drugs and whether molecular selection can refine this further is unknown. The primary aim of this study was to establish how cetuximab might be safely and effectively added to intermittent chemotherapy. Methods COIN-B was an open-label, multicentre, randomised, exploratory phase 2 trial done at 30 hospitals in the UK and one in Cyprus. We enrolled patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had received no previous chemotherapy for metastases. Randomisation was done centrally (by telephone) by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit using minimisation with a random element. Treatment allocation was not masked. Patients were assigned (1:1) to intermittent chemotherapy plus intermittent cetuximab or to intermittent chemotherapy plus continuous cetuximab. Chemotherapy was FOLFOX (folinic acid and oxaliplatin followed by bolus and infused fluorouracil). Patients in both groups received FOLFOX and weekly cetuximab for 12 weeks, then either had a planned interruption (those taking intermittent cetuximab) or planned maintenance by continuing on weekly cetuximab (continuous cetuximab). On RECIST progression, FOLFOX plus cetuximab or FOLFOX was recommenced for 12 weeks followed by further interruption or maintenance cetuximab, respectively. The primary outcome was failure-free survival at 10 months. The primary analysis population consisted of patients who completed 12 weeks of treatment without progression, death, or leaving the trial. We tested BRAF and NRAS status retrospectively. The trial was registered, ISRCTN38375681. Findings We registered 401 patients, 226 of whom were enrolled. Results for 169 with KRAS wild-type are reported here, 78 (46%) assigned to intermittent cetuximab and 91 (54%) to continuous cetuximab. 64 patients assigned to intermittent cetuximab and 66 of those

  15. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; Leite, Marieli F. M.; Trujillo, Jose R.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors, especially in Gynecology. The photodynamic reaction is based on the production of reactive oxygen species after the activation of a photosensitizer. Advantages of the PDT in comparison to the surgical resection are: ambulatory treatment and tissue recovery highly satisfactory, through a non-invasive procedure. The cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I and II presents potential indications for PDT. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PDT for the diagnostics and treatment of CIN I and II. The equipment and the photosensitizer are produced in Brazil with a representative low cost. It is possible to visualize the fluorescence of the cervix and to treat the lesions, without side effects. The proposed clinical protocol shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  16. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook; B.C.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues - spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  17. Carbon dioxide laser management cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, J.H.; Wright, V.C.; Voros, J.I.; Riopelle, M.A.; Hohenschutz, V.

    1981-12-01

    In this report we describe the use of the carbon dioxide laser for the outpatient management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A comparison of treatment effectiveness for different grades of CIN is also included. Two hundred fifty-six cases were evaluated by colposcopy, cytology, and histopathology, treated by at least 5 to 6 mm of laser vaporization, and followed up for an average of 10.7 months. Follow-up examinations included cytology, colposcopy, and directed biopsy if a suspicious lesion was discovered. During the follow-up, 18 cases of persistent CIN were identified (7.0%). Most of these were successfully managed with repeat laser treatment. Overall success of laser surgery for CIN, one or two applications, was 97.6%. Few complications were encountered. Laser surgery appears to offer acceptable treatment effectiveness, early identification of persistent disease, and easy retreatment when required. (Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 141:828, 1981.)

  18. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook, B.C.; Casarett, G.W.; Deye, J.A.; Adoff, L.M.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues--spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), or 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed any neoplasms. Seven dogs receiving fast neutrons have developed 9 neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  19. Ablation of neoplasia by direct current.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T V; Engler, P; Pullan, B R; Holt, S

    1994-08-01

    The application of low-voltage direct electrical current (DEC) has been studied in animals and humans for the ablation of anal condylomata, oesophageal cancer and Kaposi's sarcoma. Twenty milliamps of DEC passed through multiple 6 cm x 1 cm, flat-plate longitudinal electrodes into the squamous mucosa of the oesophagus of healthy dogs for periods ranging from 10 min to 2 h resulted in denudation and necrosis of the oesophageal mucosa at the site of application of the current. In humans, the application of DEC to two patients with benign anal condyloma acuminata, three patients with inoperable obstructing oesophageal cancer and one patient with disseminated Kaposi sarcoma resulted in striking necrosis of tumour tissue that was confirmed by macroscopic and microscopic studies. These initial findings imply promising therapeutic potential for the use of DEC as a simple, effective, safe, low-cost alternative for ablation of neoplasia.

  20. Immunoscore encompassing CD3+ and CD8+ T cell densities in distant metastasis is a robust prognostic marker for advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoonjin; Koh, Jiwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background The immunoscore (IS), an index based on the density of CD3+ and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the tumor center (CT) and invasive margin (IM), has gained considerable attention as a prognostic marker. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have also been reported to have prognostic value. However, its clinical significance has not been fully clarified in patients with advanced CRC who present with distant metastases. Methods The density of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, FOXP3+, CD68+, and CD163+ immune cells within CRC tissue procured from three sites–the primary CT, IM, and distant metastasis (DM)–was determined using immunohistochemistry and digital image analyzer (n=196). The IS was obtained by quantifying the densities of CD3+ and CD8+ TILs in the CT and IM. IS-metastatic and IS-macrophage–additional IS models designed in this study–were obtained by adding the score of CD3 and CD8 in DM and the score of CD163 in primary tumors (CT and IM), respectively, to the IS. Result Higher IS, IS-metastatic, and IS-macrophage values were significantly correlated with better prognosis (p=0.020, p≤0.001, and p=0.005, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that only IS-metastatic was an independent prognostic marker (p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between KRAS mutation and three IS models. However, in the subgroup analysis, IS-metastatic showed a prognostic association regardless of the KRAS mutational status. Conclusion IS is a reproducible method for predicting the survival of patients with advanced CRC. Additionally, an IS including the CD3+ and CD8+ TIL densities at DM could be a strong prognostic marker for advanced CRC. PMID:27835889

  1. Factors predicting efficacy of oxaliplatin in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ± folinic acid in a compassionate-use cohort of 481 5-FU-resistant advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bensmaïne, M A; Marty, M; Gramont, A de; Brienza, S; Lévi, F; Ducreux, M; François, E; Gamelin, E; Bleiberg, H; Cvitkovic, E

    2001-01-01

    A statistical analysis was performed on the patient data collected from two compassionate-use programmes using oxaliplatin (Eloxatin®) + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ± folinic acid (FA), to identify predictive factors for oxaliplatin-based salvage treatment in patients with 5-FU-resistant advanced colorectal cancer (ACRC). 481 5-FU-resistant ACRC patients, most with performance status ≤ 2, ≥ 3 involved sites, and ≥ 2 prior lines of chemotherapy, received oxaliplatin + 5-FU ± FA. Prognostic factors associated with overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic and/or Cox proportional hazards analyses. The ORR was 16% (95% CI: 13–20), the median TTP was 4.2 months (95% CI: 3.4–4.6), and the median OS was 9.6 months (95% CI: 8.6–10.6). The multivariate analysis indicated poor (≥ 2 WHO) performance status (PS), a large number of prior chemotherapy regimens (≥ 3), a low baseline haemoglobin level (< 10 g/dl), and a triweekly (vs biweekly) treatment administration schedule as significantly associated (P< 0.05) with a lower ORR. Sex (male), number of organs involved (≥3) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) level (≥ 2 × the upper limit of normal) were associated (P< 0.05) with shorter TTP. Poor PS, a large number of organs involved, and elevated AP were independently and significantly correlated with shorter OS. Our analysis identified a relationship between efficacy results of oxaliplatin + 5-FU ± FA treatment in 5-FU-resistant ACRC patients and baseline prognostic factors related to PS, extent of disease and number of prior regimens. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506488

  2. Long noncoding RNA CRNDE functions as a competing endogenous RNA to promote metastasis and oxaliplatin resistance by sponging miR-136 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongyan; Song, Xiaodi; Kang, Ting; Yan, Baohong; Feng, Li; Gao, Li; Ai, Liang; Liu, Xiaoni; Yu, Jie; Li, Huiqi

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE) is a novel gene recognized as a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is highly elevated in colorectal cancer and many other solid tumors but its functions on metastasis and oxaliplatin (OXA) resistance are unknown. In our study, we confirmed the upregulation of CRNDE in both primary specimens from colorectal cancer patients and colorectal cancer cell lines. Knockdown of CRNDE expression inhibited the migration and invasion potency of colorectal cancer cells with no effect on cell apoptosis. Overexpression of CRNDE promoted the migration and invasion potency of colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that CRNDE conferred chemoresistance in colorectal cancer cells. Knockdown of CRNDE with OXA treatment decreased cell viability and promoted DNA damage and cell apoptosis, while the overexpression of CRNDE with OXA treatment reduced DNA damage and cell apoptosis. Further in-depth mechanistic studies revealed that CRNDE functioned as a competing endogenous RNA for miR-136, led to the de-repression of its endogenous target, E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1). Overall, our findings demonstrate that CRNDE functions as a competing endogenous RNA to promote metastasis and OXA resistance by sponging miR-136 in colorectal cancer. PMID:28115855

  3. In vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by multimodal colposcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Qu, Yingjie; Pei, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Linlin; Zhang, Shiwu; Chang, Shufang; Smith, Zachary J.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for women in developing countries. Colposcopy plays an important role in early screening and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In this paper, we developed a multimodal colposcopy system that combines multispectral reflectance, autofluorescence, and RGB imaging for in vivo detection of CIN, which is capable of dynamically recording multimodal data of the same region of interest (ROI). We studied the optical properties of cervical tissue to determine multi-wavelengths for different imaging modalities. Advanced algorithms based on the second derivative spectrum and the fluorescence intensity were developed to differentiate cervical tissue into two categories: squamous normal (SN) and high grade (HG) dysplasia. In the results, the kinetics of cervical reflectance and autofluorescence characteristics pre and post acetic acid application were observed and analyzed, and the image segmentation revealed good consistency with the gold standard of histopathology. Our pilot study demonstrated the clinical potential of this multimodal colposcopic system for in vivo detection of cervical cancer.

  4. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after polypectomy: a consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Sidney J; Zauber, Ann G; Fletcher, Robert H; Stillman, Jonathon S; O'brien, Michael J; Levin, Bernard; Smith, Robert A; Lieberman, David A; Burt, Randall W; Levin, Theodore R; Bond, John H; Brooks, Durado; Byers, Tim; Hyman, Neil; Kirk, Lynne; Thorson, Alan; Simmang, Clifford; Johnson, David; Rex, Douglas K

    2006-01-01

    Adenomatous polyps are the most common neoplastic findings uncovered in people who undergo colorectal screening or have a diagnostic workup for symptoms. It was common practice in the 1970s for these patients to have annual follow-up surveillance examinations to detect additional new adenomas as well as missed synchronous adenomas. As a result of the National Polyp Study report in 1993, which demonstrated clearly in a randomized design that the first postpolypectomy examination could be deferred for 3 years, guidelines published by a gastrointestinal consortium in 1997 recommended that the first follow-up surveillance be 3 years after polypectomy for most patients. In 2003, these guidelines were updated, colonoscopy was recommended as the only follow-up examination, and stratification at baseline into lower and higher risk for subsequent adenomas was suggested. The 1997 and 2003 guidelines dealt with both screening and surveillance. However, it has become increasingly clear that postpolypectomy surveillance is now a large part of endoscopic practice, draining resources from screening and diagnosis. In addition, surveys have demonstrated that a large proportion of endoscopists are conducting surveillance examinations at shorter intervals than recommended in the guidelines. In the present paper, a careful analytic approach was designed addressing all evidence available in the literature to delineate predictors of advanced pathology, both cancer and advanced adenomas, so that patients can be more definitely stratified at their baseline colonoscopy into those at lower or increased risk for a subsequent advanced neoplasia. People at increased risk have either three or more adenomas, or high-grade dysplasia, or villous features, or an adenoma > or =1 cm in size. It is recommended that they have a 3-year follow-up colonoscopy. People at lower risk who have one or two small (< 1 cm) tubular adenomas with no high-grade dysplasia can have a follow-up in 5 to 10 years

  5. Obesity and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Nimptsch, Katharina; Pischon, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the association of obesity with risk of colorectal cancer and the potential underlying mechanisms from an epidemiological perspective. Current research indicates that there is a moderate but consistently reported association between general obesity (as determined by BMI) and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. The relative risk associated with obesity is higher for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum and it is higher in men than in women. By contrast, abdominal adiposity (as determined by waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio) is similarly strongly associated with colon cancer in men and women, suggesting that abdominal adiposity is a more important risk factor for colon cancer than general adiposity, at least in women. Putative mechanisms that may account for the link between adiposity and colorectal cancer risk include hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, altered immune response, oxidative stress, as well as disturbances in insulin-like growth factors, adipokines, and sex steroids. Understanding the link between obesity and colorectal cancer may pave the way for targeted prevention of colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality.

  6. Screening for pancreatic neoplasia in high-risk individuals: who, what, when, how?

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2005-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease. Most symptomatic, clinically detected PCs are advanced and not curable. Indeed, the estimated 5-year survival rate is 4%, which is attributable to late diagnosis and low resection rate. Screening of high-risk individuals and early detection of small PCs and precursor lesions might improve the outcome if curative therapy could be offered in the presymptomatic stage. This article summarizes the available published data and preliminary results and discusses the different approaches to screening for pancreatic neoplasia at 2 university-based programs in the United States.

  7. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  8. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955). PMID:22280244

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of fecal immunochemical test in average- and familial-risk colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Inés; Hernandez, Vicent; González-Mao, Carmen; Rivera, Concepción; Iglesias, Felipe; Alves, María Teresa; Cid, Lucía; Soto, Santiago; De-Castro, Luisa; Vega, Pablo; Hermo, Jose Antonio; Macenlle, Ramiro; Martínez, Alfonso; Estevez, Pamela; Cid, Estela; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Portillo, Isabel; Bujanda, Luis; Fernández-Seara, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background There is little information about the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in familial-risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Objectives The objective of this article is to investigate whether FIT diagnostic accuracy for advanced neoplasia (AN) differs between average and familial-risk (first-degree relative) patients. Methods A total of 1317 consecutive participants (595 familial) who collected one stool sample before performing a colonoscopy as a CRC screening test were included. FIT diagnostic accuracy for AN was evaluated with Chi-square test at a 20 µg hemoglobin/g of feces cut-off value. Finally, we determined which variables were independently related to AN. Results An AN was found in 151 (11.5%) patients. The overall accuracy was not statistically different between both cohorts for AN (88.4%, 91.7%; p = 0.051). At the cut-off stablished, differences in FIT sensitivity (31.1%, 40.6%; p = 0.2) or specificity (96.5%, 97.3%; p = 0.1) were not statistically significant. Finally, independent variables such as sex (male) (odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–3.1), age (50–65, >65 years) (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.3; OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.1), previous colonoscopy (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.9) and FIT ≥20 µg/g feces (OR 17.7, 95% CI 10.8–29.1) were associated with AN diagnosis. Conclusions FIT accuracy for AN detection is equivalent in average and familial-risk CRC screening cohorts. PMID:25452848

  10. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy.

  11. Genetic variability in EGFR, Src and HER2 and risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Elizabeth M; Curtin, Karen; Hsu, Li; Kulmacz, Richard J; Duggan, David J; Makar, Karen W; Xiao, Liren; Carlson, Christopher S; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2011-01-01

    The EGFR signaling pathway is involved in carcinogenesis at multiple sites, particularly colorectal cancer, and is a target of colorectal cancer chemotherapy. EGFR signaling is linked to pro-carcinogenic mechanisms, including cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and more recently prostaglandin synthesis. Genetic variability in this pathway has not yet been studied in relation to colorectal carcinogenesis. In three case-control studies of colorectal adenoma (n=485 cases/578 controls), colon cancer (n=1424 cases/1780 controls) and rectal cancer (n=583 cases/775 controls), we investigated associations between candidate SNPs, tagSNPs and haplotypes in EGFR signaling (EGFR, Src, and HER2) and risk. We also examined associations with tumor subtypes: TP53 and KRAS2 mutations, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. All three studies were genotyped using an identical Illumina GoldenGate assay, allowing thorough investigation of genetic variability across stages and locations of colorectal neoplasia. The EGFR tagSNP 142572T>C (rs3752651) CC genotype was associated with a suggested increased risk for both colon (OR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.00-1.96; p-trend=0.04) and rectal cancer (OR: 1.39; 95% CI: 0.81-2.41; p-trend=0.65). In tumor subtype analyses, the association was limited to TP53-mutated colon tumors. Using the Chatterjee 1 df Tukey test to assess gene-gene interactions, we observed a statistically significant (p<0.01) interaction between SNPs in EGFR and Src for colorectal adenoma risk. The association with EGFR 142572 should be investigated in additional studies and the significant gene-gene interaction between EGFR and Src in relation to adenoma risk suggests that these two genes are jointly affecting early stages in colorectal carcinogenesis and requires further follow-up. PMID:22199994

  12. Genetic variation in UGT genes modify the associations of NSAIDs with risk of colorectal cancer: colon cancer family registry.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Dominique; Koepl, Lisel M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Balavarca, Yesilda; Xiao, Liren; Baron, John A; Hsu, Li; Coghill, Anna E; Campbell, Peter T; Kleinstein, Sarah E; Figueiredo, Jane C; Lampe, Johanna W; Buck, Katharina; Potter, John D; Kulmacz, Richard J; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung K; Newcomb, Polly A; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-01

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with reduced risk of colorectal neoplasia. Previous studies have reported that polymorphisms in NSAID-metabolizing enzymes central to NSAID metabolism including UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 may modify this protective effect. We investigated whether 35 functionally relevant polymorphisms within CYP2C9 and UGT genes were associated with colorectal cancer risk or modified the protective effect of NSAIDs on colorectal cancer susceptibility, using 1,584 colorectal cancer cases and 2,516 unaffected sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. A three-SNP genotype in UGT1A6 (G-A-A; Ala7-Thr181-Arg184) and the Asp85 variant in UGT2B15 increased the risk of colorectal cancer (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.04-14.45 and OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.10-1.63, respectively). We observed interactions between UGT1A3 Thr78Thr (A>G) and NSAID use (P-interaction = 0.02), a three-SNP genotype within UGT2B4 and ibuprofen use (P-interaction = 0.0018), as well as UGT2B15 Tyr85Asp (T>G) and aspirin use (P-interaction = 0.01). The interaction with the UGT2B4 and the UGT2B15 polymorphisms were noteworthy at the 25% FDR level. This study highlights the need for further pharmacogenetic studies to identify individuals who might benefit from NSAID use as part of developing effective strategies for prevention of colorectal neoplasia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  14. Linkage to chromosome 2q32.2-q33.3 in familial serrated neoplasia (Jass syndrome).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aedan; Nancarrow, Derek; Clendenning, Mark; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Duggan, David; Taverna, Darin; McKeone, Diane; Walters, Rhiannon; Walsh, Michael D; Young, Bruce W; Jass, Jeremy R; Rosty, Christophe; Gattas, Michael; Pelzer, Elise; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jill; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Parry, Susan; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Tucker, Kathy; Muir, Amanda; Drini, Musa; Macrae, Finlay; Newcomb, Polly; Potter, John D; Pavluk, Erika; Lindblom, Annika; Young, Joanne P

    2011-06-01

    Causative genetic variants have to date been identified for only a small proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC). While conditions such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Lynch syndrome have well defined genetic causes, the search for variants underlying the remainder of familial CRC is plagued by genetic heterogeneity. The recent identification of families with a heritable predisposition to malignancies arising through the serrated pathway (familial serrated neoplasia or Jass syndrome) provides an opportunity to study a subset of familial CRC in which heterogeneity may be greatly reduced. A genome-wide linkage screen was performed on a large family displaying a dominantly-inherited predisposition to serrated neoplasia genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10 K SNP Array. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were performed and resulting regions of interest, as well as previously reported CRC susceptibility loci at 3q22, 7q31 and 9q22, were followed up by finemapping in 10 serrated neoplasia families. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed regions of interest at 2p25.2-p25.1, 2q24.3-q37.1 and 8p21.2-q12.1. Finemapping linkage and haplotype analyses identified 2q32.2-q33.3 as the region most likely to harbour linkage, with heterogeneity logarithm of the odds (HLOD) 2.09 and nonparametric linkage (NPL) score 2.36 (P = 0.004). Five primary candidate genes (CFLAR, CASP10, CASP8, FZD7 and BMPR2) were sequenced and no segregating variants identified. There was no evidence of linkage to previously reported loci on chromosomes 3, 7 and 9.

  15. Characteristics of and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in young adults in a screening population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Jo, Hee Bum; Kwack, Won Gun; Jeong, Yun Jin; Yoon, Yeo-Jin; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate prevalence and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in adults aged < 50 years, for whom screening is not recommended. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared prevalence and characteristics of colorectal and advanced adenomas in patients aged < 50 years who underwent colonoscopy screening with subjects aged ≥ 50 years. To evaluate risk factors for colorectal and advanced adenoma in young adults, we used multivariable logistic regression models. Colorectal neoplasm characteristics were evaluated and compared with those in older patients. RESULTS: Among 2819 patients included, prevalences of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma were 19.7% and 1.5%, respectively. As patient age increased, so did the prevalence of colorectal neoplasm. However, prevalence of advanced adenoma did not differ between age-groups 45-49 years and ≥ 50 years (OR = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.17-1.07, P = 0.070). In younger age-group (< 50 years), colorectal adenoma was significantly associated with older age, waist circumference (OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.15-2.55, P = 0.008), and current smoking (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.07-2.41, P = 0.023). Alcohol consumption was an independent risk factor for colorectal advanced adenoma (OR = 3.69, 95%CI: 1.08-12.54, P = 0.037). Multiple neoplasms and large neoplasms (≥ 1 cm) were more prevalent in subjects ≥ 50 years. CONCLUSION: Current screening strategies for colorectal cancer may need to be amended to account for patient age, especially in young subjects with abdominal obesity, current smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:26973394

  16. Relationship of ECL cells and gastric neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, H. L.; Brenna, E.; Sandvik, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell in the oxyntic mucosa has a key role in the regulation of gastric secretion since it synthesizes and releases the histamine regulating the acid secretion from the parietal cell. Gastrin is the main regulator of the ECL cell function and growth. Long-term hypergastrinemia induces ECL cell hyperplasia, and if continued, neoplasia. ECL cell carcinoids occur in man after long-term hypergastrinemia in conditions like pernicious anemia and gastrinoma. There is also accumulating evidence that a proportion of gastric carcinomas of the diffuse type is derived from the ECL cell. Furthermore, the ECL cell may, by producing substances with angiogenic effects (histamine and basic fibroblast growth factor), be particularly prone to develop malignant tumors. Although the general opinion is that gastrin itself has a direct effect on the oxyntic mucosal stem cell, it cannot be excluded that the general trophic effect of gastrin on the oxyntic mucosa is mediated by histamine or other substances from the ECL cell, and that the ECL cell, therefore, could play a role also in the tumorigenesis/carcinogenesis of gastric carcinomas of intestinal type. PMID:10461363

  17. Pheochromocytomas in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Tacon, Lyndal J; Learoyd, Diana L; Robinson, Bruce G

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PC) is a neuroendocrine tumor that originates from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. The production of catecholamines, including epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, may lead to haemodynamic instability. Over 30% of PCs are associated with germline mutations, including re-arranged in transfection (RET) mutations seen in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) syndromes. Around 40% of individuals with MEN2 develop PC, though it is rarely the presenting feature. Compared to sporadic PC, MEN2-associated PC is more likely to be epinephine secreting and demonstrate bilateral adrenal involvement, and is less likely to be malignant. The diagnosis of PC requires clinical suspicion and biochemical testing, followed by imaging studies. Novel nuclear medicine modalities, including FDG positron emission tomography (PET) and 68Ga DOTATATE PET have added to the conventional techniques of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanindine (MIBG) scintigraphy, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment of PC is surgical and requires peri-operative alpha and, frequently, beta blockade. Novel surgical techniques, such as adrenal sparing surgery and a laparoscopic approach, have decreased peri-operative morbidity. Surveillance for PC is life long, due to the risk of metastatic disease.

  18. Optical coherence tomography in vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Ronni; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Boven, Hester H.; Vincent, Andrew D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Beurden, Marc; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2012-11-01

    Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC) is a gynecological cancer with an incidence of two to three per 100,000 women. VSCC arises from vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), which is diagnosed through painful punch biopsy. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to differentiate between normal and VIN tissue. We hypothesize that (a) epidermal layer thickness measured in OCT images is different in normal tissue and VIN, and (b) quantitative analysis of the attenuation coefficient (μoct) extracted from OCT data differentiates VIN from normal vulvar tissue. Twenty lesions from 16 patients are imaged with OCT. Directly after data acquisition, a biopsy is performed. Epidermal thickness is measured and values of μoct are extracted from 200 OCT scans of normal and VIN tissue. For both methods, statistical analysis is performed using Paired Mann-Whitney-test. Correlation between the two methods is tested using a Spearman-correlation test. Both epidermal layer thickness as well as the μoct are different between normal vulvar tissue and VIN lesions (p<0.0001). Moreover, no correlation is found between the epidermal layer thickness and μoct. This study demonstrates that both the epidermal thickness and the attenuation coefficient of vulvar epithelial tissue containing VIN are different from that of normal vulvar tissue.

  19. Histologic classification of penile intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Elsa F; Chaux, Alcides; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2012-05-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and their corresponding precancerous lesions can be classified in 2 major groups: human papillomavirus (HPV) related and HPV unrelated. In the former (warty and basaloid SCC), there is a predominance of undifferentiated basaloid cells. In the latter (eg, usual, papillary, and verrucous SCC), the predominant cell is larger with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Based on these morphologic features, a new term, "penile intraepithelial neoplasia" (PeIN), was proposed. PeIN was further subclassified into differentiated and undifferentiated, with the latter being subdivided into basaloid, warty, and warty-basaloid subtypes. Macroscopically, PeIN subtypes are indistinguishable. Microscopically, differentiated PeIN is characterized by acanthosis, parakeratosis, enlarged keratinocytes with abundant "pink" cytoplasm (abnormal maturation), and hyperchromatic cells in the basal layer. In basaloid PeIN the epithelium is replaced by a monotonous population of uniform, small, round, and basophilic cells. Warty PeIN is characterized by a spiky surface, prominent atypical parakeratosis, and pleomorphic koilocytosis. Warty-basaloid PeIN show features of both warty and basaloid PeIN. There is a significant association of subtypes of PeIN with specific variants of invasive SCCs. This is a simple and reproducible nomenclature for penile precancerous lesions based on cell type and differentiation. It takes into account the similarities between vulvar and penile pathology and the hypothesis of a bimodal pathway of penile cancer progression.

  20. [Indications for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vanhaelen, C

    2001-09-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer is undergoing serious transformation. Surgical techniques have evolved, the role of adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy has been confirmed as an essential part of the current treatment of these cancer and new drugs, established in advanced disease are now being introduced in combination schemes of promise in both palliative and adjuvant chemotherapy.

  1. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  2. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: A review of diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joseph R; Siekas, Lacey L; Kaz, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a premalignant lesion of the anal mucosa that is a precursor to anal cancer. Although anal cancer is relatively uncommon, rates of this malignancy are steadily rising in the United States, and among certain high risk populations the incidence of anal cancer may exceed that of colon cancer. Risk factors for AIN and anal cancer consist of clinical factors and behaviors that are associated with the acquisition and persistence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The strongest HPV-associated risk factors are HIV infection, receptive anal intercourse, and high risk sexual behavior. A history of HPV-mediated genital cancer, which suggests infection with an oncogenic HPV strain, is another risk factor for AIN/anal cancer. Because progression of AIN to anal cancer is known to occur in some individuals over several years, screening for AIN and early anal cancer, as well as treatment of advanced AIN lesions, is reasonable in certain high-risk populations. Although randomized controlled trials evaluating screening and treatment outcomes are lacking, experts support routine screening for AIN in high risk populations. Screening is performed using anal cytological exams, similar to those performed in cervical cancer screening programs, along with direct tissue evaluation and biopsy via high resolution anoscopy. AIN can be treated using topical therapies such as imiquimod, 5-flurouracil, and trichloroacetic acid, as well as ablative therapies such as electrocautery and laser therapy. Reductions in AIN and anal cancer rates have been shown in studies where high-risk populations were vaccinated against the oncogenic strains of HPV. Currently, the CDC recommends both high-risk and average-risk populations be vaccinated against HPV infection using the quadrivalent or nonavalent vaccines. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with AIN and the role of HPV vaccination, particularly in high risk populations. PMID:28255426

  3. KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kostakis, Ioannis D; Agrogiannis, George; Vaiopoulos, Aristeidis G; Mylona, Eleni; Patsouris, Efstratios; Kouraklis, Gregory; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Kisspeptins, the products of the KISS1 gene, are involved in cancer invasion, migration, metastasis and angiogenesis, while they induce apoptosis in various cancers. Herein, we studied KISS1 expression in colorectal cancer. We analyzed KISS1 expression using immunohistochemistry and image analysis in normal and malignant tissue samples from 60 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. The results correlated with various clinicopathological parameters. The expression of KISS1 was much higher in normal than in malignant colonic mucosa. However, among malignant tissues, KISS1 expression was higher in larger tumors (>4 cm) than in smaller ones (≤4 cm) and in stages III and IV than in stages I and II. In addition, it was higher in patients with lymph node metastases. Moreover, KISS1 levels in the normal mucosa and their difference from those in the malignant mucosa were higher in the right part of the large intestine than in the left one. KISS1 expression is reduced during the malignant transformation of the colonic mucosa and there is a difference in the expression pattern between the right and the left part of the large intestine. However, larger and advanced colorectal tumors express higher KISS1 levels than smaller and localized ones.

  4. Thymidylate synthase polymorphisms, folate and B-vitamin intake, and risk of colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, R A; Liu, J-F; Sellick, G S; Logan, R F A; Houlston, R S; Muir, K R

    2007-01-01

    The effects of polymorphisms in genes coding for key folate metabolism enzymes such as thymidylate synthetase (TS) on colorectal neoplasia risk are likely to be influenced by gene–gene and gene–nutrient interactions. We investigated the combined effects of three polymorphisms in the TS gene region, TSER, TS 3R G>C, and TS 1494del6, dietary intakes of folate and other B vitamins, and genotype for other folate metabolism variants, in a colorectal adenoma (CRA) case–control study. Individuals homozygous for TS 1494del6 del/del were at significantly reduced CRA risk compared to those with either ins/del or ins/ins genotypes (odds ratio 0.52; 95% confidence interval: 0.31–0.85, P=0.009). We also observed evidence of interactions between TS 1494del6 genotype and intake of folate, and vitamins B6 and B12, and MTHFR C677T genotype, with the reduction in risk in del/del homozygotes being largely confined to individuals with high nutrient intakes and MTHFR 677CC genotype (Pinteraction=0.01, 0.006, 0.03, and 0.07, respectively). TSER genotype, when considered either alone or in combination with TS 3R G>C genotype, did not significantly influence CRA risk. These findings support a role for TS in colorectal carcinogenesis, and provide further evidence that functional polymorphisms in folate metabolism genes act as low-risk alleles for colorectal neoplasia and participate in complex gene–gene and gene–nutrient interactions. PMID:17971770

  5. [Heredity in renal and prostatic neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Prayer Galetti, T; D'Arrigo, L; De Zorzi, L; Patarnello, T

    1997-09-01

    There is an ever growing report of data supporting the evidence that accumulated genetic changes underlie the development of neoplasia. The paradigma of this multistep process is colon cancer were cancer onset is associated, over decades, with at least seven genetic events. The number of genetic alterations increases moving from adenomatous lesions to colon cancer and, although the genetic alterations occur according to a preferred sequence, the total accumulation of changes rather than their sequential order is responsible of tumor biological behavior. It is noteworthy that, at least for this neoplasia, carcinogenesis appears to arise as a result of the mutational activation of oncogenes coupled with the mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In some cases mutant suppressor genes appear to exert a phenotypic effect even when present in the heterozygous state thus been non "recessive" at the cellular level. The general features of this model may apply also to renal cell cancer (RCC) and prostate cancer (CaP). Extensive literature exists on the cytogenetic and molecular findings in RCC. Only 2% of RCC are familiar, but molecular genetic studies of these cancers have provided important informations on RCC pathogenesis. As with other cancers, familiar RCC is characterized by an early age of onset and frequent multicentricity. A pathological classification useful in studying these patients subdivide renal cancers in papillary (pRCC) and non papillary (RCC) neoplasms. The most common cause of inherited RCC is the Von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by retinal and cerebellar hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic cysts and RCC. Over 70% of these patients will develop an RCC by their sixth decade. In 1993 the isolation of the tumor suppressor gene in VHL disease at the level of chromosome 3p25-p26 have lead to a better understanding of RCC. Most missense mutations are associated with high risk of

  6. [Prophylactic thyroidectomy in multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marijuán, V; León, S; Moreno, F; Carles, C; Roca, A; García-Sala, C; Ponce, J L

    2009-10-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2a consists on medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism. The identification of the RET proto-oncogene in 1993 has changed the prognosis of the disease. We have retrospectively studied the patients diagnosed of MEN 2a in our centre for the last 7 years in order to establish the most adequate age to undergo surgery. We present ten patients diagnosed with MEN 2a, whose ages ranged from 1.5 to 11 years old. Mean age at time of operation: 6,4 years An ultrasound study, calcitonin determinations and cathecholamines and urinary metanephrine levels were obtained before surgery. The surgical treatment is based on total total thyroidectomy, in selected cases lymph node resection in the central zone lf the neck. The most frequent RET mutation is the one affecting codon 634 (exon 10), which was found in children. Both of them had an alteration in codon 611 (exon11). No complications appeared after surgery and hospital discharge took place in the 2nd-4th day after surgery. Pathological findings were medullary thyroid microcarcinoma (MTMC) in 3 out of 10 patients, calcitonin preoperative tests were high in one of them. No tumoral cells were found in the lymph nodes. During the follow up period, 9 out of 10 from the operated patients, maintained normal calcitonin, CEA, PTH, calcium, cathecholamines and urinary metanephrine levels. Since there are 3 cases of MTC in patients between 3 and 6 years old, and diagnostic test data are not conclusive, we thoroughly recommend prophyilactic thyroidectomy at early ages, from 3 to 4 years old.

  7. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  8. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  9. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  10. Nutrigenetics in cancer research--folate metabolism and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2005-11-01

    The B vitamin folate is essential for one-carbon transfer reactions, including those related to the methylation of DNA or other substrates and nucleotide synthesis. Epidemiologic and experimental studies implicate low-folate intakes in elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia and suggest that biologic mechanisms underlying this relation include disturbances in DNA methylation patterns or adverse effects on DNA synthesis and repair. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, a vast amount of data on inherited genetic variability has become available. This genetic information can be used in studies of molecular epidemiology to provide information on multiple aspects of folate metabolism. First, studies linking polymorphisms in folate metabolism to an altered risk of cancer provide evidence for a causal link between this pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Second, studies on genetic characteristics can help clarify whether certain individuals may benefit from higher or lower intakes of folate or nutrients relevant to folate metabolism. Third, studies on genetic polymorphisms can generate hypotheses regarding possible biologic mechanisms that connect this pathway to carcinogenesis. Last, genetic variability in folate metabolism may predict survival after a cancer diagnosis, possibly via pharmacogenetic effects. To solve the puzzle of the folate-cancer relation, a transdisciplinary approach is needed that integrates knowledge from epidemiology, clinical studies, experimental nutrition, and mathematical modeling. This review illustrates knowledge that can be gained from molecular epidemiology in the context of nutrigenetics, and the questions that this approach can answer or raise.

  11. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers.

  12. Gut microbiome development along the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Jia, Huijue; Stadlmayr, Andreas; Tang, Longqing; Lan, Zhou; Zhang, Dongya; Xia, Huihua; Xu, Xiaoying; Jie, Zhuye; Su, Lili; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Xin; Li, Junhua; Xiao, Liang; Huber-Schönauer, Ursula; Niederseer, David; Xu, Xun; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Kristiansen, Karsten; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Tilg, Herbert; Datz, Christian; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-11

    Colorectal cancer, a commonly diagnosed cancer in the elderly, often develops slowly from benign polyps called adenoma. The gut microbiota is believed to be directly involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The identity and functional capacity of the adenoma- or carcinoma-related gut microbe(s), however, have not been surveyed in a comprehensive manner. Here we perform a metagenome-wide association study (MGWAS) on stools from advanced adenoma and carcinoma patients and from healthy subjects, revealing microbial genes, strains and functions enriched in each group. An analysis of potential risk factors indicates that high intake of red meat relative to fruits and vegetables appears to associate with outgrowth of bacteria that might contribute to a more hostile gut environment. These findings suggest that faecal microbiome-based strategies may be useful for early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal adenoma or carcinoma.

  13. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  14. Elective cesarean hysterectomy for treatment of cervical neoplasia. An update.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M S; Roberts, W S; Fiorica, J V; Angel, J L; Finan, M A; Cavanagh, D

    1993-03-01

    From January 1, 1979, to March 31, 1991, 37 patients underwent elective cesarean hysterectomy for early cervical neoplasia. Thirty-four patients had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III, and three patients had stage IA-1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Twenty-eight were primary cesarean sections; nine had obstetric indications. The mean operative time was 128 minutes; mean estimated blood loss was 1,400 mL. One patient experienced an intraoperative hemorrhage (3,500 mL). There were no other recognized intraoperative complications. Four significant postoperative complications included a vaginal cuff abscess, a wound dehiscence and pelvic abscess, one patient with febrile morbidity and an ileus and ligation with partial transection of a ureter. Patients were discharged on a mean of postoperative day 5.7. Although significant complications occurred, we believe that the noncompliant nature of our patient population justifies elective cesarean hysterectomy for treatment of cervical neoplasia.

  15. Cell-based Immunotherapy for Colorectal Cancer with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cancer worldwide. Although incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are gradually decreasing in the US, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have poor prognosis with an estimated 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Over the past decade, advances in combination chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer have led to significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival. However, patients with metastatic disease gain little clinical benefit from conventional therapy, which is associated with grade 3~4 toxicity with negative effects on quality of life. In previous clinical studies, cell-based immunotherapy using dendritic cell vaccines and sentinel lymph node T cell therapy showed promising therapeutic results for metastatic colorectal cancer. In our preclinical and previous clinical studies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells treatment for colorectal cancer showed favorable responses without toxicities. Here, we review current treatment options for colorectal cancer and summarize available clinical studies utilizing cell-based immunotherapy. Based on these studies, we recommend the use CIK cell therapy as a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27162526

  16. Epithelial neoplasia in Drosophila entails switch to primitive cell states.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sumbul J; Bajpai, Anjali; Alam, Mohammad Atif; Gupta, Ram P; Harsh, Sneh; Pandey, Ravi K; Goel-Bhattacharya, Surbhi; Nigam, Aditi; Mishra, Arati; Sinha, Pradip

    2013-06-11

    Only select cell types in an organ display neoplasia when targeted oncogenically. How developmental lineage hierarchies of these cells prefigure their neoplastic propensities is not yet well-understood. Here we show that neoplastic Drosophila epithelial cells reverse their developmental commitments and switch to primitive cell states. In a context of alleviated tissue surveillance, for example, loss of Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) tumor suppressor in the wing primordium induced epithelial neoplasia in its Homothorax (Hth)-expressing proximal domain. Transcriptional profile of proximally transformed mosaic wing epithelium and functional tests revealed tumor cooperation by multiple signaling pathways. In contrast, lgl(-) clones in the Vestigial (Vg)-expressing distal wing epithelium were eliminated by cell death. Distal lgl(-) clones, however, could transform when both tissue surveillance and cell death were compromised genetically and, alternatively, when the transcription cofactor of Hippo signaling pathway, Yorkie (Yki), was activated, or when Ras/EGFR signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, transforming distal lgl(-) clones displayed loss of Vg, suggesting reversal of their terminal cell fate commitment. In contrast, reinforcing a distal (wing) cell fate commitment in lgl(-) clones by gaining Vg arrested their neoplasia and induced cell death. We also show that neoplasia in both distal and proximal lgl(-) clones could progress in the absence of Hth, revealing Hth-independent wing epithelial neoplasia. Likewise, neoplasia in the eye primordium resulted in loss of Elav, a retinal cell marker; these, however, switched to an Hth-dependent primitive cell state. These results suggest a general characteristic of "cells-of-origin" in epithelial cancers, namely their propensity for switch to primitive cell states.

  17. [Gut microbial influence and probiotics on colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Myung, Dae Seong; Joo, Young Eun

    2012-11-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a community of 10(13)-10(14) microorganisms that harbor in the intestine and normally participate in a symbiotic relationship with human. Technical and conceptual advances have enabled rapid progress in characterizing the taxonomic composition, metabolic capacity and immunomodulatory activity of the human intestinal microbiota. Their collective genome, defined as microbiome, is estimated to contain ≥150 times as many genes as 2.85 billion base pair human genome. The intestinal microbiota and its microbiome form a diverse and complex ecological community that profoundly impact intestinal homeostasis and disease states. It is becoming increasingly evident that the large and complex bacterial population of the large intestine plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Numerous studies show that gut immunity and inflammation have impact on the development of colorectal cancer. Additionally, bacteria have been linked to colorectal cancer by the production of toxic and genotoxic bacterial metabolite. In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer and role for probiotics in the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  18. Coffee intake and the risk of colorectal adenoma: The colorectal adenoma study in Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-07-15

    Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage which contains several potential anticarcinogenic and chemopreventive compounds, and has been hypothesized to have protective effects in colorectal neoplasia. However, the limited available data on coffee consumption in relation to colorectal adenoma (CRA), a precursor lesion to most colorectal cancers, remain largely inconsistent. In this study, we evaluated the association of coffee intake with the risk of CRA in a middle-aged Japanese population. Study subjects were selected from examinees who underwent total colonoscopy as part of a cancer screening program and responded to self-administered dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. A total of 738 patients with adenoma and 697 controls were included in the study. Coffee intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and divided into quartiles based on the distribution among controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of CRA, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. High coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of CRA, with a multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quartile of coffee intake of 0.67 (95% CI = 0.48-0.93; ptrend  = 0.02). The inverse association of coffee intake was limited to proximal (OR = 0.64; 95%CI = 0.44-0.95; ptrend  = 0.04) and distal colon adenoma (OR = 0.62; 95%CI = 0.39-0.99; ptrend  = 0.06), and appeared to be more evident with small (OR = 0.68; 95%CI = 0.49-0.96; ptrend  = 0.04) and single adenomas (OR = 0.65; 95%CI = 0.44-0.95; ptrend  = 0.02). Green tea intake was not found to be associated with CRA risk. This study provides support for the protective effect of coffee drinking on colon adenomas, a precursor of colon cancer.

  19. Factors associated with conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia: A case control study

    SciTech Connect

    Napora, C.; Cohen, E.J.; Genvert, G.I.; Presson, A.C.; Arentsen, J.J.; Eagle, R.C.; Laibson, P.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Familial and environmental factors may play a role in the development of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Nineteen patients with biopsy-proven CIN completed a questionnaire to evaluate possible predisposing factors. Nineteen age-matched and sex-matched controls completed questionnaires and received slit-lamp examinations. Factors associated with a relatively increased risk of developing CIN included exposure to petroleum products, heavy cigarette smoking, light hair and ocular pigmentation, and family origin in the British Isles, Austria or Switzerland. Non-office and nonprofessional workers were more likely to develop conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (p = .05), as were those who were not college graduates (p = .07).

  20. [Colorectal cancer screening with colonoscopy].

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Lisandro; Gómez, Estanislao J; Mella, José M; Cimmino, Daniel G; Boerr, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and also in Argentina. In the past few years colorectal cancer screening has become more popular and colonoscopy has been postulated as the gold standard. In this review we analyzed the evidence supporting this method in contrast with its complications and disadvantages.

  1. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-09-27

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors' belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn't a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC.

  2. Practical genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Shaw, Trudy G

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly heterogeneous, both genotypically and phenotypically. The most frequently occurring hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome is Lynch syndrome, accounting for approximately 3% of the total colorectal cancer burden. Polyposis syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, account for a lesser percentage. Familial colorectal cancer, defined by family history, occurs in an estimated 20% of all colorectal cancer cases. With a worldwide annual colorectal cancer incidence of over one million, and annual mortality of over 600,000, hereditary and familial forms of colorectal cancer are a major public health problem. Lynch syndrome is attributable to DNA mismatch repair germline mutations, with the MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 genes being implicated. The characteristics of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, including early age of onset and predilection to the proximal colon, mandate surveillance by colonoscopy beginning by age 20 to 25 and repeated every other year through age 40 and annually thereafter. Besides colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome also predisposes to a litany of extracolonic cancers, foremost of which is endometrial cancer, followed by cancer of the ovary, stomach, renal pelvis and ureter, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, glioblastoma multiforme in the Turcot's variant, and sebaceous skin tumors in the Muir-Torre variant and, more recently identified, cancers of the breast and prostate. The most common polyposis syndrome is familial adenomatous polyposis, caused by mutations in the APC gene. Affected individuals have multiple colonic adenomas and, without treatment invariably develop colorectal cancer. Colonic surveillance with polypectomy may be pursued until the appearance of multiple colonic adenomas, at which time prophylactic colectomy should be considered. Extra-intestinal manifestations include desmoid tumor, hepatoblastoma, thyroid carcinoma, and medulloblastoma. Other polyposis

  3. Overexpression of wild-type p21Ras plays a prominent role in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shuang; Feng, Qiang; Pan, Xin-Yan; Zou, Hong; Chen, Hao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Xin-Liang; Hong, Yan-Ling; Song, Shu-Ling; Yang, Ju-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal type of cancer. The overexpression of Ras proteins, particularly p21Ras, are involved in the development of CRC. However, the subtypes of the p21Ras proteins that are overexpressed and the mutation status remain unknown restricting the development of therapeutic antibodies targeting p21Ras proteins. The present study aimed to investigate the mutation status of ras genes associated with Ras proteins that are overexpressed in CRC and explore whether or not wild-type p21Ras could be a target for CRC therapy. p21Ras expression was examined immunohistochemically in normal colorectal epithelium, benign lesions and malignant colorectal tumor tissues by monoclonal antibody (Mab) KGH-R1 which is able to react with three types of p21Ras proteins: H-p21Ras, N-p21Ras and K-p21Ras. Then, the expression levels of p21Ras subtypes were determined in CRC by a specific Mab for each p21Ras subtype. Mutation status of ras genes in p21Ras-overexpressing CRC was detected by DNA sequencing. There was rare p21Ras expression in normal colorectal epithelium but a high level of p21Ras expression in CRC, with a significant increase from normal colorectal epithelium to inflammatory polyps, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma, respectively. Overexpression of K-p21Ras was found in all CRC tissues tested, overexpression of N-p21Ras was found in 85.7% of the CRC tissues, while H-p21Ras expression was not found in any CRC tissue. DNA sequencing showed that there were no K-ras mutations in 60% of the K-p21Ras-overexpressing CRC, while 40% of the CRC tissues harbored K-ras mutations. N-ras mutations were not found in any N-p21Ras-overexpressing CRC. Our findings indicate that overexpression of wild-type p21Ras may play a prominent role in the development of CRC in addition to ras mutations and could be a promising target for CRC therapy. PMID:28259994

  4. Colorectal carcinoma in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, J; Ong, G B

    1978-04-01

    The clinical and pathological features of colorectal carcinoma occurring in 470 Chinese patients in Hong Kong are reported. There was a preponderance of advanced stages of the disease in spite of the presence of a large number of well-differentiated lesions. Polyposis coli was the predisposing cause in 1% of our patients, and none of them had ulcerative colitis. The clinical features of our patients on presentation were generally similar to those exhibited by Caucasians. An abdominal mass was palpable in about half of patients with colonic lesions, and virtually all rectal cancers could be felt by rectal examination. Almost a quarter of our patients presented with complications. In 2% of our patients the initial diagnosis was acute appendictis. A high resection rate was achieved, but many radical resections turned out to be only palliative. Our operative mortality was 8.3%, although for social reasons, the "in-hospital" mortality was 19.2%. The corrected five-year survival rate was 42.7% when curative resection was attempted.

  5. Multidisciplinary Treatment for Colorectal Peritoneal Metastases: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneum is one of the common sites of metastasis in advanced stage colorectal cancer patients. Colorectal cancer patients with peritoneal metastases (PM) are traditionally believed to have poor prognosis, which indicates it is of no value to adopt surgical treatment. With the advancement of surgical techniques, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), and multidisciplinary treatment in recent years, the cognition and treatment strategies of colorectal peritoneal metastases (CPM) have changed dramatically. In terms of prognosis, CPM under the palliative systemic treatment shows an inferior outcome compared with nonperitoneal metastasis. Nevertheless, some CPM patients amenable to the complete peritoneal cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with HIPEC may achieve long-term survival. The prognostic factors of CPM comprise peritoneal carcinomatosis index (PCI), completeness of cytoreduction score (CC score), the presence of extraperitoneal metastasis (liver, etc.), Peritoneal Surface Disease Severity Score (PSDSS), Japanese peritoneal staging, and so forth. Taken together, literature data suggest that a multimodality approach combining complete peritoneal CRS plus HIPEC, systemic chemotherapy, and targeted therapy may be the best treatment option for PM from colorectal cancer. PMID:28105045

  6. In vivo and in vitro hyperspectral imaging of cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojian; Zheng, Wenli; Bu, Yanggao; Chang, Shufang; Tong, Qingping; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a prevalent disease in many developing countries. Colposcopy is the most common approach for screening cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, its clinical efficacy heavily relies on the examiner's experience. Spectroscopy is a potentially effective method for noninvasive diagnosis of cervical neoplasia. In this paper, we introduce a hyperspectral imaging technique for noninvasive detection and quantitative analysis of cervical neoplasia. A hyperspectral camera is used to collect the reflectance images of the entire cervix under xenon lamp illumination, followed by standard colposcopy examination and cervical tissue biopsy at both normal and abnormal sites in different quadrants. The collected reflectance data are calibrated and the hyperspectral signals are extracted. Further spectral analysis and image processing works are carried out to classify tissue into different types based on the spectral characteristics at different stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The hyperspectral camera is also coupled with a lab microscope to acquire the hyperspectral transmittance images of the pathological slides. The in vivo and the in vitro imaging results are compared with clinical findings to assess the accuracy and efficacy of the method.

  7. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  8. HIF2 and endocrine neoplasia: an evolving story.

    PubMed

    Maher, Eamonn R

    2013-06-01

    In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Toledo et al. report the identification of activating mutations in the HIF2 (EPAS1) transcription factor in a subset of sporadic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. These findings add significantly to an evolving and complex story of the role of hypoxic gene response pathways in human endocrine neoplasia.

  9. Penile intraepithelial neoplasia--a veiled lesion in genitourinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jaleel, H.; Narouz, N.; Wade, A. A.; Allan, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    Penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is a clinically well known condition. However, its diagnosis is often difficult. We present four cases of PIN, seen in our department. Various histological patterns ranging from PIN I to PIN III were noted in these cases. 




 PMID:10754953

  10. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  11. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26393651

  12. Fecal immunochemical test accuracy in average-risk colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Vicent; Cubiella, Joaquin; Gonzalez-Mao, M Carmen; Iglesias, Felipe; Rivera, Concepción; Iglesias, M Begoña; Cid, Lucía; Castro, Ines; de Castro, Luisa; Vega, Pablo; Hermo, Jose Antonio; Macenlle, Ramiro; Martínez-Turnes, Alfonso; Martínez-Ares, David; Estevez, Pamela; Cid, Estela; Vidal, M Carmen; López-Martínez, Angeles; Hijona, Elisabeth; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Rodriguez-Prada, Jose Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) accuracy for colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced neoplasia (AN) detection in CRC screening. METHODS: We performed a multicentric, prospective, double blind study of diagnostic tests on asymptomatic average-risk individuals submitted to screening colonoscopy. Two stool samples were collected and the fecal hemoglobin concentration was determined in the first sample (FIT1) and the highest level of both samples (FITmax) using the OC-sensor™. Areas under the curve (AUC) for CRC and AN were calculated. The best FIT1 and FITmax cut-off values for CRC were determined. At this threshold, number needed to scope (NNS) to detect a CRC and an AN and the cost per lesion detected were calculated. RESULTS: About 779 individuals were included. An AN was found in 97 (12.5%) individuals: a CRC in 5 (0.6%) and an advanced adenoma (≥ 10 mm, villous histology or high grade dysplasia) in 92 (11.9%) subjects. For CRC diagnosis, FIT1 AUC was 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.98) and FITmax AUC was 0.95 (95%CI: 0.93-0.97). For AN, FIT1 and FITmax AUC were similar (0.72, 95%CI: 0.66-0.78 vs 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68-0.79, respectively, P = 0.34). Depending on the number of determinations and the positivity threshold cut-off used sensitivity for AN detection ranged between 28% and 42% and specificity between 91% and 97%. At the best cut-off point for CRC detection (115 ng/mL), the NNS to detect a CRC were 10.2 and 15.8; and the cost per CRC was 1814€ and 2985€ on FIT1 and FITmax strategies respectively. At this threshold the sensitivity, NNS and cost per AN detected were 30%, 1.76, and 306€, in FIT1 strategy, and 36%, 2.26€ and 426€, in FITmax strategy, respectively. CONCLUSION: Performing two tests does not improve diagnostic accuracy, but increases cost and NNS to detect a lesion. PMID:24574776

  13. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer What’s New in Colorectal Cancer Research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  14. Can Colorectal Polyps and Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Found Early? Why is it important to find colorectal cancer early? Screening is the process of looking for ... Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer? More In Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Endoscopic Resection and Radiofrequency Ablation for Early Esophageal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Belghazi, Kamar; Bergman, Jacques; Pouw, Roos E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the last few decades, endoscopic treatment of early neoplastic lesions in the esophagus has established itself as a valid and less invasive alternative to surgical resection. Endoscopic resection (ER) is the cornerstone of endoscopic therapy. Next to the curative potential of ER, by removing neoplastic lesions, ER may also serve as a diagnostic tool. The relatively large tissue specimens obtained with ER enable accurate histological staging of a lesion, allowing for optimal decision-making for further patient management. ER was pioneered in Japan, mainly for the resection of gastric lesions and squamous esophageal neoplasia, and also Western countries have been increasingly implementing ER in the treatment of early gastroesophageal neoplasia, mostly associated with Barrett's esophagus (BE). In BE, however, there is still a risk of metachronous lesions in the remainder of the Barrett's after focal ER. Additional treatment of all Barrett's mucosa is therefore advised. Currently, the most effective method for this is by using radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This review will provide an overview of indications for ER and RFA. Key Messages and Conclusions Endoscopic management of early esophageal neoplasia is a safe and valid alternative to surgery and is nowadays the treatment of choice. ER is the mainstay of endoscopic management of early esophageal neoplasia since it allows for removal of neoplastic lesions and provides a large tissue specimen for histological evaluation. In case of early neoplasia in BE, focal ER should be complemented by eradication of the remaining Barrett's mucosa. RFA has proven to be a safe and effective modality to achieve complete eradication of Barrett's mucosa. PMID:27333327

  16. Reptile neoplasia at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden, 1901-2002.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Trupkiewicz, John G

    2006-03-01

    A retrospective study of neoplasia in reptiles held at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden was conducted. A total of 3,684 original necropsy reports for the period 1901-2002 were reviewed and revealed 86 cases of neoplasia. Original glass slides or re-cuts from paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were examined for confirmation of the original diagnosis. At necropsy, a total of six neoplasms were identified in six of 490 chelonians (1.2%), 22 neoplasms in 19 of 736 lizards (3.0%), and 58 neoplasms in 53 of 1,835 snakes (2.9%). An additional 12 neoplasms were found in biopsies of one turtle and 10 snakes. In the chelonians, all the neoplasms were seen in turtles, four of six tumors were malignant (66%) and no organ predilection was noted. For lizards, the liver was the most commonly affected organ, with 7 of 22 primary neoplasms (31%). Multiple tumor types were identified in three lizards (15%), metastasis occurred in five cases (25%), and malignant tumors were identified in 16 cases (73%). In snakes, the liver was most frequently affected by neoplasia at necropsy, with 13 of 58 primary neoplasms (22%); multiple types of neoplasm were identified in five cases (10%) and metastasis in six (9%); and 42 tumors (80%) were diagnosed as malignant. When biopsies were included for snakes, however, the skin was the most commonly affected organ, with 17 of 69 neoplasms (24%). One of five lizards (20%) and four of six snakes (66%) with metastasis also had a second primary neoplasm. Since 1967, the incidence of lizard neoplasia has increased from 0.7% to 5.9%, and snake neoplasia has increased from 2.6% to 9.3%.

  17. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy through a Port-Catheter System as Preoperative Initial Therapy in Patients with Advanced Liver Dysfunction due to Synchronous and Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Arai, Yasuaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Miyazaki, Masaya; Shimamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of preoperative initial hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) through a port-catheter system in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases. The aim of HAIC was to improve patients' clinical condition for later surgical removal of primary colorectal cancer. Methods. Port-catheter systems were placed radiologically in 21 patients (mean age 58.6 {+-} 8.1 years) with liver dysfunction due to synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Initial HAIC of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil was administered weekly as a 5 hr continuous infusion through this system. Surgical removal of the primary lesion was planned after HAIC improved the liver function. Results. Port-catheter system placement was successful in all patients without severe complications. Patients were followed up for a median of 309 days (range 51-998 days). After starting HAIC, no severe adverse events that caused drug loss and treatment postponement or suspension were observed in any of the patients. HAIC was performed a mean of 4.5 {+-} 3.0 times and the liver function improved in all patients. Curative (n = 18) or palliative (n = 1) surgical removal of the primary lesion was performed. The remaining 2 patients died because extrahepatic metastases developed and their performance status worsened; thus, surgery could not be performed. The median survival times of all patients and the operated patients were 309 and 386 days, respectively. Conclusion. Initial HAIC administration is a safe and efficacious method for improving liver function prior to operative resection of primary colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases.

  18. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  19. The roles of JK-1 (FAM134B) expressions in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Kais; Gopalan, Vinod; Salajegheh, Ali; Lu, Cu-Tai; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2014-08-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate the clinicopathological correlations of JK-1(FAM134B) expression and its relationship to carcinogenesis in a colorectal adenoma-adenocarcinoma model. JK-1(FAM134B) protein expression was studied in a colon cancer cell line by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. JK-1(FAM134B) expression profiles at mRNA and protein levels were investigated in cancer tissues from 236 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and 32 patients with colorectal adenoma using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The findings were then correlated with the clinicopathological features of these tumours. JK-1(FAM134B) protein was demonstrated in the colon cancer cells by Western blot. The protein was located in the nuclei of the tumour cells at both cellular and tissue levels. In colorectal adenocarcinomas, lower levels of JK-1(FAM134B) protein expression were associated with younger age (p=0.032), larger tumour size (p=0.004), advanced cancer stages (p=0.016) and higher rates of cancer recurrence (p=0.04). Also, lower levels of JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA expression were associated with advanced cancer stages (p=0.02) and presence of lymphovascular invasion (p=0.014). Higher JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA and protein expression levels were identified in adenomas and non-neoplastic mucosae, compared to carcinomas (p=0.005). To conclude, JK-1(FAM134B) mRNA expression and JK1 (FAM134B) protein levels varied with the different stages of progression of colorectal tumours. The expression levels of the gene were associated with clinicopathological features in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma suggesting that JK-1(FAM134B) gene has roles in controlling some steps in the development of the invasive phenotypes from colorectal adenoma to early staged as well as advanced staged colorectal adenocarcinomas.

  20. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Adams, Scott V.; Wernli, Karen J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Makar, Karen W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms [rs1051740 and rs2234922], and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Methods Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n=519), HPs (n=691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n=227) and polyp-free controls (n=772) receiving a colonoscopy from 12/04-9/07 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Results Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR=2.0, 1.2–3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.2–2.4), HPs (OR=2.4, 95% CI 1.7–3.3), and both types (OR=2.8, 95% CI 1.8–4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Discussion Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location. PMID:21598178

  1. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer.

  2. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma: A case suitable for active surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Dillard, Melissa R.; Zhu, Grace G.; Gordetsky, Jennifer B.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to typical prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)-like ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare variant of prostate cancer with low-grade clinical behavior. We report a case of a 66-year-old African-American male with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen who underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI/ultrasound fusion-guided biopsies. Pathology demonstrated low-volume Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 (Grade Group 1), acinar adenocarcinoma involving one core and PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma on a separate core. Herein, we discuss the potential role of active surveillance for patients with this rare variant of prostate cancer found in the era of advanced imaging with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. PMID:28216939

  3. The nature of the white opaque substance within colorectal neoplastic epithelium as visualized by magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Kentaro; Yao, Kenshi; Hisabe, Takashi; Nambu, Masami; Ohtsu, Kensei; Ueo, Tetsuya; Yano, Shinji; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Nagahama, Takashi; Kanemitsu, Takao; Yamasaki, Kazutomo; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Akinori; Daa, Tsutomu; Yokoyama, Shigeo; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Enjoji, Munechika

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: We previously reported our discovery of a white opaque substance (WOS) that is opaque to endoscopic light inside the epithelium while using magnifying endoscopy (ME) to examine gastric epithelial neoplasia. Histopathologic analysis revealed that the WOS comprises minute lipid droplets (LDs) accumulated within the neoplastic epithelium. In addition, the WOS was found in colorectal epithelial neoplasia, although it was unclear whether this WOS corresponded to an accumulation of LDs, as in the stomach. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to elucidate whether the WOS observed in colorectal epithelial tumors comprises LDs. Patients and methods: A consecutive series of 40 WOS-positive and 40 WOS-negative colorectal epithelial tumors was analyzed. One biopsy specimen was taken from each neoplasm. Cryostat sections were stained with oil red O for LD, and sections after formalin-fixation for LD were immunostained with anti-adipophilin antibody. Results: The prevalence of LDs stained with oil red O in WOS-positive vs. WOS-negative lesions was 47.5 % (19/40) vs. 5 % (2/40), respectively (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the WOS coincided with the expression of adipophilin; the prevalence of LDs stained by anti-adipophilin antibody in WOS-positive vs. WOS-negative lesions was 100 % (40/40) vs. 62.5 % (25/40), respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study elucidated for the first time that endoscopically visualized WOS in colorectal epithelial neoplasia may be composed of LDs accumulated in the neoplastic epithelium. PMID:27853741

  4. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC

  5. Proteomic analysis reveals overexpression of moesin and cytokeratin 17 proteins in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Yong; Jung, Woon Yong; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Han Kyeom; Kim, Aeree; Shin, Bong Kyung

    2012-03-01

    The study of tumor biomarkers was gradually facilitated by the adoption of proteomic strategies due to less invasiveness and higher sensitivity. Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide and its incidence has markedly increased in Korea. While the adoption of proteomic strategies facilitated the study of tumor biomarkers, to date, no common agreement has been derived from proteomic investigations regarding tumor markers of colorectal cancer. This study was designed to find molecules differentially expressed in colorectal cancer compared to non-tumor mucosa. Four colorectal adenocarcinoma and corresponding non-tumor tissue samples were analyzed to find previously unknown proteins via two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS spectrometry. Western blot assays and tissue microarray (TMA) immunohistochemistry were performed to validate the identified proteins. Among the twelve up-regulated and one down-regulated proteins identified, moesin, cytokeratin (KRT) 17 and carbonic anhydrase I were validated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemistry. On immunohistochemistry, both moesin and KRT17 demonstrated a tendency of increased expression as pT stage advanced. Both moesin and KRT17 were not expressed in normal colorectal epithelium. These two proteins may play a role in cancer invasion and/or metastasis in colorectal carcinoma, and could be candidate biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  6. Quality assurance in the treatment of colorectal cancer: the EURECCA initiative.

    PubMed

    Breugom, A J; Boelens, P G; van den Broek, C B M; Cervantes, A; Van Cutsem, E; Schmoll, H J; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe. Over the past few decades, important advances have been made in screening, staging and treatment of colorectal cancer. However, considerable variation between and within European countries remains, which implies that further improvements are possible. The most important remaining question now is: when are we, health care professionals, delivering the best available care to patients with colon or rectal cancer? Currently, quality assurance is a major issue in colorectal cancer care and quality assurance awareness is developing in almost all disciplines involved in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients. Quality assurance has shown to be effective in clinical trials. For example, standardisation and quality control were introduced in the Dutch TME trial and led to marked improvements of local control and survival in rectal cancer patients. Besides, audit structures can also be very effective in monitoring cancer management and national audits showed to further improve outcome in colorectal cancer patients. To reduce the differences between European countries, an international, multidisciplinary, outcome-based quality improvement programme, European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA), has been initiated. In the near future, the EURECCA dataset will perform research on subgroups as elderly patients or patients with comorbidities, which are often excluded from trials. For optimal colorectal cancer care, quality assurance in guideline formation and in multidisciplinary team management is also of great importance. The aim of this review was to create greater awareness and to give an overview of quality assurance in the management of colorectal cancer.

  7. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  8. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab for Patients With HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MOUNTAINEER)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Tumors; Neoplasms, Colorectal; HER-2 Gene Amplification; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Colon Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

  9. The Multidisciplinary Management of Colorectal Cancer: Present and Future Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Chelsie K; Kratz, Jeremy D; Zurbriggen, Luke D; LoConte, Noelle K; Lubner, Sam J; Uboha, Natalya; Mulkerin, Daniel; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Deming, Dustin A

    2016-09-01

    As treatment strategies for patients with colorectal cancer advance, there has now become an ever-increasing need for multidisciplinary teams to care for these patients. Recent investigations into the timing and duration of perioperative therapy, as well as, the rise of molecular profiling have led to more systemic chemotherapeutic options. The most efficacious use, in terms of timing and patient selection, of these therapies in the setting of modern operative and radiotherapy techniques requires the generation of care teams discussing cases at multidisciplinary conferences. This review highlights the role of multidisciplinary team conferences, advances in perioperative chemotherapy, current clinical biomarkers, and emerging therapeutic agents for molecular subtypes of metastatic colon cancer. As our understanding of relevant molecular subtypes increases and as data becomes available on treatment response, the treatment of colorectal cancer will become more precise and effective.

  10. Implications of miRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    With the exponential growth of research efforts on non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) in the past decade, miRNAs have been demonstrated to be important in many major human diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Due to the broad regulatory function of miRNAs, alterations of their expression can have profound consequences on multiple critical genes and pathways. One of the major issues related to the success of treating advanced colorectal cancer is chemoresistance. In this review, we will present some of the recent advancements in miRNA research related to chemoresistance mechanisms to 5-FU based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and cancer stem cells. We believe that this miRNA-mediated resistance mechanism will offer novel strategies to develop future anti-cancer therapies.

  11. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  12. Association between Cysticercosis and Neoplasia: A Study Based on Autopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Ribeiro, Grace Kelly Naves de Aquino; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infections including the cysticercosis induce inflammatory cells to produce free radicals and synthesize carcinogenic toxins. The cells with genetic mutations proliferate in a disorganized manner, leading to the development of neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the relation between cysticercosis and neoplasia. Patients autopsied were divided into 4 groups: patients with neoplasia and cysticercosis (NC), patients with neoplasia only (NN), patients with cysticercosis only (CC), and patients without neoplasia or cysticercosis (WW). Of 2012 autopsy reports analyzed, 0.4 showed NC. In groups CC and NC, the most common location of the parasite was the brain. There was a predominance of three or more cysticerci in groups NC and CC. In the NC group, all had malignant neoplasms, and was predominance of benign neoplasm in NN group. The digestive system was the most frequent neoplasia. By calculating odds ratio, rate of neoplasia in patients with cysticercosis was 0.74. In conclusion, the demographic profile of patients with cysticercosis and neoplasia is similar to that of patients with cysticercosis alone. The incidence of cysticercosis and neoplasia was greater in older patients suggesting that immunosenescence may contribute to development of neoplasia promoted by cysticercosis. PMID:24288510

  13. Association between cysticercosis and neoplasia: a study based on autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Ribeiro, Grace Kelly Naves de Aquino; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infections including the cysticercosis induce inflammatory cells to produce free radicals and synthesize carcinogenic toxins. The cells with genetic mutations proliferate in a disorganized manner, leading to the development of neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the relation between cysticercosis and neoplasia. Patients autopsied were divided into 4 groups: patients with neoplasia and cysticercosis (NC), patients with neoplasia only (NN), patients with cysticercosis only (CC), and patients without neoplasia or cysticercosis (WW). Of 2012 autopsy reports analyzed, 0.4 showed NC. In groups CC and NC, the most common location of the parasite was the brain. There was a predominance of three or more cysticerci in groups NC and CC. In the NC group, all had malignant neoplasms, and was predominance of benign neoplasm in NN group. The digestive system was the most frequent neoplasia. By calculating odds ratio, rate of neoplasia in patients with cysticercosis was 0.74. In conclusion, the demographic profile of patients with cysticercosis and neoplasia is similar to that of patients with cysticercosis alone. The incidence of cysticercosis and neoplasia was greater in older patients suggesting that immunosenescence may contribute to development of neoplasia promoted by cysticercosis.

  14. The Detection of the Methylated Wif-1 Gene Is More Accurate than a Fecal Occult Blood Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Tournigand, Christophe; Furet, Jean-Pierre; Carrau, Jean-Pierre; Canoui-Poitrine, Florence; Sobhani, Iradj

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical benefit of guaiac fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) is now well established for colorectal cancer screening. Growing evidence has demonstrated that epigenetic modifications and fecal microbiota changes, also known as dysbiosis, are associated with CRC pathogenesis and might be used as surrogate markers of CRC. Patients and Methods We performed a cross-sectional study that included all consecutive subjects that were referred (from 2003 to 2007) for screening colonoscopies. Prior to colonoscopy, effluents (fresh stools, sera-S and urine-U) were harvested and FOBTs performed. Methylation levels were measured in stools, S and U for 3 genes (Wif1, ALX-4, and Vimentin) selected from a panel of 63 genes; Kras mutations and seven dominant and subdominant bacterial populations in stools were quantified. Calibration was assessed with the Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square, and discrimination was determined by calculating the C-statistic (Area Under Curve) and Net Reclassification Improvement index. Results There were 247 individuals (mean age 60.8±12.4 years, 52% of males) in the study group, and 90 (36%) of these individuals were patients with advanced polyps or invasive adenocarcinomas. A multivariate model adjusted for age and FOBT led to a C-statistic of 0.83 [0.77–0.88]. After supplementary sequential (one-by-one) adjustment, Wif-1 methylation (S or U) and fecal microbiota dysbiosis led to increases of the C-statistic to 0.90 [0.84–0.94] (p = 0.02) and 0.81 [0.74–0.86] (p = 0.49), respectively. When adjusted jointly for FOBT and Wif-1 methylation or fecal microbiota dysbiosis, the increase of the C-statistic was even more significant (0.91 and 0.85, p<0.001 and p = 0.10, respectively). Conclusion The detection of methylated Wif-1 in either S or U has a higher performance accuracy compared to guaiac FOBT for advanced colorectal neoplasia screening. Conversely, fecal microbiota dysbiosis detection was not more accurate. Blood and urine

  15. Epigenetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ajay; Boland, C Richard

    2012-12-01

    In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research was mainly focused on genetic changes (ie, those that altered DNA sequences). Although this has been extremely useful as our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of cancer has grown and matured, there is another realm in tumor development that does not involve changing the sequence of cellular DNA. This field is called "epigenetics" and broadly encompasses changes in the methylation of cytosines in DNA, changes in histone and chromatin structure, and alterations in the expression of microRNAs, which control the stability of many messenger RNAs and serve as "master regulators" of gene expression. This review focuses on the epigenetics of colorectal cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field.

  16. Colorectal carcinogenesis-update and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raskov, Hans; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common malignancy in the Western World and despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and screening, it is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this part of the world. Numerous factors are found important in the development of CRC including colonocyte metbolism, high risk luminal environment, inflammation, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet, tobacco, and alchohol consumption. In recent years focus has turned towards the genetics and molecular biology of CRC and several interesting and promising correlations and pathways have been discovered. The major genetic pathways of CRC are the Chromosome Instability Pathway representing the pathway of sporadic CRC through the K-ras, APC, and P53 mutations, and the Microsatellite Instability Pathway representing the pathway of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer through mutations in mismatch repair genes. To identify early cancers, screening programs have been initiated, and the leading strategy has been the use of faecal occult blood testing followed by colonoscopy in positive cases. Regarding the treatment of colorectal cancer, significant advances have been made in the recent decade. The molecular targets of CRC include at least two important cell surface receptors: the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The genetic and molecular knowledge of CRC has widen the scientific and clinical perspectives of diagnosing and treatment. However, despite significant advances in the understanding and treatment of CRC, results from targeted therapy are still not convincing. Future studies will determine the role for this new treatment modality. PMID:25561783

  17. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  18. [Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy with CyberKnife®for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koki; Kaihara, Masaki; Sunahori, Sayaka; Yamashiro, Naotsugu; Nishiya, Shin; Ito, Yasuhiro; Funakoshi, Kazuto; Egawa, Tomohisa; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Nagashima, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    For treatment of colorectal liver metastases, liver resection is recommended for resectable cases in the clinical guidelines for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, there are currently no data supporting the efficacy of radiation therapy as a topical treatment, and this treatment can therefore not presently be recommended. With CyberKnife®, it is possible to perform stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator with high accuracy, even for lesions in the trunk area such as liver metastases. Between December 2009 and September 2014 in our hospital, we performed radiation treatment using CyberKnife® for 14 cases with 22 colorectal liver metastases. As a result, we obtained response and local control rates of 76.2%and 81.0%, respectively. Moreover, no advanced adverse events were observed. Thus, we consider that CyberKnife® treatment for colorectal liver metastases is effective as a topical treatment, with low invasiveness and high safety.

  19. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility.

  20. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-12-27

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented.

  1. Minimally invasive colorectal surgery: status and technical specifications.

    PubMed

    Keller, D S; Ibarra, S; Haas, E M

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopy was the most significant technologic advance in colorectal surgery in the last quarter century. The safety, feasibility and oncologic equivalence have been proven, and undisputed clinical benefits have also been demonstrated over open approaches. Despite proven benefits, laparoscopic has not dominated the market, especially for colon and rectal cancer cases. Adaptations in laparoscopic technique were developed to increase use of minimally invasive surgery. Concurrently, there has been a paradigm shift toward less invasive technologies to further optimize patient outcomes. From these needs, hand assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS), single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), and robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) were applied to colorectal surgery. Each platform has unique costs and benefits, and similar outcomes when likened to each other in comparative studies. However, conventional laparoscopy, HALS, SILS, and RALS actually serve a complementary role as tools to increase the use of minimally invasive colorectal surgery. The goal of this paper is to review the history, current status, technical specifications, and evolution of the major minimally invasive platforms for colorectal surgery.

  2. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  3. Piroxicam decreases postirradiation colonic neoplasia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Scobey, M.W.; Cassidy, K.T.; Geisinger, K.R. )

    1990-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent piroxicam on chronic radiation proctitis in the rat. Forty female Wistar rats received a 2250-cGy dose of irradiation to the distal 2 cm of the colon. Twenty received piroxicam 8.0 mg/kg orally 30 minutes before exposure and 24 hours after exposure; 20 rats served as irradiated controls. All animals were evaluated by colonoscopy 1 and 3 weeks postexposure and every third week until death or killing at 1 year. At killing, colons were removed for light microscopic examination. One year postirradiation results showed no differences in mortality, vascular changes, acute inflammation, colitis cystica profunda, or rectal stricture between the control and piroxicam-treated groups. However, at 1 year postirradiation the control group demonstrated neoplasia in 15 of 19 animals compared with eight of 20 animals in the piroxicam-treated group. The first endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasm occurred at 15 weeks postirradiation in one control irradiated rat whereas the first evidence of endoscopic neoplasm in the piroxicam-treated group did not occur until 36 weeks postirradiation. Histologic examination documented a tendency toward a greater presence of adenocarcinomas in the control group compared with the piroxicam-treated group. The authors conclude that piroxicam treatment significantly decreased the incidence of colonic neoplasia in general as well as delayed the endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasia in rats after pelvic irradiation. 41 references.

  4. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  5. Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer The Importance of Early Detection Past Issues / Summer ... Cancer of the colon or rectum is called colorectal cancer. The colon and the rectum are part of ...

  6. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... may trigger unnecessary procedures or follow-up. Does health insurance pay for colorectal cancer screening? The Affordable Care ... other federal laws.) People should check with their health insurance provider to determine their colorectal cancer screening coverage. ...

  7. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is it Important to Know Your Family Health History? If you have a family health history of colorectal cancer, your doctor may consider your family health history when deciding which colorectal cancer screening might be ...

  8. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  9. Mice Expressing Activated PI3K Rapidly Develop Advanced Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leystra, Alyssa A.; Deming, Dustin A.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Farhoud, Mohammed; Paul Olson, Terrah J.; Hadac, Jamie N.; Nettekoven, Laura A.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Clipson, Linda; Sullivan, Ruth; Washington, Mary Kay; Torrealba, Jose R.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway play a key role in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers by altering cellular growth, metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis (1). Mutations in the catalytic domain of PI3K that generate a dominantly active kinase are commonly found in human colorectal cancers and have been thought to drive tumor progression, but not initiation (2). However, the effects of constitutively activated PI3K upon the intestinal mucosa have not been previously studied in animal models. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of a dominantly active form of the PI3K protein in the mouse intestine results in hyperplasia and advanced neoplasia. Mice expressing constitutively active PI3K in the epithelial cells of the distal small bowel and colon rapidly developed invasive adenocarcinomas in the colon that spread into the mesentery and adjacent organs. The histological characteristics of these tumors were strikingly similar to invasive mucinous colon cancers in humans. Interestingly, these tumors formed without a benign polypoid intermediary, consistent with the lack of aberrant WNT signaling observed. Together, our findings indicate a non-canonical mechanism of colon tumor initiation that is mediated through activation of PI3K. This unique model has the potential to further our understanding of human disease and facilitate the development of therapeutics through pharmacologic screening and biomarker identification. PMID:22525701

  10. Coffee intake and risk of colorectal cancer among Chinese in Singapore: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sabrina; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay; Sun, Can-Lan; Wang, Renwei; Turesky, Robert J; Yu, Mimi C

    2010-01-01

    We prospectively investigated whether coffee consumption was associated with decreased risk of colorectal cancer and whether cigarette smoking and stage of disease modify the association in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. During the first 12 years of follow-up, 961 colorectal cancer cases occurred in the cohort of over 60,000 middle-aged or older Chinese men and women living in Singapore. Baseline dietary exposures were assessed through in-person interviews using a validated food frequency questionnaire. The relation between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk was assessed by proportional hazards (Cox) regression. No overall association between coffee intake and colorectal cancer was observed. However, in analysis by subsite and stage restricted to ever smokers, the coffee-colon cancer association became statistically significant for advanced disease (P for trend = 0.01). The hazard ratio was 0.56 (95% confidence interval = 0.35-0.90) for advanced colon cancer in drinkers of 2 or more cups per day compared with those who drank no coffee or less than 1 cup per day. Although there is a null association between coffee intake and risk of colorectal cancer overall, coffee may protect against smoking related advanced colon cancer.

  11. Crohn's disease and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, C D; Andrews, H A; Prior, P; Allan, R N

    1994-01-01

    The colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease eliminating all known biases was assessed in a cohort of 281 patients with Crohn's disease who resided in the West Midlands at the time of diagnosis, and were first seen within five years of onset of symptoms between 1945-1975. All patients were 15 years of age or more at onset and were followed up from 12-35 years (total 5213 person years at risk (PYR)). The colorectal cancer risk in the series compared with the risk in the general population was computed by applying sex and age specific PYRs to the date of death or end of the study period 31 December 1991. There were six colonic and two rectal cancers. Six of the eight colorectal cancers were diagnosed 20 or more years after the onset of Crohn's disease. The relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for the series as a whole was 3.4 (p < 0.001), with a fivefold excess in the colon, but no significant excess in the rectum. Patients with extensive colitis showed an 18-fold increase in risk (RR = 18.2, p < 0.001), which decreased with increasing age at onset. This study shows that there is a statistical excess risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients who develop their Crohn's disease at a young age of onset (less than 30 years of age). PMID:8200559

  12. Vaginal cancer in a patient treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3): case report.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, G; Adonakis, G; Ravazoula, P; Kourounis, G

    2006-01-01

    In 1% to 3% of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) will either coexist or occur at a later date. The time interval from an earlier diagnosis of CIN 3 to a current diagnosis of VAIN 3 varies from two to 17 years. Invasive vaginal cancer occurred in a woman five years after total abdominal hysterectomy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. In women who have undergone total hysterectomy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer, postoperative cytologic and colposcopic follow-up of the vagina is necessary.

  13. Narrow-band imaging (NBI) magnifying endoscopic classification of colorectal tumors proposed by the Japan NBI Expert Team.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasushi; Tanaka, Shinji; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Saito, Shoichi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Wada, Yoshiki; Fujii, Takahiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Uraoka, Toshio; Kobayashi, Nozomu; Nakamura, Hisashi; Hotta, Kinichi; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Naoto; Fu, Kuang-I; Tsuruta, Osamu; Kawano, Hiroshi; Kashida, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Yoji; Machida, Hirohisa; Kusaka, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Naohisa; Hirata, Ichiro; Terai, Takeshi; Yamano, Hiro-O; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Taku; Yamaguchi, Yuichiro; Tamai, Naoto; Nakano, Naoko; Hayashi, Nana; Oka, Shiro; Iwatate, Mineo; Ishikawa, Hideki; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Saito, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Many clinical studies on narrow-band imaging (NBI) magnifying endoscopy classifications advocated so far in Japan (Sano, Hiroshima, Showa, and Jikei classifications) have reported the usefulness of NBI magnifying endoscopy for qualitative and quantitative diagnosis of colorectal lesions. However, discussions at professional meetings have raised issues such as: (i) the presence of multiple terms for the same or similar findings; (ii) the necessity of including surface patterns in magnifying endoscopic classifications; and (iii) differences in the NBI findings in elevated and superficial lesions. To resolve these problems, the Japan NBI Expert Team (JNET) was constituted with the aim of establishing a universal NBI magnifying endoscopic classification for colorectal tumors (JNET classification) in 2011. Consensus was reached on this classification using the modified Delphi method, and this classification was proposed in June 2014. The JNET classification consists of four categories of vessel and surface pattern (i.e. Types 1, 2A, 2B, and 3). Types 1, 2A, 2B, and 3 are correlated with the histopathological findings of hyperplastic polyp/sessile serrated polyp (SSP), low-grade intramucosal neoplasia, high-grade intramucosal neoplasia/shallow submucosal invasive cancer, and deep submucosal invasive cancer, respectively.

  14. Hereditary forms of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in western countries; it is the third most common cancer in men after prostate and lung cancer and the second most common in women after breast cancer. Colorectal cancer is usually sporadic but in a small proportion is hereditary. The genetic cause is well established, allowing pre-symptomatic diagnosis in at-risk relatives. The present article reviews the most novel findings presented at the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association on hereditary forms of colorectal cancer, especially Lynch syndrome and MUTYH-associated polyposis, as well as diverse organisational aspects that can favour the correct management of these patients and their relatives.

  15. Venous thromboembolism: a review of risk and prevention in colorectal surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, David

    2006-10-01

    Hospitalization for surgery has a high risk of developing venous thromboembolism, a condition that encompasses both deep-vein thrombosis and its potentially fatal complication, pulmonary embolism. Colorectal surgery implies a specific high risk for postoperative thromboembolic complications relative to other general surgery. This may be a result of pelvic dissection, the perioperative positioning of these patients, or the presence of additional risk factors common to this patient group, such as cancer, advanced age, or inflammatory bowel disease. The potential impact of venous thromboembolism and the need for effective thromboprophylaxis often are underestimated in these patients. Recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in colorectal surgery patients are based on the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines for thrombosis prevention in general surgery patients, with treatment stratified according to the type of surgery and additional venous thromboembolism risk factors present. Prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin or unfractionated heparin is recommended for colorectal surgery patients classified as moderate to high risk. The small number of studies focusing specifically on colorectal patients, or on cancer or abdominal surgery patients with a colorectal subgroup, has shown that both low-molecular-weight heparin and unfractionated heparin can effectively reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism. Low-molecular-weight heparin has the practical advantage of once-daily administration and shows a lower risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. This review will assess the risk of venous thromboembolism in colorectal surgery patients and discuss current evidence-based guidelines and recommendations for prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  16. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  17. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-04-15

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  18. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  19. Iron, microbiota and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and anaemia are common in colorectal cancer. Replacement with oral or intravenous iron effectively treats this deficiency. However, mechanistic and population studies suggest that excess iron promotes colorectal carcinogenesis. Growing research into gut microbiota and dysbiosis suggests one explanation for this association. Iron is growth limiting for many pathogenic bacteria and may promote a shift in the ratio of pathogenic to protective bacteria. This may increase the toxic bacterial metabolites, promoting inflammation and carcinogenesis. This has important implications as we seek to correct anaemia in our patients.

  20. Venous thromboembolism following colorectal surgery for suspected or confirmed malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Brenton; Hitos, Kerry; Fletcher, John P

    2011-01-01

    Surgery for colorectal cancer conveys a high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The effect of thromboprophylactic regimens of varying duration on the incidence of VTE was assessed in 417 patients undergoing surgery between 2005 and 2009 for colorectal cancer. Low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) was used in 52.7% of patients, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in 35.3%, and 10.7% received LDUH followed by LMWH. Pharmacological prophylaxis was continued after hospitalisation in 31.6%. Major bleeding occurred in 4% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.9%. The incidence of symptomatic VTE from hospital admission for surgery to 12 months after was 2.4%. There were no in-hospital VTE events. The majority of events occurred in the three-month period after discharge, but there were VTE events up to 12 months, especially in patients with more advanced cancer and multiple comorbidities.

  1. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeng Jin; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMRT) on cortisol level, the Stress Arousal Checklist (SACL) score, blood pressure, and heart rate in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Forty-six patients were divided into control and experimental groups. Cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before surgery and between 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. on the first, third, and fifth days after surgery. SACL score was measured before surgery and on the fifth day after surgery at the same time points. PMRT was performed twice a day for 5 days. Analyses of covariance with advanced covariate levels and t tests showed that PMRT helps colorectal cancer patients achieve a lower stress response and provides an important basis for stress control.

  2. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC. PMID:26811627

  3. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC.

  4. Need for simulation in laparoscopic colorectal surgery training

    PubMed Central

    Celentano, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The dissemination of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) has been slow despite increasing evidence for the clinical benefits, with a prolonged learning curve being one of the main restrictions for a prompt uptake. Performing advanced laparoscopic procedures requires dedicated surgical skills and new simulation methods designed precisely for LCS have been established: These include virtual reality simulators, box trainers, animal and human tissue and synthetic materials. Studies have even demonstrated an improvement in trainees’ laparoscopic skills in the actual operating room and a staged approach to surgical simulation with a combination of various training methods should be mandatory in every colorectal training program. The learning curve for LCS could be reduced through practice and skills development in a riskfree setting. PMID:26425266

  5. Classifications of Multispectral Colorectal Cancer Tissues Using Convolution Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Haj-Hassan, Hawraa; Chaddad, Ahmad; Harkouss, Youssef; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew; Tanougast, Camel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer among men and women. Its diagnosis in early stages, typically done through the analysis of colon biopsy images, can greatly improve the chances of a successful treatment. This paper proposes to use convolution neural networks (CNNs) to predict three tissue types related to the progression of CRC: benign hyperplasia (BH), intraepithelial neoplasia (IN), and carcinoma (Ca). Methods: Multispectral biopsy images of thirty CRC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Images of tissue samples were divided into three groups, based on their type (10 BH, 10 IN, and 10 Ca). An active contour model was used to segment image regions containing pathological tissues. Tissue samples were classified using a CNN containing convolution, max-pooling, and fully-connected layers. Available tissue samples were split into a training set, for learning the CNN parameters, and test set, for evaluating its performance. Results: An accuracy of 99.17% was obtained from segmented image regions, outperforming existing approaches based on traditional feature extraction, and classification techniques. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of CNN for the classification of CRC tissue types, in particular when using presegmented regions of interest.

  6. Invasive Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Masquerading as Nodular Scleritis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Medha; Sundar, Dheepak; Vanathi, Murugesan; Meel, Rachna; Kashyap, Seema; Chawla, Rohan; Tandon, Radhika

    The authors report a rare case of ocular surface squamous neoplasia with intraocular involvement that had an initial masquerade presentation of recurrent anterior nodular scleritis. A 35-year-old male patient presented with right eye recurrent anterior nodular scleritis for which a lamellar patch graft was done. Two months later, the patient presented with recurrence of symptoms. Histopathology review revealed the presence of well-differentiated squamous cell malignancy. A high index of suspicion for malignancy is required in such cases when they do not respond to conventional therapy.

  7. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Cao, Dalhia Thao; Beuvon, Frédéric; Leblanc, Sarah; Terris, Benoit; Camus, Marine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The possible benefit of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early neoplasia arising in Barrett’s esophagus remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of ESD for the treatment of early Barrett’s neoplasia. Methods All consecutive patients undergoing ESD for the resection of a visible lesion in a Barrett’s esophagus, either suspicious of submucosal infiltration or exceeding 10 mm in size, between February 2012 and January 2015 were prospectively included. The primary endpoint was the rate of curative resection of carcinoma, defined as histologically complete resection of adenocarcinomas without poor histoprognostic factors. Results Thirty-five patients (36 lesions) with a mean age of 66.2 ± 12 years, a mean ASA score of 2.1 ± 0.7, and a mean C4M6 Barrett’s segment were included. The mean procedure time was 191 ± 79 mn, and the mean size of the resected specimen was 51.3 ± 23 mm. En bloc resection rate was 89%. Lesions were 12 ± 15 mm in size, and 81% (29/36) were invasive adenocarcinomas, six of which with submucosal invasion. Although R0 resection of carcinoma was 72.4%, the curative resection rate was 66% (19/29). After a mean follow-up of 12.9 ± 9 months, 16 (45.7%) patients had required additional treatment, among whom nine underwent surgical resection, and seven further endoscopic treatments. Metachronous lesions or recurrence of cancer developed during the follow-up period in 17.2% of the patients. The overall complication rate was 16.7%, including 8.3% perforations, all conservatively managed, and no bleeding. The 30-day mortality was 0%. Conclusion In this early experience, ESD yielded a moderate curative resection rate in Barrett’s neoplasia. At present, improvements are needed if ESD is to replace piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection in the management of Barrett’s neoplasia. PMID:27087948

  8. Integumentary Disorders Including Cutaneous Neoplasia in Older Horses.

    PubMed

    Knottenbelt, Derek C

    2016-08-01

    Few skin diseases specifically or exclusively affect older horses and donkeys. Hypertrichosis (hirsutism) associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction is probably the most recognized and best understood exception and is the most common age-related skin condition in equids. Many other conditions are known to be more serious in older horses. Horses affected with immune-compromising conditions can be more severely affected by infectious diseases of the skin or heavy and pathologically significant parasitism. Neoplasia of the skin is probably more prevalent and worse in older horses, although many of the more serious skin tumors develop initially at a younger age.

  9. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia using hexaminolevulinate and methylaminolevulinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, Philipp; Staboulidou, Ismini; Hertel, Herrmann; Schippert, Cordula; Hillemanns, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer. Previous studies indicated that photodynamic therapy (PDT) represents an effective treatment modality in CIN. In 28 patients with CIN 1 - 3, 1 - 2 cycles of PDT were conducted using hexaminolevulinate (HAL) or methylaminolevulinate (MAL) and a special light delivery system. After 6 months, biopsies were obtained to assess response. The overall response rate for complete or partial response was 65%. Photodynamic therapy using new ALA esters is effective and may offer unique advantages in the therapy of CIN.

  10. Risk factors for second primary neoplasia of esophagus in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of esophageal neoplasia in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients is not low; however, routine esophageal surveillance is not included in staging of newly-diagnosed H&N cancers. We aimed to investigate the risk factors for synchronous esophageal neoplasia and the impact of endoscopy on management of H&N cancer patients. Methods A total of 129 newly diagnosed H&N cancer patients who underwent endoscopy with white-light imaging, narrow-band imaging (NBI) with magnifying endoscopy (ME), and chromoendoscopy with 1.5% Lugol’s solution, before definite treatment were enrolled prospectively. Results 60 esophageal lesions were biopsied from 53 (41.1%) patients, including 11 low-grade, 14 high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and 12 invasive carcinoma in 30 (23.3%) patients. Alcohol consumption [odds ratio (OR) 5.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-26.44], advanced stage (stage III and IV) of index H&N cancers (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.11-7.99), and lower body mass index (BMI) (every 1-kg/m2 increment with OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-0.99) were independent risk factors for synchronous esophageal neoplasia. NBI with ME was the ideal screening tool (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 97.3%, 94.1%, and 96.3%, respectively, for detection of dysplastic and cancerous esophageal lesions). The treatment strategy was modified after endoscopy in 20 (15.5%) patients. The number needed to screen was 6.45 (95% CI 4.60-10.90). Conclusions NBI-ME surveillance of esophagus should be done in newly-diagnosed H&N cancer patients, especially those with alcohol drinking, lower BMI, and advanced stage of primary tumor. PMID:24456340

  11. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after polypectomy: a consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Sidney J; Zauber, Ann G; Fletcher, Robert H; Stillman, Jonathon S; O'Brien, Michael J; Levin, Bernard; Smith, Robert A; Lieberman, David A; Burt, Randall W; Levin, Theodore R; Bond, John H; Brooks, Durado; Byers, Tim; Hyman, Neil; Kirk, Lynne; Thorson, Alan; Simmang, Clifford; Johnson, David; Rex, Douglas K

    2006-05-01

    Adenomatous polyps are the most common neoplastic findings discovered in people who undergo colorectal screening or who have a diagnostic work-up for symptoms. It was common practice in the 1970s for these patients to have annual follow-up surveillance examinations to detect additional new adenomas and missed synchronous adenomas. As a result of the National Polyp Study report in 1993, which showed clearly in a randomized design that the first postpolypectomy examination could be deferred for 3 years, guidelines published by a gastrointestinal consortium in 1997 recommended that the first follow-up surveillance take place 3 years after polypectomy for most patients. In 2003 these guidelines were updated and colonoscopy was recommended as the only follow-up examination, stratification at baseline into low risk and higher risk for subsequent adenomas was suggested. The 1997 and 2003 guidelines dealt with both screening and surveillance. However, it has become increasingly clear that postpolypectomy surveillance is now a large part of endoscopic practice, draining resources from screening and diagnosis. In addition, surveys have shown that a large proportion of endoscopists are conducting surveillance examinations at shorter intervals than recommended in the guidelines. In the present report, a careful analytic approach was designed to address all evidence available in the literature to delineate predictors of advanced pathology, both cancer and advanced adenomas, so that patients can be stratified more definitely at their baseline colonoscopy into those at lower risk or increased risk for a subsequent advanced neoplasia. People at increased risk have either 3 or more adenomas, high-grade dysplasia, villous features, or an adenoma 1 cm or larger in size. It is recommended that they have a 3-year follow-up colonoscopy. People at lower risk who have 1 or 2 small (<1 cm) tubular adenomas with no high-grade dysplasia can have a follow-up evaluation in 5-10 years, whereas

  12. Novel synthetic antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling inhibit colorectal cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Waaler, Jo; Machon, Ondrej; von Kries, Jens Peter; Wilson, Steven Ray; Lundenes, Elsa; Wedlich, Doris; Gradl, Dietmar; Paulsen, Jan Erik; Machonova, Olga; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Dinh, Huyen; Krauss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is deregulated in several types of human cancer where it plays a central role in tumor cell growth and progression. Here we report the identification of 2 new small molecules that specifically inhibit canonical Wnt pathway at the level of the destruction complex. Specificity was verified in various cellular reporter systems, a Xenopus double-axis formation assay and a gene expression profile analysis. In human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, the new compounds JW67 and JW74 rapidly reduced active β-catenin with a subsequent downregulation of Wnt target genes, including AXIN2, SP5, and NKD1. Notably, AXIN2 protein levels were strongly increased after compound exposure. Long-term treatment with JW74 inhibited the growth of tumor cells in both a mouse xenograft model of CRC and in Apc(Min) mice (multiple intestinal neoplasia, Min). Our findings rationalize further preclinical and clinical evaluation of these new compounds as novel modalities for cancer treatment.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia Enable Javascript to view the ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia (typically known by the acronym ...

  14. Cytomorphology and PCNA expression pattern in bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Cerastoderma edule with haemic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; De Vico, Gionata

    2013-07-09

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) is a pathologic condition reported in several bivalve species in different geographic areas. In this study we describe the cytomorphological features and the proliferative behaviour, assessed by the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), of HN in common cockle Cerastoderma edule and Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovicialis. In mussels the presence of at least 5 types of atypical haemocytes was detected, including A- and B-type cells, previously described in M. edulis and Mytilus sp., with predominance of A-type cells in early phases of the disease and B-type cells in more advanced stages. PCNA immunostaining was positive for 97 to 100% of the neoplastic cells, with both cytoplasmic (A cells) and nuclear patterns (B cells). Conversely, in C. edule there was no distinctive morphological cell sub-population, and staining atypical haemocytes with PCNA (range 93 to 100%) showed nuclear expression in early phases of disease and cytoplasmic expression in more advanced stages. The above findings suggest distinct histo-pathogenetic pathways for HN in mussels and common cockles.

  15. [High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia: state-of-the-art].

    PubMed

    Allina, D O; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zavalishina, L E; Kekeeva, T V; Frank, G A

    2015-01-01

    According to current views, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is the most likely precursor of prostate adenocarcinoma. This review gives the latest data of genetic, proteomic, and morphological analyses of this neoplasia and touches upon the probems that might arise when searching for new markers for differential diagnosis and prognosis estimation.

  16. p53 codon 72 polymorphism in vulval cancer and vulval intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, A N; Ryan, A; Hopster, D; Jacobs, I J

    2000-01-01

    p53 codon 72 polymorphism was analysed in UK women with human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated vulval intraepithelial neoplasia and vulval squamous cell carcinoma. Arginine homozygotes were significantly less common in either group compared with controls. We conclude that the arginine polymorphism may confer protection against the development of HPV-associated vulval neoplasia. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044351

  17. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  18. [Systemic therapy for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2005-06-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to the traditional 5-fluorouracil, newer anticancer drugs are available including irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Monoclonal antibodies like bevacizumab and cetuximab have been integrated into modern treatment regimens. Based on randomized clinical trials we can formulate rational treatment strategies as outlined in this article.

  19. The Role of MicroRNAs in Myeloproliferative Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Shaban; Azizi, Seyed Ghader; Soleimani, Masoud; Farshi, Yadollah; Kashani Khatib, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    MiRs are 17-25 nucleotide non-coding RNAs. These RNAs target approximately 80% of protein coding mRNAs. MiRs control gene expression and altered expression of them affects the development of cancer. MiRs can function as tumor suppressor via down-regulation of proto-oncogenes and may function as oncogenes by suppressing tumor suppressors. Myeloproliferative neoplasias (formerly known as chronic myeloproliferative disorders) form a class of hematologic malignancies demonstrating the expansion of stem cells in one or more hematopoietic cell lines. CML results from an acquired translocation known as BCR-ABL (Philadelphia chromosome). JAK2V617F mutation is present in over 95% of PV, 55% of ET and 65% of PMF cases. Aberrant expression of miR is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasias, pathogenesis, disease progress and response to treatment. MiRs can also be potential therapeutic targets. CML is mainly treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as Imatinib. In addition, altered function of miRs may be used as a prognostic factor in treatment. Resistance to Imatinib is currently a major clinical problem. The role of a number of miRs has been demonstrated in this resistance. Changing expression pattern of miRs can be effective in response to treatment and inhibition of drug resistance. In this paper, we set out to evaluate the effect of miRs in pathogenesis and treatment of MPN. PMID:27489593

  20. Aortic chondroid neoplasia in two Labrador Retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, R; Durham, J A; Premanandan, C; Scansen, B A

    2015-12-01

    In the same week, two Labrador Retriever dogs presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for cardiac evaluation. The presenting signs in both dogs included: weight loss, weakness, lethargy, and decreased femoral pulses. The first dog presented in cardiogenic shock and biventricular congestive heart failure, which initially responded to treatment; however, the dog was euthanized due to deteriorating clinical condition. In contrast, the second dog had a milder clinical course without signs of congestive heart failure, and remained stable over the 2-month period of clinical evaluation prior to euthanasia. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype in the first dog, while a space-occupying intraluminal mass originating at the aortic valve with preserved left ventricular systolic function was observed in the second dog. At autopsy, each dog had a large obstructive luminal mass affecting the ascending aorta and arch. Histopathology revealed that the mass in the first dog was consistent with a benign chondroma, while in the second dog the morphologic characteristics, mitotic activity, and infiltrative growth justified a diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. This report presents the contrasting clinical disease progression and findings in two dogs with aortic neoplasia, with a proposed pathogenesis of cardiac failure secondary to aortic neoplasia.

  1. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  2. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS AND COLORECTAL ADENOCARCINOMA AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TUMOR STAGING AND DEGREE OF CELL DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    PICANÇO-JUNIOR, Olavo Magalhães; OLIVEIRA, Andre Luiz Torres; FREIRE, Lucia Thereza Mascarenhas; BRITO, Rosangela Baia; VILLA, Luisa Lina; MATOS, Délcio

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of neoplasia among the worldwide adult population. Among neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, it is ranked second in relation to prevalence and mortality, but its etiology is only known in around 5% of the cases. It is believed that 15% of malignant diseases are related to viral oncogenesis. Aim To correlate the presence of HPV with the staging and degree of cell differentiation among patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted on 144 patients divided between a test group of 79 cases of colorectal cancer and a control group to analyze 144 patients aged 25 to 85 years (mean, 57.85 years; standard deviation, 15.27 years and median, 58 years). Eighty-six patients (59.7%) were male. For both groups, tissue samples from paraffin blocks were subjected to DNA extraction followed by the polymerase chain reaction using generic and specific primers for HPV 16 and 18. Dot blot hybridization was also performed with the aim of identifying HPV DNA. Results The groups were shown to be homogenous regarding sex, age and site of HPV findings in the samples analyzed. Out of the 41 patients with HPV, 36 (45.6%) were in the cases and five (7.7%) were in the control group (p<0.001). All the HPV cases observed comprised HPV 16, and HPV 18 was not shown in any of the cases studied. There were no significant differences in comparisons of sex, age and site regarding the presence of HPV in either of the groups. It was not observe any significant difference in relation to staging or degree of cell differentiation among the patients with colorectal cancer. Conclusion Human papillomavirus type 16 is present in individuals with colorectal carcinoma. However, its presence was unrelated to staging or degree of differentiation. PMID:25184765

  3. Fibersol-2 induces apoptosis of Apc-deficient colorectal Cancer (SW480) cells and decreases polyp formation in Apc MIN mice.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Sara Cuesta; Olson, Susan Losee; Young So, Eui; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Toru; Preuss, Fabian

    2016-06-02

    The consumption of dietary fibers has been implicated with a lowered risk of human colorectal cancer. Proposed mechanisms involve alterations in the stool consistency, transit time, and formation of short-chain fatty acid by dietary fiber fermentation, and the reorganization of gut microbiota. Here we show that Fibersol-2, a digest-resistant maltodextrin, not only inhibits proliferation of colorectal SW480 cancer cell lines by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), but decreases the numbers of the adenoma count in Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia (MIN) mice carrying a mutation in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli gene by 84 d of age. These observations provide direct evidence that Fibersol-2 intrinsically contains anti-cancer activity, independent of the intestinal metabolism and any potential interactions with the microbiota.

  4. Previstage™ GCC test for staging patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    -embedded lymph nodes for detecting occult metastases. Previstage GCC is a new diagnostic tool that may improve the accuracy of staging, prognosis of clinical outcomes and prediction of therapeutic responses to adjuvant therapy, representing a key advance in the management of patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:18785805

  5. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Han

    2015-05-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the elderly. However, elderly patients with CRC tend to be under-presented in clinical trials and undertreated in clinical practice. Advanced age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective therapy in elderly patients with CRC. The best guide about optimal cancer treatment can be provided by comprehensive geriatric assessment. Elderly patients with stage III colon cancer can enjoy the same benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin or capecitabine as younger patients, without a substantial increase in toxicity. With conflicting results of retrospective studies and a lack of data available from randomized studies, combined modality treatment should be used with great caution in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic CRC. For elderly patients who are frail or vulnerable, however, monotherapy or a stop-and-go strategy may be desirable. The use of targeted therapies in older patients with metastatic CRC appears to be promising in view of their better efficacy and toxicity. Treatment should be individualized based on the nature of the disease, the physiologic or functional status, and the patient's preference.

  6. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer prevention: point.

    PubMed

    Arber, Nadir

    2008-08-01

    The limited success of current treatments for most advanced common malignancies highlights the importance of cancer prevention. Clinical trials on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor drugs showed the potential of chemoprevention as a strategy for reducing cancer incidence, although not without associated side effects. The attractiveness of these drugs partly stems from an ability to engage multiple mechanisms of action by their potential to influence multiple components of the carcinogenesis pathway, from initiation to progression. There are two isoforms of the COX enzymes. COX-1 is constitutively expressed in normal tissues and serves as a "housekeeper" of mucosal integrity, whereas COX-2 is an immediate early response gene that is highly inducible by neoplastic and inflammatory stimuli. COX-2 is significantly overexpressed in colorectal neoplasms, making it an attractive therapeutic target. The drug market has been revolutionized by the development of preparations targeted selectively against COX-2, and a proof of concept has been achieved. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer is already possible with celecoxib, but it is still not the ultimate drug of choice especially because of the cardiovascular risk associated with COX-2 inhibitors. Better patient selection and more effective and safer drugs are needed. Celecoxib is probably best used in a subset of individuals at moderate to high colorectal cancer risk and low risk of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Genetic Heterogeneity in Colorectal Cancer and its Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Barranha, Rui; Costa, José Luís; Carneiro, Fátima; Machado, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the development of complementary diagnostic exams and modern targeted therapies, colorectal cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this context, a lot of research has been conducted in the last years to find new markers of poor prognosis. The existence of a complex tumour architecture formed by multiple subclones genetically heterogeneous has been increasingly considered in recent studies as an element of particular importance. This feature seems to influence factors as relevant as the representativeness of tumour biopsies for genetic diagnosis and the efficacy of targeted therapies.There is growing evidence suggesting a relation between genetic heterogeneity and the patientsâ prognosis. The widespread use of next-generation sequencing techniques will allow a better understanding of the true degree of genetic heterogeneity in colorectal tumours, its causes and impact on the course of the disease. In this review we intend to analyse the recent findings related to the genetic heterogeneity of colorectal cancer, as well as its major clinical implications.

  9. Microtopographic Inspection and Fractal Analysis of Skin Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Hipolito, Alberto Valencia; Gutierrez, Gustavo Fidel; Chanona, Jorge; Gallegos, Eva Ramón

    2008-04-01

    ) corresponding to some neoplasia is higher (1.334+/-0.072) than those for healthy skin (1.091+/-0.082). A significant difference between the fractal dimensions of neoplasia and healhty skin (>0.001) was registered. The FD of microtopography maps (FDm) can also distinguish between healthy and malignant tissue in general (2.277+/-0.070 to 2.309+/-0.040), but not discriminate the different types of skin neoplasias. The combination of the rugometric evaluation and fractal geometry characterization provides valuable information about the malignity of skin lesions and type of lesion.

  10. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response. PMID:27380134

  11. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  12. Thyroid neoplasia following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Jarosz, H.; Calandra, D.; McCall, A.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1987-06-01

    The question of thyroid neoplasia following high-dose radiation treatment to the neck and mediastinum for malignant neoplasms such as Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and young adults has been raised recently. Five patients, 19 to 39 years old, were operated on for thyroid neoplasms that developed following cervical and mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had papillary carcinomas and two had follicular adenomas. The latency period between radiation exposure and the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasm ranged from eight to 16 years. This limited series provided strong support for the recommendation that children and young adults who are to receive high-dose radiation therapy to the head, neck, and mediastinum should receive suppressive doses of thyroxine prior to radiation therapy in order to suppress thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and then be maintained on a regimen of suppression permanently.

  13. Preconception radiation, intrauterine diagnostic radiation, and childhood neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Shiono, P.H.; Chung, C.S.; Myrianthopoulos, N.C.

    1980-10-01

    Diagnostic x-ray examinations as a potential risk for neoplasia were investigated in a prospective study of 55,908 women who participated in the Collaborative Perinatal Project of the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke. The x-ray exposure histories of 145 mothers whose children developed neoplasms and 290 matched controls were examined. Of the childhood neoplasms, 40 were malignant and 105 were benign. Generally, the data were consistent with increased risk of malignant neoplasms among children of women exposed to x-rays before and during pregnancy, with a somewhat higher relative risk estimate for preconception exposure. No significant association of x-ray exposure and benign neoplasms was detected.

  14. A metastatic ovarian angiosarcoma mimicking hematologic neoplasia at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gaiolla, Rafael Dezen; Duarte, Ivison Xavier; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare aggressive neoplasms of vascular endothelial origin with a high metastatic rate and poor prognosis. Involvement of the bone marrow by the angiosarcoma is exceedingly uncommon, and there have only been a few cases reported in the literature to date. Clinical manifestations and common laboratory findings of bone marrow involvement can mimic other more common bone marrow-replacing neoplasias such as lymphomas and acute leukemia. A definitive diagnosis is difficult to make from cytologic material, probably due to an associated bone marrow fibrosis, and requires bone marrow trephine biopsy with an immunohistochemical profile. Here we had the opportunity to study a case of metastatic angiosarcoma with positive cytologic findings and an unusual presentation that challenged its primary diagnosis.

  15. A Metastatic Ovarian Angiosarcoma Mimicking Hematologic Neoplasia at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gaiolla, Rafael Dezen; Duarte, Ívison Xavier; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare aggressive neoplasms of vascular endothelial origin with a high metastatic rate and poor prognosis. Involvement of the bone marrow by the angiosarcoma is exceedingly uncommon, and there have only been a few cases reported in the literature to date. Clinical manifestations and common laboratory findings of bone marrow involvement can mimic other more common bone marrow-replacing neoplasias such as lymphomas and acute leukemia. A definitive diagnosis is difficult to make from cytologic material, probably due to an associated bone marrow fibrosis, and requires bone marrow trephine biopsy with an immunohistochemical profile. Here we had the opportunity to study a case of metastatic angiosarcoma with positive cytologic findings and an unusual presentation that challenged its primary diagnosis. PMID:24847252

  16. Photodynamic therapy of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) high grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Belotto, Renata; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer and associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in target cells that will generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon illumination, inducing the death of abnormal tissue and PDT with less damaging to normal tissues than surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy and seems to be a promising alternative procedure for CIN treatment. The CIN high grades (II and III) presents potential indications for PDT due the success of PDT for CIN low grade treatment. The patients with CIN high grade that were treated with new clinic protocol shows lesion regression to CIN low grade 60 days after the treatment. The new clinical protocol using for treatment of CIN high grade shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  17. Myeloid Neoplasias: What Molecular Analyses Are Telling Us

    PubMed Central

    Gutiyama, Luciana M.; Coutinho, Diego F.; Lipkin, Marina V.; Zalcberg, Ilana R.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, cytogenetic and molecular characterizations of hematological disorders at diagnosis and followup have been most valuable for guiding therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Genetic and epigenetic alterations detected by different procedures have been associated to different cancer types and are considered important indicators for disease classification, differential diagnosis, prognosis, response, and individualization of therapy. The search for new biomarkers has been revolutionized by high-throughput technologies. At this point, it seems that we have overcome technological barriers, but we are still far from sorting the biological puzzle. Evidence based on translational research is required for validating novel genetic and epigenetic markers for routine clinical practice. We herein discuss the importance of genetic abnormalities and their molecular pathways in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms. We also discuss how novel genomic abnormalities may interact and reassess concepts and classifications of myeloid neoplasias. PMID:23056961

  18. [Currently available classifications of lymphoid neoplasia and their clinical applicability].

    PubMed

    Nakamine, H; Nanba, K

    1996-11-01

    Controversy and confusion in the classification of lymphoid neoplasia have long been sources of frustration as exemplifed by the statement of Rupert A. Willis in 1948, that "Nowhere in pathology has a chaos of names so clouded clear concept as in the subject of lymphoid tumors." Taxonomically, "Classifications are theories about the basis of natural order, not dull catalogues compiled only to avoid chaos." (Stephen J. Gould, 1989), but this definition can not always be applicable to the classifications of human diseases, even though they themselves are also biologic phenomena. The International Lymphoma Study Group has recently proposed "a revised European-American classification of lymphoid neoplasms", which has again resulted in the time of "the great debate". The major purpose of this article is, therefore, to assess the above classification.

  19. Anastomotic dehiscence (AD) in colorectal cancer surgery: mechanical anastomosis versus manual anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Oprescu, C; Beuran, M; Nicolau, AE; Negoi, I; Venter, MD; Morteanu, S; Oprescu-Macovei, AM

    2012-01-01

    disease, anastomotic dehiscence incidence was of 13.8% (4/29) when using mechanical suture and 8.3% (1/12) when using manual suturing. The period required for postoperative resumption of intestinal transit was of 3.12 days for mechanical suturing and 3.93 days in case of manual suture. The mean time (MT) to perform the ileocolic and colocolic mechanical anastomosis is 9 ± 2 minutes. If anastomosis is “cured" with surjet wire or separate threads, MT is 11 ± 5 minutes. MT to perform the ileocolic and colocolic manual anastomosis is 9 ± 3 minutes for surjet wire and 18 ± 5 minutes for separate threads. MT to perform the colorectal mechanical anastomosis is 15 ± 4 minutes. MT to perform the colorectal manual anastomosis is 30 ± 7 minutes (using separate threads). Detailing the nature of the surgical reinterventions, we have found: 7 reinterventions for AD post mechanical anastomoses (1 case of suture defect, 2 cases of resection and re-anastomoses, 4 cases with external branching stoma); 5 reinterventions for AD post manual anastomoses (0 cases of suture defect, 1 case of resection with re-anastomosis, 4 cases of external shunt stoma). In the analyzed group, we recorded a total of 57 deaths from a total of 714 cases resulting in a mortality rate of 7.98%. Conclusions: Mechanical suture technique is not ideal for making digestive sutures. With the exception of low colorectal anastomoses where mechanical sutures are preferable, we cannot claim the superiority of mechanical anastomoses over those manually made, for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23346248

  20. RNF43 and ZNRF3 are commonly altered in serrated pathway colorectal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Catherine E.; McKeone, Diane M.; Kalimutho, Murugan; Bettington, Mark L.; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Dumenil, Troy D.; Wockner, Leesa F.; Burge, Matthew; Leggett, Barbara A.; Whitehall, Vicki L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Serrated pathway colorectal cancers (CRCs) are characterised by a BRAF mutation and half display microsatellite instability (MSI). The Wnt pathway is commonly upregulated in conventional CRC through APC mutation. By contrast, serrated cancers do not mutate APC. We investigated mutation of the ubiquitin ligases RNF43 and ZNRF3 as alternate mechanism of altering the Wnt signal in serrated colorectal neoplasia. RNF43 was mutated in 47/54(87%) BRAF mutant/MSI and 8/33(24%) BRAF mutant/microsatellite stable cancers compared to only 3/79(4%) BRAF wildtype cancers (p<0.0001). ZNRF3 was mutated in 16/54(30%) BRAF mutant/MSI and 5/33(15%) BRAF mutant/microsatellite stable compared to 0/27 BRAF wild type cancers (p=0.004). An RNF43 frameshift mutation (X659fs) occurred in 80% BRAF mutant/MSI cancers. This high rate was verified in a second series of 25/35(71%) BRAF mutant/MSI cancers. RNF43 and ZNRF3 had lower transcript expression in BRAF mutant compared to BRAF wildtype cancers and less cytoplasmic protein expression in BRAF mutant/MSI compared to other subtypes. Treatment with a porcupine inhibitor reduced RNF43/ZNRF3 mutant colony growth by 50% and synergised with a MEK inhibitor to dramatically reduce growth. This study suggests inactivation of RNF43 and ZNRF3 is important in serrated tumorigenesis and has identified a potential therapeutic strategy for this cancer subtype. PMID:27661107

  1. Texture Analysis of Abnormal Cell Images for Predicting the Continuum of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanougast, Camel

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal cell (ABC) is a markedly heterogeneous tissue area and can be categorized into three main types: benign hyperplasia (BH), carcinoma (Ca), and intraepithelial neoplasia (IN) or precursor cancerous lesion. In this study, the goal is to determine and characterize the continuum of colorectal cancer by using a 3D-texture approach. ABC was segmented in preprocessing step using an active contour segmentation technique. Cell types were analyzed based on textural features extracted from the gray level cooccurrence matrices (GLCMs). Significant texture features were selected using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) of ABC with a p value cutoff of p < 0.01. Features selected were reduced with a principal component analysis (PCA), which accounted for 97% of the cumulative variance from significant features. The simulation results identified 158 significant features based on ANOVA from a total of 624 texture features extracted from GLCMs. Performance metrics of ABC discrimination based on significant texture features showed 92.59% classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 94.44% specificity. These findings suggest that texture features extracted from GLCMs are sensitive enough to discriminate between the ABC types and offer the opportunity to predict cell characteristics of colorectal cancer. PMID:28331793

  2. General Aspects of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centelles, Josep J.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments. PMID:23209942

  3. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  4. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:27713769

  5. Dietary intakes of red meat, poultry, and fish during high school and risk of colorectal adenomas in women.

    PubMed

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Bernstein, Adam M; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S; Willett, Walter C; Wu, Kana

    2013-07-15

    Adolescent diet may be etiologically relevant for colorectal carcinogenesis. We examined the association between meat and fish intakes during adolescence and the risk of colorectal adenomas later in life among 19,771 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II. Subjects had completed a validated food frequency questionnaire in 1998 (when aged 34-51 years) about their diets during high school and subsequently underwent at least 1 lower-bowel endoscopy during the study period (1998-2007). During this period, 1,494 subjects were diagnosed with colorectal adenomas. Intake of red meat during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk when comparing those in the highest versus lowest category of intake (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 1.35). Similarly, intake of fish during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.78, 1.17). Intake of poultry during adolescence was associated with a lower risk of total colorectal (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.99), distal (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.99), rectal (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.90), and advanced (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.93) adenomas. Replacement of 1 serving per day of red meat with 1 serving per day of poultry or fish was associated with 41% and 35% decreased risks for rectal adenomas and advanced adenomas, respectively. Our findings do not suggest an association between red meat intake during adolescence and colorectal adenomas later in life, but higher poultry intake during this time was associated with a lower risk of colorectal adenomas.

  6. Focusing the Spotlight on the Zebrafish Intestine to Illuminate Mechanisms of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobert, Viola H; Mouradov, Dmitri; Heath, Joan K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, encompassing colon and rectal cancer, arises from the epithelial lining of the large bowel. It is most prevalent in Westernised societies and is increasing in frequency as the world becomes more industrialised. Unfortunately, metastatic colorectal cancer is not cured by chemotherapy and the annual number of deaths caused by colorectal cancer, currently 700,000, is expected to rise. Our understanding of the contribution that genetic mutations make to colorectal cancer, although incomplete, is reasonably well advanced. However, it has only recently become widely appreciated that in addition to the ongoing accumulation of genetic mutations, chronic inflammation also plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of this disease. While a robust and tractable genetic model of colorectal cancer in zebrafish, suitable for pre-clinical studies, is not yet available, the identification of genes required for the rapid proliferation of zebrafish intestinal epithelial cells during development has highlighted a number of essential genes that could be targeted to disable colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, appreciation of the utility of zebrafish to study intestinal inflammation is on the rise. In particular, zebrafish provide unique opportunities to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental factors on the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier function. With currently available tools, the interplay between epigenetic regulators, intestinal injury, microbiota composition and innate immune cell mobilisation can be analysed in exquisite detail. This provides excellent opportunities to define critical events that could potentially be targeted therapeutically. Further into the future, the use of zebrafish larvae as hosts for xenografts of human colorectal cancer tissue, while still in its infancy, holds great promise that zebrafish could one day provide a practical, preclinical personalized medicine platform for the rapid assessment of the

  7. Viral-type orchitis: a potential mimic of testicular neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Kristina M; Young, Robert H; Ferry, Judith A

    2009-10-01

    Orchitis of viral or presumed viral etiology is an uncommon cause of testicular pain or enlargement. Rarely orchitis is clinically or radiographically suggestive of neoplasia, resulting in a testicular biopsy or orchiectomy being performed. Between 1978 and 2004, 10 cases submitted in consultation were diagnosed as orchitis at the Massachusetts General Hospital. The patients were from 18 to 37 years of age and presented with testicular enlargement or a mass, pain, or both. Radiographic studies were suspicious for a neoplasm in all 5 cases in which results were available. The patients underwent testicular biopsy (2 cases), orchiectomy (6 cases), biopsy immediately followed by orchiectomy (1 case), or biopsy followed by orchiectomy 3 weeks later (1 case). The cases were submitted with diagnoses that included intratubular seminoma, intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unspecified, Sertoli cell hyperplasia, myeloid sarcoma, and lymphoma. Microscopic examination revealed preservation of the architecture of the testicular parenchyma, typically with hemorrhage and edema, with patchy inflammation in the form of a lymphohistiocytic infiltrate within seminiferous tubules and also between tubules. The intratubular infiltrate usually predominated. Immunohistochemical studies, performed in 7 cases showed a mixture of CD68+ histiocytes and CD3+ T cells, with few B cells (CD20+) and few granulocytes. Follow-up was available in 5 cases; all 5 patients were alive and well 11 months to 10 years after diagnosis. In the rare instance in which a testicular specimen with orchitis is submitted for pathologic evaluation, diagnosis may be difficult. Familiarity with the pathologic changes characteristic of orchitis will help avoid misdiagnosis.

  8. Treatment of ocular surface squamous neoplasia with Mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Muecke, J

    2010-05-01

    AIM To report the outcome of treatment of non-invasive ocular surface squamous neoplasia (or conjunctival-corneal intra-epithelial neoplasia (CCIN)) where topical mitomycin C (MMC) has been used in the treatment regimen. DESIGN Prospective, non-comparative interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS 91 primary or recurrent CCIN lesions from 90 patients treated in a single ocular oncology centre over a 10.5-year period. INTERVENTION 73 cases of localised, non-invasive CCIN and eight cases of recurrent CCIN received a treatment regimen of surgical excision+/-cryotherapy, followed by two to three 1-week cycles of adjuvant topical MMC (0.04% four times a day). 10 cases of diffuse CCIN received two to three 1-week cycles of topical MMC (0.04% four times a day) as sole primary treatment. Main outcome measure Successful treatment was defined as no clinical recurrence of CCIN. RESULTS Mean follow-up of 56.8 months (range 5.8 to 119.8) and median 57.3 months, revealed no recurrences (0%) in the localised primary group, and one persistent case and two recurrences (30%) in the diffuse primary group. There was one recurrence (12.5%) in the recurrent group, but this was in the only eye with a diffuse type of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS MMC treatment following surgical excision appears to decrease the recurrence rate of localised CCIN and should be considered as adjuvant therapy in primary treatment. MMC should also be considered as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of localised recurrent disease. MMC may be used as sole therapy in more diffuse disease, but close ongoing follow-up is recommended in view of the significant risk of persistent or recurrent disease.

  9. Computed tomographic findings in 57 cats with primary pulmonary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Aarsvold, Stacie; Reetz, Jennifer A; Reichle, Jean K; Jones, Ian D; Lamb, Christopher R; Evola, Maria G; Keyerleber, Michele A; Marolf, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary neoplasia is relatively uncommon in cats and generally has a poor prognosis. In this multicenter, retrospective study of 57 cats with pulmonary neoplasia, the most frequent presenting signs were anorexia/inappetence (39%) and cough (37%). The pulmonary tumors were considered to be incidental findings in 9% cats. In computed tomographic (CT) images, primary pulmonary tumors appeared as a pulmonary mass in 55 (96%) cats and as a disseminated pulmonary lesion without a defined mass in two (4%) cats. Most pulmonary tumors were in the caudal lobes, with 28 (49%) in the right caudal lobe and 17 (30%) in the left caudal lobe. CT features associated with pulmonary tumors included mass in contact with visceral pleura (96%), irregular margins (83%), well-defined borders (79%), bronchial compression (74%), gas-containing cavities (63%), foci of mineral attenuation (56%), and bronchial invasion (19%). The mean (range) maximal dimension of the pulmonary masses was 3.5 cm (1.1-11.5 cm). Additional foci of pulmonary disease compatible with metastasis were observed in 53% cats. Pleural fluid was evident in 30% cats and pulmonary thrombosis in 12% cats. The histologic diagnoses were 47 (82%) adenocarcinomas, six (11%) tumors of bronchial origin, three (5%) adenosquamous cell carcinomas, and one (2%) squamous cell carcinoma. In this series, adenocarcinoma was the predominant tumor type, but shared many features with less common tumor types. No associations were identified between tumor type and CT features. Prevalence of suspected intrapulmonary metastasis was higher than in previous radiographic studies of cats with lung tumors.

  10. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

  11. Capecitabine: indications and future perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassata, A; Procoplo, G; Alù, M; Ferrari, L; Ferrario, E; Beretta, E; Longarini, R; Busto, G; De Candis, D; Bajetta, E

    2001-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines remain the most important drugs in the treatment of breast and colorectal carcinoma, but response rates and survival time have been disappointing. Optimal administration is by continuous intravenous infusion, which makes it cumbersome to use and compromises patient independence. Recently, a number of new agents, including fluorouracil prodrugs and selective dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase inhibitors, have been studied, with promising results. Capecitabine is the first in a new class of fluoropyrimidines. It is an oral, tumor-activated anticancer drug whose activity mimics that of continuously infused 5-fluorouracil. Capecitabine circumvents dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase catabolism and appears to be at least as active against metastatic colorectal and breast cancer as conventionally administered intravenous 5-fluorouracil, with significantly less toxicity, an improved quality of life, and lesser cost. Capecitabine may ultimately provide enhanced antitumor activity to fluorouracil-containing regimes for advanced colorectal and breast cancer.

  12. Population screening for colorectal cancer by flexible sigmoidoscopy or CT colonography: study protocol for a multicenter randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most prevalent type of cancer in Europe. A single flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) screening at around the age of 60 years prevents about one-third of CRC cases. However, FS screens only the distal colon, and thus mortality from proximal CRC is unaffected. Computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a highly accurate examination that allows assessment of the entire colon. However, the benefit of CTC testing as a CRC screening test is uncertain. We designed a randomized trial to compare participation rate, detection rates, and costs between CTC (with computer-aided detection) and FS as primary tests for population-based screening. Methods/Design An invitation letter to participate in a randomized screening trial comparing CTC versus FS will be mailed to a sample of 20,000 people aged 58 or 60 years, living in the Piedmont region and the Verona district of Italy. Individuals with a history of CRC, adenomas, inflammatory bowel disease, or recent colonoscopy, or with two first-degree relatives with CRC will be excluded from the study by their general practitioners. Individuals responding positively to the invitation letter will be then randomized to the intervention group (CTC) or control group (FS), and scheduled for the screening procedure. The primary outcome parameter of this part of the trial is the difference in advanced neoplasia detection between the two screening tests. Secondary outcomes are cost-effectiveness analysis, referral rates for colonoscopy induced by CTC versus FS, and the expected and perceived burden of the procedures. To compare participation rates for CTC versus FS, 2,000 additional eligible subjects will be randomly assigned to receive an invitation for screening with CTC or FS. In the CTC arm, non-responders will be offered fecal occult blood test (FOBT) as alternative screening test, while in the FS arm, non-responders will receive an invitation letter to undergo screening with either FOBT or CTC

  13. Development of a Reactive Stroma Associated with Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia in EAF2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E.; Ai, Junkui; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Wang, Yujuan; Wang, Dan; Eisermann, Kurtis; Rigatti, Lora H.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Ma, Hei M.; Wang, Xinhui; Dar, Javid A.; Parwani, Anil V.; Simons, Brian W.; Ittman, Michael M.; Li, Luyuan; Davies, Benjamin J.; Wang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-responsive tumor suppressor frequently deleted in advanced prostate cancer that functions as a transcription elongation factor of RNA Pol II through interaction with the ELL family proteins. EAF2 knockout mice on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background developed late-onset lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, B-cell lymphoma and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In order to further characterize the role of EAF2 in the development of prostatic defects, the effects of EAF2 loss were compared in different murine strains. In the current study, aged EAF2−/− mice on both the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ backgrounds exhibited mPIN lesions as previously reported on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background. In contrast to the 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J mixed genetic background, the mPIN lesions in C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ EAF2−/− mice were associated with stromal defects characteristic of a reactive stroma and a statistically significant increase in prostate microvessel density. Stromal inflammation and increased microvessel density was evident in EAF2-deficient mice on a pure C57BL/6J background at an early age and preceded the development of the histologic epithelial hyperplasia and neoplasia found in the prostates of older EAF2−/− animals. Mice deficient in EAF2 had an increased recovery rate and a decreased overall response to the effects of androgen deprivation. EAF2 expression in human cancer was significantly down-regulated and microvessel density was significantly increased compared to matched normal prostate tissue; furthermore EAF2 expression was negatively correlated with microvessel density. These results suggest that the EAF2 knockout mouse on the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ genetic backgrounds provides a model of PIN lesions associated with an altered prostate microvasculature and reactive stromal compartment corresponding to that reported in human prostate tumors. PMID:24260246

  14. Racial and ethnic factors in the genetic pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Carethers, J M

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer can develop by two distinct pathogenic mechanisms: one involving chromosomal breakage and aneuploidy (called chromosomal instability) and one involving mutations at DNA micro-satellite sequences (termed micro-satellite instability). Relatively few reports consider these mechanisms of colorectal cancer development across racial or ethnic groups. Available data indicate a moderate increase in colorectal cancer risk among Ashkenazi Jews who have a mutational polymorphism at codon 1307 in the APC gene. In American blacks, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of right-sided colonic tumors and an earlier age of onset of colorectal cancer. In addition, blacks have the highest colon cancer incidence in the United States among ethnic groups and have poorer 5-year survival rates compared with whites. While some differences may be attributed to health care access and socioeconomic differences, these do not completely explain all the variances. In the chromosomal instability pathway, there are polymorphisms within the P53 gene that are more prevalent in blacks, but the significance of these polymorphisms is not fully known. Blacks are more likely to demonstrate micro-satellite instability in their tumors; however, the mechanism for this phenomenon in blacks is unexplored. Differences in diet among racial and ethnic groups and polymorphic variations in drug metabolizing or acetylation genes have not been adequately cataloged. Identification of genetic and environmental factors among racial and ethnic groups should offer some insights into the observed epidemiologic data and advance opportunities to better understand the control and development of colorectal cancer.

  15. Oxidative Balance Score, Colorectal Adenoma, and Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, So Yeon J.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Flanders, W. Dana; McClellan, William M.; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Gross, Myron D.; Judd, Suzanne; Goodman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background An oxidative balance score (OBS) that combines pro- and anti-oxidant exposures was previously reported to be associated with incident sporadic colorectal adenoma. We extend the previous analyses by assessing associations of the OBS and colorectal adenoma with circulating biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes [FIP] and fluorescent oxidation products [FOP]), and inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP]). Methods Using pooled data from two previously conducted colonoscopy-based case-control studies of incident, sporadic colorectal adenoma (n=365), the OBS was constructed and divided into three approximately equal intervals, with the lowest interval used as the reference. Biomarker levels were dichotomized as “high” versus “low” based on the median values among controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results For the OBS-adenoma association, the ORs (95% CIs) for the middle and highest (relative to the lowest) score intervals were 0.81 (0.46–1.43) and 0.39 (0.17–0.89), respectively. The corresponding OBS category-specific ORs (95% CIs) were 0.50 (0.25–1.01) and 0.25 (0.10–0.65) for FIP, 2.01 (1.13–3.75) and 3.48 (1.51–8.02) for FOP, and 0.57 (0.31–1.04) and 0.21 (0.09–0.49) for CRP. The ORs (95% CIs) reflecting associations of adenoma with high levels of FIP, FOP, and CRP were 1.89 (1.08–3.30), 1.82 (1.11–2.99) and 1.45 (0.88–2.40), respectively. Conclusions As hypothesized, the OBS was inversely associated with colorectal adenoma and circulating FIP and CRP levels. The reason for the unexpected direct OBS-FOP association is unknown. Impact These data support the use of combined measures of pro- and anti-oxidant exposures in studies of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:24443405

  16. MicroRNA MIR21 and T Cells in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mima, Kosuke; Nishihara, Reiko; Nowak, Jonathan A; Kim, Sun A; Song, Mingyang; Inamura, Kentaro; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Yang, Juhong; Dou, Ruoxu; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Baba, Hideo; Giovannucci, Edward L; Bowden, Michaela; Loda, Massimo; Giannakis, Marios; Bass, Adam J; Dranoff, Glenn; Freeman, Gordon J; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between colorectal neoplasia and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment remain to be elucidated. Experimental evidence suggests that microRNA MIR21 (miR-21) suppresses antitumor T-cell-mediated immunity. Thus, we hypothesized that tumor MIR21 expression might be inversely associated with T-cell density in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 538 rectal and colon cancer cases from the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we measured tumor MIR21 expression by a quantitative reverse-transcription PCR assay. Densities of CD3(+), CD8(+), CD45RO (PTPRC)(+), and FOXP3(+) cells in tumor tissue were determined by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association of MIR21 expression (ordinal quartiles as a predictor variable) with T-cell density (ordinal quartiles as an outcome variable), adjusting for tumor molecular features, including microsatellite instability; CpG island methylator phenotype; KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations; and LINE-1 methylation. We adjusted the two-sided α level to 0.012 for multiple hypothesis testing. Tumor MIR21 expression was inversely associated with densities of CD3(+) and CD45RO(+) cells (Ptrend < 0.0005). The multivariate odds ratio of the highest versus lowest quartile of MIR21 for a unit increase in quartile categories of CD3(+) or CD45RO(+) cells was 0.44 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.28 to 0.68] or 0.41 (95% CI, 0.26-0.64), respectively. Our data support a possible role of tumor epigenetic deregulation by noncoding RNA in suppressing the antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immune response and suggest MIR21 as a potential target for immunotherapy and prevention in colorectal cancer.

  17. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  18. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  19. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  20. Molecular characteristics of colorectal serrated polyps and hyperplastic polyps

    PubMed Central

    Sambuudash, Otgontuya; Kim, Hee Man; Jo, Hannah; Kim, Hyun Sik; Lee, Kyong Joo; Park, Hong Jun; Kim, Jae Woo; Cho, Mee Yon; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The serrated neoplasia pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis is characterized by BRAF mutation and aberrant DNA methylation, which have not been reported on Korean patients. The aim of this study was to investigate BRAF mutation and DNA methylation in colorectal serrated polyps and the right colon. Between 2005 and 2013, 146 colon polyps (47 tubular adenomas [TAs], 53 traditional serrated adenomas [TSAs], 17 sessile serrated adenomas/polyps [SSAs], and 29 hyperplastic polyps in the proximal colon [PHPs]) were collected from patients. Paraffin-embedded colon polyp tissue was used for DNA extraction. BRAF V600E mutation was identified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. The methylation status of the long interspersed nucleotide element-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), mutL homolog 1 (hMLH1), and CD133 genes were evaluated through disulfite conversion, PCR, and pyrosequencing assay. BRAF V600E mutation was found in 2.1% of TAs, 47.2% of TSAs, 41.2% of SSAs, and 20.7% of PHPs. TSA and SSA had higher BRAF mutation rates than did TA (P < 0.0001). TSA had higher BRAF mutation rates than did PHP (P = 0.018). IGFBP7 hypermethylation was found in 17% of TAs, 37.7% of TSAs, 88.2% of SSAs, and 37.5% of PHPs. TSA and SSA had higher hypermethylation of IGFBP7 than did TA (P = 0.021 and P < 0.0001, respectively). SSA had higher hypermethylation of IGFBP7 than did PHP (P = 0.002). hMLH1 hypermethylation was found in 2.1% of TAs, 5.7% of TSAs, 0% of SSAs, and 0% of PHPs. CD133 hypermethylation was found in 21.3% of TAs, 9.4% of TSAs, 35.3% of SSAs, and 17.4% of PHPs. BRAF mutation and methylation in TSA and SSA are different from those in PHP in Koreans. These findings suggested that PHP may have different molecular characteristics compared with other serrated polyps. PMID:27930579

  1. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  2. Targeting histone methylation for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Lin, Chengyuan; Zhong, Linda L. D.; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping; Wu, Jiang; Bian, Zhaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) results from accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Disruption of epigenetic regulation in CRC, particularly aberrant histone methylation mediated by histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and demethylases (HDMs), have drawn increasing interest in recent years. In this paper, we aim to review the roles of histone methylation and associated enzymes in the pathogenesis of CRC, and the development of small-molecule modulators to regulate histone methylation for treating CRC. Multiple levels of evidence suggest that aberrant histone methylations play important roles in CRC. More than 20 histone-methylation enzymes are found to be clinically relevant to CRC, including 17 oncoproteins and 8 tumor suppressors. Inhibitors of EZH2 and DOT1L have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects in preclinical CRC treatment. Potent and selective chemical probes of histone-methylation enzymes are required for validation of their functional roles in carcinogenesis and clinical translations as CRC therapies. With EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438 entering into phase I/II trials for advanced solid tumors, histone methylation is emerging as a promising target for CRC. PMID:28286564

  3. Prevalence of neoplasia in llamas and alpacas (Oregon State University, 2001-2006).

    PubMed

    Valentine, Beth A; Martin, Jeanne M

    2007-03-01

    Prevalence and type of neoplastic disease were determined in 551 camelid submissions (368 alpacas [Lama pacos], 180 llamas [Lama glama], and 3 cases in which species was not identified) over a 5-year period. Forty neoplasms were identified in 38 animals (6.9%). Prevalence of neoplasia in llamas was higher (11%) than in alpacas (4.9%). Mean age of camelids with neoplasia was 9.42 +/- 4.9 years. Mean age of alpacas with neoplasia (5.48 +/- 3.7 years) was significantly less than of llamas with neoplasia (12.53 +/- 3.2 years; P < 0.001). Cutaneous and mucocutaneous fibroma/fibropapilloma was most common (10 animals), followed by cutaneous and mucocutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (6 animals), disseminated lymphoma (5 animals), and fibrosarcoma (4 animals). Four of 5 animals with lymphoma were alpacas, aged 0.21 to 4 years. Lymphoma occurred in 1 aged llama (15 years). Disseminated carcinoma and adenocarcinoma occurred in 4 llamas and 2 alpacas, and included biliary (2), gastrointestinal (2), mammary gland (1), and unknown (1) origin. Mean age of camelids with any type of carcinoma or adenocarcinoma (12.36 +/- 2.8 years) was significantly greater than that of camelids with lymphoma (4.24 +/- 6.2 years; P = 0.02). Results indicate that neoplasia is relatively common in camelids and that there are differences between llamas and alpacas as regards prevalence of neoplasia, tumor types, and age at diagnosis.

  4. The Spatial Predilection for Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I.-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs) are easily missed with conventional white-light endoscopy. This study aimed to assess whether early ESCNs have a spatial predilection and the patterns of recurrence after endoscopic treatment. We analyzed the circumferential and longitudinal location of early ESCNs, as well as their correlations with exposure to carcinogens in a cohort of 162 subjects with 248 early ESCNs; 219 of which were identified by screening and 29 by surveillance endoscopy. The circumferential location was identified using a clock-face orientation, and the longitudinal location was identified according to the distance from the incisor. The most common circumferential and longitudinal distributions of the early ESCNs were found in the 6 to 9 o’clock quadrant (38.5%) and at 26 to 30 cm from the incisor (41.3%), respectively. A total of 163 lesions (75%) were located in the lower hemisphere arc, and 149 (68.4%) were located at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor. One hundred eleven (51%) early ESCNs were centered within the “hot zone” (i.e., lower hemisphere arc of the esophagus at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor), which comprised 20% of the esophageal area. Exposure to alcohol, betel nut, or cigarette was risk factors for the development of early ESCNs in the lower hemisphere. After complete endoscopic treatment, the mean annual incidence of metachronous tumors was 10%. In addition, 43% of the metachronous recurrent neoplasias developed within the “hot zone.” Cox regression analysis revealed that the index tumor within the hot zone (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–8.68; P = 0.02) and the presence of numerous Lugol-voiding lesions in the esophageal background mucosa were independent predictors for metachronous recurrence (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.36–15.56; P = 0.01). We identified a hot zone that may be used to enhance the detection of early ESCNs during endoscopic screening and surveillance

  5. Sinonasal Neoplasia – Clinicopathological Profile And Importance of Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sarawagi, Radha; Raghuwanshi, Sameer; Yadav, Pankaj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal cavity and Paranasal sinus malignancies are very rare, in which maxillary sinus is the commonest, followed by ethmoid, frontal and sphenoid sinus. Computed Tomography (CT) & Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) play a key role in diagnosis, staging and management of paranasal sinuses and nasal pathologies. Multiplanar imaging in CT helps better imaging of critical anatomical areas. Aim of our study was to study the incidence, clinical features, CT features and its importance in the management of sinonasal neoplasms. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital of MP, India. Consecutive 40 histologically proven cases of sinonasal neoplasia who visited the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Radiotherapy are included in our study. Demography and clinical features were recorded. Cases of nasal and paranasal sinus masses diagnosed on CT attending ENT and Radiotherapy OPD or admitted in the Radiotherapy ward forms the material of this study. This included patients of both sexes and all ages. Histopathological examination was asked to confirm the diagnosis made on CT. Results There were total 40 cases of sinonasal neoplasia among which 24 were benign. Almost all the benign cases were seen in the age group <40 y with mean age of 20 y and most of the malignant cases were seen in the age group above 40 y with mean age of 55 y. In our study we found male preponderance with male female ratio of 4:1 in both benign and malignant conditions. The commonest presenting symptoms of the patients with sinonasal masses in our study was nasal obstruction (75%) and nasal discharge (67.5%) followed by nasal mass (65%), epistaxis (62.5%) and headache (60%). Angiofibroma and papilloma were the commonest benign lesions. Commonest malignant lesion was squamous cell carcinoma. Of the malignant Sinonasal tumours studied in our series, maxillary sinus was involved in 13, ethmoid sinuses and nasal cavity in 10 cases each, and frontal

  6. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  7. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M A; Buckley, D; Henson, D B; Armitage, N C

    1998-11-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value.

  8. [The biological behavior of colorectal carcinoma in young patients].

    PubMed

    Valdovinos Díaz, M A; Guerrero, C; Nava, A A; Jacobo, J; Villalobos, J J

    1991-01-01

    Patients of the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán under 40 years of age with colorectal carcinoma were compared with similar patients above 40 in a retrospective and longitudinal study. Patterns of presentation, stage at diagnosis, degree of tumor differentiation and survival were analyzed. Abdominal pain, rectal bleeding and weight loss were the most frequent clinical manifestations in both groups. Constipation was more common in the young adults (60.5% vs 34.2%; p less than 0.05). In both groups, rectosigmoid was the most frequent location of the neoplasm. Cecal carcinoma was found in 2.6% of patients under 40 years and in 11.8% (p less than 0.05) in older patients. There was a higher frequency of mucinous tumors in the young patients (26% vs 13%; p = NS). Colon cancer in both groups were in advanced stage at presentation. The survival rate for young adults was 30%, and 21% for the other group (p = NS). The degree of tumor differentiation did not affect survival in both groups. Dukes stage was the only prognostic factor identified. The need for early recognition of colorectal cancer in young adults is emphasized by the greater incidence of advanced disease and poor prognosis.

  9. [Esophageal, gastric and colorectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Stolte, M

    2001-01-01

    The new WHO-classification of the tumours of the digestive System replaces the "blue books", and are now dealt with completely in a single book. In addition to the histological features of the lesions, the new classification also contains information on epidemiology, aetiology, endoscopy, genetic susceptibility, molecular genetics, prognosis and predictive factors. The erstwhile mostly black-and-white histological photographs have at last again been replaced by numerous colour photographs and supplemented by endoscopic and macroscopic pictures. The changes to the individual tumour classifications are only few. The former classification of the malignant lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract has now been replaced by the classification of these lesions that has long been in use. New additions are the gastrointestinal tract has long been in use. New additions are the gastrointestinal stroma tumours (GIST) and the gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumour (GANT). To the epithelial tumours of the oesophagus have now been added the basaloid squamous cell tumours of the vermiform appendix and the colorectum have now been added the serrated adenoma and the small-cell carcinoma. The following new chapter have been included: adenocarcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction, secondary carcinomas of the stomach, secondary tumours of the small bowel and colon, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis, familial adenomatosis coli, and HNPCC. For the first time the intra-epithelial neoplasias in chronic inflammatory bowel disease have been differentiated, i.e. adenomas distinguished from the dysplasias, while the latter term has now been replaced by the term "intra-epithelial neoplasias". In comparison with the former "blue books", the new WHO-classification, prepared by presentatives of numerous disciplines--for the first time including clinicians--has taken on the character of a text book.

  10. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish

  11. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Nuri Faruk

    2015-02-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  12. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  13. Tailored telephone counseling increases colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were randomly assigned to receive one of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening. Participants received either a tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention or a non-tailored print brochures intervention. Data were collected at baseline and 3 months post-baseline. Group differences and the effect of the interventions on adherence and stage movement for colorectal cancer screening were examined using t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression. Individuals in the tailored telephone counseling plus brochures group were significantly more likely to complete colorectal cancer screening and to move forward on stage of change for fecal occult blood test, any colorectal cancer test stage and stage of the risk-appropriate test compared with individuals in the non-tailored brochure group at 3 months post-baseline. A tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention successfully promoted forward stage movement and colorectal cancer screening adherence among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. PMID:26025212

  14. Knowledge of colorectal cancer among older persons.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, S P; Weinrich, M C; Boyd, M D; Johnson, E; Frank-Stromborg, M

    1992-10-01

    Cancer screening is a national health priority, especially for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. The researchers measured colorectal cancer knowledge among 211 older Americans. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest two-by-two factorial design was used to test the effect of knowledge on participation in fecal occult blood screening. The American Cancer Society's colorectal cancer educational slide-tape presentation served as the basis for all of the educational programs. Hemoccult II kits were distributed at no cost to the participants. Descriptive statistics, chi 2, and logistic regressions were used to analyze data. One-half of the participants had incomes below the poverty level. Almost one-half the subjects in the study sample stated that they had not received any information about colorectal cancer within the past year. Caucasians had more knowledge of colorectal cancer than African Americans [F(1, 78) = 7.92, p < 0.01] and persons with higher income had more knowledge than persons with less income [F(2, 76) = 3.01, p = 0.05]. Subjects showed significant increases in colorectal cancer knowledge 6 days after the colorectal cancer education program [t(79) = 2.59, p = 0.01] and this increased knowledge was a predictor of participation in free fecal occult blood screening [chi 2(1, n = 164) = 5.34, p = 0.02].

  15. Familial aggregation of colorectal cancer in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A S; Bondy, M L; Levin, B; El-Badawy, S; Khaled, H; Hablas, A; Ismail, S; Adly, M; Mahgoub, K G; McPherson, R S; Beasley, R P

    1998-09-11

    We have investigated the familial aggregation of colorectal cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in Egypt because of the high incidence of colorectal cancer in Egyptian children and young adults and the prevalence of consanguinity there. In a pilot study, we conducted detailed interviews with 111 Egyptian colorectal cancer patients and 111 healthy Egyptian controls about their family histories of colorectal cancer, and other cancers, consanguinity, age at diagnosis, symptoms and recurrence. Eight patients (7.2%) had one or more first- or second-degree relatives under age 40 with colorectal cancer, suggestive of HNPCC by the Amsterdam criteria. One of these families had a typical history of HNPCC, with 4 relatives having colorectal cancer in 3 generations; 3 of these relatives were younger than age 45 at colon cancer diagnosis, and other relatives had extracolonic tumors. Another 14 patients (12.6%) had a first- or second-degree relative with a family history of other neoplasms such as endometrial, urinary and hepatobiliary cancers that could also be related to HNPCC. Four patients with early-onset colon cancer and a family history of other HNPCC-related cancers reported that their parents were first-degree cousins.

  16. [Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: Chlamydia trachomatis and other co-factors].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Troconis, J T

    1995-09-01

    The incidence of Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) in patients with diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) was studied in one hundred eighty patients. The Chlamydiazyme test was performed in all of them. Endocervical samples were taken from 103 patients with CIN and 77 women who sought medical attention for different gynecological reasons (CG). Twenty three tests (12.8%) were positive; 15 of them had CIN (14.6%) and 8 were from the control group (10.4%). It was found a statistical significant difference between NIC III and early intercourse, NIC III and age, NIC and vaginal douches and, among NIC and number of pregnancies and deliveries. There was not a significant difference among Ct and early intercourse, number of sexual partners, pregnancies, deliveries, vaginal douches, oral contraceptives (OC), and vaginal discharge. No statistically significant differences were found between NIC and number of sexual partners, and OC and vaginal discharge. The low incidence of Ct in patients with CIN does not mean that Ct does not play a role in the origin and development of the cervical pathology.

  17. Imiquimod in cervical, vaginal and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia: a review.

    PubMed

    de Witte, C J; van de Sande, A J M; van Beekhuizen, H J; Koeneman, M M; Kruse, A J; Gerestein, C G

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is in the vast majority of patients accountable for the development of vulvar, cervical and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, CIN, VAIN); precursors of vulvar, cervical and vaginal cancers. The currently preferred treatment modality for high grade VIN, CIN and VAIN is surgical excision. Nevertheless surgical treatment is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and recurrence is not uncommon. The aim of this review is to present evidence on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of imiquimod (an immune response modifier) in HPV-related VIN, CIN and VAIN. A search for papers on the use of imiquimod in VIN, CIN and VAIN was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases. Data was extracted and reviewed. Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed; 16 on VIN, 3 on CIN and 2 on VAIN. Complete response rates in VIN ranged from 5 to 88%. Although minor adverse effects were frequently reported, treatment with imiquimod was well tolerated in most patients. Studies on imiquimod treatment of CIN and VAIN are limited and lack uniformly defined endpoints. The available evidence however, shows encouraging effect. Complete response rates for CIN 2-3 and VAIN 1-3 ranged from 67 to 75% and 57 to 86% respectively. More randomized controlled trials on the use of imiquimod in CIN, VAIN and VIN with extended follow-up are necessary to determine the attributive therapeutic value in these patients.

  18. Laboratory management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: proposing a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Herfs, Michael; Crum, Christopher P

    2013-03-01

    Since the discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 in early 80s, the link between HPV and cervical cancer has been established with certainty, a function of the discovery and cloning of a range of HPV types associated with both cancer precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or CIN) and carcinomas and extensive epidemiologic, clinical, pathologic, and experimental data. These accumulated results have culminated in new paradigms of cancer prevention through screening and triage. Despite this, the management of women with CIN is still suboptimal and the overtreatment of these conditions still occurs, largely due to the lack of clarity regarding which precancerous lesions are most likely to progress in grade. Recently, a discrete population of cuboidal cells was discovered at the cervical squamocolumnar junction, the anatomic site where the large majority of HPV-related (pre)neoplastic lesions develop. These cells seem to be embryonic in nature and participate both in benign metaplasias and the initial phase of precancer development. This review summarizes the historical evolution of precursor management, assesses the potential role of this and other discoveries in segregating lower from higher-risk precursors, and examines their potential impact on the management of women with real or potential cervical cancer precursors.

  19. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.E.; van Belle, G.; LoGerfo, J.P.

    1987-08-07

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship.

  20. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A: case report.

    PubMed

    Păun, D L; Poiană, C; Petriş, R; Radian, S; Miulescu, R Dănciulescu; Constantinescu, G; Orban, C

    2013-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) is a complex autosomal dominant inherited syndrome characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma and primary parathyroid hyperplasia. In patients with only one or two clinical features, identification of a germline RET(REarranged in Transfection) mutation or the identification of the clinical features of MEN 2A in other first degree relatives is required to make the diagnosis. We present the case of a family with MEN 2A syndrome confirmed by genetic analysis which identified RET gene mutation in 634 codon in father - DV - aged 48 years and also in daughter DM -aged 20 years. The specific feature in this case is that the index case was the daughter (diagnosed and operated for pheochromocytoma at the age of 19 years), the father being diagnosed later with medullary thyroid carcinoma by mutational screening in all family members. This family supports the phenomenon of anticipation, in which severity increases and the age of onset decreases in successive generations, the syndrome being discovered earlier and with a worse prognostic in the daughter.

  1. Screening, Surveillance, and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kevin C.; Menon, Raman; Bastawrous, Amir; Billingham, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia has been increasing, especially in high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, and those who are immunosuppressed. Several studies with long-term follow-up have suggested that rate of progression from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer is ∼ 5%. This number is considerably higher for those at high risk. Anal cytology has been used to attempt to screen high-risk patients for disease; however, it has been shown to have very little correlation to actual histology. Patients with lesions should undergo history and physical exam including digital rectal exam and standard anoscopy. High-resolution anoscopy can be considered as well, although it is of questionable time and cost–effectiveness. Nonoperative treatments include expectant surveillance and topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. Operative therapies include wide local excision and targeted ablation with electrocautery, infrared coagulation, or cryotherapy. Recurrence rates remain high regardless of treatment delivered and surveillance is paramount, although optimal surveillance regimens have yet to be established. PMID:26929753

  2. Evaluation of Candidate Methylation Markers to Detect Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shivapurkar, Narayan; Sherman, Mark E.; Stastny, Victor; Echebiri, Chinyere; Rader, Janet S.; Nayar, Ritu; Bonfiglio, Thomas A.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Wang, Sophia S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Studies of cervical cancer and its immediate precursor, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3), have identified genes that often show aberrant DNA methylation and therefore, represent candidate early detection markers. We used quantitative PCR assays to evaluate methylation in five candidate genes (TNFRSF10C, DAPK1, SOCS3, HS3ST2 and CDH1) previously demonstrated as methylated in cervical cancer. Methods In this analysis, we performed methylation assays for the five candidate genes in 45 invasive cervical cancers, 12 histologically normal cervical specimens, and 23 liquid-based cervical cytology specimens confirmed by expert review as unequivocal demonstrating cytologic high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, thus representing the counterparts of histologic CIN3. Results We found hypermethylation of HS3ST2 in 93% of cancer tissues and 70% of cytology specimens interpreted as CIN3; hypermethylation of CDH1 was found in 89% of cancers and 26% of CIN3 cytology specimens. Methylation of either HS3ST2 or CDH1 was observed in 100% of cervical cancer tissues and 83% of CIN3 cytology specimens. None of the five genes showed detectable methylation in normal cervical tissues. Conclusion Our data support further evaluation of HS3ST2 and CDH1 methylation as potential markers of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions. PMID:17894941

  3. Invasive 3-Dimensional Organotypic Neoplasia from Multiple Normal Human Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ridky, Todd W.; Chow, Jennifer M.; Wong, David J.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Refined cancer models are required to assess the burgeoning number of potential targets for cancer therapeutics within a rapid and clinically relevant context. Here we utilize tumor-associated genetic pathways to transform primary human epithelial cells from epidermis, oropharynx, esophagus, and cervix into genetically defined tumors within a human 3-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment incorporating cell-populated stroma and intact basement membrane. These engineered organotypic tissues recapitulated natural features of tumor progression, including epithelial invasion through basement membrane, a complex process critically required for biologic malignancy in 90% of human cancers. Invasion was rapid, and potentiated by stromal cells. Oncogenic signals in 3-D tissue, but not 2-D culture, resembled gene expression profiles from spontaneous human cancers. Screening well-characterized signaling pathway inhibitors in 3-D organotypic neoplasia helped distil a clinically faithful cancer gene signature. Multi-tissue 3-D human tissue cancer models may provide an efficient and relevant complement to current approaches to characterize cancer progression. PMID:21102459

  4. Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Associated with Atopic Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankit; Espana, Edgar M.; Singh, Arun D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe 2 cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that originated in the setting of severe atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC). Methods Case one involved a 73-year-old male with atopic eczema and severe AKC who developed a limbal lesion suspicious for ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN). Slit-lamp examination was significant for a new sessile lesion in the temporal limbal region of the left eye. The lesion was treated with excisional biopsy and cryotherapy. Topical therapy with mitomycin C, topical interferon alpha 2b, and topical 5-fluorouracil provided only partial control. Exenteration was eventually needed. Case two involved a 53-year-old male with history of severe AKC and eczema. Computed tomography imaging showed an infiltrative mass of the right orbit. Incisional biopsies confirmed conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of both sides (invasive in the right eye, in situ in the left eye). Exenteration was needed for control of invasive carcinoma in the right eye. Results Squamous cell carcinoma was treated without success in spite of surgical excision and aggressive treatment with multiple topical agents and multiple applications of cryotherapy. Orbital exenteration was needed in both cases. Conclusion Chronic inflammation associated with AKC may be a risk factor for the development of bilateral, diffuse, invasive, and recurrent OSSN that may require exenteration. PMID:28275599

  5. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass.

    PubMed

    Peters, H Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A; Tan, Sanda A

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15-25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass.

  6. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management. PMID:24334910

  7. [Two Cases of Colorectal Cancer with Tumor Thrombus in the Inferior Mesenteric Vein].

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Tomoya; Ogino, Shiro; Takemura, Manabu; Mugitani, Tatsuro; Akami, Toshikazu; Okano, Shinji; Ueda, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    In colorectal cancer, progression with an intravenous tumor thrombus is very rare. Here, we report 2 cases of colorectal cancer which showed a tumor thrombus in the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Case 1: A 69-year-old woman was admitted for the treatment of advanced rectal cancer, and underwent a low anterior resection. Six months of post-operative therapy was carried out with mFOLFOX6, but a metachronous lung metastasis was detected and a lung partial resection was performed. Case 2: A 67-year-old man was admitted for the treatment of advanced sigmoid colon cancer with simultaneous liver metastasis, and underwent a laparoscopic high anterior resection. Four courses of mFOLFOX6+bevacizumab chemotherapy were carried out after surgery, and subsequently he underwent a partial hepatectomy. In both cases IMV tumor thrombus was suspected from abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Tumor thrombus filling the lumen of the IMV was confirmed on histopathological examination. Colorectal cancer with IMV tumor thrombus is a form of advanced cancer with advanced vascular invasion, and there is a high risk of simultaneous or metachronous hematogenous metastasis. Combined modality therapy should therefore be given to improve the prognosis.

  8. Gastrins, iron and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    This minireview explores the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. The peptide hormone gastrin is a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with μM affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity. The ferric ion ligands have been identified as glutamates 7, 8 and 9 in the 18 amino acid peptide glycine-extended gastrin. An interaction between gastrin and transferrin was first demonstrated by covalent crosslinking techniques, and has been recently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. We have therefore proposed that gastrins act as catalysts in the loading of transferrin with iron. Several recent lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease haemochromatosis, and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentrations, suggest that gastrins may be involved in iron homeostasis. In addition the recognition that ferric ions may play an unexpected role in the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins may assist in the development of new therapies for colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Proteomic profiling of a mouse model of acute intestinal Apc deletion leads to identification of potential novel biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Abeer; Song, Fei; Reed, Karen R; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Meniel, Valerie S; Watson, Alastair J M; Pritchard, D Mark; Clarke, Alan R; Jenkins, John R

    2013-10-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accurate non-invasive screening for CRC would greatly enhance a population's health. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene mutations commonly occur in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, leading to Wnt signalling pathway activation. Acute conditional transgenic deletion of Apc in murine intestinal epithelium (AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl)) causes phenotypic changes similar to those found during colorectal tumourigenesis. This study comprised a proteomic analysis of murine small intestinal epithelial cells following acute Apc deletion to identify proteins that show altered expression during human colorectal carcinogenesis, thus identifying proteins that may prove clinically useful as blood/serum biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. Eighty-one proteins showed significantly increased expression following iTRAQ analysis, and validation of nine of these by Ingenuity Pathaway Analysis showed they could be detected in blood or serum. Expression was assessed in AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) small intestinal epithelium by immunohistochemistry, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR; increased nucelolin concentrations were also detected in the serum of AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) and Apc(Min)(/)(+) mice by ELISA. Six proteins; heat shock 60kDa protein 1, Nucleolin, Prohibitin, Cytokeratin 18, Ribosomal protein L6 and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 5,were selected for further investigation. Increased expression of 4 of these was confirmed in human CRC by qPCR. In conclusion, several novel candidate biomarkers have been identified from analysis of transgenic mice in which the Apc gene was deleted in the intestinal epithelium that also showed increased expression in human CRC. Some of these warrant further investigation as potential serum-based biomarkers of human CRC.

  10. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia disease progression is associated with increased vaginal microbiome diversity.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A; MacIntyre, D A; Lee, Y S; Smith, A; Marchesi, J R; Lehne, B; Bhatia, R; Lyons, D; Paraskevaidis, E; Li, J V; Holmes, E; Nicholson, J K; Bennett, P R; Kyrgiou, M

    2015-11-17

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary for cervical carcinogenesis. Although evidence suggests that the vaginal microbiome plays a functional role in the persistence or regression of HPV infections, this has yet to be described in women with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). We hypothesised that increasing microbiome diversity is associated with increasing CIN severity. llumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to characterise the vaginal microbiota of women with low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (LSIL; n = 52), high-grade (HSIL; n = 92), invasive cervical cancer (ICC; n = 5) and healthy controls (n = 20). Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed an increased prevalence of microbiomes characterised by high-diversity and low levels of Lactobacillus spp. (community state type-CST IV) with increasing disease severity, irrespective of HPV status (Normal = 2/20,10%; LSIL = 11/52,21%; HSIL = 25/92,27%; ICC = 2/5,40%). Increasing disease severity was associated with decreasing relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. The vaginal microbiome in HSIL was characterised by higher levels of Sneathia sanguinegens (P < 0.01), Anaerococcus tetradius (P < 0.05) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (P < 0.05) and lower levels of Lactobacillus jensenii (P < 0.01) compared to LSIL. Our results suggest advancing CIN disease severity is associated with increasing vaginal microbiota diversity and may be involved in regulating viral persistence and disease progression.

  11. Co-expression of p16 and p53 characterizes aggressive subtypes of ductal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bechert, Charles; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Tramm, Trine; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A

    2016-12-01

    In the USA alone, approximately 61,000 new diagnoses of ductal intraepithelial neoplasia 1c-3 (DIN) are made each year. Around 10-20 % of the patients develop a recurrence, about 50 % of which are invasive. Prior studies have shown that invasive breast carcinomas positive for p16 or p53 have a higher frequency of recurrence and a more aggressive course; however, the co-expression of these markers across the entire spectrum of DIN and its potential correlation with grade of the lesions has not been studied previously. Immunohistochemical staining for p16 and p53 was evaluated on 262 DIN lesions from 211 cases diagnosed between 1991 and 2008. The lesions ranged from DIN1b (atypical intraductal hyperplasia) to DIN3 (DCIS, grade 3) and included 45 cases with associated invasive carcinoma. Frequency of staining for both p16 and p53 increased with increasing grade of DIN. Strong co-expression was found exclusively in higher grade DIN lesions (DIN2 and DIN3) particularly those associated with periductal stromal fibrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate. Strong co-expression was seen in 8 of 12 DIN3 lesions (67 %) associated with invasive carcinoma. In conclusion, co-expression of p16 and p53 increases with advancing grade of DIN and is maximal in high grade DIN lesions associated with invasive carcinoma, indicating a more aggressive phenotype. A distinctive variant of DIN with periductal fibrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate invariably falls into the high-grade category, based on either morphology or marker expression. Co-expression of p16/p53 may be of help in distinguishing between high-grade and low-grade DIN lesions.

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2B and RET proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is an autosomal dominant complex oncologic neurocristopathy including medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, gastrointestinal disorders, marphanoid face, and mucosal multiple ganglioneuromas. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the major cause of mortality in MEN 2B syndrome, and it often appears during the first years of life. RET proto-oncogene germline activating mutations are causative for MEN 2B. The 95% of MEN 2B patients are associated with a point mutation in exon 16 (M918/T). A second point mutation at codon 883 has been found in 2%-3% of MEN 2B cases. RET proto-oncogene is also involved in different neoplastic and not neoplastic neurocristopathies. Other RET mutations cause MEN 2A syndrome, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, or Hirschsprung's disease. RET gene expression is also involved in Neuroblastoma. The main diagnosis standards are the acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa and the molecular analysis of RET. In our protocol the rectal biopsy is, therefore, the first approach. RET mutation detection offers the possibility to diagnose MEN 2B predisposition at a pre-clinical stage in familial cases, and to perform an early total prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical treatment of MEN 2B is total thyroidectomy with cervical limphadenectomy of the central compartment of the neck. When possible, this intervention should be performed with prophylactic aim before 1 year of age in patients with molecular genetic diagnosis. Recent advances into the mechanisms of RET proto-oncogene signaling and pathways of RET signal transduction in the development of MEN 2 and MTC will allow new treatment possibilities. PMID:22429913

  13. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled

  14. Clinicopathological features and surgical options for synchronous colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Chul; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jihun; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the clinicopathological features of synchronous cancers and treatment options according to their locations. Records of 8368 patients with colorectal cancer treated at our center between July 2003 and December 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. All synchronous colorectal cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment were included. Synchronous cancers were identified in 217 patients (2.6%). Seventy-nine patients underwent either total colectomy, subtotal colectomy, or total proctocolectomy; 116 underwent 1 regional resection, including local excision; and 22 underwent 2 regional resections. The mean age was 62 years, slightly higher than that for the single-cancer patients. Synchronous cancers were more common in male patients, more frequently located in the left colon, had more microsatellite instability-high status, and showed more advanced stage than single cancer. Extensive resection was mainly performed for synchronous cancers located in both the right and left colon. Two regional resections were performed for cancers in the right colon and rectum. There were no differences in complication rates or the occurrence of metachronous cancer between the 2-region resection and extensive resection groups. Eight years postoperatively, the mean number of daily bowel movements for these 2 groups were 1.9 and 4.3, respectively. We found that synchronous cancer was different from single cancer in terms of age, gender, location, and pathologic features. Synchronous colorectal cancer requires different treatment strategy according to the distribution of lesions. Comparison between the 2 regional resections and extensive resection approaches suggests that 2 regional resections are preferable. PMID:28248880

  15. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:24764658

  16. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  17. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  18. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  19. Smad3 phosphoisoform-mediated signaling during sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, K

    2006-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling occurring during human colorectal carcinogenesis involves a shift in TGF-beta function, reducing the cytokine's antiproliferative effect, while increasing actions that promote invasion and metastasis. TGF-beta signaling involves phosphorylation of Smad3 at serine residues 208 and 213 in the linker region and serine residues 423 and 425 in the C-terminal region. Exogenous TGF-beta activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), changing unphosphorylated Smad3 to its phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). Either pSmad3C or pSmad3L oligomerizes with Smad4, and translocates into nuclei. While the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells in vivo, JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling promotes tumor cell invasion and extracellular matrix synthesis by activated mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, hepatocyte growth factor signaling interacts with TGF-beta to activate the JNK/pSmad3L pathway, accelerating nuclear transport of cytoplasmic pSmad3L. This reduces accessibility of unphosphorylated Smad3 to membrane-anchored TbetaRI, preventing Smad3C phosphorylation, pSmad3C-mediated transcription, and antiproliferative effects of TGF-beta on epithelial cells. As neoplasia progresses from normal colorectal epithelium through adenoma to invasive adenocarcinoma with distant metastasis, nuclear pSmad3L gradually increases while pSmad3C decreases. The shift from TbetaRI/pSmad3C-mediated to JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling is a major mechanism orchestrating a complex transition of TGF-beta signaling during sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the recent understanding of Smad3 phosphoisoform-mediated signaling, particularly 'cross-talk' between Smad3 and JNK pathways that cooperatively promote oncogenic activities. Understanding of these actions should help to develop more effective

  20. Spectral classifier design with ensemble classifiers and misclassification-rejection: application to elastic-scattering spectroscopy for detection of colonic neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Castanon, David A.; Singh, Satish K.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2011-06-01

    Optical spectroscopy has shown potential as a real-time, in vivo, diagnostic tool for identifying neoplasia during endoscopy. We present the development of a diagnostic algorithm to classify elastic-scattering spectroscopy (ESS) spectra as either neoplastic or non-neoplastic. The algorithm is based on pattern recognition methods, including ensemble classifiers, in which members of the ensemble are trained on different regions of the ESS spectrum, and misclassification-rejection, where the algorithm identifies and refrains from classifying samples that are at higher risk of being misclassified. These ``rejected'' samples can be reexamined by simply repositioning the probe to obtain additional optical readings or ultimately by sending the polyp for histopathological assessment, as per standard practice. Prospective validation using separate training and testing sets result in a baseline performance of sensitivity = .83, specificity = .79, using the standard framework of feature extraction (principal component analysis) followed by classification (with linear support vector machines). With the developed algorithm, performance improves to Se ~ 0.90, Sp ~ 0.90, at a cost of rejecting 20-33% of the samples. These results are on par with a panel of expert pathologists. For colonoscopic prevention of colorectal cancer, our system could reduce biopsy risk and cost, obviate retrieval of non-neoplastic polyps, decrease procedure time, and improve assessment of cancer risk.

  1. Relationship of coagulation test abnormalities to tumour burden and postoperative DVT in resected colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iversen, L H; Thorlacius-Ussing, O

    2002-03-01

    In a prospective study, coagulation test results were compared in 137 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and 39 subjects with benign colorectal diseases. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), and soluble fibrin (SF) were measured in plasma before and after surgery. CRC patients presented with significantly higher values of F1+2 and TAT than controls. Patients with localised CRC had elevated values of F1+2 and TAT, whereas patients with advanced CRC also had elevated SF values. TAT and SF levels correlated with tumour spread, and normal values virtually excluded advanced cancer. Postoperative deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was diagnosed by phlebography in 20% of the CRC patients. Preoperative values of the markers did not predict postoperative DVT, but postoperative values did.

  2. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  3. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-16

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  4. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  5. [The premalignant disease of the endometrium: endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Francz, Mónika

    2008-03-01

    The WHO 1994 classification for endometrial hyperplasias is based on the morphologic features of the lesions. This system characterizes the nuclear cytologic morphology as typical or atypical and describes the glandular architectural pattern as simple or complex. The main problem of this classification is the poor reproducibility. Although the predictive value of the atypical category is high, there are many typical hyperplasia cases with cancer progression. Modern molecular data related to endometrial tumorigenesis and precise computerized morphometric analysis have identified the lesion that may be considered as a precursor of endometrioid adenocarcinoma. By definition, this endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) is a clonal proliferation of architecturally and cytologically altered endometrial glands which are prone to malignant transformation to endometrioid (type I) endometrial adenocarcinoma. The morphometric basis of EIN diagnosis is the D-score (DS), which is a logical combination of three morphometric features that represent the glandular complexity, glandular volume and cytological alterations. PTEN inactivation and K-ras mutation are the earliest genetic changes that can be revealed in these lesions. Hyperplasia cases that do not fit into the EIN categories are considered as benign or hormonal endometrial hyperplasia. This is the theoretical basis of a new classification system in premalignant endometrial diseases. Retrospective clinical data proved the high predictive value of the EIN scheme, so the decision on therapy can be more established. The reproducibility is excellent with application of precise definitions and PTEN immunohistochemistry. In the "Blue book" published in 2003 the WHO introduces the new morphometric- and molecular-based EIN system, and recommends it as an alternative classification method.

  6. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  7. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  8. Combining large area fluorescence with multiphoton microscopy for improved detection of oral epithelial neoplasia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia representing the complex microstructural organization of mucosa, potentially providing high specificity for detection of neoplasia, but is limited by small imaging area. Large area fluorescence methods on the other hand show high sensitivity appropriate for screening but are hampered by low specificity. In this study, we apply MPAM-SHGM following guidance from large area fluorescence, by either autofluorescence or a targeted metabolic fluorophore, as a potentially clinically viable approach for detection of oral neoplasia. Sites of high neoplastic potentially were identified by large area red/green autofluorescence or by a fluorescently labelled deoxy-glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to highlight areas of high glucose uptake across the buccal pouch of a hamster model for OSCC. Follow-up MPAM-SHGM was conducted on regions of interests (ROIs) to assess whether microscopy would reveal microscopic features associated with neoplasia to confirm or exclude large area fluorescence findings. Parameters for analysis included cytologic metrics, 3D epithelial connective tissue interface metrics (MPAM-SHGM) and intensity of fluorescence (widefield). Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology and graded by a pathologist. A small sample of human ex vivo tissues were also imaged. A generalized linear model combining image metrics from large area fluorescence and volumetric MPAM-SHGM indicated the ability to delineate normal and inflammation from neoplasia.

  9. Association of Intrauterine Device (IUD) and Cervical Neoplasia - A Study in a Poor Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, Chibuike Ogwuegbu; Ozumba, Benjamin Chukwuma; Oguanuo, Theophilus Chimezie; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a contraceptive method used by women of reproductive age group. However, there are conflicting reports on the association between IUD and cervical neoplasia. These controversies may further hamper the poor uptake of modern contraception in Nigeria. Aim This study was therefore aimed at evaluating the association between IUD and cervical neoplasia. Materials and Methods This was a case control study in which Pap smear results of 156 participants on IUD were compared with those of 156 non-users of modern contraception. The participants who were found to have abnormal cervical smear cytology results were further subjected to colposcopy. Biopsy specimens for histology were collected from the participants with obvious cervical lesions or those with suspicious lesions on colposcopy. The results were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% level of confidence. Results Seven (4.5%) and 2(1.3%) of participants using IUD had Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) 1 and CIN 2 respectively. Also, 5(3.2%) and 1(0.6%) of non-users of modern contraception had CIN 1 and CIN 2 respectively. The prevalence of cervical neoplasia among all the participants was 4.8%. Although, the proportion of women who had CIN was more among participants using IUD than non-users of modern contraception, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion There was no significant association between IUD and cervical neoplasia in this study. PMID:27504358

  10. Dietary protein and fat intake in relation to risk of colorectal adenoma in Korean.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sun Young; Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Jung Eun; Seol, Jueun; Song, Ji Hyun; Chung, Goh Eun; Yim, Jeong Yoon; Lim, Sun Hee; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-12-01

    Consumption of red meat and alcohol are known risk factors for colorectal cancer, but associations for dietary fat remain unclear. We investigated the associations of dietary fat, protein, and energy intake with prevalence of colorectal adenoma.We performed a prospective cross-sectional study on asymptomatic persons who underwent a screening colonoscopy at a single center during a routine health check-up from May to December 2011. Dietary data were obtained via a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), assisted by a registered dietician. We also obtained information on alcohol consumption and smoking status, and measured metabolic syndrome markers including abdominal circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, serum triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We calculated odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate the associations using the polytomous logistic regression models. As a secondary analysis, we also conducted a matched analysis, matched by age and sex (557 cases and 557 non-cases).The study sample included 557 cases (406 males and 151 females) with histopathologically confirmed colorectal adenoma, and 1157 controls (650 males and 507 females). The proportion of advanced adenoma was 28.1% of men and 18.5% of female, respectively. Although vegetable protein intake was inversely associated with the prevalence of colorectal adenoma, further adjustment for potential confounding factors attenuated the association, resulting in no significant associations. There were no significant associations between dietary fat intake and colorectal adenoma in energy-adjusted models. For vegetable protein in women, the OR for the comparison of those in the highest tertile with those in the lowest tertile was 0.47 (95% CI 0.25-0.91, P for trend = 0.07) after adjustment for total energy intake. However, after controlling for metabolic syndrome markers, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and family history of

  11. Dietary protein and fat intake in relation to risk of colorectal adenoma in Korean

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sun Young; Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Jung Eun; Seol, Jueun; Song, Ji Hyun; Chung, Goh Eun; Yim, Jeong Yoon; Lim, Sun Hee; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Consumption of red meat and alcohol are known risk factors for colorectal cancer, but associations for dietary fat remain unclear. We investigated the associations of dietary fat, protein, and energy intake with prevalence of colorectal adenoma. We performed a prospective cross-sectional study on asymptomatic persons who underwent a screening colonoscopy at a single center during a routine health check-up from May to December 2011. Dietary data were obtained via a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), assisted by a registered dietician. We also obtained information on alcohol consumption and smoking status, and measured metabolic syndrome markers including abdominal circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, serum triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We calculated odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate the associations using the polytomous logistic regression models. As a secondary analysis, we also conducted a matched analysis, matched by age and sex (557 cases and 557 non-cases). The study sample included 557 cases (406 males and 151 females) with histopathologically confirmed colorectal adenoma, and 1157 controls (650 males and 507 females). The proportion of advanced adenoma was 28.1% of men and 18.5% of female, respectively. Although vegetable protein intake was inversely associated with the prevalence of colorectal adenoma, further adjustment for potential confounding factors attenuated the association, resulting in no significant associations. There were no significant associations between dietary fat intake and colorectal adenoma in energy-adjusted models. For vegetable protein in women, the OR for the comparison of those in the highest tertile with those in the lowest tertile was 0.47 (95% CI 0.25–0.91, P for trend = 0.07) after adjustment for total energy intake. However, after controlling for metabolic syndrome markers, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and family history

  12. Advances in renal neoplasia: recommendations from the 2012 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding the classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. There was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as novel tumors: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor-family translocation RCC [in particular t(6; 11) RCC], and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, 3 rare epithelial carcinomas were considered emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation RCC. There were also a number of suggested modifications to existing World Health Organization 2004 categories, with the new classification to be known as the ISUP Vancouver Classification. Tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, and tumor necrosis were identified as significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The ISUP Grading System was accepted with grades 1-3 of clear cell and papillary RCC being based on nucleolar prominence, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. Consensus guidelines were formulated for specimen handling, and it was agreed that renal sinus invasion is present when tumor is in direct contact with fat or loose connective tissue of the sinus or if there is involvement of endothelial-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors was considered, and panels of immunohistochemical markers were identified for use in specific differential diagnostic scenarios.

  13. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  14. Complex and Reoperative Colorectal Surgery: Setting Expectations and Learning from Experience.

    PubMed

    Kin, Cindy

    2016-06-01

    A range of topics are covered in this issue dedicated to complex and reoperative colorectal surgery, from radiation-induced surgical problems, to enterocutaneous fistulas and locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer. Common themes include the importance of operative planning and patient counseling on the expected functional outcomes. Experts in the field offer their technical tips and clinical lessons to maximize outcomes and minimize complications in these challenging cases.

  15. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Baseline Dietary Knowledge of Colorectal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the dietary knowledge, attitudes and potential barriers to change of patients attending a colorectal outpatient clinic. Design: Use of a semistructured interview to generate qualitative and quantitative data. Setting: A regional colorectal outpatient clinic within Edinburgh. Method: Patients attending clinic with colorectal…

  16. Associations between dietary fiber and colorectal polyp risk differ by polyp type and smoking status.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenming; Shrubsole, Martha J; Smalley, Walter E; Ness, Reid M; Zheng, Wei

    2014-05-01

    The association of dietary fiber intake with colorectal cancer risk is established. However, the association may differ between cigarette smokers and nonsmokers. We evaluated this hypothesis in a large colonoscopy-based case-control study. Dietary fiber intakes were estimated by self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs with adjustment for potential confounders. Analysis also was stratified by cigarette smoking and sex. High dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced risk of colorectal polyps (P-trend = 0.003). This association was found to be stronger among cigarette smokers (P-trend = 0.006) than nonsmokers (P-trend = 0.21), although the test for multiplicative interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.11). This pattern of association was more evident for high-risk adenomatous polyps (ADs), defined as advanced or multiple ADs (P-interaction smoking and dietary fiber intake = 0.09). Among cigarette smokers who smoked ≥23 y, a 38% reduced risk of high-risk ADs was found to be associated with high intake of dietary fiber compared with those in the lowest quartile fiber intake group (P-trend = 0.004). No inverse association with dietary fiber intake was observed for low-risk ADs, defined as single nonadvanced ADs. Cigarette smoking may modify the association of dietary fiber intake with the risk of colorectal polyps, especially high-risk ADs, a well-established precursor of colorectal cancer.

  17. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Methods Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Results Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Conclusions Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials. PMID:23017053

  18. Field cancerisation in colorectal cancer: a new frontier or pastures past?

    PubMed

    Patel, Abhilasha; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Williams, Nigel; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P

    2015-04-07

    Despite considerable advances in our understanding of cancer biology, early diagnosis of colorectal cancer remains elusive. Based on the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, cancer develops through the progressive accumulation of mutations in key genes that regulate cell growth. However, recent mathematical modelling suggests that some of these genetic events occur prior to the development of any discernible histological abnormality. Cells acquire pro-tumourigenic mutations that are not able to produce morphological change but predispose to cancer formation. These cells can grow to form large patches of mucosa from which a cancer arises. This process has been termed "field cancerisation". It has received little attention in the scientific literature until recently. Several studies have now demonstrated cellular, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the macroscopically normal mucosa of colorectal cancer patients. In some reports, these changes were effectively utilised to identify patients with a neoplastic lesion suggesting potential application in the clinical setting. In this article, we present the scientific evidence to support field cancerisation in colorectal cancer and discuss important limitations that require further investigation. Characterisation of the field defect is necessary to enable early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and identify molecular targets for chemoprevention. Field cancerisation offers a promising prospect for experimental cancer research and has potential to improve patient outcomes in the clinical setting.

  19. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome. PMID:27602235

  20. Role of circulating free DNA in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Trypaki, Maria; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    The gradual elucidation of the underlying biology of colorectal cancer has provided new insights and therapeutic options for patients with metastatic disease which are selected according to predictive biomarkers. This precision medicine paradigm, however, is incomplete since not all eligible patients respond to these agents and prognostic stratification is largely based on clinicopathologic variants. Importantly, no robust data exist to help properly select patients with localized disease at high risk for recurrence and most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. There is a rapidly expanding body of literature regarding the role of the qualitative and quantitative analysis of circulating free DNA in various neoplasms, which consistently outperforms traditional tumor markers both as a predictive and as a prognostic marker. Several lines of evidence suggest that circulating free DNA may exhibit a complementary role to existing modalities for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer, the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy, for the follow-up of treated patients, for the selection of treatment for advanced disease and the assessment of response and for determining the prognosis of patients. These data, which are reviewed here, illustrate the important role that circulating biomarkers may soon have at the daily clinical practice. PMID:28035251

  1. Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Romano, Federica; Pizzuti, Laura; Segreto, Sabrina; Storto, Giovanni; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Imbriaco, Massimo; Camera, Luigi; Maurea, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the few malignant tumors in which synchronous or metachronous liver metastases [colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs)] may be treated with surgery. It has been demonstrated that resection of CRLMs improves the long-term prognosis. On the other hand, patients with un-resectable CRLMs may benefit from chemotherapy alone or in addition to liver-directed therapies. The choice of the most appropriate therapeutic management of CRLMs depends mostly on the diagnostic imaging. Nowadays, multiple non-invasive imaging modalities are available and those have a pivotal role in the workup of patients with CRLMs. Although extensive research has been performed with regards to the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance for the detection of CRLMs, the optimal imaging strategies for staging and follow up are still to be established. This largely due to the progressive technological and pharmacological advances which are constantly improving the accuracy of each imaging modality. This review describes the non-invasive imaging approaches of CRLMs reporting the technical features, the clinical indications, the advantages and the potential limitations of each modality, as well as including some information on the development of new imaging modalities, the role of new contrast media and the feasibility of using parametric image analysis as diagnostic marker of presence of CRLMs. PMID:26217455

  2. Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Romano, Federica; Pizzuti, Laura; Segreto, Sabrina; Storto, Giovanni; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Imbriaco, Massimo; Camera, Luigi; Maurea, Simone

    2015-07-28

    Colorectal cancer is one of the few malignant tumors in which synchronous or metachronous liver metastases [colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs)] may be treated with surgery. It has been demonstrated that resection of CRLMs improves the long-term prognosis. On the other hand, patients with un-resectable CRLMs may benefit from chemotherapy alone or in addition to liver-directed therapies. The choice of the most appropriate therapeutic management of CRLMs depends mostly on the diagnostic imaging. Nowadays, multiple non-invasive imaging modalities are available and those have a pivotal role in the workup of patients with CRLMs. Although extensive research has been performed with regards to the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance for the detection of CRLMs, the optimal imaging strategies for staging and follow up are still to be established. This largely due to the progressive technological and pharmacological advances which are constantly improving the accuracy of each imaging modality. This review describes the non-invasive imaging approaches of CRLMs reporting the technical features, the clinical indications, the advantages and the potential limitations of each modality, as well as including some information on the development of new imaging modalities, the role of new contrast media and the feasibility of using parametric image analysis as diagnostic marker of presence of CRLMs.

  3. Pathophysiological mechanisms of death resistance in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Ying; Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancers develop adaptive mechanisms to survive under extreme conditions and display hallmarks of unlimited proliferation and resistance to cell death. The deregulation of cell death is a key factor that contributes to chemoresistance in tumors. In a physiological context, balance between cell proliferation and death, and protection against cell damage are fundamental processes for maintaining gut epithelial homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying anti-death cytoprotection and tumor resistance often bear common pathways, and although distinguishing them would be a challenge, it would also provide an opportunity to develop advanced anti-cancer therapeutics. This review will outline cell death pathways (i.e., apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis), and discuss cytoprotective strategies in normal intestinal epithelium and death resistance mechanisms of colon tumor. In colorectal cancers, the intracellular mechanisms of death resistance include the direct alteration of apoptotic and necroptotic machinery and the upstream events modulating death effectors such as tumor suppressor gene inactivation and pro-survival signaling pathways. The autocrine, paracrine and exogenous factors within a tumor microenvironment can also instigate resistance against apoptotic and necroptotic cell death in colon cancers through changes in receptor signaling or transporter uptake. The roles of cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2, growth factors, glucose, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides in colorectal cancer will be highlighted. Targeting anti-death pathways in the colon cancer tissue might be a promising approach outside of anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenesis strategies for developing novel drugs to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26557002

  4. Genetics, diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE ROSA, MARINA; PACE, UGO; REGA, DANIELA; COSTABILE, VALERIA; DURATURO, FRANCESCA; IZZO, PAOLA; DELRIO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death. Surgery represents the mainstay of treatment in early cases but often patients are primarily diagnosed in an advanced stage of disease and sometimes also distant metastases are present. Neoadjuvant therapy is therefore needed but drug resistance may influence response and concur to recurrent disease. At molecular level, it is a very heterogeneous group of diseases with about 30% of hereditary or familial cases. During colorectal adenocarcinomas development, epithelial cells from gastrointestinal trait acquire sequential genetic and epigenetic mutations in specific oncogenes and/or tumour suppressor genes, causing CRC onset, progression and metastasis. Molecular characterization of cancer associated mutations gives valuable information about disease prognosis and response to the therapy. Very early diagnosis and personalized care, as well as a better knowledge of molecular basis of its onset and progression, are therefore crucial to obtain a cure of CRC. In this review, we describe updated genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC pointing out the extreme need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patient outcomes. PMID:26151224

  5. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Brandon T.; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A.; Grady, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma→carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA, and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumor cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimization in DNA stabilization, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multi-target stool DNA (MT-sDNA) test, which combines both mutant and methylated DNA markers and a fecal immunochemical test (FIT), recently performed favorably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the screening of asymptomatic, average risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations. PMID:25994221

  6. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon T; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A; Grady, William M

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Faecal occult blood testing and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumour cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimisation in DNA stabilisation, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multitarget stool DNA test, which combines mutant and methylated DNA markers and a faecal immunochemical test, recently performed favourably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the screening of asymptomatic, average-risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false-positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations.

  7. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  8. RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF CASES OF NEOPLASIA IN A CAPTIVE POPULATION OF EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Olds, June E; Burrough, Eric R; Fales-Williams, Amanda J; Lehmkuhl, Aaron; Madson, Darin; Patterson, Abby J; Yaeger, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Reports of neoplasia in Chiroptera species are rare. (6, 10) This retrospective study describes five types of neoplasia identified within a captive population of male Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) housed in a zoo from 2004 through November of 2014. Tumor types identified include fibrosarcoma, cutaneous lymphoma, benign focal bronchioloalveolar neoplasm, anaplastic sarcoma, and sebaceous epithelioma. To the author's knowledge, aside from a recent report of focal brochioloalveolar adenoma, (8) these tumor types have not previously been described in the Rousettus species, nor in chiropterans in general. Based upon these findings and other recent publications regarding R. aegyptiacus, neoplasia does appear to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in captive members of this megachiropterid species.

  9. Human papillomavirus infection and induction of neoplasia: a matter of fitness.

    PubMed

    Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John

    2016-10-01

    The aetiologic association between infection with certain human papillomavirus (HPV) types, high-grade squamous neoplasia, and cancer at different epithelial sites is well established. In this review we briefly discuss recent breakthroughs in the regulation of squamous epithelia in homeostasis and disease, and provide a view of how these discoveries modify our understanding of how HPV-induced neoplasia in squamous epithelia is triggered. Taken together, these observations highlight how HPVs have evolved the ability to inactivate the products of genes that are frequently mutated in non-HPV-associated pre-neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of sun-exposed skin, and introduce a Darwinian model of clonal evolution of HPV-infected cells. These concepts are considered against our current understanding of transformation zones where HPV-associated cancers occur more frequently, and other sites of non-productive (or abortive) HPV infection.

  10. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  11. [Colorectal cancer in twins. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Białek, Andrzej; Homa, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common neoplasms that often occurs in several members of family. In this communication we present the case of synchronous colorectal cancers with similar localization and similar clinical course in monozygotic twins.

  12. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Your risk of getting colorectal cancer increases as you get older. More than 90% ...

  13. Parathyroid mitogenic activity in plasma from patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Aurbach, G.D.; Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Quarto, R.; Spiegel, A.M.; Bliziotes, M.M.; Norton, J.A.; Doppman, J.L.; Marx, S.J.

    1986-05-15

    Hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands is a central feature of familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. We used cultured bovine parathyroid cells to test for mitogenic activity in plasma from patients with this disorder. Normal plasma stimulated (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation, on the average, to the same extent as it was stimulated in a plasma-free control culture. This contrasted with the results of the tests with plasma from patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in which parathyroid mitogenic activity increased 2400 percent over the control value (P less than 0.001). Plasma from these patients also stimulated the proliferation of bovine parathyroid cells in culture, whereas plasma from normal subjects inhibited it. Parathyroid mitogenic activity in plasma from the patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was greater than that in plasma from patients with various other disorders, including sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism (with adenoma, hyperplasia, or cancer of the parathyroid), sporadic primary hypergastrinemia, sporadic pituitary tumor, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (P less than 0.05). Parathyroid mitogenic activity in the plasma of patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 persisted for up to four years after total parathyroidectomy. The plasma also had far more mitogenic activity in cultures of parathyroid cells than did optimal concentrations of known growth factors or of any parathyroid secretagogue. This mitogenic activity had an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 to 55,000. We conclude that primary hyperparathyroidism in familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may have a humoral cause.

  14. Depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy for noninvasive diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard Alan

    Oral cancer is the 11th most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx account for more than 7,500 deaths each year in the United States alone. Major advances have been made in the management of oral cancer through the combined use of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, improving the quality of life for many patients; however, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often occurs at a late stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective, noninvasive methods for early diagnosis of oral neoplasia are needed. Here a method is presented to noninvasively evaluate oral lesions using depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy (DSOS). A ball lens coupled fiber-optic probe was developed to enable preferential targeting of different depth regions in the oral mucosa. Clinical studies of the diagnostic performance of DSOS in 157 subjects were carried out in collaboration with the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. An overall sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 89% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue relative to histopathology. Based on these results a compact, portable version of the clinical DSOS device with real-time automated diagnostic capability was developed. The portable device was tested in 47 subjects and a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 83% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue. The diagnostic potential of multimodal platforms incorporating DSOS was explored through two pilot studies. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with widefield imaging was carried out in 29 oral cancer patients, resulting in a combined sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 69%. Widefield imaging and spectroscopy performed slightly better in combination than each method performed independently. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with the optical contrast agents 2-NBDG, EGF-Alexa 647, and proflavine was carried out in resected tissue

  15. Clinical Presentation of Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Macharia, Ephantus; Kabiru, Joy; Zindamoyen, Alain M’bongo; Rono, Hilary; Ollando, Ernest; Wanyonyi, Leonard; Wachira, Joseph; Munene, Rhoda; Onyuma, Timothy; Sagoo, Mandeep S.; Weiss, Helen A.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance There is a trend towards treating conjunctival lesions suspected to be ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) based on the clinical impression. Objectives To describe the presentation of OSSN and identify clinical features which distinguish it from benign lesions and subsequently evaluate their recognisability. Design, Setting and Participants Prospective multi-centre study in Kenya from July 2012 through July 2014 of 496 adults presenting with conjunctival lesions. Exposures Comprehensive history, slit lamp examination and photography before excision biopsy. Frequency of clinical features in OSSN and benign lesions recorded. One histopathologist examined all specimens. Six additional masked ophthalmologists independently examined photographs from 100 participants and assessed clinical features. Main Outcomes and Measures Proportions and means were compared using Chi-square, Fisher’s exact test or t-test as appropriate. Inter-observer agreement was estimated using Kappa statistic. Examiners’ assessments were compared to a reference. Results Among 496 participants, OSSN was the most common (38%) histological diagnosis, followed by pterygium (36%) and actinic keratosis (19%). OSSN cases were slightly older and tended to have lower levels of education than benign ones. Females predominated (67% of OSSN vs 64% of benign lesions; P = .65). HIV-infection was common among OSSN cases (74%). The commonest location was the nasal limbus (61% OSSN vs 78% benign lesions; P < .001). Signs more frequent in OSSN included; feeder vessels, odds ratio [OR], 5.8 [95%CI, 3.2-10.5]; moderate inflammation, OR, 3.5 [95%CI,1.8-6.8]; corneal involvement, OR, 2.7 [95%CI,1.8-4.0]; leukoplakia, OR, 2.6 [95%CI,1.7-3.9]; papilliform surface, OR, 2.1 [95%CI,1.3-3.5]; pigmentation, OR, 1.5 [95%CI, 1.0-2.2]; temporal location, OR, 2.0 [95%cI, 1.2-3.2]; circumlimbal location, (7.0% vs 0.3%; P<.001); severe inflammation (6.0% vs 0.3%; P <.001) and larger mean [SD] diameter (6.8 [3

  16. Diagnosing Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nguena, Marie B.; van den Tweel, Jan G.; Makupa, William; Hu, Victor H.; Weiss, Helen A.; Gichuhi, Stephen; Burton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the reliability of clinical examination and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) in distinguishing ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) from benign conjunctival lesions. Design Case-control study. Participants Sixty individuals with conjunctival lesions (OSSN and benign) and 60 age-matched controls with normal conjunctiva presenting to Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania. Methods Participants were examined and photographed, and IVCM was performed. Patients with conjunctival lesions were offered excisional biopsy with histopathology and a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test. The IVCM images were read masked to the clinical appearance and pathology results. Images were graded for several specific features and given an overall categorization (normal, benign, or malignant). A group of 8 ophthalmologists were shown photographs of conjunctival lesions and asked to independently classify as OSSN or benign. Main Outcome Measures Comparison of the histopathology diagnosis with the clinical and IVCM diagnosis. Results Fifty-two cases underwent excisional biopsy with histopathology; 34 were on the OSSN spectrum, 17 were benign, and 1 was lymphoma. The cases and controls had comparable demographic profiles. Human immunodeficiency syndrome infection was more common in OSSN compared with benign cases (58.8% vs. 5.6%; odds ratio, 24.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–204; P = 0.003). Clinically, OSSN lesions more frequently exhibited feeder vessels and tended to have more leukoplakia and a gelatinous appearance. Overall, the ophthalmologists showed moderate agreement with the histology result (average kappa = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.36–0.64). The masked grading of IVCM images reliably distinguished normal conjunctiva. However, IVCM was unable to reliably distinguish between benign lesions and OSSN because of an overlap in their appearance (kappa = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.32–0.57). No single feature was significantly more frequent in OSSN

  17. [Changes of structure and function of spleen macrophages induced by malignant neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Bakhishinian, M Z; Aznaurian, A V

    2004-01-01

    Spleen macrophages, as most active elements of the mononuclear phagocyte system, were studied using light and electron microscopy in experimental rats and mice with differenet types of malignant neoplasia, including chemically induced carcinogenesis, transplantable tumor growth and in leukosis. In chemically induced carcinogenesis macrophage phagocytic activity was reduced, morphologically, the cellular surface smoothing, cytoplasm organell reduction and nuclear pyknotic changes were found. In animals with transplanted tumors, high activity of spleen macrophages was detected. In animals with leukosis, macrophages are characterized by reduced phagocytic activity, smoothed cellular surface and a variable number of lysosomes. The results obtained support the concept of high reactivity of the cells of mononuclear phagocyte system in neoplasia.

  18. Role of the human papilloma virus in the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jastreboff, A; Cymet, T

    2002-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a public health problem as a sexually transmitted disease and as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of various cancers. The clinical manifestations, epidemiology, and virology that are critical to understanding the process of cervical dysplasia and neoplasia are reviewed. A discussion of the cervical transformation zone and the classification of cervical dysplasia and neoplasia leads into the importance of the Papanicolaou smear in prevention of potentially devastating sequelae of this virus. The role of the immune system in the progression of the disease and how it relates to vaccines, as well as treatment and prevention of HPV, are reviewed. PMID:11930025

  19. Etiology, pathogenesis and epizootiology of hematopoietic neoplasia in the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies on the etiology of hematopoietic neoplasia (HN) in soft-shell clams, Mya arenaria, have been inconclusive. Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons, polychlorinated-biphenyls and a virus have all been implicated as causative agents. The isolation of 100 nm virus-like particles from neoplastic clams proved conclusively that the causative agent is a retrovirus. The virus can induce a neoplasia in non-neoplastic clams and similar virus particles can be re-isolated and induce neoplasia. The activities of the RT are temperature dependent, found at 6[degrees]C, but not at 25[degrees]C and 37[degrees]C. The incidence rate for neoplasia in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island was 7.7% and for combined other locations, 3.7% (26/699). HN was present in clams throughout the year at varying levels. The highest incidence occurred in October (11.5%); the lowest incidence in April (1.2%) and June (2.5%). The outcome of the disease depends on the water temperature and degree of severity of neoplasia in the clams. Death rate was greatest when water temperature was at 15[degrees]C (100%). High severity clams had the highest death rate (100%). Chronicity of persistent neoplasia occurred more at 10[degrees]C (19%) than at 6[degrees]C (15%) or 15[degrees]C (0%). Remission occurred only in low severity juvenile clams at either 6[degrees]C or 10[degrees]C. Neoplasia causes metabolic alteration in clams. Remission occurred only in low severity juvenile clams at either 6[degrees]C or 10[degrees]C. The time to remission was longer at 6[degrees]C than 10[degrees]C. Neoplasia causes metabolic alteration in clams. This shown by a significant increase in uric acid, asparatate transminase and triglycerides and a decrease in urea in the hemolymph. The cell membrane of neoplastic hemocytes also shows differences in their binding pattern to lectin than the normal hemocytes, indicating a change in cell surface glycoprotein probably induced by the retrovirus.

  20. Differential diagnosis of integumentary and mucous membrane lesions. Neoplasia or inflammation?

    PubMed

    Cooley, A J

    1990-09-01

    Lesions occurring on the skin and mucous membranes of domestic animals often present both diagnostic challenges and diagnostic confusion. One of the most common causes of confusion is inflammatory lesions that can be mistaken for neoplasia and vice versa. This confusion may emanate from intrinsic biologic variability, histopathologic interpretation, secondary alterations subsequent to inflammation or necrosis, or sampling errors and omission of pertinent information by the clinician. Some diagnostic problems associated with diagnoses of granulomatous inflammation, mesenchymal neoplasia, mast cell tumors, and squamous cell carcinomas are presented, and selected specific differential diagnoses associated with diagnostic problems are discussed.

  1. Mitomycin C as an adjunct in the treatment of localised ocular surface squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C; Louis, D; Dodd, T; Muecke, J

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To report the outcome of topical mitomycin C (MMC) used as adjunctive treatment following primary excision of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN). Method: Prospective, non-comparative interventional case series of 27 primary OSSN lesions from 26 patients treated in a single ocular oncology centre over a 4 year period. Result: 27 cases of OSSN received a treatment regimen of surgical excision, followed by topical MMC. Mean follow up of 27 (SD 12) months (range 12–50, median 25 months) revealed zero recurrences. Conclusion: MMC treatment following surgical excision decreases the recurrence rate of primary ocular surface neoplasia and should be considered as adjunctive therapy in primary treatment. PMID:14693762

  2. The significance of marked nuclear atypia in grade 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Oluwole; Rodriguez, Rosemarie

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 10% to 15% of cases of grade 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia are found to have progressed to a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or higher at follow-up, and there are presently no reliable morphological predictors of this subset. It has recently been reported that cases of grade 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia that display marked nuclear atypia (defined as cases with at least 5 epithelial cells with nuclear enlargement of at least 5 times the size of an intermediate cell, and/or multinucleation of at least 5 nuclei.) have a substantially higher rate of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on short-term follow-up and may, therefore, require more aggressive initial management. We report herein our experience with a cohort of such cases. After a review of consecutive cervical biopsies, 352 cases with grade 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia were classified into group 1 (grade 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with marked atypia, n = 31) and group 2 (grade 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia without marked atypia, n = 321). The average follow-up rates for groups 1 and 2 were 93.55% (29/31) and 90.65% (291/321), respectively. Average follow-up durations were 14.3 and 17.9 months, respectively. The follow-up high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion rate of the cases with marked atypia was 10.34%, as compared with 11.68% for cases without marked atypia. The follow-up interpretive frequency (in cytologic samples) of "low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion" was significantly higher in group 1(19/29 versus 114/291, P = .009). However, no significant differences were identified between groups 1 and 2 regarding the interpretive frequencies of either high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (3/29 versus 34/291, P = 1) or "negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy" (6/29 versus 56/291, P = .8) in follow-up cytologic samples. In subsets of both groups in which high-risk human papillomavirus testing was performed in the

  3. Common Inflammatory Disorders and Neoplasia of the Ileal Pouch: A Review of Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Collinsworth, Amy L.; Liu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the standard restorative procedure after proctocolectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who require colectomy. The ileal pouch is susceptible to a variety of insults including mechanical injury, ischemia, fecal stasis, and infectious agents. In addition, the development of recurrent and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and neoplasia may occur in the ileal pouch. Although clinical, endoscopic, and radiographic examination can diagnose many ileal pouch diseases, histologic examination plays an essential role in diagnosis and management, particularly in cases with antibiotic refractory chronic pouchitis and pouch neoplasia. PMID:27785322

  4. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  5. CD44v6 overexpression related to metastasis and poor prognosis of colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Lin; Su, Wen-Yu; Lin, Yan-Wei; Xiong, Hua; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Xu, Jie; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-12-24

    CD44v6 has recently been reported as a biomarker for colorectal cancer. However, the clinical and prognostic significance of CD44v6 in colorectal cancer remains controversial. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to clarify this issue. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline, Embase and Web of Science, and the statistical analysis was conducted using Stata software. A total of twenty-one studies including 3918 colorectal cancer cases were included. The pooled analysis showed that CD44v6 overexpression in colorectal cancer was an independent prognostic marker correlating with lower 5-year overall survival rate (OR=0.78, 95%CI =0.67-0.91, p=0.001). CD44v6 overexpression was also associated with more lymph node invasion (OR=1.48, 95%CI= 1.02-2.15, p=0.04), and advanced Dukes stage (OR=2.47, 95%CI= 1.29-4.73, p=0.01). In addition, while excluding Zolbec's study, CD44v6 overexpression was associated with distance metastasis (OR=1.65, 95%CI =1.13-2.40, p=0.01). Taken together, this meta-analysis suggested that CD44v6 is an efficient prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

  6. Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm: Risk factors for recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Briedigkeit, Alexander; Sultanie, Omar; Sido, Bernd; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate risk factors for local recurrence after endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm. METHODS: Retrospective data analysis of 216 endoscopic mucosal resections for colorectal adenomas > 20 mm in 179 patients (40.3% female; median age 68 years; range 35-91 years). All patients had at least 1 follow-up endoscopy with a minimum control interval of 2 mo (mean follow-up 6 mo/2.0-43.4 mo). Possible factors associated with local recurrence were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Median size of the lesions was 30 mm (20-70 mm), 69.0% were localized in the right-sided (cecum, ascending and transverse) colon. Most of the lesions (85.6%) showed a non-pedunculated morphology and the majority of resections was in piecemeal technique (78.7%). Histology showed carcinoma or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 51/216 (23.6%) lesions including 4 low risk carcinomas (pT1a, L0, V0, R0 - G1/G2). Histologically proven recurrence was observed in 33/216 patients (15.3%). Patient age > 65 years, polyp size > 30 mm, non-pedunculated morphology, localization in the right-sided colon, piecemeal resection and tubular-villous histology were found as associated factors in univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only localization in the right-sided colon (HR = 6.842/95%CI: 1.540-30.394; P = 0.011), tubular-villous histology (HR = 3.713/95%CI: 1.617-8.528; P = 0.002) and polyp size > 30 mm (HR = 2.563/95%CI: 1.179-5.570; P = 0.017) were significantly associated risk factors for adenoma recurrence. CONCLUSION: Meticulous endoscopic follow-up is warranted after endoscopic mucosal resection of adenomas localized in the right-sided colon larger than > 30 mm, with tubular-villous histology. PMID:26981180

  7. Initial results of the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Poskus, Tomas; Strupas, Kestutis; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Bitinaitė, Dominyka; Kavaliauskas, Augustas; Samalavicius, Narimantas E; Saladzinskas, Zilvinas

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program (the Program) in Lithuania according to the criteria set by the European Union. In Lithuania, screening services are provided free of charge to the population. The National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) reimburses the institutions for performing each service; each procedure within the Program has its own administrative code. All the information about the performance of the Program is collected in one institution - the NHIF. The results of the Program were retrieved from the database of NHIF from the start of the Program from 1 July 2009 to 1 July 2012. Descriptive analysis of epidemiological indicators was carried out. Results were compared with the references in the guidelines of the European Union for quality assurance in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and diagnosis. Information service [which involves fecal immunochemical test (FIT)] was provided to 271,396 of 890,309 50-74-year-old residents. The screening uptake was 46.0% over 3 years. During this period, 19,455 (7.2%) FITs were positive and 251,941 (92.8%) FITs were negative. Referral for colonoscopy was performed in 10,190 (52.4%) patients. Colonoscopy was performed in 12,864 (66.1%) patients. Colonoscopy did not indicate any pathological findings in 8613 (67.0%) patients. Biopsies were performed in 4251 (33.0%) patients. The rate of high-grade neoplasia reported by pathologists was 3.9%; the rate of cancer was 3.1% of all colonoscopies. The rate of CRC detected by the Program was 0.2%. The CRC screening program in Lithuania meets most of the requirements for standardized CRC screening programs. The invitation coverage and rate of referral for colonoscopy after positive FIT should be improved.

  8. Bcl-xL is an oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Anna-Lena; Gdynia, Georg; Salou, Mariam; Radhakrishnan, Praveen; Duglova, Katarina; Heller, Anette; Keim, Sophia; Kautz, Nicole; Jassowicz, Adam; Elssner, Christin; He, You-Wen; Jaeger, Dirk; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schneider, Martin; Weber, Achim; Roth, Wilfried; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Koehler, Bruno Christian

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignant neoplasia in women and men worldwide. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein family is mainly known for its pivotal role in the regulation of the mitochondrial death pathway. Anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins may provide survival benefits and induce therapy resistance in cancer cells. Among anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, we found solely Bcl-xL strongly upregulated in human CRC specimens. In order to study protein function in the context of tumor initiation and progression in vivo, we generated a mouse model lacking Bcl-xL in intestinal epithelial cells (Bcl-xLIEC-KO). If challenged in an inflammation-driven tumor model, Bcl-xLIEC-KO mice showed a significantly reduced tumor burden with lower tumor numbers per animal and decreased tumor sizes. Analysis of cell death events by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting revealed a striking increase of apoptosis in Bcl-xL-negative tumors. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry excluded changes in proliferative capacity and immune cell infiltration as reasons for the reduced tumor load and thereby identify apoptosis as key mechanism. Human CRC tissue was cultured ex vivo and treated with the small molecule compound ABT-737, which inhibits Bcl-xL and Bcl-2. Under ABT-737 treatment, the amount of apoptotic tumor cells significantly increased compared with controls, whereas proliferation levels remained unaltered. In summary, our findings identify Bcl-xL as a driver in colorectal tumorigenesis and cancer progression, making it a valuable target for clinical application. PMID:27537525

  9. Dietary walnut suppression of colorectal cancer in mice: Mediation by miRNA patterns and fatty acid incorporation.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Michael A; Ko, Byung-Joon; Witte, Theodore R; Dincer, Fadime; Hardman, W Elaine; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer, unlike many other malignancies, may be preventable. Recent studies have demonstrated an inverse association between nut consumption and incidence of colon cancer; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. An emerging concept suggests that microribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may help explain the relationship between walnut consumption and decreased colorectal neoplasia risk. Seven days after HT-29 colon cancer cell injection, mice were randomized to either control or walnut diets for 25 days of diet treatment. Thirty samples of tumor and of omental adipose were analyzed to determine changes in lipid composition in each dietary group. In the tumors of the walnut-containing diet, we found significant increases in α-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and total omega-3 acids, and a decrease in arachidonic acid, as compared to the control diet. Final tumor size measured at sacrifice was negatively associated with percentage of total omega-3 fatty acid composition (r=-0.641, P=.001). MicroRNA expression analysis of colorectal tumor tissue revealed decreased expression of miRNAs 1903, 467c and 3068 (P<.05) and increased expression of miRNA 297a* (P=.0059) in the walnut-treated group as compared to control diet. Our results indicate that changes in the miRNA expression profiles likely affect target gene transcripts involved in pathways of anti-inflammation, antivascularization, antiproliferation and apoptosis. We also demonstrate the incorporation of protective fatty acids into colonic epithelium of walnut-fed mice, which may independently alter miRNA expression profiles itself. Future studies of the mechanism of widespread miRNA regulation by walnut consumption are needed to offer potential prognostic and therapeutic targets.

  10. Factors Determining Colorectal Cancer: The Role of the Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Nistal, Esther; Fernández-Fernández, Nereida; Vivas, Santiago; Olcoz, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, holds a complex community of microorganisms, which are essential for maintaining homeostasis. However, in recent years, many studies have implicated microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), with this disease considered a major cause of death in the western world. The mechanisms underlying bacterial contribution in its development are complex and are not yet fully understood. However, there is increasing evidence showing a connection between intestinal microbiota and CRC. Intestinal microorganisms cause the onset and progression of CRC using different mechanisms, such as the induction of a chronic inflammation state, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation, the production of toxic metabolites, or heterocyclic amine activation of pro-diet carcinogenic compounds. Despite these advances, additional studies in humans and animal models will further decipher the relationship between microbiota and CRC, and aid in developing alternate therapies based on microbiota manipulation.

  11. Molecular therapy of colorectal cancer: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wenhao; Feng, Junlan; Qin, Huanlong; Ma, Yanlei

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the introduction of cytotoxic drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil has improved the treatment of advanced CRC, the individual response to chemoradiotherapy varies tremendously from one patient to another. However, recent progress in CRC molecular therapies may provide new insight into the treatment of this disease. Currently, components of the EGFR, VEGF, Wnt and NF-kB pathways are the most important targets for CRC therapy. This review chronicles the development of molecular CRC therapies over the past few decades. We also provide an update on the current progress of research concerning the molecular pathways leading to CRC and discuss the possible implications for CRC therapy.

  12. Worldwide burden of colorectal cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Favoriti, Pasqualino; Carbone, Gabriele; Greco, Marco; Pirozzi, Felice; Pirozzi, Raffaele Emmanuele Maria; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the fourth cause of cancer death worldwide. There is wide variation over time among the different geographic areas due to variable exposure to risk factors, introduction and uptake of screening as well as access to appropriate treatment services. Indeed, a large proportion of the disparities may be attributed to socioeconomic status. Although colorectal cancer continues to be a disease of the developed world, incidence rates have been rising in developing countries. Moreover, the global burden is expected to further increase due to the growth and aging of the population and because of the adoption of westernized behaviors and lifestyle. Colorectal cancer screening has been proven to greatly reduce mortality rates that have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries. Statistics on colorectal cancer occurrence are essential to develop targeted strategies that could alleviate the burden of the disease. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of incidence, mortality and survival rates for colorectal cancer as well as their geographic variations and temporal trends.

  13. Prognostic impact of MGMT promoter methylation and MGMT and CD133 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New biomarkers are needed for the prognosis of advanced colorectal cancer, which remains incurable by conventional treatments. O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation and protein expression have been related to colorectal cancer treatment failure and tumor progression. Moreover, the presence in these tumors of cancer stem cells, which are characterized by CD133 expression, has been associated with chemoresistance, radioresistance, metastasis, and local recurrence. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of CD133 and MGMT and their possible interaction in colorectal cancer patients. Methods MGMT and CD133 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 123 paraffin-embedded colorectal adenocarcinoma samples, obtaining the percentage staining and intensity. MGMT promoter methylation status was obtained by using bisulfite modification and methylation-specific PCR (MSP). These values were correlated with clinical data, including overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), tumor stage, and differentiation grade. Results Low MGMT expression intensity was significantly correlated with shorter OS and was a prognostic factor independently of treatment and histopathological variables. High percentage of CD133 expression was significantly correlated with shorter DFS but was not an independent factor. Patients with low-intensity MGMT expression and ≥50% CD133 expression had the poorest DFS and OS outcomes. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that MGMT expression may be an OS biomarker as useful as tumor stage or differentiation grade and that CD133 expression may be a predictive biomarker of DFS. Thus, MGMT and CD133 may both be useful for determining the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients and to identify those requiring more aggressive adjuvant therapies. Future studies will be necessary to determine its clinical utility. PMID:25015560

  14. Are patients with skin cancer at lower risk of developing colorectal or breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Soerjomataram, I; Louwman, W J; Lemmens, V E P P; Coebergh, J W W; de Vries, E

    2008-06-15

    Ultraviolet exposure may reduce the risk of colorectal and breast cancer as the result of rising vitamin D levels. Because skin cancer is positively related to sun exposure, the authors hypothesized a lower incidence of breast and colorectal cancer after skin cancer diagnosis. They analyzed the incidence of colorectal and breast cancer diagnosed from 1972 to 2002 among 26,916 Netherlands skin cancer patients (4,089 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 19,319 basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and 3,508 cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM)). Standardized incidence ratios were calculated. A markedly decreased risk of colorectal cancer was found for subgroups supposedly associated with the highest accumulated sun exposure: men (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.71, 0.97); patients with SCC (SIR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.43, 0.93); older patients at SCC diagnosis (SIR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37, 0.88); and patients with a SCC or BCC lesion on the head and neck area (SIR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.36, 0.92 for SCC and SIR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.63, 0.97 for BCC). Patients with CMM exhibited an increased risk of breast cancer, especially advanced breast cancer (SIR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.94) and older patients at CMM diagnosis (SIR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.89). Study results suggest a beneficial effect of continuous sun exposure against colorectal cancer. The higher risk of breast cancer among CMM patients may be related to socioeconomic class, both being more common in the affluent group.

  15. Circulating and Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liangliang; Zhang, Meng; Li, Wei; Ding, Jianhua; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Huafeng; Zhao, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous family of myeloid cells that suppress T cell immunity in tumor-bearing hosts. In patients with colon cancer, MDSCs have recently been described as Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ cells correlating with cancer stage, metastasis and chemotherapy response. To learn in more detail the dynamic change and clinical relevance of circulating and tumor-infiltrating Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ MDSC in colorectal cancer, we harvested the blood from 64 patients with varying stage of colorectal cancer and tumor and matched paraneoplastic tissues from 5 patients with advanced colorectal cancer, subjected them to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of percentage, absolute number and phenotype of MDSC and finally characterized their immunosuppressive functions. Our results demonstrate that peripheral blood from colorectal cancer patients contains markedly increased percentage and absolute number of Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ MDSCs compared with healthy individuals, and this increase is closely correlated with clinical cancer stage and tumor metastasis but not primary tumor size and serum concentrations of cancer biomarker. A similar increase of MDSCs was also observed in the tumor tissues. Phenotyping MDSCs shows that they express high CD13 and CD39, low CD115, CD117, CD124 and PD-L1, and devoid of CD14, CD15 and CD66b, reminiscent of precursor myeloid cells. MDSCs from cancer patients but not healthy donors have the immunosuppressive activity and were able to inhibit in vitro autologous T-cell proliferation. Collectively, this study substantiates the presence of increased immunosuppressive circulating and tumor-resident Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ MDSCs in patients with colorectal cancers correlating with cancer stage and metastasis, and suggests that pharmacologic blockade of MDSCs should be considered in future clinical trials. PMID:23437326

  16. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Peters, H. Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15–25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass. PMID:28116210

  17. Thymic carcinoids in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Teh, B T; Zedenius, J; Kytölä, S; Skogseid, B; Trotter, J; Choplin, H; Twigg, S; Farnebo, F; Giraud, S; Cameron, D; Robinson, B; Calender, A; Larsson, C; Salmela, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of thymic carcinoids in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and to study means for detection and prevention of this tumor in patients with MEN1. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Thymic carcinoid is a rare malignancy, with approximately 150 cases reported to date. It may be associated with MEN1 and carries a poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Its underlying etiology is unknown. METHODS: Ten patients with MEN1 from eight families with anterior mediastinal tumors were included in a case series study at tertiary referring hospitals. Clinicopathologic studies were done on these patients, with a review of the literature. Mutation analysis was performed on the MEN1 gene in families with clusterings of the tumor to look for genotype-phenotype correlation. Loss of heterozygosity was studied in seven cases to look for genetic abnormalities. RESULTS: Histologic studies of all tumors were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid. Clustering of this tumor was found in some of the families-three pairs of brothers and three families with first- or second-degree relatives who had thymic carcinoid. All patients described here were men, with a mean age at detection of 44 years (range 31 to 66). Most of the patients had chest pain or were asymptomatic; none had Cushing's or carcinoid syndrome. All tumors were detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. The results of octreoscans performed in three patients were all positive. Histopathologic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid and did not stain for ACTH. Mutation analysis of the families with clustering revealed mutations in different exons/introns of the MEN1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies of seven tumors did not show LOH in the MEN1 region, but two tumors showed LOH in the 1p region. CONCLUSIONS: MEN1-related thymic carcinoids constitute approximately 25

  18. Brain metastasis from pheochromocytoma in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Rainero, I; Savi, L; Rivoiro, C; Pinessi, L

    2001-12-01

    Neurological involvement in multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome is uncommon. Notalgia paresthetica (pruritus localized in an area between D2 and D6 dermatomes) is the neurological symptom more frequently described in patients with MEN 2A. The authors report the unusual case of a MEN 2A patient with a brain metastasis from a pheochromocytoma.

  19. Lobular neoplasia diagnosed on breast Core biopsy: frequency of carcinoma on excision and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Benjamin C; Collie, Angela M B; Lott-Limbach, Abberly A; Udoji, Esther N; Sieck, Leah R; Booth, Christine N; Downs-Kelly, Erinn

    2016-12-01

    The appropriate follow-up and treatment for patients with a core biopsy diagnosis of lobular neoplasia (atypical lobular hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ) remains controversial. Several studies have attempted to address this issue, with recommendations ranging from close clinical follow-up or surveillance to mandatory surgical excision in all cases. We report the findings at our institution, where virtually every core needle biopsy diagnosis of lobular neoplasia results in follow-up excision. The goal of the study was to identify potential predictors of upgrade to a more significant lesion. We identified 76 patients over a 15-year period with a core biopsy diagnosis of pure lobular neoplasia and no other high-risk lesions. Subsequent surgical excision identified 10 cases (13%) that were upgraded to carcinoma. Upgrade diagnoses included invasive ductal carcinoma (n=1), invasive lobular carcinoma (n=4), ductal carcinoma in situ (n=3), and pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (n=2). All 10 upgraded cases had imaging findings suspicious for malignancy including irregular masses, asymmetric densities, or pleomorphic calcifications. Of the 10 upgraded cases, 7 were diagnosed as lobular carcinoma in situ on core biopsy. The data support a role for radiologic-pathologic correlation in the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions and suggest that the extent of lobular neoplasia in core biopsy specimens may be an indicator of the likelihood of upgrade to carcinoma.

  20. THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALO METHANES (THMs) IN THE DRINKING WATER
    Christopher Sistrunk and Tony DeAngelo, North Carolina Central University and US Environmental Protection Agency
    The THMs are the most widely distributed and the most co...

  1. Multiple head and neck neoplasia following radiation for benign disease during childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, D.K.; Eden, A.R.; Biller, H.F.

    1988-06-01

    A woman received radiation therapy to the adenoids for benign disease at the age of 10 years and subsequently developed an adenocarcinoma of the middle ear, a parathyroid adenoma, and a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland in adulthood. This appears to be the first such case on record. The literature of neoplasia after head and neck irradiation is briefly reviewed.

  2. Genetics of Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Neoplasias (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of endocrine and neuroendocrine neoplasias. This summary contains information about the MEN1 gene, the RET gene, genetic testing, and clinical interventions. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have a hereditary medullary thyroid cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  3. Proceedings From the First Asia-Oceania Research Organisation on Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Faro, Edited by Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    The First Asia-Oceania Research Organisation on Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) Meeting was held in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, in July 2005. The conference covered regional issues relating to infection with the human papillomavirus—epidemiology, virology, and immunology, testing, screening, and prevention strategies—as well as cervical cancer screening and its management.

  4. Studies on the presence of viral antibodies in patients with various forms of malignant neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Ionescu, T; Lungu, M; Predescu, E; Nastac, E

    1975-01-01

    The study of viral antibodies in 6714 sera demonstrated that the level of antibodies to infectious viruses was the same in cancer patients as in controls. However, the patients with various forms of neoplasia showed a considerable percentage and high antibody levels to viruses with oncogenic potential for animals (adenovirus, SV40, Rous virus) or involved in human carcinogenesis (herpes virus).