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Sample records for advanced colorectal neoplasia

  1. (1)H NMR Spectroscopy of Fecal Extracts Enables Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Aurelien; Dona, Anthony C; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Tournigand, Christophe; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Lebaleur, Yann; Sobhani, Iradj; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing cause of mortality in developing countries, warranting investigation into its etiopathogenesis and earlier diagnosis. Here, we investigated the fecal metabolic phenotype of patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia and controls using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR as well as Wif-1 methylation levels in stools, serum, and urine and correlated to the metabolic profile of each patient. The predictivity of the model was 0.507 (Q(2)Y), and the explained variance was 0.755 (R(2)Y). Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia demonstrated increased fecal concentrations of four short-chain fatty acids (valerate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and decreased signals relating to β-glucose, glutamine, and glutamate. The predictive accuracy of the multivariate (1)H NMR model was higher than that of the guaiac-fecal occult blood test and the Wif-1 methylation test for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia. Correlation analysis between fecal metabolites and bacterial profiles revealed strong associations between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum species with short-chain fatty acids concentration and inverse correlation between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and glucose. These preliminary results suggest that fecal metabonomics may potentially have a future role in a noninvasive colorectal screening program and may contribute to our understanding of the role of these dysregulated molecules in the cross-talk between the host and its bacterial microbiota. PMID:26211820

  2. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced

  3. Favorable lifestyle before diagnosis associated with lower risk of screen-detected advanced colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Markus D; de Lange, Thomas; Botteri, Edoardo; Nguyen, Dung-Hong; Evensen, Helge; Steen, Chloé B; Hoff, Geir; Bernklev, Tomm; Hjartåker, Anette; Berstad, Paula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between adherence to health recommendations and detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. METHODS: A total of 14832 women and men were invited to CRC screening, 6959 in the fecal immunochemical test arm and 7873 in the flexible sigmoidoscopy arm. These were also sent a self-reported lifestyle questionnaire to be completed prior to their first CRC screening. A lifestyle score was created to reflect current adherence to healthy behaviors in regard to smoking, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol consumption and food consumption, and ranged from zero (poorest) to six (best). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%CIs were calculated using multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between the single lifestyle variables and the lifestyle score and the probability of detecting ACN. RESULTS: In all 6315 women and men completed the lifestyle questionnaire, 3323 (53%) in the FIT arm and 2992 (47%) in the FS arm. This was 89% of those who participated in screening. ACN was diagnosed in 311 (5%) participants of which 25 (8%) were diagnosed with CRC. For individuals with a lifestyle score of two, three, four, and five-six, the ORs (95%CI) for the probability of ACN detection were 0.82 (0.45-1.16), 0.43 (0.28-0.73), 0.41 (0.23-0.64), and 0.41 (0.22-0.73), respectively compared to individuals with a lifestyle score of zero-one. Of the single lifestyle factors, adherence to non-smoking and moderate alcohol intake were associated with a decreased probability of ACN detection compared to being a smoker or having a high alcohol intake 0.53 (0.42-0.68) and 0.63 (0.43-0.93) respectively. CONCLUSION: Adopted healthy behaviors were inversely associated with the probability of ACN detection. Lifestyle assessment might be useful for risk stratification in CRC screening. PMID:27468217

  4. The discriminatory capability of existing scores to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia: a prospective colonoscopy study of 5,899 screening participants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C. S.; Ching, Jessica Y. L.; Ng, Simpson; Lam, Thomas Y. T.; Luk, Arthur K. C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S. M.; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Chan, Francis K. L.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of seven existing risk scoring systems in predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic Chinese cohort. We prospectively recruited 5,899 Chinese subjects aged 50–70 years in a colonoscopy screening programme(2008–2014). Scoring systems under evaluation included two scoring tools from the US; one each from Spain, Germany, and Poland; the Korean Colorectal Screening(KCS) scores; and the modified Asia Pacific Colorectal Screening(APCS) scores. The c-statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values(PPVs), and negative predictive values(NPVs) of these systems were evaluated. The resources required were estimated based on the Number Needed to Screen(NNS) and the Number Needed to Refer for colonoscopy(NNR). Advanced neoplasia was detected in 364 (6.2%) subjects. The German system referred the least proportion of subjects (11.2%) for colonoscopy, whilst the KCS scoring system referred the highest (27.4%). The c-statistics of all systems ranged from 0.56–0.65, with sensitivities ranging from 0.04–0.44 and specificities from 0.74–0.99. The modified APCS scoring system had the highest c-statistics (0.65, 95% C.I. 0.58–0.72). The NNS (12–19) and NNR (5-10) were similar among the scoring systems. The existing scoring systems have variable capability to predict advanced neoplasia among asymptomatic Chinese subjects, and further external validation should be performed. PMID:26838178

  5. Innate immunity gene polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cindy M; Chia, Victoria M; Gunter, Marc J; Zanetti, Krista A; Ryan, Bríd M; Goodman, Julie E; Harris, Curtis C; Weissfeld, Joel; Huang, Wen-Yi; Chanock, Stephen; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-11-01

    Inherited variation in genes that regulate innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to colorectal neoplasia risk. To evaluate this association, we conducted a nested case-control study of 451 colorectal cancer cases, 694 colorectal advanced adenoma cases and 696 controls of European descent within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 935 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 98 genes were evaluated. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association with colorectal neoplasia. Sixteen SNPs were associated with colorectal neoplasia risk at P < 0.01, but after adjustment for multiple testing, only rs2838732 (ITGB2) remained suggestively associated with colorectal neoplasia (OR(per T allele) = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.57-0.83, P = 7.7 × 10(-5), adjusted P = 0.07). ITGB2 codes for the CD18 protein in the integrin beta chain family. The ITGB2 association was stronger for colorectal cancer (OR(per T allele) = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.30-0.55, P = 2.4 × 10(-) (9)) than for adenoma (OR(per T allele) = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.69-1.03, P = 0.08), but it did not replicate in the validation study. The ITGB2 rs2838732 association was significantly modified by smoking status (P value for interaction = 0.003). Among never and former smokers, it was inversely associated with colorectal neoplasia (OR(per T allele) = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.37-0.69 and OR(per T allele) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.54-0.95, respectively), but no association was seen among current smokers. Other notable findings were observed for SNPs in BPI/LBP and MYD88. Although the results need to be replicated, our findings suggest that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes may be related to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23803696

  6. Innate immunity gene polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited variation in genes that regulate innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to colorectal neoplasia risk. To evaluate this association, we conducted a nested case–control study of 451 colorectal cancer cases, 694 colorectal advanced adenoma cases and 696 controls of European descent within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 935 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 98 genes were evaluated. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association with colorectal neoplasia. Sixteen SNPs were associated with colorectal neoplasia risk at P < 0.01, but after adjustment for multiple testing, only rs2838732 (ITGB2) remained suggestively associated with colorectal neoplasia (ORper T allele = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.57–0.83, P = 7.7 × 10–5, adjusted P = 0.07). ITGB2 codes for the CD18 protein in the integrin beta chain family. The ITGB2 association was stronger for colorectal cancer (ORper T allele = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.30–0.55, P = 2.4 × 10− 9) than for adenoma (ORper T allele = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.69–1.03, P = 0.08), but it did not replicate in the validation study. The ITGB2 rs2838732 association was significantly modified by smoking status (P value for interaction = 0.003). Among never and former smokers, it was inversely associated with colorectal neoplasia (ORper T allele = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.37–0.69 and ORper T allele = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.54–0.95, respectively), but no association was seen among current smokers. Other notable findings were observed for SNPs in BPI/LBP and MYD88. Although the results need to be replicated, our findings suggest that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes may be related to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23803696

  7. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, EM; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, MA; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. Objective: The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in “medium risk” individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). Methods and Results: We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were “medium risk” individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In “medium risk” individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in “medium risk” individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. Discussion: NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in “medium risk” individuals. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-09-01

    Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer.A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic F-FDG uptake on F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy.Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result.F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  9. Development and progression of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Upender; Shanmugam, Chandrakumar; Katkoori, Venkat R.; Bumpers, Harvey L.; Grizzle, William E.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of genetic and molecular alterations underlie the development and progression of colorectal neoplasia (CRN). Most of these cancers arise sporadically due to multiple somatic mutations and genetic instability. Genetic instability includes chromosomal instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MSI), which is observed in most hereditary non-polyposis colon cancers (HNPCCs) and accounts for a small proportion of sporadic CRN. Although many biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis and prediction of the clinical outcomes of CRNs, no single marker has established value. New markers and genes associated with the development and progression of CRNs are being discovered at an accelerated rate. CRN is a heterogeneous disease, especially with respect to the anatomic location of the tumor, race/ethnicity differences, and genetic and dietary interactions that influence its development and progression and act as confounders. Hence, efforts related to biomarker discovery should focus on identification of individual differences based on tumor stage, tumor anatomic location, and race/ethnicity; on the discovery of molecules (genes, mRNA transcripts, and proteins) relevant to these differences; and on development of therapeutic approaches to target these molecules in developing personalized medicine. Such strategies have the potential of reducing the personal and socio-economic burden of CRNs. Here, we systematically review molecular and other pathologic features as they relate to the development, early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, progression, and prevention of CRNs, especially colorectal cancers (CRCs). PMID:22112479

  10. Early Detection of and Screening for Colorectal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There are approximately one million new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) per year worldwide, with substantial associated morbidity and mortality. The long natural history of colorectal neoplasia affords the opportunity to use preventive measures to improve survival in this disease. Currently screening for adenomatous polyps and early-stage cancers is the best methodology for improving survival. The increasing knowledge of CRC pathogenesis and its natural history is allowing the development of new tools to identify patients who will benefit most from colon cancer screening and the defining of appropriate surveillance intervals. The guidelines for screening for colorectal neoplasia have recently been substantially revised by several organizations based on developing technologies and a growing body of data on the efficacy of CRC screening. PMID:20431727

  11. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  12. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-14

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  13. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  14. Relationship between duodenal bile acids and colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Moorehead, R J; Campbell, G R; Donaldson, J D; McKelvey, S T

    1987-01-01

    To investigate a possible relationship between bile acids and colorectal neoplasia duodenal bile acids were analysed in 50 patients with colorectal adenomas and 14 with carcinoma. Using gas liquid and high performance liquid chromatography a small, but significant increase in the proportion of chenodeoxycholic acid was found in the bile of adenoma patients compared with controls (mean % +/- SD 31.0 +/- 10.8, 26.4 +/- 8.3, p = 0.01). The difference in the proportions of chenodeoxycholic acid correlated with increasing malignant potential of the adenomas as determined by increasing size, histological type, degree of dysplasia and number present. In carcinoma patients an increase in the proportion of chenodeoxycholic acid was also observed compared with controls (mean % +/- SD, 47.2 +/- 9.6, 28.0 +/- 4.5, p less than 0.01). The proportions of other bile acids in those with adenoma or carcinoma were normal. PMID:3428671

  15. Application of quantitative estimates of fecal hemoglobin concentration for risk prediction of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chao-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Min; Chang, Hung-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Hung; Chong, Lee-Won; Chen, Chun-Hao; Lin, Yueh-Shih; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Shih, Chia-Hui

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), used to evaluate fecal hemoglobin concentration, in the prediction of histological grade and risk of colorectal tumors. METHODS: We enrolled 17881 individuals who attended the two-step colorectal cancer screening program in a single hospital between January 2010 and October 2011. Colonoscopy was recommended to the participants with an FIT of ≥ 12 ngHb/mL buffer. We classified colorectal lesions as cancer (C), advanced adenoma (AA), adenoma (A), and others (O) by their colonoscopic and histological findings. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to determine the association between the FIT results and colorectal tumor grade. The risk of adenomatous neoplasia was estimated by calculating the positive predictive values for different FIT concentrations. RESULTS: The positive rate of the FIT was 10.9% (1948/17881). The attendance rate for colonoscopy was 63.1% (1229/1948). The number of false positive results was 23. Of these 1229 cases, the numbers of O, A, AA, and C were 759, 221, 201, and 48, respectively. Regression analysis revealed a positive association between histological grade and FIT concentration (β = 0.088, P < 0.01). A significant log-linear relationship was found between the concentration and positive predictive value of the FIT for predicting colorectal tumors (R2 > 0.95, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Higher FIT concentrations are associated with more advanced histological grades. Risk prediction for colorectal neoplasia based on individual FIT concentrations is significant and may help to improve the performance of screening programs. PMID:24363529

  16. Optical diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia: A Western perspective.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Shinichiro; Kheir, Ammar O; Hewett, David G

    2016-04-01

    Optical diagnosis is an emerging paradigm in Western endoscopic practice for the colonoscopic management of diminutive polyps, and includes two complementary clinical strategies: 'resect and discard', in which diminutive high-confidence adenomas are identified, and then removed and discarded without pathological assessment; and 'diagnose and leave', where diminutive high-confidence hyperplastic polyps are identified in the rectosigmoid and then left without resection or biopsy. Like other aspects of colonoscopy performance, adoption of optical diagnosis in Western practice is limited by operator dependency and variation in clinical effectiveness. There is substantial potential for optical diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia during colonoscopy to alleviate the rising costs of health care in the West. However, operator dependence in diagnostic performance together with critical system factors such as informed consent, credentialing, medical legal support and reimbursement incentives must be overcome before optical diagnosis of diminutive lesions is considered for widespread adoption in Western clinical practice. PMID:26841371

  17. Histological inflammation increases the risk of colorectal neoplasia in ulcerative colitis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Ruben J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients are at greater risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia. Several individual studies have demonstrated associations between severity of histologic inflammation and colorectal neoplasia. However, a comprehensive systematic review has not been completed. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the relationship between histologic inflammation and risk for neoplasia among available observational studies. Methods Three databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library) were systematically searched. Studies were included if they included UC patients who underwent colonoscopic assessment and when histologic inflammation and colorectal neoplasia were both reported. Colorectal neoplasia rates were compared. Quantitative meta-analysis was attempted. Results Four of 1,422 records found were eligible. Results from 2 case-control studies reported a 3.5-fold increased risk for colorectal neoplasia associated with a single point increase in histologic inflammation. This result was further corroborated by one cohort study that demonstrated increased hazard ratios. The second cohort study reported outcomes for patients with normal gross endoscopy, but had increased histological inflammation when neoplasia was assessed. Finally, this study reported increased risk for neoplastic progression by histological inflammation among patients who were normal by gross endoscopic evaluation. Quantitative meta-analysis was unsuccessful due to heterogeneity between study measures. Conclusions There is strong evidence that histologic inflammation among patients with UC increases the risk of colorectal neoplasia. The depth and nature of assessment of additional clinical variables was varied and may have resulted in greater outcome discrepancy. Additional study related to mechanisms of inflammation-related neoplasia and therapeutic modification is needed.

  18. Development of a Novel Scoring System for Predicting the Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a novel scoring system to screen subjects who have a high risk for colorectal neoplasia. Study Design and Setting We retrospectively analyzed 1061 subjects undergoing total colonoscopy (TCS) for the first time at Gihoku Kosei Hospital. The characteristics and habits of the subjects were analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk score was established according to each odds ratio of the individual risk factors, and the correlations between the sum of the risk scores and the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia for each individual were evaluated. Results Age 45–59 (risk score: 2 points) and ≥60 (3 points), male gender (1 point), and habitual alcohol consumption ≥21g daily (1 point) were extracted as the significant risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. When the risk groups were determined by summing up these risk scores, the prevalence rates of colorectal neoplasia were 8.8% for the low risk group (0–2 points), 30.5% for the low-moderate risk group (3 points), 39.1% for the high-moderate risk group (4 points), and 57.6% for the high risk group (5 points). In comparison with the low risk group, the odds ratio of the low-moderate risk, the high-moderate risk, and the high risk groups were 4.6, 6.7, and 14.1 folds, respectively. Conclusion Our scoring system, which linearly correlates with the prevalence rate of colorectal neoplasia, may be an effective tool for screening the subjects who have a high risk for colorectal neoplasia. These subjects, therefore, should be recommended to undergo TCS. PMID:27284907

  19. Folate-genetics and colorectal neoplasia: What we know and need to know next

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of folate involves a complex network of polymorphic enzymes that may explain a proportion of the risk associated with colorectal neoplasia. Over 60 observational studies primarily in non-Hispanic White populations have been conducted on selected genetic variants in specific genes, MTH...

  20. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0

  1. Insulin-like growth factor I and the development of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P J; Frajese, V; Jones, A M; Camacho-Hubner, C; Lowe, D G; Fairclough, P D; Chew, S L; Grossman, A B; Monson, J P; Besser, G M

    2000-09-01

    Patients with acromegaly are at increased risk of colorectal neoplasia and, by analogy with high-risk nonacromegalic patients, may require regular colonoscopic screening. However, it is unknown whether the risk is equal in all patients or whether some should be regarded as carrying a particularly high risk. The aims of this study were: 1) to establish the natural history of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly; 2) to establish which patients are at increased risk of developing neoplasia; and 3) to elucidate the influence of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in adenoma formation. A prospective colonoscopic evaluation of the development of new premalignant adenomas in the colon was performed in 66 patients with biochemically proven acromegaly who had previously undergone colonoscopic screening and removal of all visible polyps. Twenty-five patients (38%) had a total of 37 polyps detected at the second colonoscopy: nine (14%) had at least one adenoma, and 18 (27%) had one or more hyperplastic polyps (2 patients had both). The development of new adenomas, but not hyperplastic polyps, was associated both with elevated serum IGF-I (P < 0.005) and, to a lesser extent, with a previous adenoma at the original colonoscopy (P < 0.07). In summary, patients with acromegaly and in whom serum IGF-I remains elevated and/or who have had a previous adenoma should be regarded as having an especially high risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. Serum IGF-I seems to be implicated in the development of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly, although the exact mechanisms remain uncertain. PMID:10999811

  2. Management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Aytac, Erman; Ozuner, Gokhan; Isik, Ozgen; Gorgun, Emre; Stocchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience on management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period (< 6 mo), between 8/1997 and 4/2013, in our department were reviewed. Patient characteristics, operations, fetal health and follow-up during pregnancy, type of delivery and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: Eight patients met our study criteria. Median age at the time of diagnosis of colorectal cancer was 31 years. Median follow-up after surgery was 36 mo. Median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 wk. Three patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy and underwent surgery prior to delivery. None of the patients received adjuvant treatment during pregnancy. Five patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer within a median of 2.1 mo after delivery and underwent surgery. No adverse neonatal outcomes were noted. All deliveries were at term (2 cesarean sections) except for one preterm delivery following low anterior resection on the 34th week of pregnancy. CONCLUSION: There has been a significant delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer which is probably due to overlap of symptoms and signs between these tumors and a normal pregnancy. Surgery for colorectal cancer during pregnancy can be performed safely without compromising maternal and fetal outcomes.

  3. Prostaglandin E2-induced colonic secretion in patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis for colorectal cancer remains unresolved. A growing body of evidence suggests a direct correlation between cyclooxygenase enzyme expression, prostaglandin E2 metabolism and neoplastic development. Thus further understanding of the regulation of epithelial functions by prostaglandin E2 is needed. We hypothesized that patients with colonic neoplasia have altered colonic epithelial ion transport and express functionally different prostanoid receptor levels in this respect. Methods Patients referred for colonoscopy were included and grouped into patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Patients without endoscopic findings of neoplasia served as controls. Biopsy specimens were obtained from normally appearing mucosa in the sigmoid part of colon. Biopsies were mounted in miniaturized modified Ussing air-suction chambers. Indomethacin (10 μM), various stimulators and inhibitors of prostanoid receptors and ion transport were subsequently added to the chamber solutions. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current and slope conductance) were recorded. Tissue pathology and tissue damage before and after experiments was assessed by histology. Results Baseline short circuit current and slope conductance did not differ between the two groups. Patients with neoplasia were significantly more sensitive to indomethacin with a decrease in short circuit current of 15.1 ± 2.6 μA·cm-2 compared to controls, who showed a decrease of 10.5 ± 2.1 μA·cm-2 (p = 0.027). Stimulation or inhibition with theophylline, ouabain, bumetanide, forskolin or the EP receptor agonists prostaglandin E2, butaprost, sulprostone and prostaglandin E1 (OH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Histology was with normal findings in both groups. Conclusions Epithelial electrogenic transport is more sensitive to indomethacin in normal colonic mucosa from patients with previous or present colorectal neoplasia compared to colonic mucosa from

  4. Diagnosis by Endoscopy and Advanced Imaging of Barrett's Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Swager, Anne-Fré; Curvers, Wouter L; Bergman, Jacques J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) using dye-based chromoendoscopy, optical chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence imaging, or confocal laser endomicroscopy does not significantly increase the number of patients with a diagnosis of early neoplasia compared with high-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) with random biopsy analysis. These newer imaging techniques are not more effective in standard surveillance of patients with BE because the prevalence of early neoplasia is low and HD-WLE with random biopsy analysis detects most cases of neoplasia. The evaluation and treatment of patients with BE and early stage neoplasia should be centralized in tertiary referral centers, where procedures are performed under optimal conditions, by expert endoscopists. Lesions that require resection are almost always detected by HD-WLE, although advanced imaging techniques can detect additional flat lesions. However, these are of limited clinical significance because they are effectively eradicated by ablation therapy. No endoscopic imaging technique can reliably assess submucosal or lymphangio invasion. Endoscopic resection of early stage neoplasia in patients with BE is important for staging and management. Optical chromoendoscopy can also be used to evaluate lesions before endoscopic resection and in follow-up after successful ablation therapy. PMID:27573768

  5. Anti-Outer membrane protein C antibodies in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kohoutova, D; Drahosova, M; Cihak, M; Moravkova, P; Bures, J

    2016-07-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) represents an enormous problem worldwide. Large intestinal microbiota play an important role in the colorectal carcinogenesis. The aim of the study was to investigate anti-Outer membrane protein C (anti-OmpC) antibodies, aimed at porin C, which is embedded in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, in patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA), CRC and controls. The study included 22 patients with CRA (11 men, 11 women, aged 26-79, mean 65 ± 12), 11 patients with CRC (9 men, 2 women, aged 50-83, mean 66 ± 11) and 45 controls, blood donors (24 men, 21 women, aged 20-58, mean 38 ± 10). Serum anti-OmpC antibodies were investigated by means of ELISA. Values of 0-20 U/mL were considered to be negative; values >25 U/mL were assessed as positive. A total of 9/11 (82 %) patients with CRC had positive anti-OmpC antibodies. Anti-OmpC antibodies were negative or grey-zone in 37/45 (82 %) controls. Serum anti-OmpC were found to be significantly higher in patients with CRC (median 42.4, interquartile range (IQR) 22.2) compared to controls (median 18.3, IQR 12.4), p < 0.001. No statistically significant difference in anti-OmpC was found between controls (median 18.3, IQR 12.4) and CRA patients (median 17.7, IQR 16.5), p = 0.326. Anti-OmpC were significantly higher in patients with CRC (median 42.4, IQR 22.2) compared to patients with CRA (median 17.7, IQR 16.5), p = 0.011. Positivity of anti-OmpC antibodies was found in patients with CRC, which supports the contribution of gram-negative large intestinal microbiota to the pathogenesis of CRC. PMID:26612659

  6. Targeted therapy of colorectal neoplasia with rapamycin in peptide-labeled pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles.

    PubMed

    Khondee, Supang; Rabinsky, Emily F; Owens, Scott R; Joshi, Bishnu P; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Thomas D

    2015-02-10

    Many powerful drugs have limited clinical utility because of poor water solubility and high systemic toxicity. Here, we formulated a targeted nanomedicine, rapamycin encapsulated in pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles labeled with a new ligand for colorectal neoplasia, LTTHYKL peptide. CPC;Apc mice that spontaneously develop colonic adenomas were treated with free rapamycin, plain rapamycin micelles, and peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles via intraperitoneal injection for 35days. Endoscopy was performed to monitor adenoma regression in vivo. We observed complete adenoma regression at the end of therapy. The mean regression rate for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles was significantly greater than that for plain rapamycin micelles, P<0.01. On immunohistochemistry, we observed a significant reduction in phospho-S6 but not β-catenin expression and reduced tumor cell proliferation, suggesting greater inhibition of downstream mTOR signaling. We observed significantly reduced renal toxicity for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles compared to that of free drug, and no other toxicities were found on chemistries. Together, this unique targeted micelle represents a potential therapeutic for colorectal neoplasia with comparable therapeutic efficacy to rapamycin free drug and significantly less systemic toxicity. PMID:25483425

  7. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  8. Calcium Intake and Ion Transporter Genetic Polymorphisms Interact in Human Colorectal Neoplasia Risk in a 2-Phase Study123

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiangzhu; Liang, Ji; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Ness, Reid M.; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Guoliang; Wiese, Dawn; Zhang, Bing; Smalley, Walter E.; Edwards, Todd L.; Giovannucci, Edward; Zheng, Wei; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The kidney-specific sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) protein encoded by solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) is the direct downstream effector of the inward-rectifier potassium channel (ROMK) encoded by potassium inwardly-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 1 (KCNJ1), both of which are critical for calcium reabsorption in the kidney. Objective: We hypothesized that polymorphisms in KCNJ1, SLC12A1, and 7 other genes may modify the association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia risk. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase study in 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. Results: In phase I, we identified 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly interacted with calcium intake in adenoma risk. In phase II, rs2855798 in KCNJ1 was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, the P values for interactions between calcium intake and rs2855798 were 1 × 10−4 for all adenoma and 5 × 10−3 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with no variant allele but was significantly associated with a 41% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried at least 1 variant allele in KCNJ1. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 52% among those with at least 1 variant allele. The P values for interactions between calcium intake and combined SNPs from the KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 genes were 7.5 × 10−5 for adenoma and 9.9 × 10−5 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with nonvariant alleles in 2 genes but was significantly associated with a 34% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried a variant allele in 1 of the genes. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 64% among those with variant alleles in both genes. Conclusion: These findings, if confirmed, will be critical for the development of personalized

  9. Applications and Advancements in the use of High-Resolution Microendoscopy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Justin S.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) is a novel imaging modality that allows real-time epithelial imaging at subcellular resolution. Used in concert with any standard endoscope, this portable, low cost, ‘optical biopsy’ technology has the ability to provide images of cellular morphology during a procedure. This technology has been the subject of a number of studies investigating its use in screening and surveillance of a range of gastrointestinal neoplasia, including esophageal adenocarcinoma(EAC), esophageal squamous cell cancer(ESCC), colorectal neoplasia(CRC) and anal neoplasia. These studies have shown that HRME is a modality that consistently provides high specificity, negative predictive value, and accuracy across different diseases. In addition, they have illustrated that HRME users can be relatively easily trained in a short period of time and that users have demonstrated solid inter-rater reliability. These features make HRME a potential complement to high definition white light imaging, narrow band imaging and other ‘red flag technologies’ in facilitating real-time clinical diagnosis, endoscopic therapy and margin determination. Further clinical validation is needed to determine whether this translates to reduced procedure times, pathology costs, and follow up procedures. Finally, the HRME has a relatively simple design compared to other similar technologies, making it portable, simple to maintain, and low cost. This may allow the HRME device to function in both advanced care settings as well as in places with less resources and specialized support systems. As a whole, the HRME device has shown good performance along with low-cost and portable construction, and its application in different conditions and settings has been promising. PMID:25108219

  10. Endoscopic submucosal dissection vs laparoscopic colorectal resection for early colorectal epithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Sophie SF; Ng, Simon SM; Wong, Tiffany CL; Chiu, Philip WY; Mak, Tony WC; Leung, WW; Lee, Janet FY

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the short term outcome of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) with that of laparoscopic colorectal resection (LC) for the treatment of early colorectal epithelial neoplasms that are not amenable to conventional endoscopic removal. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study. The clinical data of all consecutive patients who underwent ESD for endoscopically assessed benign lesions that were larger than 2 cm in diameter from 2009 to 2013 were collected. These patients were compared with a cohort of controls who underwent LC from 2005 to 2013. Lesions that were proven to be malignant by initial endoscopic biopsies were excluded. Mid and lower rectal lesions were not included because total mesorectal excision, which bears a more complicated postoperative course, is not indicated for lesions without histological proof of malignancy. Both ESD and LC were performed by the same surgical unit with a standardized technique. The patients were managed according to a standard protocol, and they were closely monitored for complications after the procedures. All hospital records were reviewed, and the following data were compared between the ESD and LC groups: patient demographics, size and location of the lesions, procedure time, short-term clinical outcomes and pathology results. RESULTS: From 2005 to 2013, 65 patients who underwent ESD and 55 patients who underwent LC were included in this study. The two groups were similar in terms of sex (P = 0.41) and American Society of Anesthesiologist class (P = 0.58), although patients in the ESD group were slightly older (68.6 ± 9.4 vs 64.6 ± 9.9, P = 0.03). ESD could be accomplished with a shorter procedure time (113 ± 66 min vs 153 ± 43 min, P < 0.01) for lesions of comparable size (3.0 ± 1.2 cm vs 3.4 ± 1.4 cm, P = 0.22) and location (colon/rectum: 59/6 vs colon/rectum: 52/3, P = 0.43). ESD appeared to be associated with a lower short-term complication rate, but the difference did not reach statistical

  11. Advanced colorectal adenoma related gene expression signature may predict prognostic for colorectal cancer patients with adenoma-carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Shi, Xiao-Yu; Liao, Dai-Xiang; Cao, Bang-Rong; Luo, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Shu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are still no absolute parameters predicting progression of adenoma into cancer. The present study aimed to characterize functional differences on the multistep carcinogenetic process from the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Methods: All samples were collected and mRNA expression profiling was performed by using Agilent Microarray high-throughput gene-chip technology. Then, the characteristics of mRNA expression profiles of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were described with bioinformatics software, and we analyzed the relationship between gene expression profiles of adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence and clinical prognosis of colorectal cancer. Results: The mRNA expressions of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were significantly different between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. The biological process of gene ontology function enrichment analysis on differentially expressed genes between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group showed that genes enriched in the extracellular structure organization, skeletal system development, biological adhesion and itself regulated growth regulation, with the P value after FDR correction of less than 0.05. In addition, IPR-related protein mainly focused on the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Conclusion: The variable trends of gene expression profiles for adenoma-carcinoma sequence were mainly concentrated in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma. The differentially expressed genes are significantly correlated between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. Bioinformatics analysis is an effective way to study the gene expression profiles in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, and may provide an effective tool to involve colorectal cancer research strategy into colorectal adenoma or advanced adenoma. PMID:26131062

  12. Morphological and morphometric measurements in colorectal mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Yang, K; Richter, F; Lynch, H T; Lipkin, M

    1993-10-15

    Measurements of intermediate biomarkers have recently increased, attempting to provide useful information about cancer risk. We report morphological findings in rectal mucosal biopsies from patients at low risk and at high risk for colorectal cancer. Rectal biopsies were analyzed from fourteen Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) subjects at low risk and from twenty-seven members of families with hereditary nonpolyposis colonic cancer (HNPCC) at higher risk. The following measurements were made on rectal crypts: length of crypts, numbers of cells, diameter of the surface, middle and base of the crypts and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lamina propria. Findings indicated morphological differences in normal-appearing rectal mucosa of individuals in the HNPCC group compared with SDA subjects (P < 0.05). They included shorter crypts with fewer epithelial cells and increased cellular infiltration in the mucosa of HNPCC subjects compared with SDA subjects, suggesting minimal inflammation, and an early stage of crypt atrophy in the rectal mucosa of subjects at higher risk for colonic neoplasia. PMID:8287373

  13. Recent Developments in Colorectal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this review is to provide an update on important recent advances in radiologic colorectal imaging, with emphasis on detection, staging, and surveillance of colorectal neoplasia. Recent findings Colorectal imaging advances with magnetic resonance (MR), CT colonography (CTC), and positron emission tomography (PET) over the past year or so have been substantial. Progress in MR imaging for rectal cancer was most notable in terms of assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy. Continued maturation and clinical validation of CTC was observed for the evaluation of advanced neoplasia, among other areas. Multimodality approaches to colorectal imaging that incorporate functional PET data have also made impressive strides forward. Summary Recent advances in cross-sectional and functional radiologic imaging of the colorectum will positively impact the clinical capabilities for noninvasive evaluation of colorectal neoplasia PMID:25394232

  14. Use of faecal markers in screening for colorectal neoplasia: a European group on tumor markers position paper.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael J; van Rossum, Leo G M; van Turenhout, Sietze T; Malminiemi, Outi; Sturgeon, Catherine; Lamerz, Rolf; Nicolini, Andrea; Haglund, Caj; Holubec, Lubos; Fraser, Callum G; Halloran, Stephen P

    2011-01-01

    Several randomized controlled trials have shown that population-based screening using faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) can reduce mortality from colorectal neoplasia. Based on this evidence, a number of countries have introduced screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) and high-risk adenoma and many others are considering its introduction. The aim of this article is to critically review the current status of faecal markers as population-based screening tests for these neoplasia. Most of the available faecal tests involve the measurement of either occult blood or a panel of DNA markers. Occult blood may be measured using either the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) or a faecal immunochemical test (iFOBT). Although iFOBT may require a greater initial investment, they have several advantages over gFOBT, including greater analytical sensitivity and specificity. Their use results in improved clinical performance and higher uptake rates. Importantly for population screening, some of the iFOBTs can be automated and provide an adjustable cutoff for faecal haemoglobin concentration. However, samples for iFOBT, may be less stable after collection than for gFOBT. For new centres undertaking FOBT for colorectal neoplasia, the European Group on Tumour Markers recommends use of a quantitative iFOBT with an adjustable cutoff point and high throughput analysis. All participants with positive FOBT results should be offered colonoscopy. The panel recommends further research into increasing the stability of iFOBT and the development of improved and affordable DNA and proteomic-based tests, which reduce current false negative rates, simplify sample transport and enable automated analysis. PMID:20824704

  15. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  16. THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINATED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER TO MALE F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINA TED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING W A TER TO MALE F344/N RA TS.

    Abstract:

    The THMs are the most widely distributed and concentrated of the chlorine disinfection by-products (D...

  17. A Blood Test for Methylated BCAT1 and IKZF1 vs. a Fecal Immunochemical Test for Detection of Colorectal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, Erin L; Pedersen, Susanne K; Baker, Rohan T; Murray, David H; Gaur, Snigdha; Cole, Stephen R; Gopalsamy, Geetha; Mangira, Dileep; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance of a new blood test for colorectal cancer (CRC) to an established fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in a study population with the full range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathologies encountered in the colon and rectum. Methods: Volunteers were asked to complete a FIT prior to colonoscopy. Blood was collected after bowel preparation but prior to colonoscopy, and plasma was assayed for the presence of methylated BCAT1 and IKZF1 DNA using a multiplex real-time PCR assay. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the blood test were calculated from true- and false-positive rates for neoplasia and compared with FIT at a range of fecal hemoglobin (Hb) concentration positivity thresholds. Results: In total, 1,381 volunteers (median age 64 years; 49% male) completed both tests prior to colonoscopy. Estimated sensitivity of the BCAT1/IKZF1 blood test for CRC was 62% (41/66; 95% confidence interval 49–74%) with a specificity of 92% (1207/1315; 90–93%). FIT returned the same specificity at a cutoff of 60 μg Hb/g, at which its corresponding sensitivity for cancer was 64% (42/66; 51–75%). In the range of commonly used FIT cutoffs, respective cancer sensitivity and specificity estimates with FIT were: 59% (46–71%) and 93% (92–95%) at 80 μg Hb/g, and 79% (67–88%) and 81% (78–83%) at 10 μg Hb/g. Although estimated sensitivities were not significantly different between the two tests for any stage of cancer, FIT showed a significantly higher sensitivity for advanced adenoma at the lower cutoffs. Specificity of FIT, but not of the BCAT1/IKZF1 blood test, deteriorated substantially in people with overt blood in the feces. When combining FIT (cutoff 10 μg Hb/g) with the BCAT1/IKZF1 blood test, sensitivity for cancer was 89% (79–96%) at 74% (72–77%) specificity. Conclusions: A test based on detection of methylated BCAT1/IKZF1 DNA in blood has comparable sensitivity but better specificity for CRC than FIT at the

  18. Combined use of vitamin D3and metformin exhibits synergistic chemopreventive effects on colorectal neoplasia in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan; Wang, Qi-Long; Liu, Xia; Dong, Shu-Hong; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Chun-Yang; Guo, Li-Shu; Gao, Jing-Miao; Berger, Nathan A.; Li, Li; Ma, Lan; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 and metformin are widely used in humans for regulating mineral metabolism and as an anti-diabetic drug respectively; and both of them have been shown to have chemopreventive effects against various tumors. This study was designed to investigate the potential synergistic chemopreventive effects of vitamin D3 and metformin against the development of early colon neoplasia in two models. The first model was a 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced colon cancer rat model and the second, a DMH-dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis-associated colon neoplasia mouse model. Compared to either vitamin D3 or metformin alone, combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin showed more pronounced effect in reducing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumor in the colon. The most prominent inhibitory effects were observed in the vitamin D3 medium dose (100 IU/kg/day) and metformin medium dose (120 mg/kg/day) combination group. Furthermore, our results showed that enhancement of metformin’s chemopreventive effects by vitamin D3 was associated with down-regulation of S6P expression, via the AMPK (IGF-1)/mTOR pathway. In addition, and enhancement of vitamin D3’s chemopreventive effects by metformin was associated with inhibition of the protein expressions of c-Myc and Cyclin D1, via the vitamin D receptor/β-catenin pathway. These findings show that combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin exhibits synergistic effects against the development of early colon neoplasia. They suggest that the combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin may represent a novel strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25416412

  19. What is the best therapeutic strategy for colonoscopy of colorectal neoplasia? Future perspectives from the East.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-04-01

    Development and improvement of endoscopic techniques and devices have changed the treatment of colorectal tumors over the last decade. For the treatment of diminutive polyps, the cold snare technique of the West is becoming a promising treatment in the East because of its short procedure time and low rate of delayed bleeding by eliminating the delayed effect of electrocautery. Rather than using piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection or surgical resection for the treatment of large superficial tumors, the technique of the East of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) achieves a high success rate of en bloc R0 resection, enabling detailed pathological evaluation with less invasive treatment. This procedure should also be useful in the West where large colorectal tumors are more frequent than in the East. Regarding outcomes, however, in the literature, the definition of 'curative resection' remains somewhat inconsistent and long-term outcomes of patients with deep submucosal and/or lymphovascular invasion in the en bloc specimen have not yet been determined. Large prospective, as well as retrospective, studies of these patients are warranted. When colorectal ESD is difficult because of size or location, the pocket-creation method and/or double-balloon-assisted technique may be useful. In the East, high-quality magnified chromoendoscopy is widely available, and endoscopists try to identify focal submucosal invasion. In the West, a systematic evaluation of surveillance for the prevention of colorectal cancer has been done and is highly refined. The East and West have much to learn from each other. PMID:26524602

  20. New Insights into the Mechanism of Action of Aspirin in the Prevention of Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Luigia; López Contreras, Luilli Antonio; Sacco, Angela; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical studies have shown that the chronic administration of aspirin, even at the lowdoses (75-100 mg daily) recommended for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanism of action of aspirin as an antineoplastic agent remains controversial. However, data of clinical pharmacology and several features of the chemopreventive effect of aspirin, emerged from clinical trials, suggest that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin plays a central role in its anticancer effects. In addition to their contribution to tumor metastasis, platelets may play a role in the early phases of tumorigenesis. In response to lifestyle and environment factors, intestinal epithelial damage/ dysfunction may be associated with platelet activation, initially as a mechanism to repair the damage. However, if the platelet response is unconstrained, it may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation. Altogether these events lead to alter the normal functions of intestinal epithelial cells and may translate into cellular transformation through several mechanisms, including the overexpression of cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which are considered early events in colorectal tumorigenesis. Thus, antiplatelet agents may play a role in the prevention of CRC by modifying epigenetic events involved in early phases of colorectal tumorigenesis. Finally, we carried out a critical review of the literature on off-target mechanisms of aspirin action as anticancer drug. PMID:26369679

  1. In-vivo classification of colorectal neoplasia using high-resolution microendoscopy: improvement with experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil D.; Perl, Daniel; Lee, Michelle H.; Chang, Shannon S; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Zhou, Elinor; Mitcham, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a novel, low-cost “optical biopsy” technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The study aim was to evaluate the learning curve of HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. Methods In a prospective cohort fashion, a total of 162 polyps from 97 patients at a single tertiary care center were imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). Histopathology was the gold standard for comparison. Diagnostic accuracy was examined at three intervals over time throughout the study; the initial interval included the first 40 polyps, the middle interval included the next 40 polyps examined, and the final interval included the last 82 polyps examined. Results Sensitivity increased significantly from the initial interval (50%) to the middle interval (94%, p = 0.02) and the last interval (97%, p = 0.01). Similarly, specificity was 69% for the initial interval but increased to 92% (p = 0.07) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.02) in the last interval. Overall accuracy was 63% for the initial interval and then improved to 93% (p = 0.003) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.0007) in the last interval. Conclusions In conclusion, this in-vivo study demonstrates that an endoscopist without prior colon HRME experience can achieve greater than 90% accuracy for identifying neoplastic colorectal polyps after 40 polyps imaged. HRME is a promising modality to complement white-light endoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. PMID:25753782

  2. Efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic resections of colorectal neoplasia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Passera, Roberto; Migliore, Marco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Galloro, Giuseppe; Manta, Raffaele; Morino, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections for colorectal lesions not suitable for endoscopic resection. Summary background data The combined laparo-endoscopic approach has been proposed for large colorectal lesions unsuitable for endoscopic resection, in order to reduce morbidity of common laparoscopic resection. However, data on the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections are still controversial. Methods An Embase search of papers published during the period 1985–2014 was performed. Published studies that evaluated laparo-endoscopic resections for colorectal lesions were assessed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations by two authors. Forest plots on primary (per-lesion rate of further surgery, including surgery for complications and surgery for oncologic radical treatment) and secondary outcomes were produced based on fixed and random effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Risk for within-study bias was ascertained with QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) system. Results A total of 11 studies provided data on 707 lesions treated with a combined laparo-endoscopic approach. A variety of techniques were reported. The overall per-lesion rate of further surgery was 9.5%, while per-lesion rate of further surgery for oncologic treatment was 7.9%, per-lesion rate of further surgery for complications treatment was 3.5%, incidence of adenocarcinoma was 10.5%, incidence of overall complications was 7.9%, incidence of conversion to open surgery 4.3% and incidence of recurrence was 5.4%. Conclusions Despite laparo-endoscopic approach ensures limited invasiveness, it is affected by a consistent rate of complications and oncologic inadequacy that often requires further surgical treatment. PMID:26668744

  3. Reduced keratin expression in colorectal neoplasia and associated fields is reversible by diet and resection

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Caroline A; Rosser, Ria; Waby, Jennifer S; Noirel, Josselin; Lai, Daphne; Wright, Phillip C; Williams, Elizabeth A; Riley, Stuart A; Bury, Jonathan P; Corfe, Bernard M

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with adenomatous colonic polyps are at increased risk of developing further polyps suggesting field-wide alterations in cancer predisposition. The current study aimed to identify molecular alterations in the normal mucosa in the proximity of adenomatous polyps and to assess the modulating effect of butyrate, a chemopreventive compound produced by fermentation of dietary residues. Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients with adenomatous polyps: biopsy samples were taken from the adenoma, and from macroscopically normal mucosa on the contralateral wall to the adenoma and from the mid-sigmoid colon. In normal subjects biopsies were taken from the mid-sigmoid colon. Biopsies were frozen for proteomic analysis or formalin-fixed for immunohistochemistry. Proteomic analysis was undertaken using iTRAQ workflows followed by bioinformatics analyses. A second dietary fibre intervention study arm used the same endpoints and sampling strategy at the beginning and end of a high-fibre intervention. Results Key findings were that keratins 8, 18 and 19 were reduced in expression level with progressive proximity to the lesion. Lesional tissue exhibited multiple K8 immunoreactive bands and overall reduced levels of keratin. Biopsies from normal subjects with low faecal butyrate also showed depressed keratin expression. Resection of the lesion and elevation of dietary fibre intake both appeared to restore keratin expression level. Conclusion Changes in keratin expression associate with progression towards neoplasia, but remain modifiable risk factors. Dietary strategies may improve secondary chemoprevention. Trial registration number ISRCTN90852168. PMID:26462274

  4. Germline Variants and Advanced Colorectal Adenomas: Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib Trial Genomewide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiping; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Zauber, Ann G.; Kubo, Michikai; Matsuda, Koichi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard S.; Sieber, Oliver; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Young, Joanne; Baird, Paul N.; Ratain, Mark J.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Weiss, Scott T.; Tomlinson, Ian; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of advanced colorectal adenomas. Experimental Design Discovery Phase: 1,406 Caucasian patients (139 advanced adenoma cases and 1,267 controls) from the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial were included in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify variants associated with post-polypectomy disease recurrence. Genome-wide significance was defined as false discovery rate < 0.05, unadjusted p=7.4×10−7. Validation Phase: Results were further evaluated using 4,175 familial colorectal adenoma or CRC cases and 5,036 controls from patients of European ancestry (COloRectal Gene Identification consortium, Scotland, Australia and VQ58). Results Our study identified eight SNPs associated with advanced adenoma risk in the APC trial (rs2837156, rs7278863, rs2837237, rs2837241, rs2837254, rs741864 at 21q22.2, and rs1381392 and rs17651822 at 3p24.1, at p<10–7 level with odds ratio – OR>2). Five variants in strong pairwise linkage disequilbrium (rs7278863, rs2837237, rs741864, rs741864 and rs2837241, r2=0.8–1) are in or near the coding region for the tight junction adhesion protein, IGSF5. An additional variant associated with advanced adenomas, rs1535989 (minor allele frequency 0.11; OR 2.09; 95% confidence interval 1.50–2.91), also predicted CRC development in a validation analysis (p=0.019) using a series of adenoma cases or CRC (CORGI study) and 3 sets of CRC cases and controls (Scotland, VQ58 and Australia, N=9,211). Conclusions Our results suggest that common polymorphisms contribute to the risk of developing advanced adenomas and might also contribute to the risk of developing CRC. The variant at rs1535989 may identify patients whose risk for neoplasia warrants increased colonoscopic surveillance. PMID:24084763

  5. Advances in small bowel neuroendocrine neoplasia Banck and Small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Banck, Michaela S.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review this review aims at summarizing progress in clinical trials and basic science redefining the diagnosis and treatment of well differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NET). Recent findings Two clinical trials demonstrated antitumor activity of the long-acting somatostatin analogues octreotide LAR and lanreotide for advanced SI-NET. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus is another treatment option for patients with SI-NET, but awaits definitive proof of benefit in the ongoing RADIANT-4 study. Two whole exome/genome-sequencing studies reported in the past year provided the first genome-wide analysis of large sets of SI-NET at nucleotide resolution. Candidate therapeutically relevant alterations were found to affect SRC, SMAD genes, AURKA, EGFR, HSP90, and PDGFR as well as mutually exclusive amplification of AKT1 or AKT2 and other alterations of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling genes. The gene CDKN1B is inactivated by small insertions/deletions in 8% of patients with SI-NET suggesting cell cycle inhibitors as new candidate drugs for SI-NET. Circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived RNA in the blood are promising clinical tests for SI-NET. Summary Clinical and genomic research may merge in the near future to re-shape clinical trials and to define the ‘personalized’ treatment options for patients with SI-NET. PMID:24441281

  6. DNA methylome profiling identifies novel methylated genes in African American patients with colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Daremipouran, M; Goel, Ajay; Varma, Sudhir; Leavitt, R; Sun, Xueguang; Brim, Hassan

    2014-04-01

    The identification of genes that are differentially methylated in colorectal cancer (CRC) has potential value for both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions specifically in high-risk populations such as African Americans (AAs). However, DNA methylation patterns in CRC, especially in AAs, have not been systematically explored and remain poorly understood. Here, we performed DNA methylome profiling to identify the methylation status of CpG islands within candidate genes involved in critical pathways important in the initiation and development of CRC. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) in colorectal cancer and adenoma tissues that were compared with DNA methylome from a healthy AA subject's colon tissue and peripheral blood DNA. The identified methylation markers were validated in fresh frozen CRC tissues and corresponding normal tissues from AA patients diagnosed with CRC at Howard University Hospital. We identified and validated the methylation status of 355 CpG sites located within 16 gene promoter regions associated with CpG islands. Fifty CpG sites located within CpG islands-in genes ATXN7L1 (2), BMP3 (7), EID3 (15), GAS7 (1), GPR75 (24), and TNFAIP2 (1)-were significantly hypermethylated in tumor vs. normal tissues (P<0.05). The methylation status of BMP3, EID3, GAS7, and GPR75 was confirmed in an independent, validation cohort. Ingenuity pathway analysis mapped three of these markers (GAS7, BMP3 and GPR) in the insulin and TGF-β1 network-the two key pathways in CRC. In addition to hypermethylated genes, our analysis also revealed that LINE-1 repeat elements were progressively hypomethylated in the normal-adenoma-cancer sequence. We conclude that DNA methylome profiling based on RRBS is an effective method for screening aberrantly methylated genes in CRC. While previous studies focused on the limited identification of hypermethylated genes, ours is the first study to systematically and comprehensively identify novel hypermethylated

  7. The serrated neoplasia pathway of colorectal tumors: Identification of MUC5AC hypomethylation as an early marker of polyps with malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Florence; Mariette, Christophe; Vincent, Audrey; Wacrenier, Agnès; Maunoury, Vincent; Leclerc, Julie; Coppin, Lucie; Crépin, Michel; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-15

    The serrated neoplasia pathway accounts for 20-30% of colorectal cancers (CRC), which are characterized by extensive methylation (CpG island methylation phenotype, CIMP), frequent BRAF mutation and high microsatellite instability (MSI). We recently identified MUC5AC mucin gene hypomethylation as a specific marker of MSI CRC. The early identification of preneoplastic lesions among serrated polyps is currently challenging. Here, we performed a detailed pathological and molecular analysis of a large series of colorectal serrated polyps and evaluated the usefulness of mucin genes MUC2 and MUC5AC to differentiate serrated polyps and to identify lesions with malignant potential. A series of 330 colorectal polyps including 218 serrated polyps [42 goblet cell-rich hyperplastic polyps (GCHP), 68 microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (MVHP), 100 sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) and eight traditional serrated adenoma (TSA)] and 112 conventional adenomas was analyzed for BRAF/KRAS mutations, MSI, CIMP, MLH1 and MGMT methylation, and MUC2 and MUC5AC expression and methylation. We show that MUC5AC hypomethylation is an early event in the serrated neoplasia pathway, and specifically detects MVHP and SSA, arguing for a filiation between MVHP, SSA and CIMP-H/MSI CRC, whereas GCHP and TSA arise from a distinct pathway. Moreover, MUC5AC hypomethylation specifically identified serrated lesions with BRAF mutation, CIMP-H or MSI, suggesting that it may be useful to identify serrated neoplasia pathway-related precursor lesions. Our data suggest that MVHP should be recognized among HP and require particular attention. PMID:26476272

  8. Early identification of cervical neoplasia with Raman spectroscopy and advanced methods for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Phillip R. T.; Smith, Daniel D. W.; Mazilu, Michael; Cormack, Iain; Riches, Andrew C.; Herrington, C. Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-02-01

    Early detection of malignant tumours, or their precursor lesions, can dramatically improve patient outcome. High risk human Papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV16, infection can lead to the initiation and development of uterine cervical neoplasia. Bearing this in mind the identification of the effects of HPV infection may have clinical value. In this manuscript we investigate the application of Raman microspectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV in cultured cells when compared with normal cells. We also investigate the effect of sample fixation, which is a common clinical practice, on the ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV. Raman spectra were acquired from Primary Human Keratinocytes (PHK), PHK expressing the E7 gene of HPV 16 (PHK E7) and CaSki cells, an HPV16 containing cervical carcinoma derived cell line. The average Raman spectra display variations, mostly in peaks relating to DNA and proteins, consistent with HPV gene expression and the onset of neoplasia in both live and fixed samples. Principle component analysis was used to objectively discriminate between the cells types giving sensitivities up to 100% for the comparison between PHK and CaSki. These results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between cell lines representing different stages of cervical neoplasia. Furthermore Raman spectroscopy was able to identify cells expressing the HPV 16 E7 gene suggesting the approach may be of value in clinical practice. Finally this technique was also able to detect the effects of the virus in fixed samples demonstrating the compatibility of this technique with current cervical screening methods. However if Raman spectroscopy is to make a significant impact in clinical practice the long acquisition times must be addressed. In this report we examine the potential for beam shaping and advanced to improve the signal to noise ration hence subsequently facilitating a reduction in acquisition time.

  9. [Treatment outcome of peptide vaccination for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Fumiaki; Inoue, Keisuke; Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Hida, Jinichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sukegawa, Yasushi

    2013-11-01

    Complementary DNA( cDNA) microarray technology coupled with laser microdissection has been used to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24-restricted epitope peptides as potential targets for cancer vaccination in colorectal cancer patients. These antigenic peptides were derived from 2 different cancer-testis antigens, ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) and translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34( TOMM34). We conducted a clinical trial of colorectal cancer-specific peptide( RNF43, TOMM34) vaccines with uracil/tegafur( UFT)+Leucovorin( LV) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. The vaccinations were well tolerated without any serious adverse events. There were long-term survivors in the group showing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against both RNF43 and TOMM34, as well as in the group showing CTL responses against either RNF43 or TOMM34. A new study has been planned to obtain more immunological responses. We started a clinical trial of vaccines against multiple peptides (RNF43, TOMM34, forkhead box protein M1 [FOXM1], maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase [MELK], holliday junction recognition protein[HJURP], vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1[VEGFR1], and VEGFR2) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24393856

  10. Cytokine gene polymorphisms, cytokine levels and the risk of colorectal neoplasia in a screened population of Northeast Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, U; Shebl, FM; Palmer, AJ; Berry, S; Hold, GL; El-Omar, EM; Rabkin, CS

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Cytokine gene polymorphisms modify expression and their circulating protein levels reflect inflammatory response. Chronic inflammation plays key role in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia (CRN) associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear if inflammation is a cause or effect of tumours in sporadic CRN. We therefore investigated association of cytokine gene polymorphisms and circulating cytokine levels on risk of CRN in North East Scotland, which has a high incidence of CRN. Methods We recruited two groups of subjects from a screening colonoscopy cohort, either pre-procedure or 3–24 months post-procedure. Participants with (CRN) were compared to participants with no evidence of CRN (controls). Blood-derived DNA was used to genotype polymorphisms in IL1B, IL1-RN, IL6, IL8, IL10, PTGS2 and TNFA genes. Circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) and 6 cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-alpha) were measured. In order to examine effect of CRN resection on marker levels, we used propensity score matching. Results There were 884 subjects eligible for analysis, including 388 CRN cases and 496 controls. Cases were older (mean age 64 vs. 62 yrs, p<0.01) and more likely to be male (67% vs. 55%, p<0.001). Controls were more likely to be regular users of NSAID (p<0.0001). Compared to homozygous carriage of respective common alleles, pro-inflammatory CC genotypes of IL1B-31 C>T [OR (95% CI) 1.68 (1.03–2.73)] and PTGS2-765 C>G [OR (95% CI) 2.97 (1.05–8.46)] were each associated with increased CRN risk. Conversely, carriage of the A allele of IL8-251 A>T was associated with lower CRN risk compared to the TT genotype [ORs (95% CI) 0.60 (0.41–0.86) for heterozygous, 0.88 (0.57–1.37) for homozygous, and 0.68 (0.48–0.95) for heterozygous and homozygous combined]. Compared to post-procedure cases, IL8, TNFα, and CRP levels were significantly higher in pre-procedure cases, but IL4 and IL

  11. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  12. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  13. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Christopher R.; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M.; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  14. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Klempner, Samuel J; Garrett, Christopher R; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Chiu, Vi K

    2015-10-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  15. Advances in epigenetic biomarker research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Kuang, Ye-Ye; Hu, Xiao-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) causes approximately 600000 deaths annually and is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite significant advancements in treatment options, CRC patient survival is still poor owing to a lack of effective tools for early diagnosis and a limited capacity for optimal therapeutic decision making. Since there exists a need to find new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of CRC, the research on epigenetic biomarkers for molecular diagnostics encourages the translation of this field from the bench to clinical practice. Epigenetic alterations are thought to hold great promise as tumor biomarkers. In this review, we will primarily focus on recent advances in the study of epigenetic biomarkers for colorectal cancer and discuss epigenetic biomarkers, including DNA methylation, microRNA expression and histone modification, in cancer tissue, stool, plasma, serum, cell lines and xenografts. These studies have improved the chances that epigenetic biomarkers will find a place in the clinical practices of screening, early diagnosis, prognosis, therapy choice and recurrence surveillance for CRC patients. However, these studies have typically been small in size, and evaluation at a larger scale of well-controlled randomized clinical trials is the next step that is necessary to increase the quality of epigenetic biomarkers and ensure their widespread clinical use. PMID:24764665

  16. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  17. Analysis of Families with Lynch Syndrome Complicated by Advanced Serrated Neoplasia: The Importance of Pathology Review and Pedigree Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael D; Buchanan, Daniel D; Walters, Rhiannon; Roberts, Aedan; Arnold, Sven; McKeone, Diane; Clendenning, Mark; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jillian; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Young, Graeme P; Macrae, Finlay; Drini, Musa; Woods, Michael O; Parry, Susan; Jass, Jeremy R; Young, Joanne P

    2009-01-01

    The identification of Lynch syndrome has been greatly assisted by the advent of tumour immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, and by the recognition of the role of acquired somatic BRAF mutation in sporadic MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC). However, somatic BRAF mutation may also be present in the tumours in families with a predisposition to develop serrated polyps in the colorectum. In a subgroup of affected members in these families, CRCs emerge which demonstrate clear evidence of MMR deficiency with absent MLH1 staining and high-level microsatellite instability (MSI). This may result in these families being erroneously classified as Lynch syndrome or, conversely, an individual is considered “sporadic” due to the presence of a somatic BRAF mutation in a tumour. In this report, we describe two Lynch syndrome families who demonstrated several such inconsistencies. In one family, IHC deficiency of both MSH2 and MLH1 was demonstrated in tumours from different affected family members, presenting a confusing diagnostic picture. In the second family, MLH1 loss was observed in the lesions of both MLH1 mutation carriers and those who showed normal MLH1 germline sequence. Both families had Lynch syndrome complicated by an independently segregating serrated neoplasia phenotype, suggesting that in families such as these, tumour and germline studies of several key members, rather than of a single proband, are indicated to clarify the spectrum of risk. PMID:19241144

  18. Different risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasm in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong; Park, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the risk of developing advanced colorectal neoplasm (ACRN) according to age in Koreans. METHODS: A total of 70428 Koreans from an occupational cohort who underwent a colonoscopy between 2003 and 2012 at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital were retrospectively selected. We evaluated and compared odds ratios (OR) for ACRN between the young-adults (YA < 50 years) and in the older-adults (OA ≥ 50 years). ACRN was defined as an adenoma ≥ 10 mm in diameter, adenoma with any component of villous histology, high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. RESULTS: In the YA group, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 1.26, 95%CI: 1.02-1.55), current smoking (OR = 1.37, 95%CI: 1.15-1.63), family history of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.10), diabetes mellitus related factors (OR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.06-1.54), obesity (OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.03-1.47), CEA (OR = 1.04, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR = 1.01, 95%CI: 1.01-1.02) were related with an increased risk of ACRN. However, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 2.12, 95%CI: 1.68-2.68), current smoking (OR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.12-1.71), obesity (OR = 1.34, 95%CI: 1.09-1.65) and CEA (OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) also increased the risk of ACRN in the OA group. CONCLUSION: The risks of ACRN differed based on age group. Different colonoscopic screening strategies are appropriate for particular subjects with risk factors for ACRN, even in subjects younger than 50 years. PMID:27053853

  19. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  20. Advances in the care of patients with mucinous colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hugen, Niek; Brown, Gina; Glynne-Jones, Robert; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-06-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are classified as adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (AC). Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of CRC and is found in 10-15% of patients with CRC. MC differs from AC in terms of both clinical and histopathological characteristics, and has long been associated with an inferior response to treatment compared with AC. The debate concerning the prognostic implications of MC in patients with CRC is ongoing and MC is still considered an unfavourable and unfamiliar subtype of the disease. Nevertheless, in the past few years epidemiological and clinical studies have shed new light on the treatment and management of patients with MC. Use of a multidisciplinary approach, including input from surgeons, pathologists, oncologists and radiologists, is beginning to lead to more-tailored approaches to patient management, on an individualized basis. In this Review, the authors provide insight into advances that have been made in the care of patients with MC. The prognostic implications for patients with colon or rectal MC are described separately; moreover, the predictive implications of MC regarding responses to commonly used therapies for CRC, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and the potential for, and severity of, metastasis are also described. PMID:26323388

  1. MTHFR POLYMORPHISMS AND COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Folate is essential for the synthesis, repair and methylation of DNA. Aberrations in folate metabolism can modify our risk for cancer. Folate depletion alters DNA methylation patterns and increases DNA uracil-content and the frequency of DNA breaks. These DNA aberrations are involved in the etiology...

  2. Serum IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Katki, Hormuzd; Graubard, Barry; Pollak, Michael; Martin, Michael; Tao, Yuzhen; Schoen, Robert E; Church, Timothy; Hayes, Richard B; Greene, Mark H; Berndt, Sonja I

    2012-07-15

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Elevated serum IGF1 levels have been associated with increased colorectal cancer risk; however, studies of this association with colorectal adenoma are inconclusive. We examined serum IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 levels in relation to risk of advanced colorectal adenoma in a case-control study within the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer screening trial. A total of 764 advanced, left-sided colorectal adenoma cases and 775 controls frequency-matched on gender and ethnicity, without evidence of a left-sided polyp on sigmoidoscopy were included in the current study. Serum levels of IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples collected at baseline. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations adjusting for age, race, sex, year of blood draw, body mass index, smoking and education. Higher IGF1 levels were associated with increased adenoma risk: ORs = 1.58 (95% CI = 1.16-2.16), 1.42 (95% CI = 1.04-1.93), and 1.80 (95% CI = 1.30-2.47) for the second, third and fourth quartiles, respectively (p(trend) = 0.002). Elevated IGF2 levels were also associated with increased adenoma risk (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.05-1.96 for the fourth vs. first quartile, p(trend) = 0.02), but the association was no longer significant after adjustment for IGF1 (p(trend) = 0.28). IGFBP3 levels were not associated with adenoma risk. Our analysis showed a significant positive association between circulating IGF1 levels and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma, suggesting that IGF1 is associated with the pivotal precursor to colorectal cancer. PMID:21932422

  3. The association between MTHFR 677C>T genotype and folate status and genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation in the colon of individuals without colorectal neoplasia1234

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Joanna; Ayed, Iyeman; Kukreja, Neil; Rogers, Chris; Harris, Jessica; Gheorghiu, Alina; Liu, Chee Ling; Emery, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: Decreased genomic and increased gene-specific DNA methylation predispose to colorectal cancer. Dietary folate intake and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism (MTHFR 677C>T) may influence risk by modifying DNA methylation. Objective: We investigated the associations between MTHFR 677C>T genotype, folate status, and DNA methylation in the colon. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 336 men and women (age 19–92 y) in the United Kingdom without colorectal neoplasia. We obtained blood samples for measurement of serum and red blood cell folate, plasma homocysteine, and MTHFR 677C>T genotype and colonic tissue biopsies for measurement of colonic tissue folate and DNA methylation (genomic- and gene-specific, estrogen receptor 1, ESR1; myoblast determination protein 1, MYOD1; insulin-like growth factor II, IGF2; tumor suppressor candidate 33, N33; adenomatous polyposis coli, APC; mut-L homolog 1, MLH1; and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMT) by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and pyrosequencing, respectively. Results: Of the 336 subjects recruited, 185 (55%) carried the CC, 119 (35%) the CT, and 32 (10%) the TT alleles. No significant differences in systemic markers of folate status and colonic tissue folate between genotypes were found. The MTHFR TT genotype was not associated with genomic or gene-specific DNA methylation. Biomarkers of folate status were not associated with genomic DNA methylation. Relations between biomarkers of folate status and gene-specific methylation were inconsistent. However, low serum folate was associated with high MGMT methylation (P = 0.001). Conclusion: MTHFR 677C>T genotype and folate status were generally not associated with DNA methylation in the colon of a folate-replete population without neoplasia. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as ISRCTN43577261. PMID:24108782

  4. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn’s disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  5. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  6. Evaluation of serum nucleoside diphosphate kinase A for the detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; De Chiara, Loretta; Barcia-Castro, Leticia; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2016-01-01

    We previously described the over-expression of nucleoside diphosphate kinase A (NDKA) in tumours and serum from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, suggesting its use as biomarker. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum NDKA to detect advanced neoplasia (CRC or advanced adenomas). Furthermore, the performance of NDKA was compared with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT). The study population included a case-control cohort and a screening cohort (511 asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT). Serum NDKA was elevated in CRC patients in the case-control cohort (p = 0.002). In the screening cohort, NDKA levels were higher for advanced adenomas (p = 0.010) and advanced neoplasia (p = 0.006) compared to no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated NDKA was associated with severe characteristics of adenomas (≥3 lesions, size ≥ 1 cm or villous component). Setting specificity to 85%, NDKA showed a sensitivity of 30.19% and 29.82% for advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia, respectively. NDKA combined with FIT (100 ng/mL cut-off) detected advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia with 45.28% and 49.12% sensitivity, with specificity close to 90%. The combination of serum NDKA and FIT can improve the detection of advanced neoplasia, mainly for lesions located on the proximal colon, in asymptomatic individuals with CRC family-risk. PMID:27222072

  7. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  8. Advances in the endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J.Q.; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus is a well-recognised precursor of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma is continuing to rise in the Western world with dismal survival rates. In recent years, efforts have been made to diagnose Barrett’s earlier and improve surveillance techniques in order to pick up cancerous changes earlier. Recent advances in endoscopic therapy for early Barrett’s cancers have shifted the paradigm away from oesophagectomy and have yielded excellent results. PMID:26918175

  9. [Recent Advances in Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic agents and biomarkers have remarkably improved treatment outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, decision making regarding the choice of therapy for mCRC has been complicated by the availability of many different treatment options. In this review, we will discuss the clinical evidence for current systemic treatment, including the key roles of 3 cytotoxic drugs and oral fluoropyrimidines, the appropriate use of anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR therapy, the significance of RAS mutation status as a predictive marker for anti-EGFR therapy, and new agents for salvage therapy (regorafenib and TAS-102 [TFTD]). PMID:26809522

  10. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  11. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments. PMID:26855534

  12. [Clinical study of Peptide-cocktail vaccination with tegafur-uracil/leucovorin for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Fumiaki; Inoue, Keisuke; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sukegawa, Yasushi

    2012-11-01

    cDNA microarray technology coupled with laser microdissection has been used to identify human leukocyte antigen(HLA)-A24-restricted epitope peptides as potential targets for cancer vaccination in colorectal cancer patients. These antigenic peptides were derived from 2 different testis cancer antigens, ring finger protein 43(RNF43) and translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34(TOMM34). We conducted a clinical trial of vaccines against colorectal cancer specific peptides(RNF43 and TOMM34) with tegafur-uracil/Leucovorin( UFT/LV) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. The vaccinations were well tolerated without any adverse events. The highest long-term survival was observed in the group showing cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses against both RNF43 and TOMM34, followed by the group showing CTL responses against only RNF43 or only TOMM34. A new study has been planned in order to obtain more immunological responses, and we have started a clinical trial of vaccines against multiple peptides[RNF43, TOMM34, forkhead box protein M1(FOXM1), maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase(MELK), holliday junction recognition protein(HJURP), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)1, and VEGFR2]by using UFT/LV for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:23267878

  13. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  14. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-12-27

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  15. AMACR is associated with advanced pathologic risk factors in sporadic colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lakis, Sotiris; Papamitsou, Theodora; Panagiotopoulou, Constantina; Kotakidou, Rodoula; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze α-methylacyl CoA racemase (AMACR) expression in relation to various dysplasia phenotypes and clinicopathological parameters of sporadic colorectal adenomas. METHODS: Fifty-five cases of sporadic colorectal adenomas were categorized according to the Vienna classification for Gastrointestinal Neoplasia. These corresponded to a total of 98 different intra-lesion microscopic fields that were further independently assigned a histological grade based on the old nomenclature (mild, moderate, severe dyplasia and carcinoma in situ). AMACR expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and statistical analysis was performed to investigate possible associations with various clinicopathologic parameters of adenomas i.e. gender, age, localization, grade of dysplasia, size and configuration. RESULTS: Patient age ranged from 41 to 84 years (mean 65 ± 13.2 years); 37 patients were males and 18 were females. Adenomas ranged in size between 0.5 and 30 cm (mean 2 ± 1.3 cm), including 18 tubular, 16 villous, 20 mixed or tubulovillous, and 1 giant sessile villous adenoma. AMACR expression was observed in 3 out of 16 (18.8%) of low-grade vs 23 out of 35 (62.8%) of high-grade lesions (P = 0.002). Most adenomas exhibiting high grade dysplasia with in situ carcinoma-like areas stained positive for AMACR (15/17 or 88.2%) as compared to adenomas with high grade dysplasia which contained severe dysplasia-like foci (6/15 or 40%), (P = 0.005). In AMACR positive adenomas featuring severe dysplasia-like or in situ carcinoma-like areas, AMACR staining was not necessarily observed in the in situ component. Positivity in intra-lesion of mild, moderate or severe dysplasia-like foci was more often encountered in adenomas harboring in situ, intramucosal or infiltrative carcinoma [21/33 (63.6%) vs 9/40 (22.5%), P < 0.001]. Strong AMACR expression was found in 11 out of 17 villous adenomas, but in only 1 out of 18 tubular lesions (P = 0.005). Larger lesions, i.e. > 1 cm stained more

  16. Pair-wise comparison analysis of differential expression of mRNAs in early and advanced stage primary colorectal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tze Pheng; Roslani, April Camilla; Lian, Lay Hoong; Chai, Hwa Chia; Lee, Ping Chin; Hilmi, Ida; Goh, Khean Lee; Chua, Kek Heng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas of Malaysian patients. Design Comparative expression analysis. Setting and participants We performed a combination of annealing control primer (ACP)-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR for the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with early and advanced stage primary colorectal tumours. We recruited four paired samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) of Dukes’ A and B for the preliminary differential expression study, and a total of 27 paired samples, ranging from CRC stages I to IV, for subsequent confirmatory test. The tumouric samples were obtained from the patients with CRC undergoing curative surgical resection without preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The recruited patients with CRC were newly diagnosed with CRC, and were not associated with any hereditary syndromes, previously diagnosed cancer or positive family history of CRC. The paired non-cancerous tissue specimens were excised from macroscopically normal colonic mucosa distally located from the colorectal tumours. Primary and secondary outcome measures The differential mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas compared with macroscopically normal colonic mucosa were characterised by ACP-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR. Results The RPL35, RPS23 and TIMP1 genes were found to be overexpressed in both early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas (p<0.05). However, the ARPC2 gene was significantly underexpressed in early colorectal adenocarcinomas, while the advanced stage primary colorectal tumours exhibited an additional overexpression of the C6orf173 gene (p<0.05). Conclusions We characterised two distinctive gene expression patterns to aid in the stratification of primary colorectal neoplasms among Malaysian patients with CRC. Further work can be done to

  17. Systematic genomic identification of colorectal cancer genes delineating advanced from early clinical stage and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The initial assessment of colorectal cancer involves clinical staging that takes into account the extent of primary tumor invasion, determining the number of lymph nodes with metastatic cancer and the identification of metastatic sites in other organs. Advanced clinical stage indicates metastatic cancer, either in regional lymph nodes or in distant organs. While the genomic and genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to some degree, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis. Methods We compiled multiple genomic data types (mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation status) as well as clinical meta-data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We used an elastic-net regularized regression method on the combined genomic data to identify genetic aberrations and their associated cancer genes that are indicators of clinical stage. We ranked candidate genes by their regression coefficient and level of support from multiple assay modalities. Results A fit of the elastic-net regularized regression to 197 samples and integrated analysis of four genomic platforms identified the set of top gene predictors of advanced clinical stage, including: WRN, SYK, DDX5 and ADRA2C. These genetic features were identified robustly in bootstrap resampling analysis. Conclusions We conducted an analysis integrating multiple genomic features including mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation. This integrated approach in which one considers all of these genomic features performs better than any individual genomic assay. We identified multiple genes that robustly delineate advanced clinical stage, suggesting their possible role in colorectal cancer metastatic progression. PMID:24308539

  18. Curative effect of the recent photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO; LI, WEI; LIU, NING

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer has a high mortality rate and conventional treatments have poor therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recent curative effect and adverse reaction of photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had accepted semiconductor laser photodynamic adjuvant treatment were selected as the observation group. In addition, 30 patients who had accepted concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy during the same period served as the control group. The observation group received photofrin (2 mg/kg) intravenously in 100 ml of 5% glucose, followed by the introduction of the endoscopic optical fiber to deliver laser radiation with an intensity of 630 nm wavelength pulse power. After 2 days, necrotic tissues were removed and irradiation of the original or new tumor lesions was performed and necrotic tissues were removed. The total effective rate and survival time was higher and the length of hospital stay was shorter in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of patients in the control and observation groups with symptoms of hematochezia, change in bowel habit, intestinal stimulation and incomplete intestinal obstruction were reduced. Additionally, the reduced ratio of the observation group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). The adverse reaction rate of the observation group was lower than that of the control group and this difference was also statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of photodynamic treatment for young patients with advanced colorectal cancer can effectively improve the clinical symptoms and reduce complications. PMID:26998124

  19. [Advances of minimally invasive technique in colorectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xishan

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal surgery is rapidly developing in the direction of minimally invasive surgery and functional surgery. New technology and ideas are constantly emerging recently. Laparoscopic colon surgery has already been recommended by NCCN guideline. However, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery still needs to wait for survival and recurrence rates of long-term follow-up data for verification. In recent years, with the rapid progression of imaging equipment of laparoscope, the new 3D laparoscopic system will process image more quickly, and surgeons can get space depth feeling like open surgery only with a pair of glasses. The new 3D laparoscopic system has many advantages, and can also shorten the learning curve of the beginners. But it does not mean the traditional 2D laparoscopy has been out of date. It is admitted that dialectical view on the development of the technology and equipment is still required. New things also need the accumulation of time and validation, and the deficiency of imaging system remains to be improved. At present, the robotic colorectal cancer surgery is still in its infancy, and its application is relatively common in colon surgery. In respect of robotic rectal cancer surgery, it still lacks of long-term follow-up survival results for verification. To reduce physical and psychological trauma for patients is the goal of the surgeon. Surgeons are experiencing the change from minimally invasion to non-invasion. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and natural orifice specimen extraction surgery (NOSES) arise at the historic moment. Among them, transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) incorporates the concepts of NOTES, anal minimally invasive surgery and total mesorectum excision, guaranteeing the radical cure and no scar of abdomen, but it still needs multicenter, large sample and long-term follow-up clinical data to prove its safety, efficacy and indication. Therefore, surgical procedure is transforming from conventional

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for flat or sessile colorectal neoplasia > 20 mm: A European single-center series of 182 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Malte; Hildenbrand, Ralf; Oyama, Tsuneo; Sido, Bernd; Yahagi, Naohisa; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an attractive method for en bloc resection of larger flat neoplastic lesions. Experience with this method is limited in the Western World. Patients and methods: A total of 182 consecutive flat or sessile colorectal lesions (cecum n = 43; right-sided colon n = 65; left-sided colon n = 11, rectum: n = 63) with a size > 20 mm (mean 41.0 ± 17.4 mm) were resected in 178 patients. The data were recorded prospectively. Results: ESD was technically feasible in 85.2 % of patients with a mean procedure time of 127.5 min (± 99.8) min and a complication rate of 11.5 % (microperforation 9.3 %, delayed bleeding 2.7 %, no case of emergency surgery, 30-day mortality rate 0 %). For 155 successfully completed procedures the en bloc and R0 resection rates were 88.4 and 62.6 %. Efficacy was better for smaller lesions (20 mm to 49 mm; n = 131) than for larger lesions (50 mm to 140 mm; n = 51) with R0 rates of 70.8 vs. 40.5 % (P < 0.001) and procedure times of 92.7 ± 62.4 minutes vs. 217.0 ± 120.9 minutes (P < 0,001). Conclusions: This series confirms the efficacy of ESD for en bloc resection of colorectal lesions > 20 mm. Results are satisfactory for lesions up to 50 mm. ESD for larger lesions was associated with low R0 resection rates and very long procedure times. The clinical consequences of microperforations were minor and do not argue against the spread of ESD in the West. Meeting presentations: The data were presented in part at DDW 2014, Chicago IL, USA (Gastrointest Endosc 2014; 79: AB536) PMID:27540580

  1. Interval colorectal carcinoma: An unsolved debate.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Mark; Galvao Neto, Antonio; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC), as the third most common new cancer diagnosis, poses a significant health risk to the population. Interval CRCs are those that appear after a negative screening test or examination. The development of interval CRCs has been shown to be multifactorial: location of exam-academic institution versus community hospital, experience of the endoscopist, quality of the procedure, age of the patient, flat versus polypoid neoplasia, genetics, hereditary gastrointestinal neoplasia, and most significantly missed or incompletely excised lesions. The rate of interval CRCs has decreased in the last decade, which has been ascribed to an increased understanding of interval disease and technological advances in the screening of high risk individuals. In this article, we aim to review the literature with regard to the multifactorial nature of interval CRCs and provide the most recent developments regarding this important gastrointestinal entity. PMID:26668498

  2. Interval colorectal carcinoma: An unsolved debate

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Mark; Neto, Antonio Galvao; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC), as the third most common new cancer diagnosis, poses a significant health risk to the population. Interval CRCs are those that appear after a negative screening test or examination. The development of interval CRCs has been shown to be multifactorial: location of exam-academic institution versus community hospital, experience of the endoscopist, quality of the procedure, age of the patient, flat versus polypoid neoplasia, genetics, hereditary gastrointestinal neoplasia, and most significantly missed or incompletely excised lesions. The rate of interval CRCs has decreased in the last decade, which has been ascribed to an increased understanding of interval disease and technological advances in the screening of high risk individuals. In this article, we aim to review the literature with regard to the multifactorial nature of interval CRCs and provide the most recent developments regarding this important gastrointestinal entity. PMID:26668498

  3. [Clinical trial of a seven-peptide vaccine and tegafur-uracil/leucovorin as combination therapy for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keisuke; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Sukegawa, Yasushi; Hida, Jinichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a clinical trial of a seven-peptide vaccine in combination with tegafur-uracil/Leucovorin for advanced colorectal cancer. These antigenic peptides were derived from 5 proteins identified as cancer-testis antigens(ring finger protein 43 [RNF43], translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34[TOMM34], maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase[MELK], forkhead box M1[FOXM1], and holliday junction recognition protein[HJURP])and 2 vascular endothelial growth factor receptors(VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). Thirty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled. We found that 25 patients had Grade 1 injection-site redness/induration and 1 patient had Grade 3 anaphylaxis. Tumor imaging revealed that 3 patients had a partial response (PR), 15 had stable disease(SD)and 12 had progressive disease(PD). This trial showed that treatment with the seven-peptide vaccine and UFT/LV was well tolerated and feasible for advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:25335716

  4. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lines, K.E.; Stevenson, M.; Thakker, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  5. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancerous (malignant) tumors or grow excessively without forming tumors. Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes are caused by ... This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names corticotropin H.P. ACTHAR GEL epinephrine ADRENALIN Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia ...

  6. Which strategy after first-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Andrea, Coinu; Fausto, Petrelli; Francesca, Borgonovo Karen; Mary, Cabiddu; Mara, Ghilardi; Veronica, Lonati; Sandro, Barni

    2014-01-01

    Second-line therapy for advanced colorectal cancer is an integral part of the treatment strategy that needs to be set from the beginning for each patient, bearing in mind the expected toxicities of chosen treatments, the patient's clinical condition, comorbidities, preferences, the aims of the treatment and the molecular status. Furthermore, the distinction between lines of therapy is no longer absolute. The perspective of “continuum of care” includes switching chemotherapy prior to disease progression, maintenance therapy, drug "holidays" if needed, surgical resection of metastases in selected patients, and seems to allow a tailored treatment, in which patients are more likely to benefit from exposure to all active agents, which is known to correlate with overall survival. The scenario of second-line treatment has changed dramatically over the years and could currently benefit from several options including chemotherapy with a single agent or in combination and the addition of molecular-targeted agents developed in the last decade, such as epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies (cetuximab, panitumumab) and vascular endothelial growth factor-targeting agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept), with the possibility of bevacizumab use even beyond first progression. The purpose of this review is to summarize the most important scientific data supporting the use of chemotherapy and the new biologic agents in the second-line setting in advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:25083064

  7. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  8. An AXIN2 Mutant Allele Associated With Predisposition to Colorectal Neoplasia Has Context-Dependent Effects on AXIN2 Protein Function1

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Serina M.; Petty, Elizabeth M.; Stoffel, Elena M.; Fearon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous, germline nonsense mutations in AXIN2 have been reported in two families with oligodontia and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition, including an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation. Somatic AXIN2 mutations predicted to generate truncated AXIN2 (trAXIN2) proteins have been reported in some CRCs. Our studies of cells from an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation carrier showed that the mutant transcripts are not significantly susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay and, thus, could encode a trAXIN2 protein. In transient transfection assays, trAXIN2 was more abundant than wild-type AXIN2 protein, and in contrast to AXIN2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition did not increase trAXIN2 levels. Like AXIN2, the trAXIN2 protein interacts with β-catenin destruction complex proteins. When ectopically overexpressed, trAXIN2 inhibits β-catenin/T-cell factor–dependent reporter gene activity and SW480 CRC cell colony formation. These findings suggest the trAXIN2 protein may retain some wild-type functions when highly expressed. However, when stably expressed in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells, the trAXIN2 protein did not match AXIN2’s activity in inhibiting Wnt-mediated induction of Wnt-regulated target genes, and SW480 cells with stable expression of trAXIN2 but not AXIN2 could be generated. Our data suggest the AXIN2 1989G>A mutation may not have solely a loss-of-function role in CRC. Rather, its contribution may depend on context, with potential loss-of-function when AXIN2 levels are low, such as in the absence of Wnt pathway activation. However, given its apparent increased stability in some settings, the trAXIN2 protein might have gain-of-function in cells with substantially elevated AXIN2 expression, such as Wnt pathway–defective CRC cells. PMID:26025668

  9. KRAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In February 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on evidence-based reviews of the literature surrounding three pharmacogenomic tests. This project came about when Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) asked MAS to provide evidence-based analyses on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three oncology pharmacogenomic tests currently in use in Ontario. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these technologies. These have been completed in conjunction with internal and external stakeholders, including a Provincial Expert Panel on Pharmacogenomics (PEPP). Within the PEPP, subgroup committees were developed for each disease area. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed by the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and is summarized within the reports. The following reports can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Gene Expression Profiling for Guiding Adjuvant Chemotherapy Decisions in Women with Early Breast Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis K-RAS testing in Treatment Decisions for Advanced Colorectal Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis. Objective The objective of this systematic review is to determine the predictive value of KRAS testing in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with two anti-EGFR agents, cetuximab and panitumumab. Economic analyses are also being conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of KRAS testing. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is usually defined as stage IV disease according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer

  10. MicroRNAs in colorectal cancer as markers and targets: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing-Jia; Cao, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNA molecules encoded by eukaryotic genomic DNA, and function in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via base-pairing with complementary sequences in target mRNAs, resulting in translational repression or degradation of target mRNAs. They represent one of the major types of epigenetic modification and play important roles in all aspects of cellular activities. Altered expression of microRNAs has been found in various human diseases including cancer. Many efforts have been made to discover the characteristic microRNA expression profiles, to understand the roles of aberrantly expressed microRNAs and underlying mechanisms in different cancers. With the application of DNA microarray, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and other molecular biology techniques, increasing evidence has been accumulated which reveal that aberrant microRNAs can be detected not only intracellularly within the cancer cells, but also extracellularly in plasma of patients, postulating the potential of aberrant microRNAs as promising diagnostic/prognostic markers and attracting therapeutic targets. This review is intended to provide the most recent advances in microRNA studies in one of the most common cancers, colorectal cancer, especially the identification of those specifically altered microRNAs in colorectal cancer, validation for their relevance to clinical pathological parameters of patients, functional analyses and potential applications of these microRNAs. PMID:24764666

  11. Recent patents and advances in genomic biomarker discovery for colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Quyun, Chen; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Lin, Biaoyang

    2010-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer is the key to reducing the death rate of CRC patients. Predicting the response to current therapeutic modalities of CRC will also have a great impact on patient care. This review summarizes recent advances and patents in biomarker discovery in CRC under five major categories; including genomic changes, expression changes, mutations, epigenetic changes and microRNAs. The interesting patents include: 1) a patent for a method to differentiate normal exfoliated cells from cancer cells based on whether they were subjected to apoptosis and DNA degradation; 2) A model (PM-33 multiple molecular marker model) based on expression changes of up-regulation of the MDM2, DUSP6, and NFl genes down-regulation of the RNF4, MMD and EIF2S3 genes, which achieved an 88% sensitivity, and an 82% specificity for CRC diagnosis; 3) gene mutations in PTEN, KRAS, PIK3CA for predicting the response to anti-EGFR therapies, a common drug used for CRC treatment; 4) patents on epigenetic changes of ITGA4, SEPT9, ALX4, TFAP2E FOXL2, SARM1, ID4 etc. and many key miRNAs. Finally, future directions in the fields were commented on or suggested, including the combination of multiple categories of biomarkers and pathway central or network-based biomarker panels. PMID:20426761

  12. Bevacizumab: a safe and effective treatment in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer and repeated removal of metastases.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carpeño, Javier de; Moyano, María Sereno; Sáenz, Enrique Casado; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Batlle, Jaime Feliu; Barón, Manuel González

    2009-04-01

    Bevacizumab has been shown to be effective combined with chemotherapy for first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but little information is available about its efficacy and safety in patients who may be candidates for surgery at any time during the disease. The case history of a female patient with colorectal cancer, undergoing surgery for liver metastases and bilateral surgery for lung metastases at different time-points during her disease, is reported. Perioperative bevacizumab administration caused no complications either associated with surgery, in the early postoperative period, or in the subsequent months. PMID:19352110

  13. Molecular testing to optimize therapeutic decision making in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In recent years, therapeutic advances have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease. Along with the addition of new treatments, an increasing body of literature explores the potential benefit of using molecular testing to define tumor, circulating, or host biomarkers of benefit to specific treatment strategies. At present, testing for specific mutations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS and NRAS has become accepted practice to select patients for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted agents. Additionally, testing for the BRAF V600E mutation is used to refine decisions based on patient prognosis. The presence of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) *28 polymorphism is associated with toxicity from irinotecan, although it has not been universally applied. Nonetheless, molecular markers to predict response and toxicity of cytotoxic therapy are evolving. While the development of selection biomarkers for anti-angiogenic treatments has not proved fruitful to date, improved development strategies and novel targeted agents are anticipated to revolutionize the approach to treatment of advanced CRC in the near future. This review summarizes currently available data to select treatment strategies in patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27034809

  14. Molecular testing to optimize therapeutic decision making in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Semrad, Thomas J; Kim, Edward J

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In recent years, therapeutic advances have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease. Along with the addition of new treatments, an increasing body of literature explores the potential benefit of using molecular testing to define tumor, circulating, or host biomarkers of benefit to specific treatment strategies. At present, testing for specific mutations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS and NRAS has become accepted practice to select patients for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted agents. Additionally, testing for the BRAF V600E mutation is used to refine decisions based on patient prognosis. The presence of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) *28 polymorphism is associated with toxicity from irinotecan, although it has not been universally applied. Nonetheless, molecular markers to predict response and toxicity of cytotoxic therapy are evolving. While the development of selection biomarkers for anti-angiogenic treatments has not proved fruitful to date, improved development strategies and novel targeted agents are anticipated to revolutionize the approach to treatment of advanced CRC in the near future. This review summarizes currently available data to select treatment strategies in patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27034809

  15. Recent advances in active specific cancer vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Itoh, Kyogo; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-06-01

    Cloning techniques to identify genes and peptides of tumor-associated antigens have created new possibilities for the immunotherapy of patients with advanced cancer. Here, we review recent clinical trials of specific cancer vaccines, mainly HLA-restricted peptides, and epitope-encoding vectors for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Many researchers initially focused on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as an immunologic target antigen that is overexpressed on virtually all CRCs. A recombinant vaccine containing the CEA gene and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with CEA peptide was administered to patients with CEA-elevated CRC. Although CEA-specific responses were detected, the clinical responses were limited. Recently, new types of clinical trials--namely, a personalized protocol to take into account the immunological diversity of cytotoxic T cell responses among patients and a novel cancer-testis antigen protocol that uses multiple peptides derived from genes identified by the cDNA array method--have been introduced. The personalized protocol seemed to be better than the classical (non-personalized) protocol in terms of clinical response and survival. Novel cancer-testis antigen protocols that use multiple CRC-derived peptides were recently conducted in patients with advanced CRC. The preliminary study yielded promising results regarding specific T cell responses to peptides and survival benefits. In this review, we summarize these results and discuss future perspectives. PMID:22339221

  16. Gastrointestinal Neoplasia Associated with Bowel Parasitosis: Real or Imaginary?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Michael R.; Weidner, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Several parasitic species are well known to have carcinogenic properties, namely; Schistosoma hematobium (squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder) and the liver flukes Opisthorchis and Chlonorchis (cholangiocarcinoma). A large number of parasites are known to colonize the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to review the evidence that implicates these parasites in gastrointestinal neoplasia. Schistosoma japonicum, which is endemic primarily in east Asia, has been shown in multiple studies to convey a mildly increased risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma. The data supporting a causative role for Schistosoma mansoni in colorectal or other neoplastic processes are less convincing, limited primarily to small case-control studies and case series. Reports of possible associations between other gastrointestinal parasites (e.g., E. histolytica and A. lumbricoides) and neoplasia may be found in the literature but are limited to individual cases. We conclude that, other than S. japonicum and to a lesser extent S. mansoni, there is little evidence of an association between gastrointestinal parasites and neoplasia. PMID:22174720

  17. Outcomes of pelvic exenteration for recurrent or primary locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwa Yeon; Park, Sung Chan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Seo, Ho Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes of pelvic exenteration for patients with primary locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACRC) or locally recurrent colorectal cancer (LRCRC), and to identify clinically relevant prognostic factors. Methods Between January 2001 and December 2010, 40 consecutive patients with primary LACRC or LRCRC underwent pelvic exenteration at the National Cancer Center, Republic of Korea. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records. Results The median age was 59 years and the median follow-up time was 26 months (range, 1-117 months). The overall complication and in-hospital mortality rates were 70% (28/40) and 7.5% (3/40), respectively. The complication rates were similar between patients with primary LACRC (69.6%) and those with LRCRC (70.6%). The overall recurrence rate was 50% (17/34), and was lower in patients with primary LACRC than in patients with LRCRC (33.3% vs. 76.9%, P = 0.032). The 5-year overall survival was significantly different between primary LACRC and patients with LRCRC (58.7% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.022). Multivariate analysis revealed that radicality (R0 vs. R1/R2) was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.020). Conclusion The complication and operative mortality rates of pelvic exenteration remained high, but pelvic exenteration might provide an opportunity for long-term survival and good local control. Complete (R0) resection was the only independent prognostic factor for overall survival. PMID:26366382

  18. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  19. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-01-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  20. Stromal Expression of MicroRNA-21 in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients with Distant Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Sang; Nam, Soo Kyung; Koh, Jiwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choe, Gheeyoung; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the regional heterogeneity and clinicopathological significance of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with distant metastasis. Methods: miR-21 expression was investigated by using locked nucleic acid– fluorescence in situ hybridization in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis from 170 patients with advanced CRC. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and desmin were evaluated to identify cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) by using immunohistochemistry. Results: The miR-21 signal was observed in the cancer stroma. The expression of miR-21 (a score of 1–4) in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis was observed in specimens from 133 (78.2%), 105 (61.8%), and 91 (53.5%) patients, respectively. miR-21 expression was heterogeneous in advanced CRC. Discordance between miR-21 expression in the center of the primary cancer and either the periphery of the primary cancer or distant metastasis was 31.7% or 44.7%, respectively. miR-21 stromal expression in the periphery of the primary cancer was significantly associated with a better prognosis (p=.004). miR-21 expression was significantly associated with CAFs in the center of the primary cancer (p=.001) and distant metastases (p=.041). Conclusions: miR-21 expression is observed in cancer stroma related to the CAF quantity and frequently presents regional heterogeneity in CRC. Our findings indicate that the role of miR-21 in predicting prognosis may be controversial but provide a new perspective of miR-21 level measurement in cancer specimens. PMID:27240857

  1. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-02-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  2. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Marc C.; Vugts, Danielle J.; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R.; Schuit, Robert C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus AMS; Verheul, Henk M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq 89Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients 89Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with 89Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without 89Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC. PMID:26309164

  3. Efficacy of prophylactic anti-diarrhoeal treatment in patients receiving Campto for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffour, J; Gourgou, S; Seitz, J F; Senesse, P; Boutet, O; Castera, D; Kramar, A; Ychou, M

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of combined prophylactic and curative anti-diarrhoeal medication in advanced colorectal patients treated by irinotecan. Thirty-four pre-treated eligible patients were evaluated. There were 44% women, the median age was 65 and 38% of the patients had a 0 performance status. The patients received sucralfate(4g/d) and nifuroxazide(600 mg/d) prophylactic treatment on days 0-7. In the case of severe diarrhoea, preventive treatment was replaced by loperamide(12 mg/d) and diosmectite (9 g/d). Grade 3 delayed diarrhoea occurred in 18% of patients (90% CI: [9.5-28.9]) and 4.6% of cycles. No grade 4 delayed diarrhoea was observed. Twenty-nine patients (85%) received the preventive treatment at cycle 1, while 14% (90% CI: [6.2-25.7]) experienced grade 3 delayed diarrhoea in 3.7% of cycles for a median 4.5 days. The objective response rate was 8% (90% CI [1.4-23.1]) among the 25 assessable patients. Preventive combined treatment is effective in reducing the incidence of severe delayed diarrhoea, and it should be proposed to patients treated with mono-therapy Campto(r) and evaluated in poly-chemotherapy protocols. PMID:12552984

  4. Irreversible electroporation in the treatment of locally advanced pancreas and liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wichtowski, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Kocur, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Irreversible electroporation is a new, non-thermal ablation technique in the treatment of parenchymal organ tumors which uses short high voltage pulses of electricity in order to induce apoptosis of targeted cells. In this paper the application of this method of treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and liver cancer is analyzed. Material and methods Between 04.2014 and 09.2014 two patients with LAPC and one with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) were qualified for treatment with irreversible electroporation. Both patients remained under constant observation and control. PubMed/Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched and eight original reports on irreversible electroporation of pancreatic and liver tumors based on the biggest groups of patients were found. Results Two patients with LAPC and one with CRLM were qualified for ablation with irreversible electroporation. In all three patients a successful irreversible electroporation (IRE) procedure of the whole tumor was conducted. In the minimum seven-month follow-up 100% local control was achieved – without progression. In the literature review the local response to treatment ranged from 41% to 100%. The event-free survival rate in six-month observation was 94%. Conclusions Ablation with irreversible electroporation is a new non-thermal ablation technique which has been demonstrated, both in the previously published studies and in the cases described in this paper, as a safe and efficient therapeutic method for patients with LAPC and CRLM. PMID:27095938

  5. Retrospective evaluation of 5-fluorouracil-interferon-a aTreatment of advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    András, C; Csiki, Z; Gál, I; Takács, I; Antal, L; Szegedi, G

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe the retrospective analysis of treatment by 5-fluorouracil and interferon-a aof 34 patients with advanced colorectal cancer. An average of 4.6 treatment cycles (3 12) was applied. Complete remission was not observed; partial remission was observed in 8 patients; in 13 patients no change occurred and progression was detected in 14 cases. Remission rate was 22.8%, mean response time was 5.2 (3 12) months, mean progress-free survival 5.6 (0 22) months. Mean survival from the start of treatment was 11.9 (1 42) months and from the establishment of the diagnosis 26.1 (3 60) months. Severe life-threatening side-effects did not occur; other side-effects such as fever, nausea, diarrhea, leucopenia, and anemia responded to drugs. Treatment by 5-FU and interferon, in accordance with other authors findings, improved survival and well-being of patients but no breakthrough has been achieved. PMID:11033456

  6. Depression in older patients with advanced colorectal cancer is closely connected with immunosuppressive acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Yang, Jie; Yang, Jihua; Fu, Weijun; Jiang, Hua; Du, Juan; Zhang, Chunyang; Xi, Hao; Hou, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common tumors. CRC patients are susceptible to suffering from depression. Whether the immune system of CRC patients with depression is impaired or stimulated is controversial. Possible reasons for this conflict are the involvement of confounding factors, such as the age of the patient, the stage of the CRC and the types of treatment in previous studies. To demonstrate clearly the relationship between depression and the immune system in the context of CRC, the present study included only older patients with advanced CRC who received only chemotherapy, and the study adopted immunosuppressive acidic protein (IAP) as an immune parameter for the first time. A total of 56 older patients with advanced CRC completed the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and were divided into two groups according to SDS scores. The patients exhibiting depression were treated with fluoxetine until their symptoms remitted. The serum levels of IAP and the percentages of CD3-positive (CD3+), CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocytes and CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells and Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were calculated at the time of enrollment and once the symptoms remitted. Correlation analyses revealed that the SDS score was positively associated with serum IAP levels but negatively associated with CD3 and CD4 levels. Among the depressed and non-depressed patients, serum IAP levels and the percentages of CD3 and CD4 cells were dramatically different. After the depression symptoms were treated, the IAP levels dramatically decreased, while the levels of CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD56 were unchanged. All of above suggested that IAP was closely correlated with depression and might be a relatively objective parameter for predicting depression. PMID:23975537

  7. Advances in targeted and immunobased therapies for colorectal cancer in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Heng Fong; Yip, Wai Kien; Fifis, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies require information on specific defective signaling pathways or mutations. Advances in genomic technologies and cell biology have led to identification of new therapeutic targets associated with signal-transduction pathways. Survival times of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can be extended with combinations of conventional cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies. Targeting EGFR- and VEGFR-signaling systems has been the major focus for treatment of metastatic CRC. However, there are still limitations in their clinical application, and new and better drug combinations are needed. This review provides information on EGFR and VEGF inhibitors, new therapeutic agents in the pipeline targeting EGFR and VEGFR pathways, and those targeting other signal-transduction pathways, such as MET, IGF1R, MEK, PI3K, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and death-receptor signaling pathways for treatment of metastatic CRC. Additionally, multitargeted approaches in combination therapies targeting negative-feedback loops, compensatory networks, and cross talk between pathways are highlighted. Then, immunobased strategies to enhance antitumor immunity using specific monoclonal antibodies, such as the immune-checkpoint inhibitors anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1, as well as the challenges that need to be overcome for increased efficacy of targeted therapies, including drug resistance, predictive markers of response, tumor subtypes, and cancer stem cells, are covered. The review concludes with a brief insight into the applications of next-generation sequencing, expression profiling for tumor subtyping, and the exciting progress made in in silico predictive analysis in the development of a prescription strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:27099521

  8. Optimizing Single Agent Panitumumab Therapy in Pre-Treated Advanced Colorectal Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giampietro; Buttitta, Fiamma; D'Andrea, Mario Rosario; Tumolo, Salvatore; Buonadonna, Angela; Pavese, Ida; Cordio, Stefano; De Tursi, Michele; Mosconi, Stefania; Stumbo, Luciano; Felicioni, Lara; Marchetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To improve the selection of advanced colorectal cancer patients to panitumumab by optimizing the assessment of RAS (KRAS-NRAS) mutations. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Using a centralized pyrosequencing RAS assay, we analyzed the tumors of 94 patients, wild-type for KRAS mutations (codons 12 to 13) by Sanger sequencing (SS), treated with panitumumab. RESULTS: By SS analysis, 94 (62%) of 152 patients were wild-type and their objective response rate to panitumumab was 17%. We first optimized the KRAS test, by performing an accurate tissue-dissection step followed by pyrosequencing, a more sensitive method, and found further mutations in 12 (12.8%) cases. Secondly, tumors were subjected to RAS extension analysis (KRAS, exons 3 to 4; NRAS exons 2 to 4) by pyrosequencing that allowed to identify several rare mutations: KRAS codon 61, 5.3%; codon 146, 5.3%; NRAS, 9.5%. Overall, RAS mutation rate was 32.9%. All patients with additional RAS mutations had progressive or stable disease, except 3 patients with mutations at codon 61 of KRAS or NRAS who experienced partial (2 cases) or complete response. By excluding from the analysis 11 cases with mutations at codons 61, no patient was responsive to treatment (P = .021). RAS wild-type versus RAS mutated cases had a significantly better time to progression (P = .044), that resulted improved (p = .004) by excluding codon 61 mutations. CONCLUSION: This study shows that by optimizing the RAS test it is possible to significantly improve the identification of patients who do not gain benefit of panitumumab. Prospective studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance of rare mutations. PMID:25246275

  9. Efficacy and safety analysis of chemotherapy for advanced colitis-associated colorectal cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nio, Kenta; Higashi, Daijiro; Kumagai, Hozumi; Arita, Shuji; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakashima, Koji; Shibata, Yoshihiro; Esaki, Motohiro; Manabe, Tatsuya; Nagai, Shuntaro; Ueki, Takashi; Nakano, Michitaka; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Hirahashi, Minako; Oda, Yoshinao; Esaki, Taito; Mitsugi, Kenji; Futami, Kitaro; Akashi, Koichi; Baba, Eishi

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy for advanced colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) has been insufficiently evaluated. The goal of this study was to clarify the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy for CAC in Japan. CAC patients who were treated with chemotherapy between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively examined. Twenty-nine patients (median age, 48 years; 23 men) were assessed. Eighteen patients had ulcerative colitis, and 11 had Crohn's disease. Three ulcerative colitis and four Crohn's disease patients were in the active disease phase. Primary tumors were located in the rectum/anus (n=16), the left colon (n=9), or the right colon (n=4). Palliative or adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 13 and 16 patients, respectively. First-line palliative chemotherapy regimens were as follows: fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX; n=6), FOLFOX+bevacizumab (n=3), and others (n=4). Adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were S-1 (n=7), oxaliplatin-based (n=4) and others (n=5). In palliative chemotherapy, the objective response rate was 15%, and the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 182 and 315 days, respectively. In adjuvant chemotherapy, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 78%. Grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) were observed in 16 patients (55%). Active and remission inflammatory bowel disease patients suffered grade 3/4 nonhematological AEs at an incidence of 71 and 23%, respectively (P<0.01). Dose reduction was required in 11 patients (38%), eight of whom required it for hematological AEs. Adjuvant chemotherapy for CAC exhibited sufficient efficacy, whereas modest efficacy was shown for palliative chemotherapy for CAC. AEs, particularly nonhematological AEs, were closely associated with disease activity of colitis. PMID:26771865

  10. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. METHODS We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40’s and 50’s age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. RESULTS We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P < 0.005). Literature review disclosed 17 relevant studies. As expected, in both Asian and Western populations, the risks for overall adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher in the 50's age group as compared to the 40's age group in a similar fashion. The result of the current study were similar to previous studies on Western populations. A substantially higher rate of adenoma, was observed in studies conducted among Asian populations in both age groups. CONCLUSION The higher rate of colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population. PMID:27621582

  11. Lectin reactivities as intermediate biomarkers in premalignant colorectal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Boland, C R; Martin, M A; Goldstein, I J

    1992-01-01

    Normal colonic epithelial cells undergo maturation as they traverse the crypt to the lumenal surface. The binding of lectins to goblet cell mucins and other glycoconjugates changes as the cells migrate and differentiate. Additional stepwise modifications in glycoconjugate expression occur in premalignant and malignant neoplasms that may be detected by lectin binding studies. The lectins Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA) have been developed as markers of differentiation in normal-appearing colonic epithelium. Using a quantitative biometric system to score tissues, reduced levels of lectin binding have been found in rectal tissue from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The lectin Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA) binds to a cytoplasmic glycoconjugate expressed at the base of the colonic crypt and serves as a possible proliferation marker in the distal, but not proximal, colon. ACA binding increases in tandem with increased levels of proliferation (using BrdU incorporation) in neoplastic tissues. Binding by the peanut lectin (PNA) occurs late in the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence--in larger adenomas and in cancers--and serves as a marker of advancing neoplasia. Lectins identify the stepwise changes that occur during normal differentiation, proliferation and in advancing neoplasia. By selecting the appropriate probe, biomarkers may be developed for early, intermediate, and late events in colorectal cancer. PMID:1469891

  12. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  14. Regorafenib assessment in refractory advanced colorectal cancer: RegARd-C study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hendlisz, Alain; Deleporte, Amélie; Vandeputte, Caroline; Charette, Nicolas; Paesmans, Marianne; Guiot, Thomas; Garcia, Camilo; Flamen, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Regorafenib was recently approved for patients with pretreated advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC), despite a moderate improvement of the patients’ outcome, and significant toxicities. Based on previous studies showing that early fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-based metabolic response assessment (MRA) might adequately select patients unlikely to benefit from treatment, the RegARd-C trial uses early MRA to identify likely non-responders to regorafenib in a population of patients with aCRC and guide a comprehensive evaluation of genomic and epigenetic determinants of resistance to treatment. Methods and analysis RegARd-C is a multicentric prospective study. Its primary objective is to identify non-benefitters from regorafenib given at 160 mg/day, 3 weeks out of 4 in a population of patients with pretreated aCRC. Baseline PET is repeated at day 14 of the first treatment course. MRA is blinded for the investigators. Overall survival (OS) is the primary end point and will be correlated with metabolic parameters and (epi)genetic alterations assessed from tumour and serial blood samples. A target sample size of 105 evaluable patients (70 as derivation set and 35 as validation set), is considered as sufficient to validate an expected HR for OS of metabolic responders compared to metabolic non-responders significantly <1 (with 80% power and 1-sided 5% α in case of a true HR≤0.59 and a responders rate of 47%). Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Institut Jules Bordet's competent ethics committee and complies with the Helsinki declaration or the Belgian laws and regulations, whichever provides the greatest protection for the patient, and follows the International Conference on Harmonisation E 6 (R1) Guideline for Good Clinical Practice, reference number CPMP/ICH/135/95. The protocol and the trials results, even inconclusive, will be presented at international oncology congresses, and published in peer

  15. Development and validation of a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Di Maso, Marianna; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma (ACA) recurrence after endoscopic polypectomy. METHODS: Out of 3360 patients who underwent colon polypectomy at University of Foggia between 2004 and 2008, data of 843 patients with 1155 ACAs was retrospectively reviewed. Surveillance intervals were scheduled by guidelines at 3 years and primary endpoint was considered 3-year ACA recurrence. Baseline clinical parameters and the main features of ACAs were entered into a Cox regression analysis and variables with P < 0.05 in the univariate analysis were then tested as candidate variables into a stepwise Cox regression model (conditional backward selection). The regression coefficients of the Cox regression model were multiplied by 2 and rounded in order to obtain easy to use point numbers facilitating the calculation of the score. To avoid overoptimistic results due to model fitting and evaluation in the same dataset, we performed an internal 10-fold cross-validation by means of bootstrap sampling. RESULTS: Median lesion size was 16 mm (12-23) while median number of adenomas was 2.5 (1-3), whereof the number of ACAs was 1.5 (1-2). At 3 years after polypectomy, recurrence was observed in 229 ACAs (19.8%), of which 157 (13.5%) were metachronous neoplasms and 72 (6.2%) local recurrences. Multivariate analysis, after exclusion of the variable “type of resection” due to its collinearity with other predictive factors, confirmed lesion size, number of ACAs and grade of dysplasia as significantly associated to the primary outcome. The score was then built by multiplying the regression coefficients times 2 and the cut-off point 5 was selected by means of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In particular, 248 patients with 365 ACAs fell in the higher-risk group (score ≥ 5) where 3-year recurrence was detected in 174 ACAs (47.6%) whereas the remaining 595 patients with 690 ACAs were included in the low-risk group (score < 5) where 3

  16. Current targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Andrew; O’Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, John; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Treatment strategies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have undergone dramatic changes in the past decade and despite improved patient outcomes, there still exist areas for continued development. The introduction of targeted agents has provided clinicians with additional treatment options in mCRC, however, results have been mixed at best. These novel therapies were designed to interfere with specific molecules involved in the cellular carcinogenesis pathway and ultimately deliver a more focused treatment. Currently, their use in mCRC has been limited primarily as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy regimens. This review explores the relevant cell-signaling networks in colorectal cancer, provides focus on the current targeted agent armamentarium approved for use in mCRC and explores the usefulness of predictive mCRC biomarkers. PMID:27482287

  17. Germline variation in NCF4, an innate immunity gene, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Bríd M.; Zanetti, Krista A.; Robles, Ana I.; Schetter, Aaron J.; Goodman, Julie; Hayes, Richard B.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Gunter, Marc J.; Yeager, Meredith; Burdette, Laurie; Berndt, Sonja I.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal adenoma and cancer; however, few key inflammatory genes mediating this relationship have been identified. In this study, we investigated the association of germline variation in innate immunity genes in relation to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Our study was based on the analysis of samples collected from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We investigated the association between 196 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 20 key innate immunity genes with risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer in 719 adenoma cases, 481 cancer cases and 719 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After Bonferroni correction, the AG/GG genotype of rs5995355, which is upstream of NCF4, was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 2.43, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.73 – 3.39; P<0.0001). NCF4 is part of the NAPDH complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and the innate immune response. While not definitive, our analyses suggest that the variant allele does not affect expression of NCF4, but rather modulates activity of the NADPH complex. Additional studies on the functional consequences of rs5995355 in NCF4 may help to clarify the mechanistic link between inflammation and colorectal cancer. PMID:23982929

  18. Effect of KRAS codon13 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (advanced CRC) under oxaliplatin containing chemotherapy. Results from a translational study of the AIO colorectal study group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the value of KRAS codon 13 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (advanced CRC) treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines. Methods Tumor specimens from 201 patients with advanced CRC from a randomized, phase III trial comparing oxaliplatin/5-FU vs. oxaliplatin/capecitabine were retrospectively analyzed for KRAS mutations. Mutation data were correlated to response data (Overall response rate, ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results 201 patients were analysed for KRAS mutation (61.2% males; mean age 64.2 ± 8.6 years). KRAS mutations were identified in 36.3% of tumors (28.8% in codon 12, 7.4% in codon 13). The ORR in codon 13 patients compared to codon 12 and wild type patients was significantly lower (p = 0.008). There was a tendency for a better overall survival in KRAS wild type patients compared to mutants (p = 0.085). PFS in all patients was not different in the three KRAS genetic groups (p = 0.72). However, we found a marked difference in PFS between patients with codon 12 and 13 mutant tumors treated with infusional 5-FU versus capecitabine based regimens. Conclusions Our data suggest that the type of KRAS mutation may be of clinical relevance under oxaliplatin combination chemotherapies without the addition of monoclonal antibodies in particular when overall response rates are important. Trial registration number 2002-04-017 PMID:22876876

  19. A Phase I Study of EKB-569 in Combination with Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laheru, Dan; Croghan, Gary; Bukowski, Ronald; Rudek, Michelle; Messersmith, Wells; Erlichman, Charles; Pelley, Robert; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross; Boni, Joseph; Abbas, Richat; Martins, Patricia; Zacharchuk, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), characterize the principal toxicities, and assess the pharmacokinetics of EKB-569, an oral selective irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, in combination with capecitabine in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Experimental Design Patients were treated with EKB-569 daily for 21days and capecitabine twice daily for14 days of a 21-day cycle. The dose levels of EKB-569 (mg/day) and capecitabine (mg/m2 twice daily) assessed were 25/750, 50/750, 50/1,000 and 75/1,000. An expanded cohort was enrolled at the MTD to better study toxicity and efficacy. Samples of plasma were collected to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the agents. Treatment efficacy was assessed every other cycle. Results A total of 37 patients, the majority of whom had prior chemotherapy, received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. Twenty patients were treated at the MTD, 50 mg EKB-569, daily and 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea and rash. No patients had complete or partial responses but 48% had stable disease. The conversion of capecitabine to 5-fluorouracil was higher for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine (321 ± 151 ng*h/mL) than for capecitabine alone (176 ± 62 ng*hours/mL; P = 0.0037). Conclusion In advanced colorectal cancer, 50 mg EKB-569 daily can be safely combined with 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice a day. A statistically significant increase in plasma levels of 5-fluorouracil for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine may be due to the single-dose versus multiple-dose exposure difference, variability in exposure or a potential drug interaction. PMID:18765554

  20. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  1. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  2. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    procedure. Efforts to improve the practice of colonoscopy will be described. Another limitation of the current practice is the inability to detect polypoid neoplasia that is hidden from view under white light imaging by the natural folds that occur within the colon. A device to overcome this limitation will also be described. Efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening (and thereby decrease the death rate of this second leading cause of cancer death in the United States) are progressing in many arenas. The researcher, basic or clinical, should maintain an up to date overview of the field and how each new technological advance is likely to have a role in the screening and early detection of colorectal cancer.

  3. CNP. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, T.

    1995-05-17

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  4. Therapeutic targeting of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway: novel targeted therapies and advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the USA, and more effective treatment of CRC is therefore needed. Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this malignancy have led to the development of novel molecule-targeted therapies. Among the most recent classes of targeted therapies being developed are inhibitors targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. As one of the most frequently deregulated pathways in several human cancers, including CRC, aberrant PI3K signaling plays an important role in the growth, survival, motility and metabolism of cancer cells. Targeting this pathway therefore has considerable potential to lead to novel and more effective treatments for CRC. Preclinical and early clinical studies have revealed the potential efficacy of drugs that target PI3K signaling for the treatment of CRC. However, a major challenge that remains is to study these agents in phase III clinical trials to see whether these early successes translate into better patient outcomes. In this review we focus on providing an up-to-date assessment of our current understanding of PI3K signaling biology and its deregulation in the molecular pathogenesis of CRC. Advances in available agents and challenges in targeting the PI3K signaling pathway in CRC treatment will be discussed and placed in the context of the currently available therapies for CRC. PMID:22973417

  5. Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibody–antigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

  6. The Clinical Significance of MiR-148a as a Predictive Biomarker in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masanobu; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Balaguer, Francesc; Hur, Keun; Toiyama, Yuji; Castells, Antoni; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Aim Development of robust prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is imperative for advancing treatment strategies for this disease. We aimed to determine whether expression status of certain miRNAs might have prognostic/predictive value in CRC patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies. Methods We studied a cohort of 273 CRC specimens from stage II/III patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy and stage IV patients subjected to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. In a screening set (n = 44), 13 of 21 candidate miRNAs were successfully quantified by multiplex quantitative RT-PCR. In the validation set comprising of the entire patient cohort, miR-148a expression status was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, and its promoter methylation was quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Lastly, we analyzed the associations between miR-148a expression and patient survival. Results Among the candidate miRNAs studied, miR-148a expression was most significantly down-regulated in advanced CRC tissues. In stage III and IV CRC, low miR-148a expression was associated with significantly shorter disease free-survival (DFS), a worse therapeutic response, and poor overall survival (OS). Furthermore, miR-148a methylation status correlated inversely with its expression, and was associated with worse survival in stage IV CRC. In multivariate analysis, miR-148a expression was an independent prognostic/predictive biomarker for advanced CRC patients (DFS in stage III, low vs. high expression, HR 2.11; OS in stage IV, HR 1.93). Discussion MiR-148a status has a prognostic/predictive value in advanced CRC patients treated with conventional chemotherapy, which has important clinical implications in improving therapeutic strategies and personalized management of this malignancy. PMID:23056401

  7. Risk Factors of Advanced Adenoma in Small and Diminutive Colorectal Polyp.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo Han; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Park, Chan Seo; Kim, Sung Bum; Lee, Si Hyung; Jang, Byung Ik

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to review the clinicopathological characteristics of diminutive (≤ 5 mm) and small polyps (> 5 mm but < 10 mm) and to evaluate the risk factors of advanced adenoma for polyps of diameter < 10 mm in the colon. The medical records of 4,711 patients who underwent first colonoscopy at outpatient clinics or health promotion center were reviewed retrospectively. We analyzed the presence and risk factors of advanced adenoma, which was defined as a villous or tubulovillous polyp, high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma histologically. Total 5,058 polyps were detected in the 4,711 patients, and 93.0% (4,704/5,058) polyps were < 10 mm in size. Among them, advanced adenoma was noted in 0.6% (28/4,704) with a villous component in 19, high-grade dysplasia in 3, and adenocarcinoma in 6. Advanced and non-advanced adenomas differed significantly in age group, gender, and polyp size. Multivariate analysis showed that an advanced age (> 65 years), a male gender, and a polyp size of > 5 mm were risk factors of advanced adenoma. The incidence of advanced adenoma in polyps of < 10 mm was 0.6%. Polyp size, male gender, and age of > 65 years are independent risk factors of advanced adenoma. PMID:27510386

  8. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Results Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network

  9. A phase II randomised trial of 5-fluorouracil with or without interferon alpha-2a in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Piga, A.; Cascinu, S.; Latini, L.; Marcellini, M.; Bavosi, M.; Acito, L.; Bascioni, R.; Giustini, L.; Francini, G.; Pancotti, A.; Rossi, G.; Del Papa, M.; Carle, F.; Cellerino, R.

    1996-01-01

    With the association of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and alpha-interferon (IFN), objective responses as high as 26 63% have been reported in untreated patients with advanced colorectal cancer. However, grade 3-4 toxicity has also been reported. We have conducted a prospective phase II randomised study comparing 5-FU to 5-FU + IFN, to investigate whether the addition of IFN to a weekly 5-FU regimen devoid of significant toxicity used at our institutions could improve the effectiveness of 5-FU while maintaining acceptable toxicity. Patients with histologically proven advanced colorectal carcinoma were randomised to receive 5-FU 500 mg m-2 intravenous (i.v.) bolus on days 1-5 followed by 5-FU 500 mg m-2 i.v. bolus weekly from day 15, with or without IFN alpha-2a intramuscularly (i.m.) 1.5 mU daily on days 6-12 and 3 mU i.m. daily thereafter. The treatment was administered on an outpatient basis. Response was evaluated every 3 months, and treatment continued until progression or after two consecutive judgements of stable disease. Response rate was the main end point of the study. Of 141 patients eligible, 72 were randomised to 5-FU alone (arm A) and 69 to 5-FU + IFN (arm B). Responses were 9/72 (12.5%) in arm A and 6/69 (8.7%) in arm B; complete responses were three in arm A and two in arm B. Progression-free survival (median 4 months) and survival (median 12 months) were identical in the two arms. Toxicity was almost absent in arm A and moderate in arm B, represented mainly by haematological toxicity (usually leucopenia). In conclusion, overall survival was good in both arms of treatment and toxicity was moderate. While the response rate with 5-FU alone was in accord with the literature data, response to 5-FU + IFN was lower than expected. At least at this dosage and schedule, the association of 5-FU and IFN is no better than 5-FU alone and is of no clinical interest. PMID:8826868

  10. Optimal Number of Endoscopic Biopsies in Diagnosis of Advanced Gastric and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeowon; Choi, Hyo Sun; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Jung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic biopsy is necessary to confirm a histopathologic diagnosis. Currently, 6 to 8 biopsies are recommended for diagnosis of a suspected malignant lesion. However, multiple biopsies may result in several problems, such as an increased risk of bleeding, procedure prolongation, and increased workload to pathologists. The aim of this study was to clarify the optimal number of endoscopic biopsy specimens required in diagnosis of advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer during endoscopy were included. Five specimens were obtained sequentially from viable tissue of the cancer margin. Experienced pathologists evaluated each specimen and provided diagnoses. A total of 91 patients were enrolled. Fifty-nine subjects had advanced gastric cancer, and 32 had advanced colon cancer. Positive diagnosis rates of the first, second, and third advanced gastric cancer specimens were 81.3%, 94.9%, and 98.3%, respectively, while positive diagnosis rates of advanced colon cancer specimens were 78.1%, 87.5%, and 93.8%. Further biopsies did not increase positive diagnosis cumulative rates. This study demonstrated that three specimens were sufficient to make correct pathologic diagnoses in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, we recommend 3 or 4 biopsies from viable tissue in advanced gastrointestinal cancer to make a pathologic diagnosis during endoscopy. PMID:22219611

  11. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  12. Continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil with alpha 2b interferon for advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, J. E.; Hulse, P.; Lorigan, P.; Jayson, G.; Scarffe, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty patients with symptomatic colorectal carcinoma were commenced on treatment with 5-fluorouracil (2.5 g week-1) administered by continuous intravenous infusion and alpha 2b interferon (3 x 10(6) U s.c. three times a week). Six out of 30 patients (20%) achieved a partial response. Three patients (10%) had stable disease and 21 patients (70%) progressed on treatment. Twenty patients (67%) completed ten or more weeks of treatment. In nine patients, treatment was withdrawn after 2-9 weeks because of disease progression or death. One patient's treatment was interrupted by emergency surgery. The median survival for all patients was 210 days (7 months). The principal side-effects were oral mucositis (12/30 patients), nausea (8/30 patients) and transient diarrhoea (4/30 patients), and initial constitutional symptoms due to alpha 2b interferon. The combination of low-dose continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil and low-dose alpha 2b interferon is well tolerated but has no obvious advantage over alternative infusional regimens using 5-fluorouracil as a single agent. PMID:7599051

  13. Regorafenib (BAY 73-4506) in advanced colorectal cancer: a phase I study

    PubMed Central

    Strumberg, D; Scheulen, M E; Schultheis, B; Richly, H; Frost, A; Büchert, M; Christensen, O; Jeffers, M; Heinig, R; Boix, O; Mross, K

    2012-01-01

    Background: In a phase I dose-escalation study, regorafenib demonstrated tolerability and antitumour activity in solid tumour patients. The study was expanded to focus on patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Patients received oral regorafenib 60–220 mg daily (160 mg daily in the extension cohort) in cycles of 21 days on, 7 days off treatment. Assessments included toxicity, response, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Results: Thirty-eight patients with heavily pretreated CRC (median 4 prior lines of therapy, range 0–7) were enrolled in the dose-escalation and extension phases; 26 patients received regorafenib 160 mg daily. Median treatment duration was 53 days (range 7–280 days). The most common treatment-related toxicities included hand–foot skin reaction, fatigue, voice change and rash. Twenty-seven patients were evaluable for response: 1 achieved partial response and 19 had stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 107 days (95% CI, 66–161). At steady state, regorafenib and its active metabolites had similar systemic exposure. Pharmacodynamic assessment indicated decreased tumour perfusion in most patients. Conclusion: Regorafenib showed tolerability and antitumour activity in patients with metastatic CRC. This expanded-cohort phase I study provided the foundation for further clinical trials of regorafenib in this patient population. PMID:22568966

  14. [Anal intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Fathallah, Nadia; Barret, Maximilien; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Molinié, Vincent; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Anal intraepithelial lesions are caused by chronic infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus. Their incidence and prevalence are increasing, especially among patients with HIV infection. Their natural history is not well known, but high-grade intraepithelial lesions seem to have an important risk to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Their treatment can be achieved by many ways (surgery, coagulation, imiquimod, etc.) but there is a high rate of recurrent lesions. Pretherapeutic evaluation should benefit from high-resolution anoscopy. Periodic physical examination and anal cytology may probably be interesting for screening the disease among patients with risk factors. Vaccine against oncogenic types of papillomavirus may prevent the development of anal intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:23122632

  15. Safety of an oral anticancer agent (trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet) in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Go, M; Iwai, M; Ito, D; Asano, H; Usami, E; Teramachi, H; Yoshimura, T

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively studied the safety of trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet (TAS-102) monotherapy in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. Adverse events to TAS-102 monotherapy were observed in 22 out of 23 cases (95.7%). The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (69.6%), nausea (53.2%), and malaise (30.4%). Treatment was postponed in 54 (59.3%) out of 91 courses, and in 34 (66.7%) of these 54 courses, the delay in treatment was due to bone marrow suppression. Seven patients with peritoneal metastases suffered from nausea, whilst none of the patients without peritoneal metastases had nausea (p = 0.0139). Nausea and vomiting during a previous chemotherapy cycle was significantly associated with nausea after TAS-102 treatment (p = 0.0007), and the treatment cycles were significantly longer in patients with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (p = 0.0061). Our results suggest that the incidence of nausea was higher in patients treated with TAS-102. Therefore, it is important to inform patients of the risk of these toxicities and to provide enhanced supportive care. Moreover, we recommend that, for patients with repeated treatment postponement due to neutropenia, the dosage should be fixed based on therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. PMID:27209703

  16. ZD9331 as second- or third-line therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a phase II multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Keller, A; Canfield, V; Parker, G; Douglass, E

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of ZD9331 as second- or third-line treatment for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC). One hundred patients were recruited to the study: 45 in group 1 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen) and 55 in group 2 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen and second-line irinotecan). Patients received ZD9331 as a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle, and treatment continued until disease progression (PD) or withdrawal. After a median of 4 cycles of treatment, there were no objective responses in group 1 (N = 37), 25 (67.6%) patients had a best overall response of stable disease (SD), and 12 (32.4%) had PD. After a median of 3 cycles of treatment, there were 2 (4.5%) partial responses in group 2 (N = 44), 21 (47.7%) patients had a best overall response of SD, 20 (45.4%) had PD, and 1 (2.3%) had clinical progression. At data cut-off, 59.5% and 77.3% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively, had PD. The main adverse events were neutropenia (69%), fatigue (53%), nausea (46%), and diarrhea (40%), and most (72.3%) were grade I/II. ZD9331 demonstrated minimal antitumor activity, and manageable toxicity, in the second- or third-line treatment of aCRC. PMID:15289725

  17. TAS-102 for Treatment of Advanced Colorectal Cancers That Are No Longer Responding to Other Therapies.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Daphne L; Opdam, Frans L; Voest, Emile E

    2016-06-15

    TAS-102 is a novel oral formulation of trifluridine (TFT) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI), a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. TFT was originally synthesized in the 1960s and is a nucleoside analogue that impedes DNA synthesis by inhibition of thymidylate synthase. TFT's main mechanism of action, however, seems to be its incorporation into DNA, which distinguishes TFT from current well-known antimetabolites like 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The rapid degradation of TFT brought initial clinical development to a halt, but TFT reentered clinical trials when addition of a TPI was found to improve the bioavailability of TFT. The combined TFT-TPI formulation was tested in patients with treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer in the randomized phase III RECOURSE study. Compared with placebo, TAS-102 was associated with an overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit and a 32% reduction in risk of death [median OS, 7.1 (95% CI, 6.5-7.8) vs. 5.3 months (95% CI, 4.6-6.0); median PFS, 2.0 (95% CI, 1.9-2.1) vs. 1.7 months (95% CI, 1.7-1.8); HR for death, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.58-0.81, P < 0.001)]. Based on the results of this pivotal trial and supported by results from an earlier phase II study, TAS-102 recently gained FDA approval. This article reviews the development of TAS-102 and its therapeutic value for the proposed indication. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 2835-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27126991

  18. Palliative chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients 80 years of age and older

    PubMed Central

    Lai, P.; Sud, S.; Zhang, T.; Asmis, T.; Wheatley-Price, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (crc) has a median diagnostic age of 68 years. Despite significant progress in chemotherapy (ctx) options, few data on outcomes or toxicity from ctx in patients 80 years of age and older are available. We investigated ctx in such patients with metastatic crc (mcrc), hypothesizing high rates of hospitalization and toxicity. Methods A retrospective chart review identified patients 80 years of age and older with mcrc who initiated ctx between 2005–2010 at our institution. Patient demographics and ctx data were collected. Endpoints included rates of hospitalization, ctx discontinuation because of toxicity, and overall survival. Results In 60 patients, ctx was initiated on 88 occasions. Median age in the cohort was 83 years; 52% were men; 72% lived with family; 53% had a modified Charlson comorbidity index of 2 or greater; and 31% were taking 6 or more prescription medications at baseline. At baseline, 33% of the patients were anemic (hemoglobin < 100 g/L), 36% had leukocytosis (white blood cells > 11×109/L), and 48% had renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). In 53%, ctx was given as first-line treatment. The initial ctx dose was adjusted in 67%, and capecitabine was the most common chemotherapeutic agent (45%). In 19 instances (22%), the patient was hospitalized during or within 30 days of ctx; in 26 instances (30%), the ctx was discontinued because of toxicity, and in 48 instances (55%), the patient required at least 1 dose reduction, omission, or delay. Median overall survival was 17.8 months (95% confidence interval: 14.3 to 20.8 months). Conclusions In the population 80 years of age and older, ctx for mcrc is feasible; however, most recipients will require dose adjustments, and a significant proportion will be hospitalized or stop ctx because of toxicity. Prospective research incorporating geriatric assessment tools is required to better select these older patients for ctx. PMID:27330342

  19. 5-Fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in advanced colorectal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Tentas, K; Bacoyiannis, C; Katsikas, M; Sakelaropoulos, N; Kosmas, C; Daliani, D; Kosmidis, P

    1995-08-01

    The combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid (FA) has demonstrated activity in colorectal cancer (CC). Cisplatin is reported to have synergistic activity with 5-FU. We examined the combination FA + 5-FU + cisplatin in patients who had previously received chemotherapy with FA + 5-FU and relapsed. Two months after the last dose of FA + 5-FU and documentation of relapse, patients continued with the regimen consisting of cisplatin 20 mg/m2 in 15 min i.v. infusion followed by FA 500 mg/m2 in 1 h i.v. infusion, in the middle of which 5-FU 500 mg/m2 i.v. bolus was administered, with adequate post-hydration. This was repeated weekly for 4 weeks followed by a 2 week rest, for a maximum of six cycles. A total of 30 patients with CC that had relapsed to the combination of FA + 5-FU were treated; 23 had previous surgery and none had radiotherapy. Local recurrence was found in eight patients, metastases in the liver in 21, in lymph nodes in six, lung six and peritoneal metastases in seven. Seven patients responded partially. Toxicity requiring dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment included neutropenia 42% (grade 3:7%), mucositis 28% (grade 1:2), diarrhea 63% (Grade 3:10%), nausea-vomiting 55% (Grade 3:10%), increased creatinine value in three patients and peripheral neuropathy in two patients. We conclude that evaluation of this regimen shows substantial toxicity, with satisfactory response as a second line chemotherapy in these heavily pretreated patients. PMID:7579565

  20. A phase II trial of recombinant tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, N; Childs, B; Larchian, W; Rosado, K; Kelsen, D

    1990-08-15

    Sixteen previously treated (with only one prior regimen) patients with histologically proven metastatic or locally recurrent colorectal carcinoma were treated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) administered by 30-minute i.v. infusions twice daily for 5 consecutive days every other week for 8 weeks. Patients received 100 micrograms/m2 twice daily on day 1 of cycle 1 with escalation to 150 micrograms/m2 twice daily thereafter. Patients were concomitantly treated with indomethacin 25 mg every 6 hours and acetaminophen 650 mg every 4 hours to obviate fever and chills. Toxicities included: nausea/vomiting (69%), headache (25%), chills (69%), pain at tumor sites (63%), hypotension (31%), and hypertension (38%). Hematologic toxicity included leukopenia less than 2000 cells/mm3 (38%) and thrombocytopenia less than 100,000 cells/mm3 (13%). Liver function abnormalities occurred independently of the site or extent of metastatic disease and inconsistently in each treatment cycle. Four patients developed bilirubinemia greater than 2.5 x baseline values (range, 2.5 to 10.3 U/L); five patients had greater than 2.5 x elevations in alkaline phosphatase (range, 624 to 1663 U/L). Two patients developed retinal vein thrombosis in the absence of hemostatic abnormalities. In both instances, this complication occurred several weeks after completion of therapy. No objective responses were noted in 14 evaluable patients (95% confidence interval: 0 to 0.23). Three patients had stable disease for a median duration of 4.5 months. In conclusion, i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule has no demonstrable antitumor efficacy. Twice-daily i.v. administration of this agent is associated with more hepatotoxicity than previously reported in trials using subcutaneous or once daily i.v. administration. Retinal vein thrombosis may be a late complication of i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule. PMID:2386895

  1. Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi; Keku, Temitope O.; Martin, Christopher; Galanko, Joseph; Woosley, John T.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Satia, Jessie A.; Halabi, Susan; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The association between obesity and colorectal neoplasia may be mediated by inflammation. Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are elevated in the obese. Adipose tissue can produce and release the inflammatory cytokines that are potentially procarcinogenic. We examined circulating levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in relation to risk factors and the prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Plasma levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α were quantified in 873 participants (242 colorectal adenoma cases and 631 controls) in a colonoscopy-based cross-sectional study conducted between 1998 and 2002. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate associations between levels of inflammatory cytokines, colorectal adenomas, and known risk factors. Several known risk factors for colorectal neoplasia were associated with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines such as older age, current smoking, and increasing adiposity. The prevalence of colorectal adenomas was associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, and to a lesser degree, with CRP. For IL-6, adjusted odds ratios for colorectal adenomas were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18–2.68) for the second highest plasma level, and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.24– 2.74) for the highest level compared with the reference level. A similar association was found with TNF-α, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.54 (95% CI: 1.02–2.33) and 1.65 (95% CI: 1.09–2.50), respectively. Our findings indicate that inflammation might be involved in the early development of colorectal neoplasia, and suggest that systemic inflammatory cytokines might be an indicator of obesity and other risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:18172326

  2. Transvaginal specimen extraction in a laparoscopic anterior resection of a sigmoid colon neoplasia with en bloc right salpingo-oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    García Flórez, L J; Argüelles, J; Quijada, B; Alvarez, V; Galarraga, M A; Graña, J L

    2010-06-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery has well-known benefits. However, an abdominal incision, albeit much smaller than conventional surgery, is still needed. A transvaginal extraction of a sigmoid colon neoplasia with en bloc salpingo-oophorectomy and colorectal mechanical anastomosis is described. The technique is feasible and safe. The excellent recovery of the 86-year-old patient shows the potential future of the natural orifices endoscopic surgery. PMID:20135188

  3. Functional Analysis of SNPs in the ERCC5 Promoter in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated With Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianfang; Luo, Xi; Xie, Ganfeng; Chen, Keli; Jiang, Heng; Pan, Feng; Li, Jianjun; Ruan, Zhihua; Pang, Xueli; Liang, Houjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The promoter is the center for regulation of gene transcription due to containing numerous transcription factor binding sites. The aim of the study was to determine whether genetic variations at excision repair cross complementation group 5 (ERCC5) promoter could affect transcription factor binding and whether such single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-dependent binding could affect gene expression, drug response, and clinical outcome. A total of 170 patients who were cytologically or histologically confirmed with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), at least 1 measurable lesion, and underwent oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were studied. The polymerase chain reaction–ligation detection reaction (PCR-LDR) was used to analyze SNPs. The reporter gene assay system and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were performed to investigate the effect of SNPs on the ERCC5 promoter activity and DNA-binding activity, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression of ERCC5 in tumor tissues of colorectal cancer patients with different genotypes were detected by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Both −763A and −763G allele had nuclear protein-binding ability. +25A allele did not show any nuclear protein-binding ability, whereas +25G allele did. The relative luciferase activity of the −763A/+25G haplotype was significantly higher than other 3 haplotypes (P < 0.05). The expression level of ERCC5 mRNA and protein was significantly higher in tumor tissues with −763AA+25GG genotype combination than that with −763GG+25AA genotype combination (P < 0.05, respectively). Allelic variants (−763AA vs −763AG or –763GG, +25GG versus +25AG or +25AA) were significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.05, respectively). At multivariate analysis, patients with risk genotypes (−763AA or +25GG genotype) demonstrated a significantly increasing risk of progression (P = 0.01) or worse OS

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in 101 advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy plus cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Responsiveness to Cetuximab alone can be mediated by an increase of Epidermal Growth factor Receptor (EGFR) Gene Copy Number (GCN). Aim of this study was to assess the role of EGFR-GCN in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab. Methods One hundred and one advanced CRC patients (43 untreated- and 58 pre-treated) were retrospectively studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assess EGFR-GCN and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) to determine EGFR expression. Sixty-one out of 101 patients were evaluated also for k-ras status by direct sequencing. Clinical end-points were response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Increased EGFR-GCN was found in 60/101 (59%) tumor samples. There was no correlation between intensity of EGFR-IHC and EGFR-GCN (p = 0.43). Patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab as first line treatment had a RR of 70% (30/43) while it was 18% (10/56) in the group with previous lines of therapy (p < 0.0001). RR was observed in 29/60 (48%) of patients with increased EGFR-GCN and in 6/28 (21%) in those without (p = 0.02). At multivariate analyses, number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were predictive of response; EGFR-IHC score, increased EGFR-GCN and number of chemotherapy lines were significantly associated with a significant better PFS. Response to therapy was the only prognostic predictive factor for OS. In the 60 patients analyzed for k-ras mutations, number of chemotherapy lines, increased EGFR-GCN and k-ras wild type status predicted a better PFS. Conclusion In metastatic CRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were significantly associated with a better clinical outcome, independent of k-ras status. PMID:20398370

  5. Immune-modulating effects of the newest cetuximab-based chemoimmunotherapy regimen in advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Botta, Cirino; Bestoso, Elena; Apollinari, Serena; Cusi, Maria Grazia; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Abbruzzese, Alberto; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Misso, Gabriella; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2012-06-01

    Cetuximab is a human-murine chimeric monoclonal antibody to the epidermal growth factor receptor, active for advanced colorectal cancer treatment in combination with chemotherapy. Cetuximab mainly acts by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated pathways in cancer cells; however, in the human host, its IgG1 backbone may offer additional antitumor activity that includes FcγRs-mediated antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, phagocytosis, cross priming, and tumor-specific T-cell-mediated immune response. These mechanisms are still under active investigation. At this purpose, we have performed an immunologic investigation in advanced colon cancer patients enrolled in an ongoing phase II trial aimed to test the toxicity and the biological and antitumor activity of a novel biochemotherapy regimen combining polychemotherapy with gemcitabine, irinotecan, levofolinic acid, and fluorouracil with cetuximab and with subcutaneous low-dose metronomic aldesleukin (GILFICet regimen). The peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the first 20 patients enrolled in the GILFICet trial were collected at baseline and after 6 treatment cycles and examined for immune-phenotype change by flow cytometry. Colon cancer-specific T-cell lines were also generated ex vivo from these samples and subsequently characterized for immune phenotype, functional activity, and antigen specificity. We found a treatment-related increase of circulating dendritic cells, natural killer cells, central memory T cells, and activated T cells with a T-helper 1 (Th1)-cytotoxic phenotype. In addition, the ex-vivo characterization of antigen-specific T cells derived from the treated patients revealed a significant increase in proliferating cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors specific for carcinoembryonic antigen and thymidylate synthase derivative epitope peptides. On these basis, we concluded that the GILFICet regimen exerts substantial immune-modulating activity that significantly affects tumor antigen

  6. Tumor deposits counted as positive lymph nodes in TNM staging for advanced colorectal cancer: a retrospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yang, Shengke; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Hao; Du, Feng; Yin, Jie; Liu, Sai; Li, Ci; Xing, Shasha; Yuan, Jiatian; Lv, Bo; Fan, Jun; Leng, Shusheng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of counting tumor deposits (TDs) as positive lymph nodes (pLNs) in the pN category and evaluated its prognostic value for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. A new pN category (npN category) was calculated using the numbers of pLNs plus TDs. The npN category included 4 tiers: npN1a (1 tumor node), npN1b (2-3 tumor nodes), npN2a (4-6 tumor nodes), and npN2b (≥7 tumor nodes). We identified 4,121 locally advanced CRC patients, including 717 (11.02%) cases with TDs. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the disease-free and overall survival (DFS and OS) for npN and pN categories. Multivariate analysis showed that the npN and pN categories were both independent prognostic factors for DFS (HR 1.614, 95% CI 1.541 to 1.673; HR 1.604, 95% CI 1.533 to 1.679) and OS (HR 1.633, 95% CI 1.550 to 1.720; HR 1.470, 95% CI 1.410 to 1.532). However, the npN category was superior to the pN category by Harrell's C statistic. We conclude that it is thus feasible to consider TDs as positive lymph nodes in the pN category when evaluating the prognoses of CRC patients, and the npN category is potentially superior to the TNM (7th edition) pN category for predicting DFS and OS among advanced CRC patients. PMID:26934317

  7. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; English, J.; Colston, K. W.; Menday, P.; Moller, S.; Coombes, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:9662243

  8. EGFR methylation and outcome of patients with advanced colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    CHIADINI, ELISA; SCARPI, EMANUELA; PASSARDI, ALESSANDRO; CALISTRI, DANIELE; VALGIUSTI, MARTINA; SARAGONI, LUCA; ZOLI, WAINER; AMADORI, DINO; ULIVI, PAOLA

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with monoclonal antibody anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agents, such as cetuximab (CTX) or panitumumab, is the treatment strategy of choice in patients characterised by a wild-type (wt) RAS gene status. However, despite selection based on RAS status, a high proportion of patients do not respond to therapy. EGFR methylation has been reported to have a role in predicting the response to anti-EGFR agents. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of EGFR methylation in association with the clinical outcome of patients with mCRC treated with CTX. In total, 64 patients with mCRC were assessed in the present study. Genomic DNA was extracted from tumoral tissue and EGFR methylation and mutation of the KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA genes were analysed by pyrosequencing. EGFR expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The various alterations were analysed by assessing the objective response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. In total, 42 cases (66%) exhibited >10% EGFR methylation and there was no correlation with EGFR expression. Mean EGFR methylation of 41 and 9% was observed in KRAS-mutated and -wt patients, respectively (P=0.05). Conversely, a high EGFR methylation was observed in BRAF-wt patients with compared with patients possessing the mutated gene (18 vs. 3%, respectively; P=0.07). EGFR methylation was significantly correlated with the OS rate [hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96–1.00; P=0.019], but not PFS rate. In patients with a methylation rate <10 and >10%, the median OS rate was 7.5 months (95% CI, 4.4–9.4 months) and 12.0 months (95% CI, 8.7–13.9 months), respectively (P=0.034). In conclusion, the present study revealed a correlation between EGFR methylation and improved OS rate in patients treated with CTX-based chemotherapy. The presence of EGFR methylation is inversely correlated with BRAF and PIK3CA mutations

  9. Effect of combined folic acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 on colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) act in concert in the one-carbon metabolism and may protect against colorectal neoplasia. We examined the effect of combined B-vitamin treatment on the occurrence of colorectal adenoma. The Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study was a rand...

  10. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  11. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  12. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... SJ, et al. United States Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after ... consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Gastroenterology . 2012;143:844-857. ...

  13. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  14. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  15. Pharmacogenetic prediction of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; del Río, E; Sedano, L; Salazar, J; Cortés, A; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-10-01

    To determine whether molecular parameters could be partly responsible for resistance or sensitivity to oxaliplatin (OX)-based chemotherapy used as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the usefulness of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), XRCC1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms as predictors of clinical outcome in these patients. We treated 126 CRC patients with a first-line OX/5-fluorouracil chemotherapeutic regimen. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR on an ABI PRISM 7000, using DNA from peripheral blood. Clinical response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated according to each genotype. In the univariate analysis for CR, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant (P=0.02 and P=0.05, respectively). After adjustment for the most relevant clinical variables, only ERCC1-118 retained significance (P=0.008). In the univariate analysis for PFS, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 were significant (P=0.003 and P=0.009, respectively). In the multivariant analysis, only the XPD 751 was significant for PFS (P=0.02). Finally, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant in the univariate analysis for OS (P=0.006 and P=0.015, respectively). Both genetic variables remained significant in the multivariate Cox survival analysis (P=0.022 and P=0.03). Our data support the hypothesis that enhanced DNA repair diminishes the benefit of platinum-based treatments. PMID:18797464

  16. Pharmacogenetic prediction of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; Río, E del; Sedano, L; Salazar, J; Cortés, A; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether molecular parameters could be partly responsible for resistance or sensitivity to oxaliplatin (OX)-based chemotherapy used as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the usefulness of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), XRCC1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms as predictors of clinical outcome in these patients. We treated 126 CRC patients with a first-line OX/5-fluorouracil chemotherapeutic regimen. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR on an ABI PRISM 7000, using DNA from peripheral blood. Clinical response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated according to each genotype. In the univariate analysis for CR, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant (P=0.02 and P=0.05, respectively). After adjustment for the most relevant clinical variables, only ERCC1-118 retained significance (P=0.008). In the univariate analysis for PFS, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 were significant (P=0.003 and P=0.009, respectively). In the multivariant analysis, only the XPD 751 was significant for PFS (P=0.02). Finally, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant in the univariate analysis for OS (P=0.006 and P=0.015, respectively). Both genetic variables remained significant in the multivariate Cox survival analysis (P=0.022 and P=0.03). Our data support the hypothesis that enhanced DNA repair diminishes the benefit of platinum-based treatments. PMID:18797464

  17. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  18. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin CS; Ching, Jessica YL; Chan, Victor CW; Sung, Joseph JY

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  19. Unregulated smooth-muscle myosin in human intestinal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Alhopuro, Pia; Phichith, Denis; Tuupanen, Sari; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Nybondas, Miranda; Saharinen, Juha; Robinson, James P; Yang, Zhaohui; Chen, Li-Qiong; Orntoft, Torben; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Järvinen, Heikki; Eng, Charis; Moeslein, Gabriela; Shibata, Darryl; Houlston, Richard S; Lucassen, Anneke; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Launonen, Virpi; Ristimäki, Ari; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Sweeney, H Lee; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2008-04-01

    A recent study described a recessive ATPase activating germ-line mutation in smooth-muscle myosin (smmhc/myh11) underlying the zebrafish meltdown (mlt) phenotype. The mlt zebrafish develops intestinal abnormalities reminiscent of human Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) and juvenile polyposis (JP). To examine the role of MYH11 in human intestinal neoplasia, we searched for MYH11 mutations in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), PJS and JP. We found somatic protein-elongating frameshift mutations in 55% of CRCs displaying microsatellite instability and in the germ-line of one individual with PJS. Additionally, two somatic missense mutations were found in one microsatellite stable CRC. These two missense mutations, R501L and K1044N, and the frameshift mutations were functionally evaluated. All mutations resulted in unregulated molecules displaying constitutive motor activity, similar to the mutant myosin underlying mlt. Thus, MYH11 mutations appear to contribute also to human intestinal neoplasia. Unregulated MYH11 may affect the cellular energy balance or disturb cell lineage decisions in tumor progenitor cells. These data challenge our view on MYH11 as a passive differentiation marker functioning in muscle contraction and add to our understanding of intestinal neoplasia. PMID:18391202

  20. Capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis under neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Bryan K.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer under curative neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation using capecitabine. After 5 days of the initiation of capecitabine the patient developed a pruritic maculopapular rash in her extremities consistent with vasculitis which was confirmed on skin biopsy without any signs of systemic involvement. Capecitabine was held and the rash was treated with topical steroids with complete resolution of both rash and pruritus. Due to a lack of other alternative chemotherapeutic options and the cutaneous-only involvement of vasculitis, the capecitabine was re-introduced. Two days later, the patient developed an identical maculopapular rash with a similar distribution. Prednisone was initiated while the capecitabine was continued with complete resolution of the rash. The patient successfully completed her curative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy treatment without the need to permanently discontinue the capecitabine. PMID:26029464

  1. Assessing patients' needs and preferences in the management of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, K.

    1998-01-01

    Clinical decision-making in advanced cancer is a highly complex process. Many factors are thought to influence this process arguably the most important of these is the patient's own preference. Studies show that most patients want to be fully informed as to their diagnosis and involved in clinical decision-making. However, the attitudes of healthcare workers often preclude patient involvement. Studies have also shown that acceptability of chemotherapy for minimal therapeutic gain differs markedly between patients depending on factors such as age, gender and family status. It is clearly impossible to make decisions about what is best for patients without involving them in the decision-making process. Indeed, it could be argued that active patient participation actually simplifies this process. PMID:9579849

  2. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  3. A Phase I Trial to Evaluate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity of Cetuximab and Lenalidomide in Advanced Colorectal and Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Erin M; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Mo, Xiaokui; Trikha, Prashant; Davis, Melanie; Paul, Bonnie; Grever, Michael; Carson, William E; Otterson, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    mAbs can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) via the innate immune system's ability to recognize mAb-coated cancer cells and activate immune effector cells. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent with the capacity to stimulate immune cell cytokine production and ADCC activity. This phase I trial evaluated the combination of cetuximab with lenalidomide for the treatment of advanced colorectal and head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). This trial included patients with advanced colorectal cancer or HNSCC. Treatment consisted of cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) i.v. every two weeks with lenalidomide given orally days 1-21 on a 28-day cycle. Three dose levels of lenalidomide were evaluated (15, 20, 25 mg). Correlative studies included measurement of ADCC, FcγRIIIA polymorphism genotyping, measurement of serum cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of immune cell subtypes. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (19 colorectal cancer, 3 HNSCC). Fatigue was the only dose-limiting toxicity. One partial response was observed and 8 patients had stable disease at least 12 weeks. The recommended phase II dose is cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) with lenalidomide 25 mg daily, days 1-21. Correlative studies demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in natural killer cytotoxic activity with increasing doses of lenalidomide. Cetuximab and lenalidomide were well tolerated. There was a lenalidomide dose-dependent increase in ADCC with higher activity in patients enrolled in cohort 3 than those enrolled in cohorts 1/2. Although response was not a primary endpoint, there was evidence of antitumor activity for the combination therapy. Further investigation of lenalidomide as an immunomodulator in solid tumors is warranted. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2244-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27458141

  4. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 in colorectal cancer family-risk population screening

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Chiara, Loretta De; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Castro, Inés; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is related to tumour development and progression in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its utility as biomarker has been suggested. The aim of our study was to measure serum MMP-9 in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients, and to analyse its diagnostic accuracy for the detection of advanced neoplasia (AN: advanced adenomas and CRC). Additionally, we compared its diagnostic capability with the most used non-invasive faecal immunochemical test (FIT). Serum MMP-9 was quantified by ELISA in 516 asymptomatic individuals that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT. MMP-9 levels were significantly related to age and gender and therefore the concentration was corrected by these confounders. Corrected MMP-9 (cMMP-9) levels were higher in individuals with advanced adenomas (AA; p-value = 0.029) and AN (p-value = 0.056) compared to individuals with no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated cMMP-9 concentration was associated with more severe characteristics of adenomas (number of lesions, size and histology). Nevertheless, the diagnostic accuracy of cMMP-9 was considerably lower than that of FIT for identifying AA (22.64% vs. 47.17% sensitivity, 90% specificity) or AN (19.30% vs. 52.63% sensitivity, 90% specificity). According to our results, serum MMP-9 cannot be considered of utility for the diagnosis of AN in CRC family-risk population screening. PMID:26264519

  5. Image analysis for discrimination of cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Harper, Diane

    2000-01-01

    Colposcopy involves visual imaging of the cervix for patients who have exhibited some prior indication of abnormality, and the major goals are to visually inspect for any malignancies and to guide biopsy sampling. Currently colposcopy equipment is being upgraded in many health care centers to incorporate digital image acquisition and archiving. These permanent images can be analyzed for characteristic features and color patterns which may enhance the specificity and objectivity of the routine exam. In this study a series of images from patients with biopsy confirmed cervical intraepithelia neoplasia stage 2/3 are compared with images from patients with biopsy confirmed immature squamous metaplasia, with the goal of determining optimal criteria for automated discrimination between them. All images were separated into their red, green, and blue channels, and comparisons were made between relative intensity, intensity variation, spatial frequencies, fractal dimension, and Euler number. This study indicates that computer-based processing of cervical images can provide some discrimination of the type of tissue features which are important for clinical evaluation, with the Euler number being the most clinically useful feature to discriminate metaplasia from neoplasia. Also there was a strong indication that morphology observed in the blue channel of the image provided more information about epithelial cell changes. Further research in this field can lead to advances in computer-aided diagnosis as well as the potential for online image enhancement in digital colposcopy.

  6. The topography of colorectal cancer varies by race/ethnicity and affects the utility of flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    PubMed

    Theuer, C P; Taylor, T H; Brewster, W R; Campbell, B S; Becerra, J C; Anton-Culver, H

    2001-12-01

    Colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50 is recommended for all Americans considered at "average" risk for the development of colorectal cancer either with flexible sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or with colonoscopy. Patients who elect flexible sigmoidoscopy and FOBT undergo full colonoscopy only if left-sided neoplasia is detected or if the FOBT is positive. Unfortunately in blacks and whites most right-sided colorectal lesions are unaccompanied by left-sided sentinel lesions, which leads some to prefer colonoscopic screening in these patients. The topography of colorectal cancer in Asians and Latinos is unavailable. We used 1988-1995 California Cancer Registry data to determine the topography of 105,906 consecutive colorectal cancers among Asian, black, Latino, and white patients. We found that the proportion of colorectal cancer distal to the splenic flexure and therefore detectable by flexible sigmoidoscopy varied by ethnicity: Asian (71%) > Latino (63%) > white (57%) > black (55%); P < 0.001. These differences were significant after adjusting for age and sex. The risk of distal disease relative to whites was 1.61 in Asians, 1.15 in Latinos, and 0.82 in blacks (P < 0.001). Flexible sigmoidoscopy detects a higher proportion of colorectal cancers in Asians and Latinos than in whites or blacks. Further study is needed to assess whether the topography of benign colorectal neoplasia parallels that of malignant disease. Colorectal screening recommendations may need to incorporate racial and ethnic differences in colorectal neoplasia topography. PMID:11768820

  7. Malignant Neoplasia of the Sex Skin in 2 Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Beck, Amanda P; Magden, Elizabeth R; Buchl, Stephanie J; Baze, Wallace B

    2016-04-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous malignant neoplasia within the sex skin of aged female chimpanzees. In both cases, the initial presentation resembled nonhealing traumatic wounds to the sex skin, with different degrees of infection, ulceration, and tissue necrosis. Histopathology of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in one case and of adenocarcinoma with metastasis in the other. Advanced age and previous trauma likely contributed to the development of the neoplasias in both cases; long-term sun exposure may also have contributed to the development of the squamous cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, these 2 cases represent the first reports of sex skin neoplasia in chimpanzees. PMID:27053571

  8. The Microbiome and Colorectal Neoplasia – Environmental Modifiers of Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, L.E.; Bresalier, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of colon cancer is complex, yet it is undoubtedly impacted by intestinal microbiota. Whether the contribution to colon carcinogenesis is generated through the presence of an overall dysbiosis or by specific pathogens is still a matter for debate. However, it is apparent that interactions between microbiota and the host are mediated by a variety of processes including signaling cascades, the immune system, host metabolism, and regulation of gene transcription. To fully appreciate the role of microbiota in colon carcinogenesis it will be necessary to expand efforts to define populations in niche environments, such as colonic crypts, explore cross talk between the host and the microbiota, and more completely define the metabolomic profile of the microbiota. These efforts must be pursued with appreciation that dietary substrates and other environmental modifiers mediate changes in the microbiota as well as their metabolism and functional characteristics. PMID:23949252

  9. The microbiome and colorectal neoplasia: environmental modifiers of dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, N D; Ritchie, L E; Bresalier, R S; Chapkin, R S

    2013-09-01

    The etiology of colon cancer is complex, yet it is undoubtedly impacted by intestinal microbiota. Whether the contribution to colon carcinogenesis is generated through the presence of an overall dysbiosis or by specific pathogens is still a matter for debate. However, it is apparent that interactions between microbiota and the host are mediated by a variety of processes, including signaling cascades, the immune system, host metabolism, and regulation of gene transcription. To fully appreciate the role of microbiota in colon carcinogenesis, it will be necessary to expand efforts to define populations in niche environments, such as colonic crypts, explore cross talk between the host and the microbiota, and more completely define the metabolomic profile of the microbiota. These efforts must be pursued with appreciation that dietary substrates and other environmental modifiers mediate changes in the microbiota, as well as their metabolism and functional characteristics. PMID:23949252

  10. Ablative Therapies for Colorectal Polyps and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.; Nurkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques are gaining popularity in the management of colorectal polyps and occasionally superficial cancers. While their use is in many times palliative, they have proven to be curative in carefully selected patients with polyps or malignancies, with less morbidity than radical resection. However, one should note that data supporting local and ablative therapies for colorectal cancer is scarce and may be subject to publication bias. Therefore, for curative intent, these techniques should only be considered in highly select cases as higher rates of local recurrences have also been reported. The aim of this review is to explain the different modalities of local and ablative therapies specific to colorectal neoplasia and explain the indications and circumstances where they have been most successful. PMID:25089281

  11. Surgery for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O; Keep, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the most common pre-malignant lesion. Atypical squamous changes occur in the transformation zone of the cervix with mild, moderate or severe changes described by their depth (CIN 1, 2 or 3). Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is treated by local ablation or lower morbidity excision techniques. Choice of treatment depends on the grade and extent of the disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of alternative surgical treatments for CIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to April 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of alternative surgical treatments in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risks of bias. Risk ratios that compared residual disease after the follow-up examination and adverse events in women who received one of either laser ablation, laser conisation, large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ), knife conisation or cryotherapy were pooled in random-effects model meta-analyses. Main results Twenty-nine trials were included. Seven surgical techniques were tested in various comparisons. No significant differences in treatment failures were demonstrated in terms of persistent disease after treatment. Large loop excision of the transformation zone appeared to provide the most reliable specimens for histology with the least morbidity. Morbidity was lower than with laser conisation, although the trials did not provide data for every outcome measure. There were not enough data to assess the effect on morbidity when compared with laser ablation. Authors’ conclusions The evidence

  12. Marine mammal neoplasia: a review.

    PubMed

    Newman, S J; Smith, S A

    2006-11-01

    A review of the published literature indicates that marine mammal neoplasia includes the types and distributions of tumors seen in domestic species. A routine collection of samples from marine mammal species is hampered, and, hence, the literature is principally composed of reports from early whaling expeditions, captive zoo mammals, and epizootics that affect larger numbers of animals from a specific geographic location. The latter instances are most important, because many of these long-lived, free-ranging marine mammals may act as environmental sentinels for the health of the oceans. Examination of large numbers of mortalities reveals incidental proliferative and neoplastic conditions and, less commonly, identifies specific malignant cancers that can alter population dynamics. The best example of these is the presumptive herpesvirus-associated metastatic genital carcinomas found in California sea lions. Studies of tissues from St. Lawrence estuary beluga whales have demonstrated a high incidence of neoplasia and produced evidence that environmental contamination with high levels of polychlorinated biphenols and dichlorophenyl trichloroethane might be the cause. In addition, viruses are suspected to be the cause of gastric papillomas in belugas and cutaneous papillomas in Florida manatees and harbor porpoises. While experimental laboratory procedures can further elucidate mechanisms of neoplasia, continued pathologic examination of marine mammals will also be necessary to follow trends in wild populations. PMID:17099143

  13. Impact of Young Age on Treatment Efficacy and Safety in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Patients From Nine First-Line Phase III Chemotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Charles D.; Bot, Brian M.; Thomas, David M.; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T.; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. Methods We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. Results A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P < .001) were less common in young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Conclusion Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC. PMID:21646604

  14. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  15. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU. PMID:11367875

  16. Plasma selenium levels and the risk of colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Russo, M W; Murray, S C; Wurzelmann, J I; Woosley, J T; Sandler, R S

    1997-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that selenium may protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia. We examined the potential chemopreventive properties of selenium against colorectal adenomas while controlling for a number of dietary and life-style factors. We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients referred for colonoscopy to University of North Carolina Hospitals. Cases had one or more pathologically confirmed adenomas, and noncases had none. Plasma selenium levels were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction and platform technique. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. The mean plasma selenium concentrations for cases (n = 37) and noncases (n = 36) were 107 and 120 micrograms/l, respectively (p = 0.06). Those in the fourth quartile of plasma selenium level had 0.24 times the risk (95% confidence interval = 0.06-1.04) for colorectal adenomas of those in the first quartile. The adjusted odds ratio for colorectal adenomas was 0.58 (95% confidence interval = 0.31-1.08) for a 30 microgram/l increase in plasma selenium level. Lower plasma selenium levels were associated with multiple adenomas but not with adenoma size or location. These data support a protective effect of selenium against colorectal adenomas after adjustment for possible confounders. Selenium might be a potentially useful chemopreventive agent for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:9290116

  17. New concepts in neoplasia as applied to diagnostic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Fenoglio-Preiser, C.M.; Weinstein, R.S.; Kaufman, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Cellular Aspects of Neoplasia; Oncogenes and Cancer; Chromosome and Oncogene Rearrangements in Leukemia and Lymphoma; Ionizing Radiation and Neoplasia; and Papillomaviruses and Neoplasia in Man.

  18. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw L.; Stockley, Tracy L.; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients’ clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  19. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw L; Stockley, Tracy L; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Siu, Lillian L

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients' clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  20. Emerging Entities in Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Rohit; Smith, Steven C; Divatia, Mukul; Amin, Mahul B

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews emerging entities in renal epithelial neoplasia, including tubulocystic carcinoma, clear-cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC), thyroid-like follicular RCC, ALK-related RCC, translocation RCC, acquired cystic disease-related RCC, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, and hereditary leiomyomatosis-RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Many of these rarer subtypes of RCC were recently studied in more depth and are included in the upcoming version of the World Health Organization classification of tumors. Emphasis is placed on common gross and morphologic features, differential diagnoses, use of ancillary studies for making accurate diagnoses, molecular alterations, and predicted biologic behavior based on previous studies. PMID:26612218

  1. Phase 1 Study of ABT-751 in Combination With CAPIRI (Capecitabine and Irinotecan) and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudek, Michelle A; Dasari, Arvind; Laheru, Daniel; He, Ping; Jin, Runyan; Walker, Rosalind; Taylor, Gretchen E; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross C; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A; Purcell, W Thomas

    2016-08-01

    ABT-751 is an orally bioavailable sulfonamide with antimitotic properties. A nonrandomized phase 1 dose-escalation study of ABT-751 in combination with CAPIRI (capecitabine and irinotecan) and bevacizumab was conducted to define the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and pharmacokinetics in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Patients were treated with ABT-751 daily for 7 days (alone) and then began 21-day cycles of treatment with ABT-751 daily and capecitabine twice daily for 14 days plus irinotecan on day 1 intravenously. Bevacizumab was added as standard of care at 7.5 mg/kg on day 1 after the first 2 dose levels. Because of intolerance to the regimen, a reduced dose of ABT-751 was also explored with reduced-dose and full-dose CAPIRI with bevacizumab. ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics, ABT-751 glucuronidation, and protein binding were explored. Twenty-four patients were treated over 5 dose levels. The maximum tolerated dose was ABT-751 125 mg combined with full-dose CAPIRI and bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg on day 1. DLTs were hypokalemia, elevated liver tests, and febrile neutropenia. ABT-751 is metabolized by UGT1A8 and to a lesser extent UGT1A4 and UGT1A1. Irinotecan and APC exposure were increased, SN-38 exposure was similar, and SN-38 glucuronide exposure was decreased. Clinically relevant alterations in ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics were not observed. Despite modest efficacy, the combination of ABT-751, CAPIRI, and bevacizumab will not be studied further in colorectal cancer. PMID:26632033

  2. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Laterally Spreading Colorectal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li; Wang, Yadong; Wang, Xianfei; Li, Aimin; Liu, Side

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Laterally spreading tumor (LST) is a colorectal pre-cancerous lesion. Previous studies have demonstrated distinct LST clinicopathological characteristics in different populations. This study evaluated clinicopathological characteristics of LST in a Chinese population. Methods A total of 259 Chinese LST patients with 289 lesions were recruited for endoscopic and clinicopathological analyses. Results Among these 289 lesions, 185 were granular type (LST-G), whereas 104 were non-granular type (LST-NG). LST-G lesions were further classified into homogeneous G-type and nodular mixed G-type, while LST-NG lesions were further classified into flat elevated NG-type and pseudo-depressed NG-type. Clinically, these four LST subtypes showed distinct clinicopathological characteristics, e.g., lesion size, location, or histopathological features (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and submucosal carcinoma). The nodular mixed G-type showed larger tumor size and higher incidence of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia compared to the other three subtypes, while pseudo-depressed NG-type lesions showed the highest incidence of submucosal carcinoma. Noticeably, no diffidence was detected between the lesions of homogeneous G-type and flat elevated NG-type with regard to the histopathological features. Histology of the malignancy potential was associated with nodular mixed G-type [OR = 2.41, 95% CI (1.09–5.29); P = 0.029], flat elevated NG-type [OR = 3.49, 95% CI (1.41–8.22); P = 0.007], Diameter ≥30 mm [OR = 2.56, 95% CI (1.20–5.20); P = 0.009], Villous adenoma [OR = 2.76, 95% CI (1.01–7.58); P = 0.048] and serrated adenoma [OR = 6.99, 95% CI (1.81–26.98); P = 0.005]. Conclusion Chinese LSTs can be divided into four different subtypes, which show distinct clinicopathological characteristics. Morphology, size and pathological characteristics are all independent predictors of advanced histology. PMID:24751926

  3. The role of antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer according to K-RAS status.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Grande, Enrique; Polo, Eduardo; Afonso, Ruth; Reina, Juan José; Jorge, Mónica; Campos, Juan Manuel; Martínez, Virginia; Angeles, Cristina; Montagut, Clara

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Recently, it has been found that about 40 % of patients with CRC have mutations in the K-RAS gene. Several clinical trials have showed that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who present tumour-promoting mutations in signalling pathways involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which includes activating K-RAS mutations, do not respond to anti-EGFR drugs such as panitumumab and cetuximab. Hence, K-RAS status is now considered an important negative predictive factor for response to anti-EGFR drugs. Moreover, K-RAS status seems to have also a prognostic role in CRC, but this fact is somewhat controversial. Activity of antiangiogenic agents seems not to be influenced by K-RAS gene status. Tumour angiogenesis has attracted interest in attempts to improve the management of mCRC. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is fundamental to the regulation of angiogenesis, and research has focused on developing agents that selectively target it. In this way, the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has provided important clinical benefits in terms of response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival to patients with mCRC. Efficacy data of bevacizumab in K-RAS wild-type patients seem to be comparable with the efficacy data observed with anti-EGFR therapies in a cross-trial comparison. Although there is a lack of prospective and randomized data in this setting, the combination of chemotherapy plus antiangiogenic agents could be considered as an effective alternative for the treatment of mCRC with independence of K-RAS gene status. Here, we review the available data we have in the literature of the use of antiangiogenic strategies in the treatment of mCRC nowadays. PMID:24793846

  4. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  5. Addition of cetuximab to oxaliplatin-based first-line combination chemotherapy for treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: results of the randomised phase 3 MRC COIN trial

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Timothy S; Adams, Richard A; Smith, Christopher G; Meade, Angela M; Seymour, Matthew T; Wilson, Richard H; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Harris, Rebecca; Fisher, David; Kenny, Sarah L; Kay, Edward; Mitchell, Jenna K; Madi, Ayman; Jasani, Bharat; James, Michelle D; Bridgewater, John; Kennedy, M John; Claes, Bart; Lambrechts, Diether; Kaplan, Richard; Cheadle, Jeremy P

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background In the Medical Research Council (MRC) COIN trial, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted antibody cetuximab was added to standard chemotherapy in first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer with the aim of assessing effect on overall survival. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, patients who were fit for but had not received previous chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy (arm A), the same combination plus cetuximab (arm B), or intermittent chemotherapy (arm C). The choice of fluoropyrimidine therapy (capecitabine or infused fluouroracil plus leucovorin) was decided before randomisation. Randomisation was done centrally (via telephone) by the MRC Clinical Trials Unit using minimisation. Treatment allocation was not masked. The comparison of arms A and C is described in a companion paper. Here, we present the comparison of arm A and B, for which the primary outcome was overall survival in patients with KRAS wild-type tumours. Analysis was by intention to treat. Further analyses with respect to NRAS, BRAF, and EGFR status were done. The trial is registered, ISRCTN27286448. Findings 1630 patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups (815 to standard therapy and 815 to addition of cetuximab). Tumour samples from 1316 (81%) patients were used for somatic molecular analyses; 565 (43%) had KRAS mutations. In patients with KRAS wild-type tumours (arm A, n=367; arm B, n=362), overall survival did not differ between treatment groups (median survival 17·9 months [IQR 10·3–29·2] in the control group vs 17·0 months [9·4–30·1] in the cetuximab group; HR 1·04, 95% CI 0·87–1·23, p=0·67). Similarly, there was no effect on progression-free survival (8·6 months [IQR 5·0–12·5] in the control group vs 8·6 months [5·1–13·8] in the cetuximab group; HR 0·96, 0·82–1·12, p=0·60). Overall response rate increased from 57% (n=209

  6. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current “gold-standard” surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett’s surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett’s mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  7. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current "gold-standard" surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett's surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett's mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  8. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  9. Fecal Immunochemical Tests Combined With Other Stool Tests for Colorectal Cancer and Advanced Adenoma Detection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Niedermaier, Tobias; Weigl, Korbinian; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite moderate to high detection rates of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) of colorectal cancer (CRC), detection of adenomas remains limited. Further stool tests exist, which are not used in routine practice, such as DNA or RNA markers and protein markers. We aimed at systematically investigating and summarizing evidence for diagnostic performance of combinations of FIT with other stool tests compared with FIT alone in early detection of CRC and its precursors. METHODS: We systematically reviewed studies that evaluated FITs in combination with other stool tests and compared measures of diagnostic accuracy with and without additional stool tests. PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception to May 2015. Reference lists of eligible studies were also screened. Two reviewers extracted data independently. RESULTS: Some of the reports on DNA, RNA, or tissue tests, including tests based on DNA mutations, methylation, and integrity in selected genes as well as microRNA expression, showed some improvements of diagnostic test accuracy. In contrast, so far assessed stool protein markers did generally not lead to substantial improvements in performance of FIT when added to the latter. Many marker combinations were reported only in one study each, and few studies were conducted in a true screening setting. CONCLUSIONS: Several stool markers show potential to improve performance of FITs. However, the results require confirmation in further studies, which should also evaluate the costs and cost-effectiveness of combined screening strategies. PMID:27253514

  10. Characterization of the T cell repertoire by deep T cell receptor sequencing in tissues and blood from patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, KENJI; HAZAMA, SHOICHI; YAMAGUCHI, RUI; IMOTO, SEIYA; TAKENOUCHI, HIROKO; INOUE, YUKA; KANEKIYO, SHINSUKE; SHINDO, YOSHITARO; MIYANO, SATORU; NAKAMURA, YUSUKE; KIYOTANI, KAZUMA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize infiltrated T cell clones that define the tumor immune environment and are important in the response to treatment in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). In order to explore predictive biomarkers for the efficacy of immunochemotherapies, T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis was performed using blood samples and tumor tissues obtained from patients with advanced CRC that had been treated with a combination of five-cancer peptide vaccines and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The TCR-α/β complementary DNAs (cDNAs), prepared from the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) obtained from 17 tumor tissues and 39 peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 9 CRC patients at various time points, were sequenced. The oligoclonal enrichment of certain TCR sequences was identified in tumor tissues and blood samples; however, only a few TCR sequences with a frequency of >0.1% were commonly detected in pre- and post-treatment tumor tissues, or in post-treatment blood and tissue samples. The average correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between the post-treatment tumor tissues and blood samples were 0.023 and 0.035, respectively, and were much lower compared with the correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between pre- and post-treatment blood samples (0.430 and 0.370, respectively), suggesting that T cell populations in tumor tissues vary from those in blood. Although the sample size was small, a tendency for the TCR diversity in tumor tissues to drastically decrease during the treatment was indicated in two patients, who exhibited a longer progression-free survival time. The results of the present study suggest that TCR diversity scores in tissues may be a useful predictive biomarker for the therapeutic effect of immunochemotherapy for patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27284367

  11. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2: achievements and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Machens, Andreas; Dralle, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Incremental advances in medical technology, such as the development of sensitive hormonal assays for routine clinical care, are the drivers of medical progress. This principle is exemplified by the creation of the concept of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, encompassing medullary thyroid cancer, pheochromocytoma, and primary hyperparathyroidism, which did not emerge before the early 1960s. This review sets out to highlight key achievements, such as joint biochemical and DNA-based screening of individuals at risk of developing multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, before casting a spotlight on current challenges which include: (i) ill-defined upper limits of calcitonin assays for infants and young children, rendering it difficult to implement the biochemical part of the integrated DNA-based/biochemical concept; (ii) our increasingly mobile society in which different service providers are caring for one individual at various stages in the disease process. With familial relationships disintegrating as a result of geographic dispersion, information about the history of the origin family may become sketchy or just unavailable. This is when DNA-based gene tests come into play, confirming or excluding an individual's genetic predisposition to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 even before there is any biochemical or clinical evidence of the disease. However, the unrivaled molecular genetic progress in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 does not come without a price. Screening may uncover unknown gene sequence variants representing either harmless polymorphisms or pathogenic mutations. In this setting, functional characterization of mutant cells in vitro may generate helpful ancillary evidence with regard to the pathogenicity of gene variants in comparison with established mutations. PMID:22584715

  12. BRAF, PIK3CA, and HER2 Oncogenic Alterations According to KRAS Mutation Status in Advanced Colorectal Cancers with Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jiwon; Kwak, Yoonjin; Seo, An Na; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-EGFR antibody–based treatment is an important therapeutic strategy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC); despite this, several mutations—including KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 amplification—are associated with the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies and clinical implications of these genetic alterations in advanced CRC. Methods KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations were determined by Cobas real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 191 advanced CRC patients with distant metastasis. Microsatellite instability (MSI) status was determined by a fragmentation assay and HER2 amplification was assessed by silver in situ hybridization. In addition, KRAS mutations were investigated by the Sanger sequencing method in 97 of 191 CRC cases. Results Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were found in 104 (54.5%), 6 (3.1%), and 25 (13.1%) cases of advanced CRC, respectively. MSI-high status and HER2 amplification were observed in 3 (1.6%) and 16 (8.4%) cases, respectively. PIK3CA mutations were more frequently found in KRAS mutant type (18.3%) than KRAS wild type (6.9%) (P = 0.020). In contrast, HER2 amplifications and BRAF mutations were associated with KRAS wild type with borderline significance (P = 0.052 and 0.094, respectively). In combined analyses with KRAS, BRAF and HER2 status, BRAF mutations or HER2 amplifications were associated with the worst prognosis in the wild type KRAS group (P = 0.004). When comparing the efficacy of detection methods, the results of real time PCR analysis revealed 56 of 97 (57.7%) CRC cases with KRAS mutations, whereas Sanger sequencing revealed 49 cases (50.5%). Conclusions KRAS mutations were found in 54.5% of advanced CRC patients. Our results support that subgrouping using PIK3CA and BRAF mutation or HER2 amplification status, in addition to KRAS mutation status, is helpful for managing advanced CRC patients. PMID

  13. Potential Targets for Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Temraz, Sally; Mukherji, Deborah; Shamseddine, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The step-wise development of colorectal neoplasia from adenoma to carcinoma suggests that specific interventions could delay or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Several key factors involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis have already been identified including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), survivin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Clinical trials of COX-2 inhibitors have provided the “proof of principle” that inhibition of this enzyme can prevent the formation of colonic adenomas and potentially carcinomas, however concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these drugs have limited their use as a chemopreventative strategy. Curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin are chemopreventive agents that are able to suppress multiple signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis and hence are attractive candidates for further research. PMID:23975167

  14. The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in European patients with advanced colorectal cancer harbors infrequent mutations in its tyrosine kinase domain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a member of the ErbB family of receptors, is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase (TK) activated by the binding of extracellular ligands of the EGF-family and involved in triggering the MAPK signaling pathway, which leads to cell proliferation. Mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain are frequent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, to date, only very few, mainly non-European, studies have reported rare EGFR mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods We screened 236 clinical tumor samples from European patients with advanced CRC by direct DNA sequencing to detect potential, as yet unknown mutations, in the EGFR gene exons 18 to 21, mainly covering the EGFR TK catalytic domain. Results EGFR sequences showed somatic missense mutations in exons 18 and 20 at a frequency of 2.1% and 0.4% respectively. Somatic SNPs were also found in exons 20 and 21 at a frequency of about 3.1% and 0.4% respectively. Of these mutations, four have not yet been described elsewhere. Conclusions These mutation frequencies are higher than in a similarly sized population characterized by Barber and colleagues, but still too low to account for a major role played by the EGFR gene in CRC. PMID:22026926

  15. Development of an imaging-guided CEA-pretargeted radionuclide treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: first clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, R; Boerman, O C; Goldenberg, D M; Sharkey, R M; van Herpen, C M L; Franssen, G M; McBride, W J; Chang, C-H; Rossi, E A; van der Graaf, W T A; Oyen, W J G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiolabelled antibody targeting of cancer is limited by slow blood clearance. Pretargeting with a non-radiolabelled bispecific monoclonal antibody (bsMAb) followed by a rapidly clearing radiolabelled hapten peptide improves tumour localisation. The primary goals of this first pretargeting study in patients with the anti-CEACAM5 × anti-hapten (HSG) bsMAb, TF2, and the radiolabelled hapten-peptide, IMP288, were to assess optimal pretargeting conditions and safety in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Different dose schedules were studied in four cohorts of five patients: (1) shortening the interval between the bsMAb and peptide administration (5 days vs 1 day), (2) escalating the TF2 dose (from 75 to 150 mg), and (3) reducing the peptide dose (from 100 to 25 μg). After confirmation of tumour targeting by 111In-IMP288, patients were treated with a bsMAb/177Lu-IMP288 cycle. Results: Rapid and selective tumour targeting of the radiolabelled peptide was visualised within 1 h, with high tumour-to-tissue ratios (>20 at 24 h). Improved tumour targeting was achieved with a 1-day interval between the administration of the bsMAb and the peptide and with the 25-μg peptide dose. High 177Lu-IMP288 doses (2.5–7.4 GBq) were well tolerated, with some manageable TF2 infusion reactions, and transient grades 3–4 thrombocytopaenia in 10% of the patients who received 177Lu-IMP288. Conclusion: This phase I study demonstrates for the first time that pretargeting with bsMAb TF2 and radiolabelled IMP288 in patients with CEA-expressing CRC is feasible and safe. With this pretargeting method, tumours are specifically and rapidly targeted. PMID:23860529

  16. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and gastrointestinal stromal cancers: European group on tumor markers 2014 guidelines update

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, MJ; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Nicolini, A; Kalousová, M; Holubec, L; Sturgeon, C

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and management of patients with several different types of gastrointestinal cancer, especially colorectal, gastric, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) adenocarcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of this article is to provide updated and evidence-based guidelines for the use of biomarkers in the different gastrointestinal malignancies. Recommended biomarkers for colorectal cancer include an immunochemical-based fecal occult blood test in screening asymptomatic subjects ≥50 years of age for neoplasia, serial CEA levels in postoperative surveillance of stage II and III patients who may be candidates for surgical resection or systemic therapy in the event of distant metastasis occurring, K-RAS mutation status for identifying patients with advanced disease likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapeutic antibodies and microsatellite instability testing as a first-line screen for subjects with Lynch syndrome. In advanced gastric or GOJ cancers, measurement of HER2 is recommended in selecting patients for treatment with trastuzumab. For patients with suspected GIST, determination of KIT protein should be used as a diagnostic aid, while KIT mutational analysis may be used for treatment planning in patients with diagnosed GISTs. PMID:23852704

  17. Dermatology clinics: what's new in dermatopathology: news in nonmelanocytic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Harleen K; Patel, Rita V; Goldenberg, Gary

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews the recent dermatopathology literature involving nonmelanocytic neoplasia, with a focus on important work done over the last 5 years. The discussion includes advances in the understanding of Merkel cell carcinoma pathogenesis and prognosis; changes in the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee of Cancer staging manual in reference to staging of squamous cell carcinoma and Merkel cell carcinoma; newly described or rare histopathologic patterns and entities including squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma, rippled-pattern adnexal neoplasms, onychomatricoma, spindle cell predominant trichodiscoma/neurofollicular hamartoma, and myoepithelioma; and microsatellite instability in sebaceous neoplasms of Muir-Torre syndrome and other tumors. PMID:23021050

  18. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  19. Phase II trial of panitumumab with irinotecan as salvage therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer (TOPIC study)

    PubMed Central

    NISHI, TOMOHIRO; HAMAMOTO, YASUO; NAGASE, MICHITAKA; DENDA, TADAMICHI; YAMAGUCHI, KENSEI; AMAGAI, KENJI; MIYATA, YOSHINORI; YAMANAKA, YASUHIRO; YANAI, KAI; ISHIKAWA, TSUTOMU; KUROKI, YOSHIFUMI; FUJII, HIROFUMI

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical impact of salvage panitumumab with irinotecan for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. The present study conducted a single-arm, multicenter phase II trial for mCRC with skin toxicity prevention program. The subjects were mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS, who showed resistance to fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin and irinotecan. Panitumumab was administered at a dose of 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 60 min, and irinotecan was administered at a dose of 100–180 mg/m2 every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 90 min, depending on the preceding treatment dose. To prevent skin toxicities, a moisturizer was applied and oral antibiotics (100 mg minocycline twice daily) were initiated for 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was the response rate (RR) determined by independent reviewers. Secondary endpoints were the disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS) time, overall survival (OS) time and adverse events. A total of 35 patients were enrolled between October 2010 and March 2012. The median age was 61 years (range, 41–76 years), with 25 male and 10 female patients. The initial irinotecan dose was 150 mg/m2 in 19 patients and 180 mg/m2 in 1 patient. The remaining patients were treated with ≤120 mg/m2. A central review indicated a partial response in 8 patients (22.9%) and stable disease in 6 patients (17.1%), with an RR of 22.9% (95% confidence interval, 12.1–39.0) and a DCR of 40%. The RR of the patients with standard-dose irinotecan (150 or 180 mg/m2) was 30%, although that of low-dose irinotecan (100–120 mg/m2) was 13%. The median PFS time was 2.7 months, and the median OS time was 6.3 months. A grade 3 or above acne-like rash developed in 25.7% of patients. In conclusion, panitumumab and irinotecan as salvage therapy for mCRC KRAS wild-type patients with skin toxicity prevention exhibits limited efficacy. In particular, the effect of low-dose irinotecan with panitumumab appears to be

  20. Laparoscopic Colorectal Training Gap in Colorectal and Surgical Residents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mark; Williamson, Paul; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an established safe procedure with demonstrated benefits. Proficiency in this specialty correlates with the volume of cases. We examined training in this surgical field for both general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents to determine whether the number of cases needed for proficiency is being realized. Methods: We examined the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Colorectal Surgeons (ABCRS) operative statistics for graduating general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents. Results: Although the number of advanced laparoscopy cases had increased for general surgery residents, there was still a significant gap in case volume between the average number of laparoscopic colorectal operations performed by graduating general surgery residents (21.6) and those performed by graduating colon and rectal surgery residents (81.9) in 2014. Conclusion: There is a gap between general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residency training for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. General surgery residents are not meeting the volume of cases necessary for proficiency in colorectal surgery. This deficit represents a structural difference in training. PMID:27493468

  1. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  2. An internally and externally validated nomogram for predicting the risk of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, W; Uehara, K; Minamimura, K; Tanaka, C; Takii, Y; Miyauchi, H; Sadahiro, S; Fujita, K; Moriwaki, T; Nakamura, M; Takahashi, T; Tsuji, A; Shinozaki, K; Morita, S; Ando, Y; Okutani, Y; Sugihara, M; Sugiyama, T; Ohashi, Y; Sakata, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Asians, the risk of irinotecan-induced severe toxicities is related in part to UGT1A1*6 (UGT, UDP glucuronosyltransferase) and UGT1A1*28, variant alleles that reduce the elimination of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. We prospectively studied the relation between the UGT1A1 genotype and the safety of irinotecan-based regimens in Japanese patients with advanced colorectal cancer, and then constructed a nomogram for predicting the risk of severe neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. Methods: Safety data were obtained from 1312 patients monitored during the first 3 cycles of irinotecan-based regimen in a prospective observational study. In development of the nomogram, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to test the associations of candidate factors to severe neutropenia in the first cycle. The final nomogram based on the results of multivariable analysis was constructed and validated internally using a bootstrapping technique and externally in an independent data set (n=350). Results: The UGT1A1 genotype was confirmed to be associated with increased risks of irinotecan-induced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and diarrhoea. The final nomogram included type of regimen, administered dose of irinotecan, gender, age, UGT1A1 genotype, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, pre-treatment absolute neutrophil count, and total bilirubin level. The model was validated both internally (bootstrap-adjusted concordance index, 0.69) and externally (concordance index, 0.70). Conclusions: Our nomogram can be used before treatment to accurately predict the probability of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in the first cycle of therapy. Additional studies should evaluate the effect of nomogram-guided dosing on efficacy in patients receiving irinotecan. PMID:25880011

  3. A phase I study of the chinese herbal medicine PHY906 as a modulator of irinotecan-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; Copur, M Sitki; Rose, Michal; Wadler, Scott; Stephenson, Joe; O'Rourke, Mark; Brenckman, Wayne; Tilton, Robert; Liu, Shwu-Huey; Jiang, Zaoli; Su, Tahmun; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chu, Edward

    2011-06-01

    PHY906 is a novel Chinese herbal preparation that has been used in the Orient for over 1800 years to treat a wide range of gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, fever, and headache. Preclinical and clinical studies were conducted to further investigate the biologic and clinical activities of this herbal medicine. To ensure standardization and maintain interbatch reliability of PHY906, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to establish a "chemical fingerprint" of PHY906. In vivo preclinical studies using the murine Colon 39 tumor model showed that PHY906 protected against the weight loss associated with irinotecan treatment. In the presence of PHY906, mice were able to tolerate otherwise lethal doses of irinotecan. Significantly improved antitumor activity and overall survival were observed in animals treated with the combination of irinotecan and PHY906 versus irinotecan alone. The combination of PHY906 with irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and leucovorin (LV) also resulted in at least additive antitumor activity with no increased host toxicity. Based on these in vivo studies, a phase I multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose escalation, cross-over study of PHY906 as a modulator of the weekly, bolus regimen of irinotecan, 5-FU, and LV (IFL) in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) was conducted. The specific objectives of this clinical trial were to determine the safety and tolerability of PHY906 when administered concomitantly with the bolus, weekly IFL regimen. Treatment with PHY906 did not alter the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU, irinotecan, or the irinotecan metabolite SN-38. PMID:21859559

  4. Phase IB study of doxorubicin in combination with the multidrug resistance reversing agent S9788 in advanced colorectal and renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, C. J.; Voest, E. E.; Tueni, E.; Van Oosterom, A. T.; Backx, A.; De Mulder, P. H.; Hecquet, B.; Lucas, C.; Gerard, B.; Bleiberg, H.

    1997-01-01

    S9788 is a new triazineaminopiperidine derivate capable of reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells resistant to chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin. It does not belong to a known class of MDR revertants, but its action involves the binding of P-glycoprotein. Thirty-eight evaluable patients with advanced colorectal or renal cell cancer were treated with doxorubicin alone (16 patients) followed after disease progression with combination treatment of doxorubicin plus S9788 (12 patients) or upfront with the combination of doxorubicin plus S9788 (22 patients). S9788 was given i.v. as a loading dose of 56 mg m-2 over 30 min followed by doxorubicin given at 50 mg m-2 as a bolus infusion. Thereafter, a 2-h infusion of S9788 was administered at escalating doses ranging from 24 to 120 mg m-2 in subsequent cohorts of 4-10 patients. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that concentrations of S9788 that are known to reverse MDR in vitro were achieved in patients at non-toxic doses. Compared with treatment with doxorubicin alone, treatment with the combination of doxorubicin and S9788 produced a significant increase in the occurrence of WHO grade 3-4 granulocytopenia. Treatment with S9788 was cardiotoxic as it caused a dose-dependent and reversible increase in corrected QT intervals as well as clinically non-significant arrhythmias on 24- or 48-h Holter recordings. Although clinically relevant cardiac toxicities did not occur, the study was terminated as higher doses of S9788 may increase the risk of severe cardiac arrhythmias. Twenty-nine patients treated with S9788 plus doxorubicin were evaluable for response, and one patient, who progressed after treatment with doxorubicin alone, achieved a partial response. We conclude that S9788 administered at the doses and schedule used in this study results in relevant plasma concentrations in humans and can safely be administered in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:9374386

  5. [Tumor markers for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Miyake, Y; Noura, S; Ogawa, M; Yasui, M; Ikenaga, M; Sekimoto, M; Monden, M

    2001-09-01

    CEA and CA19-9 are the two most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer that are currently utilized clinically. The positive rate of CEA is 40-60% and that of CA19-9 is 30-50%. Simultaneous use of the two markers is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect and monitoring the recurrence of advanced colorectal cancer. Surgical specimens may also provide useful information for the appropriate treatment of patients. Using surgically resected lymph nodes, we examined micrometastasis to assess the spread of the cancer cells and the malignant potential of colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-cytokeratin antibody revealed no significant impact of micrometastasis on patient prognosis, while RT-PCR assay using CEA as a genetic marker suggested a positive value in predicting a rapid recurrence. Among various molecular markers, we found that CDC25B phosphatase was a powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer. Diagnosis of the existence and malignant potential of cancer cells, together with serum tumor marker levels, may help to construct a more useful system for the better treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:11579645

  6. Fractal Analysis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizii, Markus; Moinfar, Farid; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) represent precursor lesions of cervical cancer. These neoplastic lesions are traditionally subdivided into three categories CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3, using microscopical criteria. The relation between grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and its fractal dimension was investigated to establish a basis for an objective diagnosis using the method proposed. Methods Classical evaluation of the tissue samples was performed by an experienced gynecologic pathologist. Tissue samples were scanned and saved as digital images using Aperio scanner and software. After image segmentation the box counting method as well as multifractal methods were applied to determine the relation between fractal dimension and grades of CIN. A total of 46 images were used to compare the pathologist's neoplasia grades with the predicted groups obtained by fractal methods. Results Significant or highly significant differences between all grades of CIN could be found. The confusion matrix, comparing between pathologist's grading and predicted group by fractal methods showed a match of 87.1%. Multifractal spectra were able to differentiate between normal epithelium and low grade as well as high grade neoplasia. Conclusion Fractal dimension can be considered to be an objective parameter to grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:25302712

  7. A Trial of Calcium and Vitamin D for the Prevention of Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Baron, John A.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Mott, Leila A.; Rees, Judy R.; Sandler, Robert S.; Snover, Dale C.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Ivanova, Anastasia; Cole, Bernard F.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Beck, Gerald J.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Burke, Carol A.; Church, Timothy R.; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Goodman, Michael; Kim, Adam S.; Robertson, Douglas J.; Rothstein, Richard; Shaukat, Aasma; Seabrook, March E.; Summers, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiologic and preclinical data suggest that higher intake and serum levels of vitamin D and higher intake of calcium reduce the risk of colorectal neoplasia. To further study the chemopreventive potential of these nutrients, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of supplementation with vitamin D, calcium, or both for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. METHODS We recruited patients with recently diagnosed adenomas and no known colorectal polyps remaining after complete colonoscopy. We randomly assigned 2259 participants to receive daily vitamin D3 (1000 IU), calcium as carbonate (1200 mg), both, or neither in a partial 2×2 factorial design. Women could elect to receive calcium plus random assignment to vitamin D or placebo. Follow-up colonoscopy was anticipated to be performed 3 or 5 years after the baseline examinations, according to the endoscopist’s recommendation. The primary end point was adenomas diagnosed in the interval from randomization through the anticipated surveillance colonoscopy. RESULTS Participants who were randomly assigned to receive vitamin D had a mean net increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 7.83 ng per milliliter, relative to participants given placebo. Overall, 43% of participants had one or more adenomas diagnosed during follow-up. The adjusted risk ratios for recurrent adenomas were 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 1.09) with vitamin D versus no vitamin D, 0.95 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.06) with calcium versus no calcium, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.80 to 1.08) with both agents versus neither agent. The findings for advanced adenomas were similar. There were few serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Daily supplementation with vitamin D3 (1000 IU), calcium (1200 mg), or both after removal of colorectal adenomas did not significantly reduce the risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas over a period of 3 to 5 years. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  8. Pharmacological Intervention through Dietary Nutraceuticals in Gastrointestinal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Bhat, Showket H; Husain, Eram; Abu-Duhier, Faisel; Hadi, S M; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-07-01

    Neoplastic conditions associated with gastrointestinal (GI) tract are common worldwide with colorectal cancer alone accounting for the third leading rate of cancer incidence. Other GI malignancies such as esophageal carcinoma have shown an increasing trend in the last few years. The poor survival statistics of these fatal cancer diseases highlight the need for multiple alternative treatment options along with effective prophylactic strategies. Worldwide geographical variation in cancer incidence indicates a correlation between dietary habits and cancer risk. Epidemiological studies have suggested that populations with high intake of certain dietary agents in their regular meals have lower cancer rates. Thus, an impressive embodiment of evidence supports the concept that dietary factors are key modulators of cancer including those of GI origin. Preclinical studies on animal models of carcinogenesis have reflected the pharmacological significance of certain dietary agents called as nutraceuticals in the chemoprevention of GI neoplasia. These include stilbenes (from red grapes and red wine), isoflavones (from soy), carotenoids (from tomatoes), curcuminoids (from spice turmeric), catechins (from green tea), and various other small plant metabolites (from fruits, vegetables, and cereals). Pleiotropic action mechanisms have been reported for these diet-derived chemopreventive agents to retard, block, or reverse carcinogenesis. This review presents a prophylactic approach to primary prevention of GI cancers by highlighting the translational potential of plant-derived nutraceuticals from epidemiological, laboratory, and clinical studies, for the better management of these cancers through consumption of nutraceutical rich diets and their intervention in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25365584

  9. Low levels of Caspase-3 predict favourable response to 5FU-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: Caspase-3 inhibition as a therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, L; Meyer, M; Fay, J; Curry, S; Bacon, O; Duessmann, H; John, K; Boland, K C; McNamara, D A; Kay, E W; Bantel, H; Schulze-Bergkamen, H; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy (CT) remains the mainstay treatment of CRC in the advanced setting, and activates executioner caspases in target cells. Executioner caspases are key proteins involved in cell disassembly during apoptosis. Activation of executioner caspases also has a role in tissue regeneration and repopulation by stimulating signal transduction and cell proliferation in neighbouring, non-apoptotic cells as reported recently. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) consisting of tumour tissue from 93 stage II and III colon cancer patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, patients with low levels of active Caspase-3 had an increased disease-free survival time. This was particularly pronounced in patients who received 5FU-based adjuvant CT. In line with this observation, lower serum levels of active Caspase-3 were found in patients with metastasised CRC who revealed stable disease or tumour regression compared with those with disease progression. The role of Caspase-3 in treatment responses was explored further in primary human tumour explant cultures from fresh patient tumour tissue. Exposure of explant cultures to 5FU-based CT increased the percentage of cells positive for active Caspase-3 and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick end Labelling (TUNEL), but also the expression of regeneration and proliferation markers β-Catenin and Ki-67, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Of note, selective inhibition of Caspase-3 with Ac-DNLD-CHO, a selective, reversible inhibitor of Caspase-3, significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers as well as COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 with aspirin or celecoxib did not affect Caspase-3 levels but also reduced Ki-67 and β-Catenin levels, suggesting that Caspase-3 acted via COX-2 to stimulate cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. This indicates that low levels of active Caspase-3 may represent a

  10. Low levels of Caspase-3 predict favourable response to 5FU-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: Caspase-3 inhibition as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, L; Meyer, M; Fay, J; Curry, S; Bacon, O; Duessmann, H; John, K; Boland, K C; McNamara, D A; Kay, E W; Bantel, H; Schulze-Bergkamen, H; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy (CT) remains the mainstay treatment of CRC in the advanced setting, and activates executioner caspases in target cells. Executioner caspases are key proteins involved in cell disassembly during apoptosis. Activation of executioner caspases also has a role in tissue regeneration and repopulation by stimulating signal transduction and cell proliferation in neighbouring, non-apoptotic cells as reported recently. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) consisting of tumour tissue from 93 stage II and III colon cancer patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, patients with low levels of active Caspase-3 had an increased disease-free survival time. This was particularly pronounced in patients who received 5FU-based adjuvant CT. In line with this observation, lower serum levels of active Caspase-3 were found in patients with metastasised CRC who revealed stable disease or tumour regression compared with those with disease progression. The role of Caspase-3 in treatment responses was explored further in primary human tumour explant cultures from fresh patient tumour tissue. Exposure of explant cultures to 5FU-based CT increased the percentage of cells positive for active Caspase-3 and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick end Labelling (TUNEL), but also the expression of regeneration and proliferation markers β-Catenin and Ki-67, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Of note, selective inhibition of Caspase-3 with Ac-DNLD-CHO, a selective, reversible inhibitor of Caspase-3, significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers as well as COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 with aspirin or celecoxib did not affect Caspase-3 levels but also reduced Ki-67 and β-Catenin levels, suggesting that Caspase-3 acted via COX-2 to stimulate cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. This indicates that low levels of active Caspase-3 may represent a

  11. Biochemical modulation of fluorouracil: comparison of methotrexate, folinic acid, and fluorouracil versus folinic acid and fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, A; Tsavaris, N; Giannopoulos, A; Bacoyiannis, C; Papadimas, V; Kalahanis, N; Karatzas, G; Kosmas, C; Sakelaropoulos, N; Archimandritis, A; Papachristodoulou, A; Kosmidis, P

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in biochemical pharmacology have revealed the basis for the biological modulation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by methotrexate (MTX) and folinic acid (FA). Sequential use of MTX given 24 h prior to 5-FU has resulted in enhanced cell kill in vitro and in vivo. In addition, administration of FA prior to 5-FU has led to potentiation of 5-FU action by stabilization of the ternary complex of thymidine synthase. In the present randomized study, two groups of patients with advanced colorectal cancer were treated as follows: 43 patients (pts) in group A received 5-FU + FA, whereas 45 pts in group B received 5-FU + FA + MTX. The dosage was as follows: group A received FA i.v. at 300 mg/m2 per day, prior to i.v. 5-FU at 500 mg/m2 per day on days 1-4; group B was given MTX i.v. at 130 mg/m2 per day on day 0, followed 24 h later by FA at 15 mg q6h x 6, and 5-FU + FA was started on day 1 and given at the same doses and schedule described for group A. Objective responses were achieved by 8/43 pts in group A (1 complete response and 7 partial responses) and by 18/45 pts in group B (3 complete and 15 partial responses), all occurring in the liver. There was no significant difference in the median time to progression (group A 6.1 months, group B 6.8 months) or the median survival (group A 9.2 months, group B 10.3 months). Toxicity was significantly greater in group B [grade 2-3 mucositis 20% versus only 2% in group A (P < 0.0001); grade 3 diarrhea in group B 15% versus 3% in group A (P < 0.001)]. According to our results, double biological modulation of 5-FU with MTX + FA led to an enhanced response rate with increased toxicity as compared with the 5-FU + FA regimen given at less than its maximally tolerated dose. PMID:8646806

  12. Differences in Epidemiologic Risk Factors for Colorectal Adenomas and Serrated Polyps by Lesion Severity and Anatomical Site

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Adams, Scott V.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a case-control design, we evaluated differences in risk factors for colorectal polyps according to histological type, anatomical site, and severity. Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative aged 20–79 years who underwent colonoscopy in Seattle, Washington, between 1998 and 2007 and comprised 628 adenoma cases, 594 serrated polyp cases, 247 cases with both types of polyps, and 1,037 polyp-free controls. Participants completed a structured interview, and polyps were evaluated via standardized pathology review. We used multivariable polytomous logistic regression to compare case groups with controls and with the other case groups. Factors for which the strength of the association varied significantly between adenomas and serrated polyps were sex (P < 0.001), use of estrogen-only postmenopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.01), and smoking status (P < 0.001). For lesion severity, prior endoscopy (P < 0.001) and age (P = 0.05) had significantly stronger associations with advanced adenomas than with nonadvanced adenomas; and higher education was positively correlated with sessile serrated polyps but not with other serrated polyps (P = 0.02). Statistically significant, site-specific associations were observed for current cigarette smoking (P = 0.05 among adenomas and P < 0.001 among serrated polyps), postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy (P = 0.01 among adenomas), and obesity (P = 0.01 among serrated polyps). These findings further illustrate the epidemiologic heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasia and may help elucidate carcinogenic mechanisms for distinct pathways. PMID:23459948

  13. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  14. Diagnosis and therapies for gastric non-invasive neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Motohiko

    2015-01-01

    There has been a great discrepancy of pathological diagnosis for gastric non-invasive neoplasia/dysplasia between Japanese and western pathologists. In Japan, lesions that most western pathologists diagnose as dysplasia are often considered adenocarcinoma based on nuclear and structural atypia regardless of the presence of invasion. In the Vienna classification, gastric non-invasive intraepithelial neoplasia (NIN) were divided into low grade and high grade (including intra-mucosal cancer of Japanese criteria). The diagnosis by both endoscopy and pathology of biopsy specimen is difficult. Recent advances of diagnostic modality such as magnified endoscopy and imaged enhanced endoscopy is expected to improve the diagnostic yield for NIN. There are two treatment strategies for NIN, observation and diagnostic therapy by endoscopic resection (ER). ER is acceptable because of its less invasiveness and high local control rate, on the other hand, cancer-developing rate of low-grade NIN is reported to be low. Therefore there is controversy for the treatment of gastric NIN. Prospective study based on unified pathological definition is required in the future. PMID:26640329

  15. Neither Neoplasia Nor Tuberculosis, but Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Mambie, Adeline; Wallet, Frédéric; Scherman, Laurine; Armand, Sylvie; Vervelle, Christine; Faure, Karine; Guery, Benoit; Titécat, Marie; Loïez, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Tularaemia is an emerging anthropozoonosis transmitted by contact with infected animals and through arthropod bites, inhalation, or ingestion. We describe a pulmonary nodule suggesting cancer in a 70-year-old man. Histological analysis excluded neoplasia, and bacteriological culture excluded tuberculosis. Serological testing and PCR Francisella were positive for this hunter patient, then treated by ciprofloxacin with a favourable outcome. PMID:27419157

  16. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  17. Variation in the Association Between Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility Loci and Colorectal Polyps by Polyp Type

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N.; Schwartz, Malaika R.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D.; Makar, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24–79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type. PMID:24875374

  18. Methylation pattern of ALX4 gene promoter as a potential biomarker for blood-based early detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Rasoul; Atapour, Norollah; Vatandoust, Nasimeh; Farahani, Najmeh; Ahangari, Fatemeh; Salehi, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: To develop a non-invasive screening method for colorectal cancer, we evaluated the methylation of ALX4 gene promoter in serum samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and equal number of healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In serum samples from 25 patients with colorectal cancer and 25 healthy control subjects, isolated serum free-floating DNA was treated with sodium bisulfite and analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) with primers specific for methylated or unmethylated promoter CpG island sequences of the ALX4 gene. Results: Methylation of the ALX4 gene promoter was present in the serum DNA of patients with adenoma and colorectal cancer. A sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 88% were achieved in the detection of promoter methylation in colorectal neoplasia samples. The difference in methylation status of the ALX4 promoter between the patients with colorectal neoplasia and the control group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results indicate that this serum free DNA test of methylation of the ALX4 gene promoter is a sensitive and specific method. Therefore in combination with other useful markers it seems ALX4 has the potential of a clinically useful test for the early detection of colorectal cancer. PMID:26918234

  19. Colorectal Cancer Screening Based on Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Ching, Jessica Y.L.; Chan, Victor C.W.; Lam, Thomas Y.T.; Luk, Arthur K.C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Sung, Joseph J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated whether age- and gender-based colorectal cancer screening is cost-effective. Recent studies in the United States identified age and gender as 2 important variables predicting advanced proximal neoplasia, and that women aged <60 to 70 years were more suited for sigmoidoscopy screening due to their low risk of proximal neoplasia. Yet, quantitative assessment of the incremental benefits, risks, and cost remains to be performed. Primary care screening practice (2008–2015). A Markov modeling was constructed using data from a screening cohort. The following strategies were compared according to the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for 1 life-year saved: flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) 5 yearly; colonoscopy 10 yearly; FS for each woman at 50- and 55-year old followed by colonoscopy at 60- and 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, and 65-year old followed by colonoscopy at 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70-year old. All male subjects received colonoscopy at 50-, 60-, and 70-year old under strategies 3 to 5. From a hypothetical population of 100,000 asymptomatic subjects, strategy 2 could save the largest number of life-years (4226 vs 2268 to 3841 by other strategies). When compared with no screening, strategy 5 had the lowest ICER (US$42,515), followed by strategy 3 (US$43,517), strategy 2 (US$43,739), strategy 4 (US$47,710), and strategy 1 (US$56,510). Strategy 2 leads to the highest number of bleeding and perforations, and required a prohibitive number of colonoscopy procedures. Strategy 5 remains the most cost-effective when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. From the cost effectiveness analysis, FS for women and colonoscopy for men represent an economically favorable screening strategy. These findings could inform physicians and policy-makers in triaging eligible subjects for risk-based screening, especially in countries with limited colonoscopic

  20. Genomic Landscapes of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal prognosis. However, recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology have led to the systematic characterization of the genomes of all major tumor types in the pancreas. This characterization has revealed the unique genomic landscape of each tumor type. This knowledge will pave the way for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic tumors that take advantage of the genetic alterations in these neoplasms. PMID:25812653

  1. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  2. [Maintenance therapy for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeo; Kato, Shunsuke

    2014-08-01

    Some trials have demonstrated the benefits of maintenance chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. In chemotherapeutic strategies for advanced colorectal cancer, chemotherapy-related toxicity prevention and quality of life(QOL)maintenance are more important than the introduction of a strong regimen, especially when additional surgery is not possible. In Japan, the combination of a folinic acid/5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin(FOLFOX)regimen and bevacizumab is a popular first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, despite its effectiveness, neuropathy or hand-foot syndrome after 5 or 6 cycles tends to lead to chemotherapy withdrawal. CAIRO3 trial reported the effectiveness of capecitabine and bevacizumab as a maintenance chemotherapy regimen. Additionally, the ML18147 trial demonstrated that bevacizumab beyond progression(BBP)prolonged overall survival(OS)and progression free survival(PFS)in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Although those trials demonstrated the effectiveness of continuous or maintenance bevacizumab administration, no trials have compared the effectiveness of cytotoxic drugs with bevacizumab as maintenance therapies. Moreover, controversy exists regarding the selection of drugs as a maintenance therapy and the identification of patients who would benefit from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132024

  3. Primary lung neoplasia in a beagle colony.

    PubMed

    Hahn, F F; Muggenburg, B A; Griffith, W C

    1996-11-01

    As part of long-term pulmonary carcinogenesis studies in dogs, it is important to analyze the incidence of spontaneous lung neoplasia. Primary lung carcinoma incidence was determined in two control populations of Beagle dogs observed for their life spans. One population comprised 216 dogs (112 males and 104 females) that were controls for life span studies, and another comprised 182 dogs (50 males and 132 females) that were retirees from a breeding colony. Forty lung neoplasms were noted in the 398 dogs; 35 neoplasms were carcinomas classified as papillary adenocarcinoma (20), bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (9), adenosquamous carcinoma (5), or bronchial gland carcinoma (1). The other five neoplasms were a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, three adenomas, and a fibroma. The crude incidence of lung carcinomas averaged for both populations was 8.8% (35/398) and was dominated by a relatively high incidence of lung neoplasia in aged dogs, those dying after the median life span of 13.6 years. PMID:8952021

  4. Increased Expression of PHGDH and Prognostic Significance in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Shu; Zhu, Hui-Jun; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Jin-Hong; Wang, Xu-Dong; Qiang, Jian-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) plays an essential role in cancer-specific metabolic reprogramming. It has been reported as a putative metabolic oncogene in several types of human malignant tumors, such as breast cancer and melanoma. To date, PHGDH expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as its association with clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic implication remain undetermined. In this study, we determined the PHGDH protein expression using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry (TMA-IHC) on 193 pairs of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of CRC and adjacent tissues, 25 chronic colitis, 41 low-, and 19 high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia specimens, and we also determined PHGDH mRNA level using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) on additional 23 pairs of fresh CRC tissues and adjacent tissues. We found that both PHGDH mRNA and protein was highly expressed in tumor tissues in comparison with matched adjacent non-tumor tissues, and high PHGDH protein expression was correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = .038) and larger tumor (P = .001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that PHGDH protein expression (HR = 2.285, 95% CI = 1.18 to 4.41, P = .014), tumor differentiation (HR = .307, 95% CI = .154 to 0.609, P = .001), and TNM stage (HR = 1.791, 95% CI = 1.125 to 2.85, P = .014) were independent prognostic factors in CRC. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log rank test showed that high PHGDH protein expression contributed to poor outcome in CRC patients (P < .001). In conclusion, these results suggest that assessment of PHGDH expression could be useful in identifying a high-risk subgroup of CRC. PMID:27267836

  5. [Progress of endoscopic screening and differentiation of colorectal polyps].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xianchun; Liu, Jun; Ren, Hongyu

    2016-04-25

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising year by year, thus screening of neoplastic colorectal polyps is very important for the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. In recent years, endoscopic techniques have advanced dramatically, such as high definition endoscopy, magnified endoscopy, conventional or virtual chromoendoscopy. Some of these technologies not only can improve the adenoma detection rate, but also may help to enable real-time endoscopic diagnosis and thereby guide decisions about endoscopic resection. The second generation colon capsule endoscopy provides a new and relative reliable noninvasive tool for colorectal diseases screening and diagnosis. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of advanced imaging techniques available for the detection and differentiation of colorectal polyps. PMID:27112483

  6. Endoscopic Treatment of Early Barrett's Neoplasia: Expanding Indications, New Challenges.

    PubMed

    Pech, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy of early Barrett's neoplasia is nowadays the treatment of choice and recommended over surgery in most current guidelines. Recent data suggest radiofrequency ablation of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia when confirmed by an expert pathologist. Endoscopic therapy of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and mucosal Barrett's adenocarcinoma consists of two steps: first endoscopic resection of all visible lesions, and second ablation of the remaining flat Barrett's mucosa to reduce the rate of recurrences and metachronous neoplasia. The preferred ablation method is radiofrequency ablation. In case of Barrett's adenocarcinoma with incipient submucosal invasion, endoscopic treatment can be considered curative when there are no further risk factors present. PMID:27573769

  7. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learned, Future Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Venook, Alan P

    2016-05-01

    Survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has dramatically improved over the past 20 years, primarily because physicians have become adept at using the many regimens approved for this patient population. Future advances may come from understanding molecular subtypes, finding and treating new actionable mutations, and harnessing the immune system. PMID:27226509

  8. Red-flag technologies in gastric neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Susana

    2013-07-01

    Given its morbidity and mortality, the early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer is an area of intense research focus. This article reviews the emerging use of enhanced endoscopic imaging technologies in the detection and management of gastric cancer. The combined use of white-light endoscopy with enhanced imaging technologies, such as magnification narrow-band imaging, chromoendoscopy, and autofluorescence endoscopy, demonstrates promise in the improved ability to detect and delineate gastric neoplasia. However, widespread clinical use is still limited, mainly because of the restricted availability of the technologies. PMID:23735104

  9. Management of hemopoietic neoplasias during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Paydas, Semra

    2016-08-01

    Hemopoietic neoplasias are unique cancers generally affecting bone marrow, and requires a special attention for disease control and also their complications. When these neoplastic disorders accompany to pregnancy there are many risks both for mother and foetus. Diagnostic difficulties due to the limited use of imaging modalities is essential in pregnant women. On the other hand suboptimal using of the anti-neoplastic drugs and their higher toxicity in mother and foetus must be considered in the management of these neoplastic disorders. Due to the lack of therapeutic guidelines in these cases, team approach is essential and therapy requires to the use the art of medicine. PMID:27283927

  10. Thrombocytopenia associated with neoplasia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Grindem, C B; Breitschwerdt, E B; Corbett, W T; Page, R L; Jans, H E

    1994-01-01

    Ten percent (214/2,059) of all dogs with cancer at North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital had thrombocytopenia. The thrombocytopenia was associated with infectious/inflammatory etiologies in 4%, miscellaneous disorders (therapy, bone marrow failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation) in 35%, and neoplasia without identifiable secondary factors in 61% of cancer-bearing dogs. Classifying these dogs by tumor groups revealed the following proportionate ratios: lymphoid, 29%; carcinoma, 28%; sarcoma, 20%; hemic neoplasia, 7%; multiple, 5%; unclassified, 3%; benign, 3%; brain, 3%; and endocrine, 3%. Dogs with hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, and melanoma were at increased risk of developing thrombocytopenia. Cytotoxic therapy was the major factor increasing the risk of thrombocytopenia in dogs with melanoma. Golden Retrievers were the only breed recognized with a predisposition to develop thrombocytopenia. If thrombocytopenia is identified in a dog with cancer, we recommend thorough evaluation of the coagulation system before surgery or therapy, and careful consideration of the risks and potential benefits of myelosuppressive or L-asparaginase therapy. PMID:7884725

  11. Thyroid neoplasia in captive raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephanie L; Allender, Matthew C; Bohling, Mark; Ramsay, Edward C; Morandi, Federica; Newkirk, Kimberly M

    2010-03-01

    Two adult, spayed, female raccoons were diagnosed with thyroid neoplasia. One raccoon had a palpable, left-sided, nonfunctional thyroid adenocarcinoma which was treated with a thyroidectomy twice with local recurrence both times. After the second recurrence, pulmonary metastases were identified. A third thyroidectomy was performed, and a vascular access port was placed for administration of intravenous doxorubicin. The raccoon developed pancytopenia and became anorexic after chemotherapy, and the owner elected humane euthanasia. The second raccoon had nonpalpable, bilateral, functional follicular thyroid adenomatous hyperplasia and was treated with a right thyroidectomy and a partial left thyroidectomy, leaving behind the grossly normal portion of the left thyroid. However, the animal was still hyperthyroid after surgery and was then successfully managed with topical methimazole gel. Thyroid pathology has been documented in raccoons in Europe, but is not reported in the United States. Thyroid neoplasia in raccoons can occur as a nonfunctional adenocarcinoma, as is commonly reported in dogs, or as a functional adenoma, as is commonly reported in cats. Raccoons with adenocarcinomas should be evaluated for pulmonary metastasis. Methimazole gel may be a viable treatment option for raccoons with hyperthyroidism. PMID:20722264

  12. Spontaneous neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus).

    PubMed

    Khoii, Mina K; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Burns, Roy B; Carmichael, K Paige; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

    2008-09-01

    Little information is available about diseases and pathology of species within the family Tenrecidae, including the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus), a Madagascan insectivore. This report summarizes necropsy and histopathologic findings of neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs. Although only four animals are included in this report, neoplasia seems to be a common and significant source of morbidity and mortality in greater hedgehog tenrecs. Types of neoplasia identified include a thyroid follicular-solid carcinoma, two urinary bladder transitional cell carcinomas, uterine endometrial polyps, and multicentric B-cell lymphoma. Due to small sample size, no etiology could be determined, but genetics, viral infection, pesticide treatment, nutrition, or other environmental factors might contribute to the development of neoplasia in this species. This is the first report of neoplasia in greater hedgehog tenrecs. PMID:18817002

  13. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  14. Treatment of peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    März, Loreen; Piso, Pompiliu

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal seedings of a colorectal tumor represent the second most frequent site of metastasis (after the liver). In the era of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-only chemotherapy, the prognosis was poor for colorectal cancer with peritoneal metastases. Within the last few years, new chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have improved the prognosis; however, the response to these treatments seems to be lower than that for liver metastases. The combination of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy have further improved both disease-free survival and overall survival. Keeping this in mind, every patient presenting with peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer should be evaluated and receive adequate treatment, if possible in the above-mentioned combination. This paper reviews recent advancements in the therapy of peritoneal carcinomatosis. PMID:26424828

  15. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  16. Mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Gen; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have been extensively used for the surgical management of colorectal cancer during the last two decades. Accumulating data have demonstrated that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncologic outcomes when compared with open surgery. However, some controversies regarding the oncologic quality of mini-invasive surgery for rectal cancer exist. Meanwhile, some progresses in colorectal surgery, such as robotic technology, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, natural orifice specimen extraction, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, have been made in recent years. In this article, we review the published data and mainly focus on the current status and latest advances of mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:24589210

  17. Is height a risk factor for colorectal adenoma?

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Although it is generally known that the risk for all types of cancer increases with adult height, combined and for several common site-specific cancers (including colon and rectal), evidence is limited for adenomas, which are precursors to colorectal cancer. We evaluated the association between height and risk of colorectal adenoma at various stages of the adenoma-carcinoma pathway. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using data from patients who had undergone a complete colonoscopy as part of a health examination at the Health Promotion Center of Samsung Medical Center between October 13, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A total of 1,347 male subjects were included in our study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between height and colorectal adenoma. Results: Each 5-cm increase in height was associated with 1.6% and 5.3% higher risks of advanced colorectal adenoma and high-risk colorectal adenoma, respectively, but associations were not significant after adjusting for age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome, alcohol intake, smoking, family history of colorectal cancer, and regular aspirin use (p = 0.840 and p = 0.472, respectively). Conclusions: No clear association was found between colorectal adenoma risk and height. Unlike other site-specific tumors reported to have a consistent relationship with height, the association between colorectal tumor and height remains controversial. PMID:26701232

  18. The evolving classification of renal cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R

    2015-03-01

    The classification of renal cell neoplasia is morphologically based; however, this has evolved over the last 35 years with the incorporation of genetic characteristics into the diagnostic features of some tumors. The 2013 Vancouver classification recognized 17 morphotypes of renal parenchymal malignancy and two benign tumors. This classification included the newly established entities tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor family translocation RCC and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition to these newly described forms of RCC there are a number of novel tumors that are currently recognized as emerging entities. These are likely to be incorporated into subsequent classifications and include thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B mutation-associated RCC, ALK translocation RCC, tuberous sclerosis complex-associated RCC, and RCC with (angio) leiomyomatous stroma. PMID:25753529

  19. T cells, precocious aging, and familial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, H H; Schuman, S H; Goust, J M; Jorgenson, R

    1978-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with precocious aging and was found to have low levels of active and total T cells. Family history revealed a high familial incidence of cancer on both the maternal and paternal sides, and activ T cell levels were found to be low in several living family members. The patient developed osteogenic sarcoma 13 months after initial study. Since our previous studies have reported low active and total T cells in patients with cancer, the present results suggest that subjects with low active T cells should be monitored frequently to detect possible neoplasia in it early stages. They also suggest that impaired cellular immunity in humans is associated with, if not the cause of, accelerated aging. PMID:304823

  20. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  1. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook; B.C.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues - spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  2. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook, B.C.; Casarett, G.W.; Deye, J.A.; Adoff, L.M.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues--spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), or 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed any neoplasms. Seven dogs receiving fast neutrons have developed 9 neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  3. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; Leite, Marieli F. M.; Trujillo, Jose R.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors, especially in Gynecology. The photodynamic reaction is based on the production of reactive oxygen species after the activation of a photosensitizer. Advantages of the PDT in comparison to the surgical resection are: ambulatory treatment and tissue recovery highly satisfactory, through a non-invasive procedure. The cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I and II presents potential indications for PDT. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PDT for the diagnostics and treatment of CIN I and II. The equipment and the photosensitizer are produced in Brazil with a representative low cost. It is possible to visualize the fluorescence of the cervix and to treat the lesions, without side effects. The proposed clinical protocol shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  4. Genitoanal human papillomavirus infection and associated neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Gross, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus infection; about 40 out of 150 known HPV genotypes have been associated with genitoanal lesions in the female and male. They have been divided into low-risk (LR) and high-risk (HR) HPV types according to the association of each HPV genotype with genitoanal benign warts, genitoanal cancer and precursor lesions. For the most part, genitoanal HPV infection is equally common in men and in women. Genitoanal HPVs are predominantly transmitted by sexual intercourse. In a minor number of individuals where HR HPV infection has persisted, malignant squamous-cell tumors may develop. There are 15 mucosal oncogenic HPV types which are the etiological factor of cervical cancer and other genitoanal cancers. DNAs of HR HPV types are present in 100% of all cervical carcinomas and in 100% of the precursor lesions, the cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 2 and 3. HPV-16 and -18 alone account for 70% of the oncogenic mucosal HPV types identified. HR HPV types, mostly HPV-16 and -18, are the causes of vaginal and vulvar cancers in females, anal cancers in both genders and cancer of the penis in men. While anal cancers are linked to HR HPVs in more than 80% of cases, only 40% of vulvar cancers and 50% of penile cancers are HPV positive. Genitoanal cancers have a similar anatomy, histology and similar risk factors as well as natural histories. About 60% of vulvar and 50% of penile cancers are HPV negative, but associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, mainly lichen sclerosus. Clinical manifestations of LR HPVs in both sexes are genitoanal warts (condylomata acuminata), which are benign highly infectious tumors. The highest rate of warts is observed in females 16-24 years of age. In males the peak is at the age of 20-24 years. Diagnosis of genitoanal warts should exclude other sexually transmitted infections and diseases. A high number of genitoanal dermatoses, benign tumors, malignant squamous

  5. Colorectal clinical trials: what is on the horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H; Goldberg, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of colorectal cancer, where more effective therapies have led to improved outcomes in patients with advanced disease. However, the 5-year overall survival rate remains poor. Genomic sequencing has allowed us to understand that colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, where tumor-specific variants affect the prognosis and outcomes in patients. This has shaped the future directions of treatment and the development of clinical trials, including the incorporation of novel targeted therapies and investigations into the role of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26777152

  6. Piecemeal Versus En Bloc Resection of Large Rectal Adenomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Colorectal Adenoma With Mild Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenoma With Severe Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenomatous Polyp; Colorectal Low Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Colorectal High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia

  7. High Resolution Microendoscopy for Quantitative Diagnosis of Esophageal Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongsuk

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the esophagus account for 3.8% of all cases of cancers, with approximately 482,300 new cases reported in 2008 worldwide. In the United States alone, it is estimated that approximately 18,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 2013, and 15,210 deaths are expected. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation therapy, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often at an advanced and incurable stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective methods for early detection of esophageal neoplasia are needed. Here, quantitative classification algorithms for high resolution miscroendoscopic images were developed to distinguish between esophageal neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. A clinical study in 177 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the classification algorithm in collaboration with the Mount Sinai Medical Center in the United States, the First Hospital of Jilin University in China, and the Cancer Institute and Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science in China. The study reported a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 92%, respectively, in the training set, 87% and 97%, respectively, in the test set, and 84% and 95%, respectively, in an independent validation set. Another clinical study in 31 patients with Barrett's esophagus resulted in a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85%. Finally, a compact, portable version of the high resolution microendoscopy (HRME) device using a consumer-grade camera was developed and a series of biomedical experimental studies were carried out to assess the capability of the device.

  8. Phase II study of reintroduction of oxaliplatin for advanced colorectal cancer in patients previously treated with oxaliplatin and irinotecan: RE-OPEN study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of reintroducing oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard chemotherapy has not been verified. We performed a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of reintroducing oxaliplatin. Methods Eligible patients had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and irinotecan that achieved a response or stable disease followed by confirmed disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior oxaliplatin-based therapy. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR) after 12 weeks of treatment starting. The DCR was defined as the sum of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 (range: 35–77) years and the male/female ratio was 19/14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 84.8%. Fourteen primary tumors were in the colon and 19 were in the rectum. All patients received modified FOLFOX6 as the protocol treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment starting, the DCR was 39.4% (95% confidence interval 21.8–57.0) and the response rate (complete response and partial response) was 6.1%. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was five and the median total dose of oxaliplatin was 425 mg/m2. Median progression-free survival time was 98 days and median overall survival was 300 days. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 allergic reactions was 28.1% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was 53.1% and 0%, respectively. There were no other severe adverse events and no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion Reintroducing oxaliplatin can be both safe and effective. This may be a salvage option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who achieved a response or stable disease with prior oxaliplatin-based therapy followed by disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior

  9. Intraoperative augmented reality for laparoscopic colorectal surgery by intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cahill, R A; Mortensen, N J

    2010-08-01

    Advances in imaging quality and capability have been the major driver of the laparoscopic revolution that has dramatically impacted upon operative strategies and surgical patient care in recent years. Increasingly now the technological capacity is becoming available to supraselect or extend the useful clinical range of the electromagnetic spectrum beyond visible or white light. This has markedly broadened the intraprocedural optical information available at intraluminal endoscopy and there is likely to be considerable similar benefit for laparoscopy. Rather than narrow band or ultraviolet imaging however, it is the near infrared (NIR) spectrum that seems of most potential to exploit during intra-abdominal endoscopy in particular as this energy range is capable of penetrating relatively deeply into tissues such as the mesentery and bowel wall without inducing thermal damage due to heat dissipation or indeed the intracellular effects associated with higher energy, shorter wavelength energies. By incorporating the NIR spectrum alongside more conventional laparoscopic imaging, a greater appreciation of tissue architecture, character and quality is possible in particular with respect to lymphatic and vascular channel anatomy and flow dynamics and also real-time optical histology (by NIR optical coherence tomography). Such a facility may significantly aid critical intraoperative decision making during colorectal operations by informing the surgeon regarding the most biologically relevant lymphatic basin and lymph nodes for any target area of interest (especially important if considering tailored operative extent for colorectal neoplasia), the sufficiency and quality of arterial supply (and hence inform re the perfusion of stapled intestinal ends prior to reanastomosis) and perhaps even in situ pathological assessment. This article provides a state of art overview of the fascinating potential of this emergent technological capability. PMID:20802433

  10. The Usefulness of a Novel Screening Kit for Colorectal Cancer Using the Immunochromatographic Fecal Tumor M2 Pyruvate Kinase Test

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jeong Ho; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Tae Ho; Jun, Eun Jung; Oh, Jung-Whan; Kim, Chang Whan; Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Byung-Wook; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Soo-Heon; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims M2 pyruvate kinase (M2-PK) is an enzyme that is produced in undifferentiated and proliferating tissues. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of the immunochromatographic M2 pyruvate kinase (iM2-PK) for the screening of colorectal cancer (CRC) and premalignant lesions. Methods Healthy volunteers and patients with colorectal neoplasia were enrolled in six academic hospitals in the capital province of Korea. The iM2-PK value was compared with the immunochromatographic fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) and fecal tumor M2-PK enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results A total of 323 subjects were enrolled. The sensitivity of iM2-PK for CRC was 92.8%, which was superior to iFOBT (47.5%, p<0.0001). For adenomatous lesions, the sensitivity of iM2-PK was 69.4%, which was also superior to iFOBT (12.1%, p<0.001). Compared with M2-PK ELISA, iM2-PK exhibited significantly enhanced sensitivity for CRC (97.5% vs 80.0%, p=0.0289). The sensitivity of iM2-PK was higher in advanced stages of CRC compared with cancers confined to the mucosa and submucosa (p<0.05). However, lymph node metastasis had no influence on the sensitivity of iM2-PK. Conclusions The iM2-PK exhibited increased sensitivity for identifying CRC and adenomatous lesions compared with iFOBT. Given its rapid results and convenience, CRC screening using iM2-PK is promising. PMID:25473070

  11. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of a novel endoscopic fluorescence imaging modality using oral 5-aminolevulinic acid for colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruki, Eriko So; Saito, Yutaka; Abe, Seiichiro; Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Taku; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Sekine, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Five-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is being increasingly used for photodynamic diagnosis and therapy of various types of tumors including brain, urologic, and other neoplasias. The use of 5-ALA to treat Barrett’s carcinomas has been documented, but its clinical effectiveness for diagnosis of gastrointestinal tumors, particularly early cancers, remains unknown. Patients and methods: The aim of our feasibility study was to evaluate the visibility of colorectal tumors using endoscopic fluorescence imaging (EFI) after oral administration of 5-ALA. The lesions identified by direct visualization and by the spectrums produced using EFI modality with 5-ALA were compared to the clinicopathologic features of resected specimens. Results: Twenty-three patients with a total of 27 known colorectal lesions were enrolled in the study. The median tumor size was 30 mm (range 10 – 75). Eleven of the lesions were flat or depressed lesions and 16 were sessile. Red fluorescence was observed in 22 out of 27 lesions. Red fluorescence was negative in 4 out of 11 flat or depressed lesions. In comparison with histopathologic findings, the rates of red fluorescence visibility were 62.5 % in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, 77.8 % in high-grade neoplasia, and 100 % in submucosal carcinoma. Red fluorescence visibility increased with the degree of dysplasia. There were no significant adverse events identified in this study. Conclusions: This feasibility study using EFI with 5-ALA demonstrated high visibility of superficial colorectal neoplasia. EFI with 5-ALA appears to be a novel, safe technique for improving real-time colorectal tumor imaging. PMID:26793782

  12. In vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by multimodal colposcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Qu, Yingjie; Pei, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Linlin; Zhang, Shiwu; Chang, Shufang; Smith, Zachary J.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for women in developing countries. Colposcopy plays an important role in early screening and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In this paper, we developed a multimodal colposcopy system that combines multispectral reflectance, autofluorescence, and RGB imaging for in vivo detection of CIN, which is capable of dynamically recording multimodal data of the same region of interest (ROI). We studied the optical properties of cervical tissue to determine multi-wavelengths for different imaging modalities. Advanced algorithms based on the second derivative spectrum and the fluorescence intensity were developed to differentiate cervical tissue into two categories: squamous normal (SN) and high grade (HG) dysplasia. In the results, the kinetics of cervical reflectance and autofluorescence characteristics pre and post acetic acid application were observed and analyzed, and the image segmentation revealed good consistency with the gold standard of histopathology. Our pilot study demonstrated the clinical potential of this multimodal colposcopic system for in vivo detection of cervical cancer.

  13. Correlations between expression levels of thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and efficacy of 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenqi; Wu, Yueqin; Zhang, Ping; Xi, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer (CRC) widely varies among patients; therefore, it is difficult to accurately predict chemotherapeutic responses. Some recent studies have found that key enzymes in the various metabolic pathways activated by 5-FU present potential predictors of treatment outcome. Of these enzymes, thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) are known to play important roles in the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Here, we measured expression levels of TS, TP, and DPD in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, CRC specimens and paracancerous tissue with normal mucosa by immunohistochemical and fluorescence real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. We found no significant differences in TS, TP, and DPD expression levels between CRC specimens and paracancerous tissues (P > 0.05), although overall survival and the chemotherapeutic effect were relatively poor in CRC patients with relatively high expression levels of TS, TP, and DPD, as compared to those with comparatively low expression levels (P < 0.05). Therefore, TS, TP, and DPD mRNA levels appear to be suitable indicators of the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy and prognosis of CRC. PMID:26722420

  14. Correlations between expression levels of thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and efficacy of 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenqi; Wu, Yueqin; Zhang, Ping; Xi, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer (CRC) widely varies among patients; therefore, it is difficult to accurately predict chemotherapeutic responses. Some recent studies have found that key enzymes in the various metabolic pathways activated by 5-FU present potential predictors of treatment outcome. Of these enzymes, thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) are known to play important roles in the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Here, we measured expression levels of TS, TP, and DPD in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, CRC specimens and paracancerous tissue with normal mucosa by immunohistochemical and fluorescence real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. We found no significant differences in TS, TP, and DPD expression levels between CRC specimens and paracancerous tissues (P > 0.05), although overall survival and the chemotherapeutic effect were relatively poor in CRC patients with relatively high expression levels of TS, TP, and DPD, as compared to those with comparatively low expression levels (P < 0.05). Therefore, TS, TP, and DPD mRNA levels appear to be suitable indicators of the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy and prognosis of CRC. PMID:26722420

  15. Modeling human endothelial cell transformation in vascular neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Victoria W.; MacKenzie, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC)-derived neoplasias range from benign hemangioma to aggressive metastatic angiosarcoma, which responds poorly to current treatments and has a very high mortality rate. The development of treatments that are more effective for these disorders will be expedited by insight into the processes that promote abnormal proliferation and malignant transformation of human ECs. The study of primary endothelial malignancy has been limited by the rarity of the disease; however, there is potential for carefully characterized EC lines and animal models to play a central role in the discovery, development and testing of molecular targeted therapies for vascular neoplasias. This review describes molecular alterations that have been identified in EC-derived neoplasias, as well as the processes that underpin the immortalization and tumorigenic conversion of ECs. Human EC lines, established through the introduction of defined genetic elements or by culture of primary tumor tissue, are catalogued and discussed in relation to their relevance as models of vascular neoplasia. PMID:24046386

  16. Immunoglobulin G fragment C receptor polymorphisms and KRAS mutations: are they useful biomarkers of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer treated with anti-EGFR-based therapy?

    PubMed

    Paez, David; Paré, Laia; Espinosa, Iñigo; Salazar, Juliana; del Rio, Elisabeth; Barnadas, Agustí; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2010-09-01

    KRAS mutations have been identified as a strong predictor of resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies. Besides inhibiting the EGFR pathway, anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies may exert antitumor effects through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Through this mechanism, the antibody fragment C portion (Fcγ) interacts with Fc receptors (FcγRs) expressed by immune effectors cells. We investigated the association of FcγR polymorphisms and KRAS mutation with the clinical outcome of 104 refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies. FcγRIIa-H131R and FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphisms were analyzed in genomic DNA using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system (Fluidigm, South Sanfrancisco, CA, USA). Tumor tissues from 96 cases were screened for KRAS mutations. KRAS mutation was associated with a lower response rate (RR) (P = 0.035) and a shorter progression-free survival (PFS) (3 vs 7 months; P = 0.36). FcγRIIa-H131R and FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphisms did not show statistically significant associations with response, PFS, or KRAS status. In the logistic regression analysis, KRAS status (P = 0.04) and skin toxicity (P = 0.03) were associated with RR. By multivariate analysis, the clinical risk classification (P = 0.006) and skin toxicity (P < 0.0001) were found to be independent risk factors for PFS. In conclusion, the FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIa polymorphisms are not useful as molecular markers for clinical outcome in mCRC patients. To date, the EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Classification), skin toxicity, and KRAS status are the only reliable biomarkers to identify patients that would benefit from anti-EGFR therapy. PMID:20550522

  17. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Million Strong Shop Join the Movement Share Your Story Check our Calendar Colorectal Support Community Latest News Help Wanted Read Blogs Get Social Free Printable Coloring Sheets Action Alerts About Our ...

  18. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on staging, see “ Colorectal cancer stages ” The normal colon and rectum The colon and rectum are parts ... through the anus . Types of cancer in the colon and rectum Adenocarcinomas make up more than 95% ...

  19. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Peter; Leon, Maria Elena

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a important public health problem: there are nearly one million new cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide each year and half a million deaths. Recent reports show that, in the US, it was the most frequent form of cancer among persons aged 75 years and older. Given that the majority of cancers occur in elder people and with the ageing of the population in mind, this observation gives further impetus to investigating prevention and treatment strategies among this subgroup of the population. Screening research, recommendations and implementation is an obvious priority. While there are many questions to be resolved, it is apparent that many facets of colorectal cancer are becoming increasingly understood and prospects for prevention are becoming apparent. Achieving colorectal cancer control is the immediate challenge. PMID:12421722

  20. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic fields, or radioactive substances to ... has spread to the liver. Ultrasound Ultrasound uses sound waves and their echoes to create images of the ...

  1. Role of S100 Proteins in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moravkova, Paula; Kohoutova, Darina; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Cyrany, Jiri; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The family of S100 proteins represents 25 relatively small (9–13 kD) calcium binding proteins. These proteins possess a broad spectrum of important intracellular and extracellular functions. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men (after lung and prostate cancer) and the second most frequent cancer in women (after breast cancer) worldwide. S100 proteins are involved in the colorectal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms: they enable proliferation, invasion, and migration of the tumour cells; furthermore, S100 proteins increase angiogenesis and activate NF-κβ signaling pathway, which plays a key role in the molecular pathogenesis especially of colitis-associated carcinoma. The expression of S100 proteins in the cancerous tissue and serum levels of S100 proteins might be used as a precise diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with suspected or already diagnosed colorectal neoplasia. Possibly, in the future, S100 proteins will be a therapeutic target for tailored anticancer therapy. PMID:26880885

  2. [Colorectal foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Thim, Troels; Laurberg, Søren

    2006-09-25

    A patient with a retained anally introduced colorectal foreign body or complications hereof needs appropriate treatment. The patient may be in danger and is certainly in discomfort. The problem is relatively rare; however, its incidence may be expected to increase. Guidelines for handling of the situation are lacking in many textbooks. Here, a suggestion for handling of a patient with a retained colorectal foreign body or complications hereof is presented. PMID:17032594

  3. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test. PMID:21954677

  4. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  5. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, W. J.; Moorehead, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma represents a major cause of cancer deaths in the United Kingdom. Tumours detected at an early or even premalignant stage have a better prognosis. In this review we consider the argument for screening for colorectal carcinomas and discuss the means available and the implications of implementing screening programmes using some of these methods. A suggestion is made for the more rational use of limited resources to target those at greatest risk. PMID:9185482

  6. Colorectal cancer in adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, A.; Renaut, A. J.; Whelan, J.; Taylor, I.

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, one of the most common malignancies among adults, is rare in adolescence. This low incidence coupled with non-specific symptoms and aggressive natural history leads to a poorer prognosis than in reported adult series. This article describes two cases of colorectal cancer in adolescents and reviews the literature regarding this rare condition. Earlier diagnosis and a greater understanding of the natural history may lead to improved treatment with concomitant improvements in survival. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10364965

  7. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too. PMID:26298897

  8. [Clinical characteristics of multiple endocrine neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Conte-Devolx, Bernard; Niccoli, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 2 (MEN2) are autosomal dominant inherited multiglandular diseases with familial and individual age-related penetrance and variable expression. The most frequent endocrine features of MEN1 are parathyroid involvement (> 95%), duodeno-pancreatic endocrine tissue involvement (80%), pituitary adenoma (30%), and adrenal cortex tumors (25%), with no clear syndromic variants. Identification of the germline MEN1 mutation confirms the diagnosis, but there is no phenotype-genotype correlation. All patients with MEN2 have medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The most distinctive MEN2 variants are MEN2A (MTC+pheochromocytoma+hyperparathyroidism), MEN2B (MTC+pheo), and isolated familial MTC (FMTC). The prognosis of MEN2 is linked to the progression of MTC, which depends mainly on the stage at diagnosis and the quality of initial surgical treatment. This emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and management. The specific RET codon mutation correlates with the MEN2 syndromic variant and with the age of onset and aggressiveness of MTC. Consequently, RET mutational status should guide major management decisions, such as whether and when to perform thyroidectomy. PMID:20669560

  9. Optical coherence tomography in vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Ronni; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Boven, Hester H.; Vincent, Andrew D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Beurden, Marc; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2012-11-01

    Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC) is a gynecological cancer with an incidence of two to three per 100,000 women. VSCC arises from vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), which is diagnosed through painful punch biopsy. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to differentiate between normal and VIN tissue. We hypothesize that (a) epidermal layer thickness measured in OCT images is different in normal tissue and VIN, and (b) quantitative analysis of the attenuation coefficient (μoct) extracted from OCT data differentiates VIN from normal vulvar tissue. Twenty lesions from 16 patients are imaged with OCT. Directly after data acquisition, a biopsy is performed. Epidermal thickness is measured and values of μoct are extracted from 200 OCT scans of normal and VIN tissue. For both methods, statistical analysis is performed using Paired Mann-Whitney-test. Correlation between the two methods is tested using a Spearman-correlation test. Both epidermal layer thickness as well as the μoct are different between normal vulvar tissue and VIN lesions (p<0.0001). Moreover, no correlation is found between the epidermal layer thickness and μoct. This study demonstrates that both the epidermal thickness and the attenuation coefficient of vulvar epithelial tissue containing VIN are different from that of normal vulvar tissue.

  10. Neoplasia of the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P

    1998-12-01

    Genital neoplasms in the male horse are relatively uncommon. Squamous cell carcinomas and squamous papillomas are the most commonly diagnosed neoplasms of the penis and prepuce. Geldings appear to be overrepresented for these types of neoplasms, and accumulation of smegma may be a contributing factor. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for salvaging these organs before lesions become excessively large and invasive or are allowed to metastasize. Newer treatment modalities such as 5-fluorouracil appear to be promising alternatives to surgical excision. Although generally considered to be uncommon, testicular tumors may occur more frequently than previously thought and have the potential for devastating effects on stallion fertility. Cryptorchidism appears to play a role in the development of equine testicular tumors, especially teratomas. Seminoma is by far the most common testicular tumor of the mature stallion. Seminomas are rapidly growing tumors with a greater potential to metastasize in the horse than in other domestic species. Leydig cell and Sertoli cell tumors have been reported but are relatively rare in the stallion. Orchiectomy is the standard treatment for most testicular tumors. In certain circumstances, however, such as neoplasia occurring in the only functional testis, local cryotherapy of testicular tumors may prolong the breeding career of an affected stallion. PMID:9891722

  11. Quantitative architectural analysis of bronchial intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaud, Martial; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Korbelik, Jagoda; Lam, Stephen

    2000-04-01

    Considerable variation exists among pathologist in the interpretation of intraepithelial neoplasia making it difficult to determine the natural history of these lesion and to establish management guidelines for chemoprevention. The aim of the study is to evaluate architectural features of pre-neoplastic progression in lung cancer, and to search for a correlation between architectural index and conventional pathology. Quantitative architectural analysis was performed on a series of normal lung biopsies and Carcinoma In Situ (CIS). Centers of gravity of the nuclei within a pre-defined region of interest were used as seeds to generate a Voronoi Diagram. About 30 features derived from the Voronoi diagram, its dual the Delaunay tessellation, and the Minimum Spanning Tree were extracted. A discriminant analysis was performed to separate between the two groups. The architectural Index was calculated for each of the bronchial biopsies that were interpreted as hyperplasia, metaplasia, mild, moderate or severe dysplasia by conventional histopathology criteria. As a group, lesions classified as CIS by conventional histopathology criteria could be distinguished from dysplasia using the architectural Index. Metaplasia was distinct from hyperplasia and hyperplasia from normal. There was overlap between severe and moderate dysplasia but mild dysplasia could be distinguished form moderate dysplasia. Bronchial intraepithelial neoplastic lesions can be degraded objectively by architectural features. Combination of architectural features and nuclear morphometric features may improve the quantitation of the changes occurring during the intra-epithelial neoplastic process.

  12. Relationship of ECL cells and gastric neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, H. L.; Brenna, E.; Sandvik, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell in the oxyntic mucosa has a key role in the regulation of gastric secretion since it synthesizes and releases the histamine regulating the acid secretion from the parietal cell. Gastrin is the main regulator of the ECL cell function and growth. Long-term hypergastrinemia induces ECL cell hyperplasia, and if continued, neoplasia. ECL cell carcinoids occur in man after long-term hypergastrinemia in conditions like pernicious anemia and gastrinoma. There is also accumulating evidence that a proportion of gastric carcinomas of the diffuse type is derived from the ECL cell. Furthermore, the ECL cell may, by producing substances with angiogenic effects (histamine and basic fibroblast growth factor), be particularly prone to develop malignant tumors. Although the general opinion is that gastrin itself has a direct effect on the oxyntic mucosal stem cell, it cannot be excluded that the general trophic effect of gastrin on the oxyntic mucosa is mediated by histamine or other substances from the ECL cell, and that the ECL cell, therefore, could play a role also in the tumorigenesis/carcinogenesis of gastric carcinomas of intestinal type. PMID:10461363

  13. Anal intraepitelial neoplasia: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Elorza, Garazi; Saralegui, Yolanda; Enríquez-Navascués, Jose María; Placer, Carlos; Velaz, Leyre

    2016-01-01

    Anal intraepitelial neoplasia (AIN) constitutes a major health problem in certain risk groups, such as patients with immunosuppression of varied origin, males who have sexual relations with other males, and females with a previous history of vaginal or cervical abnormalities in cytology. Its relationship with the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been well documented; however, many of the factors involved in the progression and regression of the viral infection to dysplasia and anal carcinoma are unknown. AIN can be diagnosed through cytology of the anal canal or biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy. However, the need for these techniques in high-risk groups remains controversial. Treatment depends on the risk factors and given the high morbidity and high recurrence rates the utility of the different local treatments is still a subject of debate. Surgical biopsy is justified only in the case of progression suggesting lesions. The role of the vaccination in high-risk patients as primary prevention has been debated by different groups. However, there is no general consensus on its use or on the need for screening this population. PMID:26765233

  14. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  15. Future of Minimally Invasive Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Whealon, Matthew; Vinci, Alessio; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is slowly taking over as the preferred operative approach for colorectal diseases. However, many of the procedures remain technically difficult. This article will give an overview of the state of minimally invasive surgery and the many advances that have been made over the last two decades. Specifically, we discuss the introduction of the robotic platform and some of its benefits and limitations. We also describe some newer techniques related to robotics. PMID:27582647

  16. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues. PMID:27130618

  17. Phase III Noninferiority Trial Comparing Irinotecan With Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Previously Treated With Fluorouracil: N9841

    PubMed Central

    Kim, George P.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Philip, Philip A.; Mitchell, Edith; Mathews, Abraham P.; Fitch, Tom R.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Alberts, Steven R.; Pitot, Henry C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this multicenter phase III trial was to determine whether overall survival (OS) of fluorouracil (FU) -refractory patients was noninferior when treated with second-line infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4; arm B) versus irinotecan (arm A). Cross-over to the other treatment on disease progression was mandated. Patients and Methods Patients who experienced treatment failure with one prior FU-based therapy and had not received prior irinotecan or oxaliplatin, either for metastatic disease or within 6 months of adjuvant FU therapy, were randomly assigned to arm A (irinotecan 350 or 300 mg/m2 every 3 weeks) or arm B (FOLFOX4). Results A total of 491 patients were randomly assigned (arm A, n = 245; arm B, n = 246); 288 (59%) had experienced treatment failure with FU for metastatic colorectal cancer. Two hundred twenty-seven patients (46%) received protocol-mandated third-line therapy (arm A, 43%; arm B, 57%). Median survival was 13.8 months (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.0 months) for initial treatment with FOLFOX4 and 14.3 months (95% CI, 12.0 to 15.9 months) for irinotecan (P = .38; hazard ratio = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.1). Response rates (RR; 28% v 15.5%; P = .0009) and time to progression (TTP; 6.2 v 4.4 months; P = .0009) were significantly superior with FOLFOX4. In the nonrandom subset of patients who crossed over, RR and TTP improvements with FOLFOX4 continued into third-line treatment. Irinotecan therapy was associated with more grade 3 nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and febrile neutropenia; FOLFOX4 was associated with more neutropenia and paresthesias. Conclusion In patients who experienced treatment failure with front-line FU therapy, OS does not significantly differ whether second-line therapy begins with irinotecan or FOLFOX4. FOLFOX4 produces higher RR and longer TTP. Both arms had notable OS in patients who experienced treatment failure with first-line FU therapy. PMID:19380443

  18. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  19. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Ulcerative Colitis Neoplasia: Single Non-Dysplastic Biopsies Distinguish Progressors from Non-Progressors

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, Mary P.; Skacel, Marek; Crispin, David A.; Hoff, Peter D.; Emond, Mary J.; Lai, Lisa A.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop colorectal neoplasia. At present, identification of this subset is markedly limited and necessitates lifelong colonoscopic surveillance for the entire ulcerative colitis population. Better risk markers are needed to focus surveillance onto the patients most likely to benefit. Using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed single, non-dysplastic biopsies from three patient groups: ulcerative colitis progressors (n=9) with cancer or high-grade dysplasia at a mean distance of 18 cm from the analyzed site; ulcerative colitis nonprogressors (n=8) without dysplasia during long-term surveillance; and non-ulcerative colitis normal controls (n=2). Genomic DNA from fresh colonic epithelium purified from stroma was hybridized to 287 (low-density) and 4,342 (higher-density) feature bacterial artificial chromosome arrays. Sample-to-reference fluorescence ratios were calculated for individual chromosomal targets and globally across the genome. The low-density arrays yielded pronounced genomic gains and losses in 3 of 9 (33%) ulcerative colitis progressors but in none of the 10 control patients. Identical DNA samples analyzed on the higher density arrays, using a combination of global and individual high variance assessments, distinguished all 9 progressors from all 10 controls. These data confirm that genomic alterations in ulcerative colitis progressors are widespread, even involving single non-dysplastic biopsies far distant from neoplasia. They therefore show promise toward eliminating full colonoscopic surveillance with extensive biopsy sampling in the majority of ulcerative colitis patients. PMID:20802465

  20. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. Asad Umar, ... know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  1. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... section Colorectal Cancer 4 of 6 sections Take Action! Take Action: Get Tested The best way to prevent colorectal ... I at Risk? 5 of 6 sections Take Action: Healthy Habits Quit smoking. People who smoke are ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  3. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  4. Endobronchial metastases of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosado Dawid, Natalia-Zuberoa; Villegas Fernández, Francisco Ramón; Rodríguez Cruz, María Del Mar; Ramos Meca, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal metastases affecting trachea or bronchi are highly unusual. Up to 26% of endotracheal/endobronchial metastases are due to colorectal cancer. Treatment and palliative management rely on a multidisciplinary team to improve their quality of life. PMID:26856850

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  6. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Mandelson, Margaret T; Adams, Scott V; Wernli, Karen J; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A; Makar, Karen W

    2011-01-01

    We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms (rs1051740 and rs2234922), and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n = 519), HPs (n = 691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n = 227) and polyp-free controls (n = 772) receiving a colonoscopy from December 2004 to September 2007 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR = 2.0, 1.2-3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥ 22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.4), HPs (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.7-3.3), and both types (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.8-4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location. PMID:21598178

  7. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  8. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  9. Pathophysiology of ocular surface squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi; Sagoo, Mandeep S.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is strongly associated with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). Africa has the highest incidence rates in the world. Most lesions occur at the limbus within the interpalpebral fissure particularly the nasal sector. The nasal limbus receives the highest intensity of sunlight. Limbal epithelial crypts are concentrated nasally and contain niches of limbal epithelial stem cells in the basal layer. It is possible that these are the progenitor cells in OSSN. OSSN arises in the basal epithelial cells spreading towards the surface which resembles the movement of corneo-limbal stem cell progeny before it later invades through the basement membrane below. UV radiation damages DNA producing pyrimidine dimers in the DNA chain. Specific CC → TT base pair dimer transformations of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene occur in OSSN allowing cells with damaged DNA past the G1-S cell cycle checkpoint. UV radiation also causes local and systemic photoimmunosuppression and reactivates latent viruses such as HPV. The E7 proteins of HPV promote proliferation of infected epithelial cells via the retinoblastoma gene while E6 proteins prevent the p53 tumour suppressor gene from effecting cell-cycle arrest of DNA-damaged and infected cells. Immunosuppression from UV radiation, HIV and vitamin A deficiency impairs tumour immune surveillance allowing survival of aberrant cells. Tumour growth and metastases are enhanced by; telomerase reactivation which increases the number of cell divisions a cell can undergo; vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that destroy the intercellular matrix between cells. Despite these potential triggers, the disease is usually unilateral. It is unclear how HPV reaches the conjunctiva. PMID:25447808

  10. Upregulation of nemo-like kinase is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; He, Jian; Du, Yan; Gao, Xian-Hua; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qi-Zhi; Chang, Wen-Jun; Cao, Guang-Wen; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression and oncogenic role of nemo-like kinase (NLK) in colorectal cancer. METHODS: Expression of NLK protein was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tissue specimens from 56 cases of normal colorectal mucosa, 51 cases of colorectal adenoma, and 712 cases of colorectal cancer. In addition, NLK expression was knocked down using a lentivirus carrying NLK small hairpin RNA in colorectal cancer cells. Cell viability methylthiazoletetrazolium assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry cell cycle assays, Transwell migration assays, and gene expression assays were performed to explore its role on proliferation and migration of colorectal cancer. RESULTS: Expression of NLK protein progressively increased in tissues from the normal mucosa through adenoma to various stages of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of NLK protein was associated with advanced tumor-lymph node-metastasis stages, poor differentiation, lymph node and distant metastases, and a higher recurrence rate of colorectal cancer (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses showed that NLK expression was an independent prognostic factor to predict overall survival (hazard ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.66-3.98; P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.40-2.74: P < 0.001) of colorectal cancer patients. Furthermore, knockdown of NLK expression in colorectal cancer cell lines reduced cell viability, colony formation, and migration, and arrested tumor cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the gene level, knockdown of NLK expression inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in colorectal cancer cells. CONCLUSION: NLK overexpression is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer and knockdown of NLK expression inhibits colorectal cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26269673

  11. Development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in chinchilla rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Montelongo Solís, Paola; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Cortés Trujillo, Lucero; Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to describe the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in Chinchilla rabbit by administration of estradiol. The study was performed in rabbits distributed into two groups: control and 17 β-estradiol. The determination of histological alterations and POU5F1 and c-kit proteins employed as biomarkers for the diagnosis of this neoplasia was carried out. Testicular descent and complete spermatogenesis were observed in the control group. The protein biomarkers were negative. However, in the rabbits treated with estradiol, the testes remained undescended with the gonocytes undifferentiated to spermatogonia. There were histological lesions owing to germ cell neoplasia in situ and positive to POU5F1 and c-kit proteins. These findings indicate that the chinchilla rabbit is an ideal model to study this neoplasia in which the histological characteristics and biomarkers of the disease could be clearly observed. Using this model we suggested that the persisting gonocytes could be responsible for the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ. PMID:26617392

  12. Faecal calprotectin and faecal occult blood tests in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Tibble, J; Sigthorsson, G; Foster, R; Sherwood, R; Fagerhol, M; Bjarnason, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Testing for faecal occult blood has become an accepted technique of non-invasive screening for colorectal neoplasia but lack of sensitivity remains a problem. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of faecal calprotectin and faecal occult blood in patients with colorectal cancer and colonic polyps.
METHODS—Faecal calprotectin and occult blood were assessed in 62 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 233 patients referred for colonoscopy. The range of normality for faecal calprotectin (0.5-10.5 mg/l) was determined from 96 healthy subjects.
RESULTS—Median faecal calprotectin concentration in the 62 patients with colorectal carcinoma (101 mg/l, 95% confidence interval (CI) 57-133) differed significantly from normal (2.3 mg/l, 95% CI 1.6-5.0) with 90% of patients having elevated levels (normal <10 mg/l) whereas only 36/62 (58%) had positive faecal occult bloods. There was no significant difference in faecal calprotectin levels when considering location or Dukes' staging of tumour. Percentage positivity of faecal occult bloods was significantly higher for Dukes' stage C and D cancers compared with Dukes' A and B. In the colonoscopy group, 29 patients with adenomatous polyps were detected in whom the median faecal calprotectin was 12 mg/l (95% CI 2.9-32). Sensitivity for detection of adenomatous polyps was 55% using the calprotectin method and 10% using faecal occult blood testing. The overall sensitivity and specificity of calprotectin for colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps as a combined group was 79% and 72%, respectively, compared with a sensitivity and specificity of faecal occult blood of 43% and 92%.
CONCLUSIONS—Faecal calprotectin is a simple and sensitive non-invasive marker of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps. It is more sensitive than faecal occult blood tests for detection of colorectal neoplasia at the cost of a somewhat lower specificity.


Keywords: colorectal

  13. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  14. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955). PMID:22280244

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of fecal immunochemical test in average- and familial-risk colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Inés; Hernandez, Vicent; González-Mao, Carmen; Rivera, Concepción; Iglesias, Felipe; Alves, María Teresa; Cid, Lucía; Soto, Santiago; De-Castro, Luisa; Vega, Pablo; Hermo, Jose Antonio; Macenlle, Ramiro; Martínez, Alfonso; Estevez, Pamela; Cid, Estela; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Portillo, Isabel; Bujanda, Luis; Fernández-Seara, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background There is little information about the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in familial-risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Objectives The objective of this article is to investigate whether FIT diagnostic accuracy for advanced neoplasia (AN) differs between average and familial-risk (first-degree relative) patients. Methods A total of 1317 consecutive participants (595 familial) who collected one stool sample before performing a colonoscopy as a CRC screening test were included. FIT diagnostic accuracy for AN was evaluated with Chi-square test at a 20 µg hemoglobin/g of feces cut-off value. Finally, we determined which variables were independently related to AN. Results An AN was found in 151 (11.5%) patients. The overall accuracy was not statistically different between both cohorts for AN (88.4%, 91.7%; p = 0.051). At the cut-off stablished, differences in FIT sensitivity (31.1%, 40.6%; p = 0.2) or specificity (96.5%, 97.3%; p = 0.1) were not statistically significant. Finally, independent variables such as sex (male) (odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–3.1), age (50–65, >65 years) (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.3; OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.1), previous colonoscopy (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.9) and FIT ≥20 µg/g feces (OR 17.7, 95% CI 10.8–29.1) were associated with AN diagnosis. Conclusions FIT accuracy for AN detection is equivalent in average and familial-risk CRC screening cohorts. PMID:25452848

  16. SCRIB expression is deregulated in human prostate cancer, and its deficiency in mice promotes prostate neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen B.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Dow, Lukas E.; Ryan, Andrew; Tennstedt, Pierre; Bogani, Debora; Elsum, Imogen; Greenfield, Andy; Tuveson, David A.; Simon, Ronald; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of cellular polarity is a hallmark of epithelial cancers, raising the possibility that regulators of polarity have a role in suppressing tumorigenesis. The Scribble complex is one of at least three interacting protein complexes that have a critical role in establishing and maintaining epithelial polarity. In human colorectal, breast, and endometrial cancers, expression of the Scribble complex member SCRIB is often mislocalized and deregulated. Here, we report that Scrib is indispensable for prostate homeostasis in mice. Scrib heterozygosity initiated prostate hyperplasia, while targeted biallelic Scrib loss predisposed mice to prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Mechanistically, Scrib was shown to negatively regulate the MAPK cascade to suppress tumorigenesis. Further analysis revealed that prostate-specific loss of Scrib in mice combined with expression of an oncogenic Kras mutation promoted the progression of prostate cancer that recapitulated the human disease. The clinical significance of the work in mice was highlighted by our observation that SCRIB deregulation strongly correlated with poor survival in human prostate cancer. These data suggest that the polarity network could provide a new avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21965329

  17. Genetic reconstruction of individual colorectal tumor histories

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jen-Lan; Yatabe, Yasushi; Salovaara, Reijo; Järvinen, Heikki J.; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Tavaré, Simon; Shibata, Darryl

    2000-01-01

    It is difficult to observe human tumor progression as precursor lesions are systematically removed. Alternatives to direct observations, commonly used to reveal the hidden past of species and populations, are sequence comparisons or molecular clocks. Noncoding microsatellite (MS) loci were employed as molecular tumor clocks in 13 human mutator phenotype (MSI+) colorectal tumors. Quantitative analysis revealed that specific patterns of somatic MS mutations accumulate with division after loss of mismatch repair (MMR). Tumors had unique patterns of MS mutation, and, therefore, based on this model, each tumor had its own unique history. Loss of MMR occurred very early relative to terminal clonal expansion, with an estimated average of 2,300 divisions since loss of MMR and 280 divisions since expansion. Contrary to the classical adenoma-cancer sequence, MSI+ adenomas were nearly as old as cancers (2,000 versus 2,400 divisions since loss of MMR). Negative clinical examinations preceded six tumors, independently documenting an absence of visible precursors during early MSI+ adenoma or cancer progression. These findings further extend a window beyond visible progression since loss of MMR appears to start a genetic phase involving clone sizes or phenotypes below a threshold of clinical detection. This previously occult prologue before visible neoplasia is longer and therefore likely more important than generally appreciated. PMID:10655514

  18. Extended evaluation of a Phase 1/2 trial on dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival after immunizations with an advanced generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine in late stage colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Joseph P.; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S.; Rice, Adrian; Latchman, Yvette; Xu, Younong; Messerschmidt, Gerald L.; Chaudhry, Arvind; Morse, Michael A.; Jones, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    A phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival on metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients after immunotherapy with an advanced generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine was performed. We report our extended observations on long-term overall survival and further immune analyses on a subset of treated patients including assessment of cytolytic T cell responses, T-regulatory (Treg) to T-effector (Teff) cell ratios, flow cytometry on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and determination of HLA-A2 status. An overall survival of 20% (median survival of 11 months) was observed during long-term follow-up and no long-term adverse effects were reported. Cytolytic T cell responses increased after immunizations and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were induced whether or not patients were HLA-A2 positive or Ad5 immune. PBMC samples from a small subset of patients were available for follow-up immune analyses. It was observed that the levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) specific CMI activity decreased from their peak values during follow-up in 5 patients analyzed. Preliminary results revealed that activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in a post immunization sample exhibiting high CMI activity. Treg to Teff cell ratios were assessed and samples from 3 of 5 patients exhibited a decrease in Treg to Teff cell ratio during the treatment protocol. Based upon the favorable safety and immunogenicity data obtained, we plan to perform an extensive immunologic and survival analysis on mCRC patients to be enrolled in a randomized/controlled clinical trial that investigates Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) as a single agent with booster immunizations. PMID:25956394

  19. No evidence for human papillomavirus in the etiology of colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Galloway, Denise A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Makar, Karen W.; Potter, John D.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background While some studies have reported detection of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal tumors, others have not. Methods We examined the association between oncogenic HPV infection and colorectal polyps in a case-control study of individuals with colorectal adenomas (n=167), hyperplastic polyps (n=87), and polyp-free controls (n=250). We performed real-time PCR for HPV-16 /18 DNA, and SPF PCR covering 43 HPV types, on lesional and normal colorectal tissue samples. Plasma antibodies for oncogenic HPV types were assessed via a bead-based multiplex Luminex assay. Results HPV DNA was not found in any of the 609 successfully assayed colorectal tissue samples from adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, normal biopsies adjacent to polyps, or normal biopsies of the rectum of disease-free controls. Also, there was no association between HPV seropositivity for all oncogenic HPV types combined, for either polyp type, and for men or women. When analyses were restricted to participants without a previous history of polyps, among men [adenomas (n=31), hyperplastic polyps (n=28), and controls (n=68)], there was an association between seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps when all oncogenic HPV types were combined (odds ratio=3.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–7.9). Conclusions Overall, our findings do not support an etiologic relationship between HPV and colorectal adenomas or hyperplastic polyps; however, our finding suggesting an association between HPV seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps in men may warrant further investigations. Impact After stringent controls for contamination and three methods to assess HPV infection, we report no evidence for HPV in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia for either men or women. PMID:21817125

  20. Comparison of Fecal Occult Blood Tests for Colorectal Cancer Screening in an Alaska Native Population With High Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection, 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Ellen; Asay, Elvin; Roberts, Diana; Haverkamp, Donald; Perdue, David; Bruce, Michael G.; Sacco, Frank; Espey, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Alaska Native colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. CRC screening using guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (gFOBT) are not recommended for Alaska Native people because of false-positive results associated with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated hemorrhagic gastritis. This study evaluated whether the newer immunochemical FOBT (iFOBT) resulted in a lower false-positive rate and higher specificity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia than gFOBT in a population with elevated prevalence of H. pylori infection. Methods We used a population-based sample of 304 asymptomatic Alaska Native adults aged 40 years or older undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy (April 2008–January 2012). Results Specificity differed significantly (P < .001) between gFOBT (76%; 95% CI, 71%–81%) and iFOBT (92%; 95% CI, 89%–96%). Among H. pylori-positive participants (54%), specificity of iFOBT was even higher (93% vs 69%). Overall, sensitivity did not differ significantly (P = .73) between gFOBT (29%) and iFOBT (36%). Positive predictive value was 11% for gFOBT and 32% for iFOBT. Conclusion The iFOBT had a significantly higher specificity than gFOBT, especially in participants with current H. pylori infection. The iFOBT represents a potential strategy for expanding CRC screening among Alaska Native and other populations with elevated prevalence of H. pylori, especially where access to screening endoscopy is limited. PMID:24721216

  1. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  2. Perspectives of colorectal cancer screening in Germany 2009.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian

    2009-10-15

    Adequate screening methods can decrease colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality. The guaiac test for fecal occult-blood (FOBT) is part of the German CRC Screening Program since 1970 and has evidence level Ia. In randomized multicenter-studies FOBT has an average sensitivity of 24% and decreases CRC mortality up to 30%. Immunological tests for human haemoglobin (iFOBT) show better performance characteristics than guaiac FOBT, with augmented sensitivity and specificity. However, the single tests show wide differences in diagnostic performance and iFOBT is not yet covered by insurance companies although it should replace the guaiac test for CRC screening. Visual colonoscopy, which was introduced to the German National Cancer Screening Program in 2002, is the gold standard for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. From 2003 to 2007 more than 2.8 million examinations have been documented in Germany. The prevalence of adenomas is around 20% and of CRC about 0.7% to 1.0% of the screenings. Seventy percent of the carcinomas detected during screening are in an early stage (UICC I and II). Furthermore, screening colonoscopy is a cost saving procedure with a low complication rate (0.25% overall). Insurance companies save 216€ for each screening colonoscopy mainly by prevention of neoplasia due to polypectomy. In Germany, virtual colonography by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging still lacks standardization of the hard and software. In experienced centres the sensitivity for CRC and large polyps of CT colonography is comparable to colonoscopy but in meta-analyses the ranking is lower. New technologies like computer-aided colonoscopies with sheath or double balloon techniques are coming up as well as capsule colonoscopy, which sensitivity for large polyps is about 70%. Advised by his physician, the patient can choose his most acceptable examination method from this whole set of screening tools. PMID:21160645

  3. Use of Vandetanib in Metastatic Medullary Carcinoma of Thyroid in a Pediatric Patient With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia 2B.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vidya K; Ronghe, Milind; MacGregor, Fiona B; Bradshaw, Nicola; Davidson, Rosemarie; Welbury, Richard; Reed, Nicholas; Shaikh, Mohamad G

    2016-03-01

    We describe a child with advanced, metastatic, inoperable medullary carcinoma of thyroid associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B and rearranged during transfection mutation with a positive response to vandetanib treatment. He responded well with a fall in calcitonin levels and a reduction in size of the thyroid malignancy, lymph nodes, and pulmonary metastases. He has been on vandetanib for 4 years with good clinical and biochemical response. Vandetanib has a role in the treatment of patients including children with inoperable locally advanced and metastatic medullary carcinoma of thyroid. More information is needed on its use in children and long-term outcome. PMID:26479990

  4. Fusobacterium nucleatum and T-cells in Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Yamauchi, Mai; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Nowak, Jonathan A.; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Kostic, Alecsandar D.; Giannakis, Marios; Watanabe, Hideo; Bullman, Susan; Milner, Danny A.; Harris, Curtis C.; Giovannucci, Edward; Garraway, Levi A.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Dranoff, Glenn; Chan, Andrew T.; Garrett, Wendy S.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Importance Evidence indicates a complex link between gut microbiome, immunity, and intestinal tumorigenesis. To target the microbiota and immunity for colorectal cancer prevention and therapy, a better understanding of the relationship between microorganisms and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment is needed. Experimental evidence suggests that Fusobacterium nucleatum may promote colonic neoplasia development by down-regulating antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Objective To test the hypothesis that higher amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum in colorectal carcinoma tissue is associated with lower density of T-cells in tumor tissue. Design A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on colorectal carcinoma cases in two U.S. nationwide prospective cohort studies. The amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum in colorectal carcinoma tissue was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay; we equally dichotomized positive cases (high versus low). Multivariable ordinal logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess associations of the amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum with densities (quartiles) of T-cells in tumor tissue, controlling for clinical and tumor molecular features, including microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, LINE-1 methylation, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status. We adjusted two-sided α level to 0.013 for multiple hypothesis testing. Setting The Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Participants 598 colon and rectal carcinoma cases. Main outcomes and measures Densities of CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO (PTPRC)+, and FOXP3+ T-cells in tumor tissue, determined by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis. Results Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in colorectal carcinoma tissue in 76 (13%) of 598 cases. Compared with Fusobacterium nucleatum-negative cases, Fusobacterium nucleatum-high cases were inversely associated with the density of CD3+ T

  5. Phase I and II studies of the combination of recombinant human interferon-gamma and 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ajani, J A; Rios, A A; Ende, K; Abbruzzese, J L; Edwards, C; Faintuch, J S; Saks, S; Gutterman, J U; Levin, B

    1989-04-01

    Based on the in vitro and in vivo data suggesting synergistic cytolysis by the combination of 5-fluorouracil and interferon-gamma against a variety of malignant cell lines including a human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29), we initiated studies in patients with advanced colon or rectal carcinoma. Forty-six patients received 5-fluorouracil as an intravenous injection on days 1-5 and recombinant human interferon-gamma as an intramuscular injection on days 1-14, followed by a rest period of 14 days; courses were repeated every 28 days. In the phase I study, cohorts of two patients received a stepwise dose level increase to achieve the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), at which a total of six patients were studied. The dose levels constituting the MTD were as follows: 5-fluorouracil (500 g/m2/day) and recombinant gamma-interferon (0.5 mg/m2/day). Four patients achieved a partial response in the phase I study. In the phase II study, 30 patients received therapy at the MTD. Among 29 evaluable patients in the phase II study, two patients achieved a partial response. Common toxicities included malaise, fever, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea. Transient severe myelosuppression was common but did not result in significant morbidity. Our data suggest that the combination of 5-fluorouracil and recombinant gamma-interferon did not have the same antitumor effect in patients as it had in the preclinical experiments. PMID:2499663

  6. Expression of TMEM207 in Colorectal Cancer: Relation between TMEM207 and Intelectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kenichi; Saigo, Chiemi; Kito, Yusuke; Sakuratani, Takuji; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Recent research advances highlighted an intestinal goblet cell-produced lectin, intelectin-1 (also known as omentin-1), as a tumor suppressor. One study indicated that downregulation of intelectin-1 may be related to the unfavorable prognosis among patients with colorectal carcinoma at an advanced stage. The present study was aimed at analyzing the expression of a hitherto uncharacterized transmembrane protein TMEM207 in colorectal carcinoma, and we found that the TMEM207 function is linked to intelectin-1 processing. With specific antibodies, TMEM207 immunoreactivity was detected in 38 of 216 colorectal cancer tissue samples. TMEM207 immunoreactivity correlated inversely with lymph node metastatic status (p < 0.01). TMEM207 expression significantly correlated with the mucinous phenotype of colorectal carcinoma. A coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed an interaction between intelectin-1 and TMEM207 in colorectal cancer cells. A proximal ligation assay indicated that intelectin-1 and TMEM207 were colocalized to the cytoplasm of the colorectal cancer cells. A small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of TMEM207 increased polyubiquitination and proteasome degradation of intelectin-1 in cultured colorectal cancer cells and decreased intelectin-1 secretion. These findings indicate that a loss of TMEM207 expression leads to insufficient intelectin-1 production thus promoting colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26819645

  7. Characteristics of and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in young adults in a screening population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Jo, Hee Bum; Kwack, Won Gun; Jeong, Yun Jin; Yoon, Yeo-Jin; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate prevalence and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in adults aged < 50 years, for whom screening is not recommended. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared prevalence and characteristics of colorectal and advanced adenomas in patients aged < 50 years who underwent colonoscopy screening with subjects aged ≥ 50 years. To evaluate risk factors for colorectal and advanced adenoma in young adults, we used multivariable logistic regression models. Colorectal neoplasm characteristics were evaluated and compared with those in older patients. RESULTS: Among 2819 patients included, prevalences of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma were 19.7% and 1.5%, respectively. As patient age increased, so did the prevalence of colorectal neoplasm. However, prevalence of advanced adenoma did not differ between age-groups 45-49 years and ≥ 50 years (OR = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.17-1.07, P = 0.070). In younger age-group (< 50 years), colorectal adenoma was significantly associated with older age, waist circumference (OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.15-2.55, P = 0.008), and current smoking (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.07-2.41, P = 0.023). Alcohol consumption was an independent risk factor for colorectal advanced adenoma (OR = 3.69, 95%CI: 1.08-12.54, P = 0.037). Multiple neoplasms and large neoplasms (≥ 1 cm) were more prevalent in subjects ≥ 50 years. CONCLUSION: Current screening strategies for colorectal cancer may need to be amended to account for patient age, especially in young subjects with abdominal obesity, current smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:26973394

  8. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  9. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  10. In vivo and in vitro hyperspectral imaging of cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojian; Zheng, Wenli; Bu, Yanggao; Chang, Shufang; Tong, Qingping; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a prevalent disease in many developing countries. Colposcopy is the most common approach for screening cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, its clinical efficacy heavily relies on the examiner's experience. Spectroscopy is a potentially effective method for noninvasive diagnosis of cervical neoplasia. In this paper, we introduce a hyperspectral imaging technique for noninvasive detection and quantitative analysis of cervical neoplasia. A hyperspectral camera is used to collect the reflectance images of the entire cervix under xenon lamp illumination, followed by standard colposcopy examination and cervical tissue biopsy at both normal and abnormal sites in different quadrants. The collected reflectance data are calibrated and the hyperspectral signals are extracted. Further spectral analysis and image processing works are carried out to classify tissue into different types based on the spectral characteristics at different stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The hyperspectral camera is also coupled with a lab microscope to acquire the hyperspectral transmittance images of the pathological slides. The in vivo and the in vitro imaging results are compared with clinical findings to assess the accuracy and efficacy of the method.

  11. HISTOLOGICAL PROGRESSION OF HEPATIC NEOPLASIA IN RAINBOW TROUT ('SALMO GAIRDNERI')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The histological progression of hepatic neoplasia has not been as systematically studied in rainbow trout as it has been in rodents. Two putative preneoplastic lesions have been identified, the eosinophilic focus and the basophilic focus, but whether these correspond to similar l...

  12. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  13. Endocrinopathies in Survivors of Childhood Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Nicole; Chemaitilly, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in cancer treatments have increased the number of survivors of childhood cancers. Endocrinopathies are common complications following cancer therapy and may occur decades later. The objective of the current review is to address the main endocrine abnormalities detected in childhood cancer survivors including disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, thyroid, puberty, gonads, bone, body composition, and glucose metabolism. PMID:25295241

  14. Toward a Molecular Classification of Colorectal Cancer: The Role of MGMT

    PubMed Central

    Minoo, Parham

    2013-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair enzyme with the ability to protect cells from DNA mutations by removing alkyl groups from the O6 position of guanine. Colon mucosa is exposed to the direct effects of environmental carcinogens and therefore maintaining a proficient DNA repair system is very important to stay protected against DNA mutagenesis. Loss of MGMT expression is almost exclusively associated with methylation of CpG islands in the MGMT gene promoter region which is found in approximately 40% of colorectal cancers. The role of MGMT loss in colorectal tumorigenesis is complex but numerous studies have documented methylation of this gene even in the normal appearing mucosa as well as in aberrant crypt foci, suggesting that MGMT methylation can be regarded as an early event or “field defect” in colon cancer neoplasia. The focus of this perspective is the role of MGMT in different pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis as well as the implication of this molecule in treatment decisions in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:24151575

  15. Correlating tumor metabolic progression index measured by serial FDG PET-CT, apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood genomics to patient’s outcome in advanced colorectal cancer: the CORIOLAN study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may present various behaviours that define different courses of tumor evolution. There is presently no available tool designed to assess tumor aggressiveness, despite the fact that this is considered to have a major impact on patient outcome. Methods/Design CORIOLAN is a single-arm prospective interventional non-therapeutic study aiming mainly to assess the natural tumor metabolic progression index (TMPI) measured by serial FDG PET-CT without any intercurrent antitumor therapy as a prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in patients with mCRC. Secondary objectives of the study aim to test the TMPI as a prognostic marker for progression-free survival (PFS), to assess the prognostic value of baseline tumor FDG uptake on PFS and OS, to compare TMPI to classical clinico-biological assessment of prognosis, and to test the prognostic value on OS and PFS of MRI-based apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and variation of vADC using voxel-based diffusion maps. Additionally, this study intends to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that correlate with progression of tumors and the OS of patients with mCRC. Consequently, this analysis will provide information about the signaling pathways that determine the natural and therapy-free course of the disease. Finally, it would be of great interest to investigate whether in a population of patients with mCRC, for which at present no known effective therapy is available, tumor aggressiveness is related to elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to patient outcome. Discussion Tumor aggressiveness is one of the major determinants of patient outcome in advanced disease. Despite its importance, supported by findings reported in the literature of extreme outcomes for patients with mCRC treated with chemotherapy, no objective tool allows clinicians to base treatment decisions on this factor. The CORIOLAN study will characterize TMPI using FDG-PET-based metabolic imaging

  16. Worldwide variations in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Center, Melissa M; Jemal, Ahmedin; Smith, Robert A; Ward, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented significant international variations in colorectal cancer rates. However, these studies were limited because they were based on old data or examined only incidence or mortality data. In this article, the colorectal cancer burden and patterns worldwide are described using the most recently updated cancer incidence and mortality data available from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The authors provide 5-year (1998-2002), age-standardized colorectal cancer incidence rates for select cancer registries in IARC's Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, and trends in age-standardized death rates by single calendar year for select countries in the World Health Organization mortality database. In addition, available information regarding worldwide colorectal cancer screening initiatives are presented. The highest colorectal cancer incidence rates in 1998-2002 were observed in registries from North America, Oceania, and Europe, including Eastern European countries. These high rates are most likely the result of increases in risk factors associated with "Westernization," such as obesity and physical inactivity. In contrast, the lowest colorectal cancer incidence rates were observed from registries in Asia, Africa, and South America. Colorectal cancer mortality rates have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries; however, they continue to increase in some low-resource countries of South America and Eastern Europe. Various screening options for colorectal cancer are available and further international consideration of targeted screening programs and/or recommendations could help alleviate the burden of colorectal cancer worldwide. PMID:19897840

  17. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  18. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  19. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers. PMID:24160954

  20. [Epigenetics and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Pablo; Villarejo, Pedro; Padilla, David; Menéndez, José María; Rodríguez Montes, José Antonio

    2012-05-01

    The epigenetic and physiological mechanisms that alter the structure of chromatin include the methylation of DNA, changes in the histones, and changes in RNA. A literature review has been carried out using PubMed on the evidence published on the association between epigenetics and colorectal cancer. The scientific literature shows that epigenetic changes, such as genetic modifications may be very significant in the origin of neoplastic disease, contributing both to the development and progression of the disease. PMID:22425513

  1. Techniques for colorectal anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yik-Hong; Ashour, Mohamed Ahmed Tawfik

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leak remains one of the most feared post-operative complications, particularly after anterior resection of the rectum with, the shift from abdomino-peritoneal resections to total mesorectal excision and primary anastomosis. The literature fails to demonstrate superiority of stapled over hand-sewn techniques in colorectal anastomosis, regardless of the level of anastomosis, although a high stricture rate was noted in the former technique. Thus, improvements in safety aspects of anastomosis and alternatives to hand-sewn and stapled techniques are being sought. Here, we review alternative anastomotic techniques used to fashion bowel anastomosis. Compression anastomosis using compression anastomotic clips, endoluminal compression anastomotic rings, AKA-2, biofragmental anastomotic rings, or Magnamosis all involve the concept of creating a sutureless end-to-end anastomosis by compressing two bowel ends together, leading to a simultaneous necrosis and healing process that joins the two lumens. Staple line reinforcement is a new approach that reduce the drawbacks of staplers used in colorectal practice, i.e. leakage, bleeding, misfiring, and inadequate tissue approximation. Various non-absorbable, semi or fully absorbable materials are now available. Two other techniques can provide alternative anastomotic support to the suture line: a colorectal drain and a polyester stent, which can be utilized in ultra-low rectal excision and can negate the formation of a defunctioning stoma. Doxycycline coated sutures have been used to overcome the post-operative weakness in anastomosis secondary to rapid matrix degradation mediated by matrix metalloproteinase. Another novel technique, the electric welding system, showed promising results in construction of a safe, neat, smooth sutureless bowel anastomosis. Various anastomotic techniques have been shown to be comparable to the standard techniques of suturing and stapling. However, most of these alternatives need

  2. The association of Streptococcus bovis/gallolyticus with colorectal tumors: The nature and the underlying mechanisms of its etiological role

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis (S. bovis) bacteria are associated with colorectal cancer and adenoma. S. bovis is currently named S. gallolyticus. 25 to 80% of patients with S. bovis/gallolyticus bacteremia have concomitant colorectal tumors. Colonic neoplasia may arise years after the presentation of bacteremia or infectious endocarditis of S. bovis/gallolyticus. The presence of S. bovis/gallolyticus bacteremia and/or endocarditis is also related to the presence of villous or tubular-villous adenomas in the large intestine. In addition, serological relationship of S. gallolyticus with colorectal tumors and direct colonization of S. gallolyticus in tissues of colorectal tumors were found. However, this association is still under controversy and has long been underestimated. Moreover, the etiological versus non-etiological nature of this associationis not settled yet. Therefore, by covering the most of up to date studies, this review attempts to clarify the nature and the core of S. bovis/gallolyicus association with colorectal tumors and analyze the possible underlying mechanisms. PMID:21247505

  3. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors’ belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn’t a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC. PMID:26425265

  4. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  5. [Early detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia in high-risk patients].

    PubMed

    Sendagorta, E; Herranz, P; Guadalajara, H; Zamora, F X

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of anal squamous cell carcinoma has increased alarmingly, particularly in high-risk groups such as men who have sex with men and immunosuppressed patients. Infection with an oncogenic strain of the human papillomavirus in the anal canal or perianal skin leads to anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN), progressive dysplastic intraepithelial lesions that are the precursors of anal squamous cell carcinoma. AIN can be diagnosed through cytological screening and biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy and can be treated using a range of procedures in an effort to prevent progression to invasive anal carcinoma. Given the recent advances in the understanding of this disease, and the increasing calls from experts for the establishment of screening programs to identify AIN, we review current knowledge on the condition, its diagnosis, and treatment from the point of view of dermatology. PMID:21764027

  6. Surgical treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsoulfas, Georgios; Pramateftakis, Manousos Georgios; Kanellos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most frequent cancers in Western societies with an incidence of around 700 per million people. About half of the patients develop metastases from the primary tumor and liver is the primary metastatic site. Improved survival rates after hepatectomy for metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported in the last few years and these may be the result of a variety of factors, such as advances in systemic chemotherapy, radiographic imaging techniques that permit more accurate determination of the extent and location of the metastatic burden, local ablation methods, and in surgical techniques of hepatic resection. These have led to a more aggressive approach towards liver metastatic disease, resulting in longer survival. The goal of this paper is to review the role of various forms of surgery in the treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. PMID:21267397

  7. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC

  8. Targeting Six1 by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaoming; Tian, Tian; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Xudong; Li, Lifeng; Nan, Feifei; Chang, Yu; Wang, Xinhua; Sun, Zhenchang; Lv, Feng; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    The Six1 homeodomain protein is a developmental transcription factor that has been implicated in tumor onset and progression. Recently, it’s reported that overexpression of Six1 is sufficient to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of colorectal cancer. Moreover, its expression is significantly associated with poorer overall survival probability in advanced-stage colorectal cancer. To address whether Six1 could serve as a therapeutic target for human colorectal cancer, we used a lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene knockdown method to suppress the expression of Six1 in colorectal cancer cells. We showed that lentivirusmediated shRNA targeted to Six1 gene efficiently reduced its expression in colorectal cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In vitro functional assays revealed that knockdown of Six1 significantly suppressed cell proliferation, and inhibited cell migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, tumor xenograft model demonstrated that downregulation of Six1 dramatically inhibited colorectal cancer growth in vivo. In conclusion, these findings suggest that lentivirus-mediated Six1 inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:24551283

  9. Cell-based Immunotherapy for Colorectal Cancer with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cancer worldwide. Although incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are gradually decreasing in the US, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have poor prognosis with an estimated 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Over the past decade, advances in combination chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer have led to significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival. However, patients with metastatic disease gain little clinical benefit from conventional therapy, which is associated with grade 3~4 toxicity with negative effects on quality of life. In previous clinical studies, cell-based immunotherapy using dendritic cell vaccines and sentinel lymph node T cell therapy showed promising therapeutic results for metastatic colorectal cancer. In our preclinical and previous clinical studies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells treatment for colorectal cancer showed favorable responses without toxicities. Here, we review current treatment options for colorectal cancer and summarize available clinical studies utilizing cell-based immunotherapy. Based on these studies, we recommend the use CIK cell therapy as a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27162526

  10. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  11. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  12. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  13. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: review and recommendations for screening and management.

    PubMed

    Smyczek, Petra; Singh, Ameeta E; Romanowski, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Anal cancer is a rare malignancy of the distal gastrointestinal tract, often associated with human papillomavirus, the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Currently available screening methods for anal intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor for anal cancer, combine anal Papanicolaou cytology and high resolution anoscopy with biopsy of suspicious lesions. Significant barriers to establishing anal cancer screening programmes include the small number of healthcare professionals performing high resolution anoscopy and the lack of data showing that anal cancer screening can reduce morbidity and mortality related to anal carcinoma. Despite several controversies surrounding anal cancer screening, the rising incidence of this disease in some groups supports routine screening programmes in high-risk populations, especially in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. This review outlines the epidemiology of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer and summarizes issues related to the introduction of anal cancer screening programmes. PMID:23970583

  15. [Metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma in a child with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B. Efficiency of medium-term treatment with vandetanib without thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Segura, D; Dupuis, C; Chabre, O; Piolat, C; Durand, C; Plantaz, D

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare cancer during childhood. MTC is sporadic in approximately 80% of cases and hereditary in 20%. When hereditary, it can be associated with other endocrine neoplasias and/or typical nonendocrine diseases, thus configuring the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes. Children with clinically obvious MTC belong to MEN 2A or 2B families, related to RET mutations. The standard treatment is total thyroidectomy and central neck dissection. However, treatment of advanced MTC has not yet been standardized, even if a new tyrosine kinase inhibitor specific to RET mutation has changed the outcome of such patients. Vandetanib plays a role in the treatment of children with metastatic, locally advanced and nonoperable MTC, with good tolerance. We report the 5-year treatment of an 11-year-old patient, with vandetanib and without thyroid surgery. PMID:27345554

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Producing Lactobacilli in Women with Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Min; Kim, Chol Hong; Kim, Seok Mo; Oh, Jong Seok

    2006-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical neoplasia, and hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli are the most important microorganisms for maintaining the balance of the vaginal ecosystem. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship of hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli, cervical neoplasia and high-risk HPV. Materials and Methods We enrolled 1138 women with abnormal cervical smears or cervicograms who were referred to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Chonnam National University Medical School. In all of them, 1,138 vaginal swabs were collected for the qualitative assay of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli and 150 cervical swabs were used for the HPV hybrid capture II test without regard to the subjects' pregnancy status. In the non-pregnant women, 880 cervical biopsies and/or loop electrosurgical excision procedures were performed for making the histological diagnosis. Results There was no significant difference not only between the distribution of H2O2 producing lactobacilli and the cervical histology, but also between the distribution of H2O2 producing lactobacilli and the positivity for high-risk HPV. Conclusions Both cervical neoplasia and high-risk HPV may not be influenced by the existence of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli in the vagina. PMID:19771268

  17. Piroxicam decreases postirradiation colonic neoplasia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Scobey, M.W.; Cassidy, K.T.; Geisinger, K.R. )

    1990-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent piroxicam on chronic radiation proctitis in the rat. Forty female Wistar rats received a 2250-cGy dose of irradiation to the distal 2 cm of the colon. Twenty received piroxicam 8.0 mg/kg orally 30 minutes before exposure and 24 hours after exposure; 20 rats served as irradiated controls. All animals were evaluated by colonoscopy 1 and 3 weeks postexposure and every third week until death or killing at 1 year. At killing, colons were removed for light microscopic examination. One year postirradiation results showed no differences in mortality, vascular changes, acute inflammation, colitis cystica profunda, or rectal stricture between the control and piroxicam-treated groups. However, at 1 year postirradiation the control group demonstrated neoplasia in 15 of 19 animals compared with eight of 20 animals in the piroxicam-treated group. The first endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasm occurred at 15 weeks postirradiation in one control irradiated rat whereas the first evidence of endoscopic neoplasm in the piroxicam-treated group did not occur until 36 weeks postirradiation. Histologic examination documented a tendency toward a greater presence of adenocarcinomas in the control group compared with the piroxicam-treated group. The authors conclude that piroxicam treatment significantly decreased the incidence of colonic neoplasia in general as well as delayed the endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasia in rats after pelvic irradiation. 41 references.

  18. Slow progression of periampullary neoplasia in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Moozar, Kouros L; Madlensky, Lisa; Berk, Terri; Gallinger, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Variable endoscopic surveillance protocols and treatment strategies have been proposed for periampullary neoplasia in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), primarily because of the lack of long-term, prospective natural history data. A total of 115 patients with FAP were followed prospectively for 10 years with periodic side-viewing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy by a single surgeon. The appearance of the duodenum was classified as stages 1 to 5. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance for age comparisons between stage groupings and Kaplan-Meier analysis for the lifetime risks of having a particular stage of duodenal polyposis. Eighty-seven patients had multiple endoscopies over an average of 6.6 years. Thirty-three subjects had a change in stage, within an average time of 3.9 years at an average age of 41 years. The risk of having stage 3 or 4 duodenal neoplasia increased exponentially after the age of 40. The degree of dysplasia did not correlate with stage at initial classification. Progression of neoplasia in the duodenum of patients with FAP is slow. The severity of duodenal polyposis increases with age and is not influenced by the initial stage. The average time for progression of adenoma to carcinoma is likely long. PMID:12504221

  19. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  20. The state of regional therapy in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver.

    PubMed

    Cho, May; Gong, Jun; Fakih, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Most colorectal cancer patients die from advanced disease, and two-thirds of CRC deaths are due to liver metastases. Liver resection provides the best curative option for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), yet only 20% of those patients are eligible for liver metastases resection for curative intent. Loco-regional treatment of CRLM may provide additional benefits in terms of down-staging for resection and prolonged hepatic disease control. This review focusses on hepatic arterial infusion, radioembolization and chemoembolization. PMID:26652741

  1. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, Cancers 2015, 7 1886 these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26393651

  2. Importance of universal mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry in patients with sebaceous neoplasia as an initial screening tool for Muir-Torre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Chad J; Redston, Mark; Tilton, Erin; Reimann, Julie D R

    2016-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome, a Lynch syndrome variant, is characterized by sebaceous neoplasia plus one or more malignancies, typically colon cancer. The significance of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in colorectal carcinomas is well established and is recommended as a screening tool for Lynch syndrome in newly diagnosed colorectal carcinomas. In comparison, literature on IHC application to detect MMR proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) in sebaceous neoplasia has been less studied and has been derived almost exclusively from tertiary care centers. Herein we describe the largest series to date characterizing MMR deficiency in sebaceous neoplasms, as well as the relative frequencies of each deficiency. Two hundred sixteen consecutive sebaceous neoplasms (216 patients) were analyzed from a community practice setting (133 sebaceous adenomas, 68 sebaceomas, 15 sebaceous carcinomas). One hundred forty-three were MMR deficient (66%), of which 90 were MSH2/MSH6 deficient (63%), 27 MLH1/PMS2 deficient (19%), 22 MSH6 deficient (15%), and 4 PMS2 deficient (3%). MMR deficiency was significantly associated with site, with tumors off of the head and neck more likely to be MMR deficient (specificity 96%). In contrast to prior reports, no significant trend in MMR-deficient versus -nondeficient tumors was seen in age at presentation (median age, 68 versus 66), tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor type. Given the low sensitivity of age < 60 years (30%), location off of the head and neck (41%), or presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (29%) in MMR deficiency detection, IHC screening programs should test all sebaceous neoplasms for MMR deficiency, regardless of their clinicopathological features. PMID:26826402

  3. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ is downregulated in ulcerative colitis and is involved in experimental colitis-associated neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    DOU, XIAOTAN; XIAO, JUNHUA; JIN, ZILIANG; ZHENG, PING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to also identify the association between PPAR-γ and the clinical features of patients with IBD. An azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) animal model of colitis-associated neoplasia was established to investigate the protective effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and to explore the changes in the expression of PPAR-γ during this process. A total of 66 specimens of colorectal tissue obtained from biopsy performed on IBD patients and 30 healthy control individuals were immunohistochemically stained for PPAR-γ. An AOM/DSS animal model of colitis-associated neoplasia was then established. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was conducted and it was found that, compared with the control group and patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the expression of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tissue of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) was significantly decreased (P=0.027 and 0.046, respectively). The expression of PPAR-γ was found to be negatively associated with the disease activity of UC and was not associated with the severity of disease, site of lesions or CD characteristics. Administration of 5-ASA decreased the colitis and tumor burden of colons. The expression level of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tissue was also increased in the AOM/DSS/5-ASA group compared with AOM/DSS group (P<0.001). PPAR-γ is an important factor in the pathogenesis of UC and colitis-associated cancer. The present study found that 5-ASA significantly alleviates the colitis and tumor burden in a mouse model of AOM/DSS-induced colitis-associated neoplasia, and promotes the expression of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tract. PMID:26622660

  5. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  6. The Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Colorectal Neoplasm: Systemic review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jinjuvadia, Raxitkumar; Lohia, Prateek; Jinjuvadia, Chetna; Montoya, Sergio; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been constant speculation about the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and colorectal neoplasia (CN); however, the published results are conflicting. The aims of this study are to systematic search, and assess literature to determine the available evidence on the association between these two conditions. Methods Meta-analysis was conducted based on relevant studies identified through a systematic literature review from PubMed, OvidSP and Cochrane database during January 1980 to July 2011. A combined analysis was performed, followed by a subgroup analyses stratified by the study design, type of colorectal lesions and gender. Publication bias was assessed using the Begg’s and Egger’s tests and visual inspection of funnel plot. Results Eighteen studies were included in the final analysis. Overall, MetS was associated with 34% increase in the risk of CN (summary RR - 1.34, 95% CI 1.24–1.44). The association between MetS and CN was found to be statistically significant in separate analysis for both case-control studies (summary RR -1.58, 95% CI 1.44–1.79) and cohort studies (summary RR – 1.21, 95% CI 1.13–1.29). The association remained significant when analyses were restricted by type of colorectal lesions (colorectal cancer: RR – 1.30, 95% CI 1.18–1.43; colorectal adenoma: RR – 1.37, 95% CI 1.26–1.49). Further subgroup analysis by gender showed significant association between MetS and CN in both male and female population. Conclusion Our meta-analysis showed significant association between presence of MetS and CN. These results may help in identifying high risk individuals at early stage that might benefit from targeted CRC screening intervention. PMID:23090040

  7. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:26566853

  8. HPP1: A transmembrane protein-encoding gene commonly methylated in colorectal polyps and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanne; Biden, Kelli G.; Simms, Lisa A.; Huggard, Phillip; Karamatic, Rozemary; Eyre, Helen J.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Herath, Nirmitha; Barker, Melissa; Anderson, Gregory J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Ramm, Grant A.; Jass, Jeremy R.; Leggett, Barbara A.

    2001-01-01

    Adenomas are the precursors of most colorectal cancers. Hyperplastic polyps have been linked to the subset of colorectal cancers showing DNA microsatellite instability, but little is known of their underlying genetic etiology. Using a strategy that isolates differentially methylated sequences from hyperplastic polyps and normal mucosa, we identified a 370-bp sequence containing the 5′ untranslated region and the first exon of a gene that we have called HPP1. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to isolate HPP1 from normal mucosa. Using reverse transcription–PCR, HPP1 was expressed in 28 of 30 (93%) normal colonic samples but in only seven of 30 (23%) colorectal cancers (P < 0.001). The 5′ region of HPP1 included a CpG island containing 49 CpG sites, of which 96% were found to be methylated by bisulfite sequencing of DNA from colonic tumor samples. By COBRA analysis, methylation was detected in six of nine (66%) adenomas, 17 of 27 (63%) hyperplastic polyps, and 46 of 55 (84%) colorectal cancers. There was an inverse relationship between methylation level and mRNA expression in cancers (r = −0.67; P < 0.001), and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment restored HPP1 expression in two colorectal cancer cell lines. In situ hybridization of HPP1 indicated that expression occurs in epithelial and stromal elements in normal mucosa but is silenced in both cell types in early colonic neoplasia. HPP1 is predicted to encode a transmembrane protein containing follistatin and epidermal growth factor-like domains. Silencing of HPP1 by methylation may increase the probability of neoplastic transformation. PMID:11120884

  9. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Adams, Scott V.; Wernli, Karen J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Makar, Karen W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms [rs1051740 and rs2234922], and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Methods Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n=519), HPs (n=691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n=227) and polyp-free controls (n=772) receiving a colonoscopy from 12/04-9/07 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Results Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR=2.0, 1.2–3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.2–2.4), HPs (OR=2.4, 95% CI 1.7–3.3), and both types (OR=2.8, 95% CI 1.8–4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Discussion Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location. PMID:21598178

  10. Academic Colorectal Surgery Job Search

    PubMed Central

    Kalady, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918

  11. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918

  12. Experimental colon neoplasia enhanced by extract of sperm (protamine).

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R K; Quill, D S; Dudley, H A

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of colorectal tumorigenesis in inbred rats given the potent carcinogen dimethylhydrazine has shown that protamine, given before any tumours had developed, significantly enhanced the development of large bowel tumours (100% incidence). Those animals having no adjuvant therapy or who received either heparin or 5-fluorouracil (alone or in combination) had an approximate 50% incidence of such tumours. PMID:6492040

  13. Pharmacologic resistance in colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, William A.; Swaika, Abhisek; Mody, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) persists as one of the most prevalent and deadly tumor types in both men and women worldwide. This is in spite of widespread, effective measures of preventive screening, and also major advances in treatment options. Despite advances in cytotoxic and targeted therapy, resistance to chemotherapy remains one of the greatest challenges in long-term management of incurable metastatic disease and eventually contributes to death as tumors accumulate means of evading treatment. We performed a comprehensive literature search on the data available through PubMed, Medline, Scopus, and the ASCO Annual Symposium abstracts through June 2015 for the purpose of this review. We discuss the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies now in use for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26753006

  14. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  15. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  16. [New challenges to the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Sun, J H

    2016-07-01

    Due to the progress of intracavitary afterloading technology and dosage of brachytherapy, a similar dose distribution as that of cervical conization can be achieved and can be applied to the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), it is called "afterloading conization" . Being adjusted the radioactive source movement and weight, low exposure doses to the ovary, endometrium and vagina can be assured. So a high quality of life after treatment could be maintained and overcomes the shortcomings of cervical conization and hysterectomy, such as anesthesia, bleeding, over or insufficient treatment, early ovarian ageing and operative complications. PMID:27531273

  17. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia using hexaminolevulinate and methylaminolevulinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, Philipp; Staboulidou, Ismini; Hertel, Herrmann; Schippert, Cordula; Hillemanns, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer. Previous studies indicated that photodynamic therapy (PDT) represents an effective treatment modality in CIN. In 28 patients with CIN 1 - 3, 1 - 2 cycles of PDT were conducted using hexaminolevulinate (HAL) or methylaminolevulinate (MAL) and a special light delivery system. After 6 months, biopsies were obtained to assess response. The overall response rate for complete or partial response was 65%. Photodynamic therapy using new ALA esters is effective and may offer unique advantages in the therapy of CIN.

  18. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes: A Comprehensive Imaging Review.

    PubMed

    Grajo, Joseph R; Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Sahani, Dushyant V; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2016-05-01

    MEN1, MEN2, and MEN4 comprise a series of familial disorders involving the simultaneous occurrence of tumors in more than one endocrine organ, collectively known as multiple endocrine neoplasia. Patients with this family of disorders develop tumors of the parathyroid gland, pancreas, pituitary gland, adrenal gland, and thyroid gland, along with miscellaneous neuroendocrine tumors of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Although some patients undergo early prophylactic surgical management, particularly in the setting of familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, many develop tumors later in life. These tumors are often discovered at imaging for screening purposes. Recognition of the imaging features of the known tumors is important for appropriate patient management. PMID:27153782

  19. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Type 1: Imaging Solutions to Clinical Questions.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Christopher M; Patronas, Nicholas J; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Short, Tyler K; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    The common clinical presentations of multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (MEN1) often lead to predictable clinical questions that can be answered with imaging. From pituitary adenomas to parathyroid adenoms and pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors, the multiple faces of MEN1 require an understanding of the basic disease characteristics and an understanding of multiple imaging modalities. We attempt to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the common clinical questions raised by patients with MEN1 and how radiologists can provide critical management information. PMID:26547632

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Cao, Dalhia Thao; Beuvon, Frédéric; Leblanc, Sarah; Terris, Benoit; Camus, Marine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The possible benefit of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early neoplasia arising in Barrett’s esophagus remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of ESD for the treatment of early Barrett’s neoplasia. Methods All consecutive patients undergoing ESD for the resection of a visible lesion in a Barrett’s esophagus, either suspicious of submucosal infiltration or exceeding 10 mm in size, between February 2012 and January 2015 were prospectively included. The primary endpoint was the rate of curative resection of carcinoma, defined as histologically complete resection of adenocarcinomas without poor histoprognostic factors. Results Thirty-five patients (36 lesions) with a mean age of 66.2 ± 12 years, a mean ASA score of 2.1 ± 0.7, and a mean C4M6 Barrett’s segment were included. The mean procedure time was 191 ± 79 mn, and the mean size of the resected specimen was 51.3 ± 23 mm. En bloc resection rate was 89%. Lesions were 12 ± 15 mm in size, and 81% (29/36) were invasive adenocarcinomas, six of which with submucosal invasion. Although R0 resection of carcinoma was 72.4%, the curative resection rate was 66% (19/29). After a mean follow-up of 12.9 ± 9 months, 16 (45.7%) patients had required additional treatment, among whom nine underwent surgical resection, and seven further endoscopic treatments. Metachronous lesions or recurrence of cancer developed during the follow-up period in 17.2% of the patients. The overall complication rate was 16.7%, including 8.3% perforations, all conservatively managed, and no bleeding. The 30-day mortality was 0%. Conclusion In this early experience, ESD yielded a moderate curative resection rate in Barrett’s neoplasia. At present, improvements are needed if ESD is to replace piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection in the management of Barrett’s neoplasia. PMID:27087948

  1. Integumentary Disorders Including Cutaneous Neoplasia in Older Horses.

    PubMed

    Knottenbelt, Derek C

    2016-08-01

    Few skin diseases specifically or exclusively affect older horses and donkeys. Hypertrichosis (hirsutism) associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction is probably the most recognized and best understood exception and is the most common age-related skin condition in equids. Many other conditions are known to be more serious in older horses. Horses affected with immune-compromising conditions can be more severely affected by infectious diseases of the skin or heavy and pathologically significant parasitism. Neoplasia of the skin is probably more prevalent and worse in older horses, although many of the more serious skin tumors develop initially at a younger age. PMID:27329491

  2. The efficacy of autofluorescence imaging in the diagnosis of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Moriichi, Kentaro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2016-08-01

    Image-enhanced endoscopy (IEE) has been developed and is applied in the clinical setting throughout the world. Most reports regarding IEE have evaluated the efficacy of narrow-band imaging (NBI) in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. Although autofluorescence imaging (AFI) is a form of IEE, its usefulness remains unclear. The present review focused on the efficacy of AFI in the diagnosis of colorectal disease, particularly neoplasia and ulcerative colitis (UC). AFI-based diagnoses are made via the subjective judgment of the color on the monitor. The efficacy of AFI in detection and differentiation in patients with colorectal neoplastic lesions remains controversial, which may be dependent on the study design and the diagnostic procedures. Although the number of the reports related to UC is very small, most suggest that AFI is effective in UC patients. AFI is distinct from other modalities in that it can quantitatively assess the lesion based on the fluorescence intensity without any morphological assessments. AFI could be useful for patients with colorectal disease. PMID:27294612

  3. Identification of a chromosome 18q gene that is altered in colorectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fearon, E.R.; Nigro, J.M.; Simons, J.W.; Ruppert, J.M.; Preisinger, A.C.; Vogelstein, B.; Cho, K.R.; Kern, S.E.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Thomas, G. )

    1990-01-05

    A contiguous stretch of DNA comprising 370 kilobase pairs (kb) has now been cloned from a region of chromosome 18q suspected to reside near this gene. Potential exons in the 370-kb region were defined by human-rodent sequence identities, and the expression of potential exons was assessed by an exon-connection strategy based on the polymerase chain reaction. Expressed exons were used as probes for cDNA screening to obtain clones that encoded a portion of a gene termed DCC; this cDNA was encoded by at least eight exons within the 370-kb genomic region. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA specified a protein with sequence similarity to neural cell adhesion molecules and other related cell surface glycoproteins. While the DCC gene was expressed in most normal tissues, including colonic mucosa, its expression was greatly reduced or absent in most colorectal carcinomas tested. Somatic mutations within the DCC gene observed in colorectal cancers included a homozygous deletion of the 5{prime} end of the gene, a point mutation within one of the introns, and ten examples of DNA insertions within a 0.17-kb fragment immediately downstream of one of the exons. The DCC gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of human colorectal neoplasia, perhaps through alteration of the normal cell-cell interactions controlling growth.

  4. [Colorectal cancer in children: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Liliana; Oscanoa, Mónica; Maza, Iván; Gerónimo, Jenny; Tarrillo, Fanny; Latorre, Alan; Frisancho, Oscar; Llatas, Juan

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is extremely infrequent in children and adolescents. There is little information about this entity, mainly case reports and review articles. We describe three cases of children with poor-differentiated colorectal carcinoma and advanced disease at onset. The presenting symptoms were abdominal pain and constipation, with a median of latency of symptoms of 4-48 months. None of these patients had operable disease at onset; having a disease progression despite therapy in two cases. This study reaffirms poor prognosis of pediatric CRC, probably due to an aggressive tumoral biology and advanced stage at diagnosis. Therapeutic guidelines are based in adult treatment; therefore, efforts should be made to improve tools in early diagnosis and future therapies for a better survival in childhood. PMID:25293994

  5. The Multidisciplinary Management of Colorectal Cancer: Present and Future Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Chelsie K; Kratz, Jeremy D; Zurbriggen, Luke D; LoConte, Noelle K; Lubner, Sam J; Uboha, Natalya; Mulkerin, Daniel; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Deming, Dustin A

    2016-09-01

    As treatment strategies for patients with colorectal cancer advance, there has now become an ever-increasing need for multidisciplinary teams to care for these patients. Recent investigations into the timing and duration of perioperative therapy, as well as, the rise of molecular profiling have led to more systemic chemotherapeutic options. The most efficacious use, in terms of timing and patient selection, of these therapies in the setting of modern operative and radiotherapy techniques requires the generation of care teams discussing cases at multidisciplinary conferences. This review highlights the role of multidisciplinary team conferences, advances in perioperative chemotherapy, current clinical biomarkers, and emerging therapeutic agents for molecular subtypes of metastatic colon cancer. As our understanding of relevant molecular subtypes increases and as data becomes available on treatment response, the treatment of colorectal cancer will become more precise and effective. PMID:27582648

  6. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  7. Xenovaccinotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Seledtsov, Victor I; Niza, Natalya A; Felde, Mariya A; Shishkov, Alexey A; Samarin, Denis M; Seledtsova, Galina V; Seledtsov, Dmitriy V

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this phase I-II trial were to assess the toxicity, immunological and clinical responses induced in 37 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer by the subcutaneous administration of a xenogenic polyantigenic vaccine (XPV) prepared from disrupted murine melanoma (B16) and carcinoma (LLC) cells. An inducing course of vaccinotherapy consisted of 10 immunizations (5 at weekly and 5 at fortnight intervals). Twenty-four hours later each of first 5 vaccinations the patient was subcutaneously given a low dose of the recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2). A consolidating course of vaccinotherapy consisted of monthly vaccinations. No grade III or IV toxicities, but also laboratory and clinical signs of developing systemic autoimmune disorders were noted in any XPV-treated patient. A significant increase in cell-mediated immunoreactivity to both LLC and B16 antigens (Ags) occurred in the patients after inducing vaccinations, as determined by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reactions, as well as by blood lymphocyte proliferation responses. Vaccinations also led to increased cell-mediated reactivity to murine non-tumor, spleen cell (SC)-associated Ags. This reactivity, however, was not as significant as that to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). XPV was also found to capable of generating IgG antibody-mediated responses. With immunotherapy concentrations of both interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) detectably elevated in patients' sera, suggesting intensification of T helper 1-/T helper 2-mediated responses in the XPV-treated patients. The average survival of the XPV-treated patients was noticeably superior than was that of the clinically comparable control patients (17 vs 7 months). Collectively the results suggest that xenogenic TAAs are safe to use, able to induce measurable cellular and humoral immune responses, and may be clinically effective in certain colorectal cancer patients. PMID:17258887

  8. A Multiscale Model Evaluates Screening for Neoplasia in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Curtius, Kit; Hazelton, William D; Jeon, Jihyoun; Luebeck, E Georg

    2015-05-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients are routinely screened for high grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) through endoscopic screening, during which multiple esophageal tissue samples are removed for histological analysis. We propose a computational method called the multistage clonal expansion for EAC (MSCE-EAC) screening model that is used for screening BE patients in silico to evaluate the effects of biopsy sampling, diagnostic sensitivity, and treatment on disease burden. Our framework seamlessly integrates relevant cell-level processes during EAC development with a spatial screening process to provide a clinically relevant model for detecting dysplastic and malignant clones within the crypt-structured BE tissue. With this computational approach, we retain spatio-temporal information about small, unobserved tissue lesions in BE that may remain undetected during biopsy-based screening but could be detected with high-resolution imaging. This allows evaluation of the efficacy and sensitivity of current screening protocols to detect neoplasia (dysplasia and early preclinical EAC) in the esophageal lining. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this model by predicting three important clinical outcomes: (1) the probability that small cancers are missed during biopsy-based screening, (2) the potential gains in neoplasia detection probabilities if screening occurred via high-resolution tomographic imaging, and (3) the efficacy of ablative treatments that result in the curative depletion of metaplastic and neoplastic cell populations in BE in terms of the long-term impact on reducing EAC incidence. PMID:26001209

  9. The Role of MicroRNAs in Myeloproliferative Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Shaban; Azizi, Seyed Ghader; Soleimani, Masoud; Farshi, Yadollah; Kashani Khatib, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    MiRs are 17-25 nucleotide non-coding RNAs. These RNAs target approximately 80% of protein coding mRNAs. MiRs control gene expression and altered expression of them affects the development of cancer. MiRs can function as tumor suppressor via down-regulation of proto-oncogenes and may function as oncogenes by suppressing tumor suppressors. Myeloproliferative neoplasias (formerly known as chronic myeloproliferative disorders) form a class of hematologic malignancies demonstrating the expansion of stem cells in one or more hematopoietic cell lines. CML results from an acquired translocation known as BCR-ABL (Philadelphia chromosome). JAK2V617F mutation is present in over 95% of PV, 55% of ET and 65% of PMF cases. Aberrant expression of miR is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasias, pathogenesis, disease progress and response to treatment. MiRs can also be potential therapeutic targets. CML is mainly treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as Imatinib. In addition, altered function of miRs may be used as a prognostic factor in treatment. Resistance to Imatinib is currently a major clinical problem. The role of a number of miRs has been demonstrated in this resistance. Changing expression pattern of miRs can be effective in response to treatment and inhibition of drug resistance. In this paper, we set out to evaluate the effect of miRs in pathogenesis and treatment of MPN. PMID:27489593

  10. The Role of MicroRNAs in Myeloproliferative Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Shaban; Azizi, Seyed Ghader; Soleimani, Masoud; Farshi, Yadollah; Kashani Khatib, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    MiRs are 17-25 nucleotide non-coding RNAs. These RNAs target approximately 80% of protein coding mRNAs. MiRs control gene expression and altered expression of them affects the development of cancer. MiRs can function as tumor suppressor via down-regulation of proto-oncogenes and may function as oncogenes by suppressing tumor suppressors. Myeloproliferative neoplasias (formerly known as chronic myeloproliferative disorders) form a class of hematologic malignancies demonstrating the expansion of stem cells in one or more hematopoietic cell lines. CML results from an acquired translocation known as BCR-ABL (Philadelphia chromosome). JAK2V617F mutation is present in over 95% of PV, 55% of ET and 65% of PMF cases. Aberrant expression of miR is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasias, pathogenesis, disease progress and response to treatment. MiRs can also be potential therapeutic targets. CML is mainly treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as Imatinib. In addition, altered function of miRs may be used as a prognostic factor in treatment. Resistance to Imatinib is currently a major clinical problem. The role of a number of miRs has been demonstrated in this resistance. Changing expression pattern of miRs can be effective in response to treatment and inhibition of drug resistance. In this paper, we set out to evaluate the effect of miRs in pathogenesis and treatment of MPN. PMID:27489593

  11. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  12. Colorectal carcinogenesis-update and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raskov, Hans; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common malignancy in the Western World and despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and screening, it is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this part of the world. Numerous factors are found important in the development of CRC including colonocyte metbolism, high risk luminal environment, inflammation, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet, tobacco, and alchohol consumption. In recent years focus has turned towards the genetics and molecular biology of CRC and several interesting and promising correlations and pathways have been discovered. The major genetic pathways of CRC are the Chromosome Instability Pathway representing the pathway of sporadic CRC through the K-ras, APC, and P53 mutations, and the Microsatellite Instability Pathway representing the pathway of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer through mutations in mismatch repair genes. To identify early cancers, screening programs have been initiated, and the leading strategy has been the use of faecal occult blood testing followed by colonoscopy in positive cases. Regarding the treatment of colorectal cancer, significant advances have been made in the recent decade. The molecular targets of CRC include at least two important cell surface receptors: the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The genetic and molecular knowledge of CRC has widen the scientific and clinical perspectives of diagnosing and treatment. However, despite significant advances in the understanding and treatment of CRC, results from targeted therapy are still not convincing. Future studies will determine the role for this new treatment modality. PMID:25561783

  13. [Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy with CyberKnife®for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koki; Kaihara, Masaki; Sunahori, Sayaka; Yamashiro, Naotsugu; Nishiya, Shin; Ito, Yasuhiro; Funakoshi, Kazuto; Egawa, Tomohisa; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Nagashima, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    For treatment of colorectal liver metastases, liver resection is recommended for resectable cases in the clinical guidelines for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, there are currently no data supporting the efficacy of radiation therapy as a topical treatment, and this treatment can therefore not presently be recommended. With CyberKnife®, it is possible to perform stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator with high accuracy, even for lesions in the trunk area such as liver metastases. Between December 2009 and September 2014 in our hospital, we performed radiation treatment using CyberKnife® for 14 cases with 22 colorectal liver metastases. As a result, we obtained response and local control rates of 76.2%and 81.0%, respectively. Moreover, no advanced adverse events were observed. Thus, we consider that CyberKnife® treatment for colorectal liver metastases is effective as a topical treatment, with low invasiveness and high safety. PMID:26489566

  14. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-12-27

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  15. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  16. Cytomorphology and PCNA expression pattern in bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Cerastoderma edule with haemic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; De Vico, Gionata

    2013-07-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) is a pathologic condition reported in several bivalve species in different geographic areas. In this study we describe the cytomorphological features and the proliferative behaviour, assessed by the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), of HN in common cockle Cerastoderma edule and Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovicialis. In mussels the presence of at least 5 types of atypical haemocytes was detected, including A- and B-type cells, previously described in M. edulis and Mytilus sp., with predominance of A-type cells in early phases of the disease and B-type cells in more advanced stages. PCNA immunostaining was positive for 97 to 100% of the neoplastic cells, with both cytoplasmic (A cells) and nuclear patterns (B cells). Conversely, in C. edule there was no distinctive morphological cell sub-population, and staining atypical haemocytes with PCNA (range 93 to 100%) showed nuclear expression in early phases of disease and cytoplasmic expression in more advanced stages. The above findings suggest distinct histo-pathogenetic pathways for HN in mussels and common cockles. PMID:23836773

  17. Effects of cellular redox balance on induction of apoptosis by eicosapentaenoic acid in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and rat colon in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Latham, P; Lund, E; Brown, J; Johnson, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Epidemiological evidence suggests n-3 polyunsaturated lipids may protect against colorectal neoplasia. Consumption of fish oil modulates crypt cytokinetics in humans, and crypt apoptosis in animal models. To explore these effects, we investigated involvement of caspase enzymes and cellular redox balance in the induction of apoptosis by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in HT29 cells, and in rat colon in vivo.
METHODS—Survival of HT29 cells grown with EPA in the presence of caspase inhibitors, antioxidants, or buthionine sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione neosynthesis, was determined. The effects of EPA enriched fish oil and glutathione depletion on apoptosis in rat colon were assessed using microdissected crypts.
RESULTS—Treatment of HT29 cells with EPA reduced viable cell number and activated caspase 3, prior to cell detachment. Antioxidants and caspase inhibitors blocked HT29 cell death whereas glutathione depletion increased it. Rats fed fish oil had higher crypt cell apoptosis than those fed corn oil, and glutathione depletion enhanced this effect.
CONCLUSIONS—Incorporation of EPA into colonic epithelial cell lipids increases apoptosis. The results of this study, using both an animal and cell line model, support the hypothesis that this effect is mediated via cellular redox tone, and is sensitive to glutathione metabolism. The data suggest a mechanism whereby polyunsaturated fatty acids may influence the susceptibility of colorectal crypt cells to induction or progression of neoplasia.


Keywords: eicosapentaenoic acid; apoptosis; glutathione; caspase; redox; colorectal cancer; rat PMID:11413117

  18. Prevalence of colorectal adenomas in asymptomatic young adults: a window to early intervention?

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji Yeong; Kim, Kwang Min; Yang, Hae Jin; Yu, Kil Jong; Lee, Jae Gon; Jeong, Yeon Oh; Shim, Sang Goon

    2016-06-01

    Objective The prevalence of colorectal adenoma is increasing in the average-risk population. However, little research is available on colorectal adenoma in young adults under age 40. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of colorectal adenoma in 20- to 39-year-old adults. Methods We evaluated 4286 asymptomatic young adults aged 20 to 39 years who underwent first colonoscopy screening as part of an employer-provided health wellness programme at the Health Promotion Centre of Samsung Changwon Hospital, Korea from January 2011 to December 2013. Logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for colorectal adenoma in asymptomatic young adults. Results The prevalence of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma was 11.6% (497/4286) and 0.9% (39/4286), respectively. By age group, the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was 5.4% (33/608) in participants aged 20 to 29 years and 12.6% (464/3678) in participants aged 30 to 39. Colorectal adenoma was found in 13.1% (403/3072) of men and 7.7% (94/1214) of women. Increased risk of colorectal adenoma was associated with age over 30 years (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.64-3.42), current smoker status (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.14-1.91), and alcohol consumption (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63). Conclusions Our findings indicate that even if the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was low in young adults aged 20 to 39, being over 30, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption can affect young adults who have no other CRC risks. PMID:26863602

  19. Mice Expressing Activated PI3K Rapidly Develop Advanced Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leystra, Alyssa A.; Deming, Dustin A.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Farhoud, Mohammed; Paul Olson, Terrah J.; Hadac, Jamie N.; Nettekoven, Laura A.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Clipson, Linda; Sullivan, Ruth; Washington, Mary Kay; Torrealba, Jose R.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway play a key role in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers by altering cellular growth, metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis (1). Mutations in the catalytic domain of PI3K that generate a dominantly active kinase are commonly found in human colorectal cancers and have been thought to drive tumor progression, but not initiation (2). However, the effects of constitutively activated PI3K upon the intestinal mucosa have not been previously studied in animal models. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of a dominantly active form of the PI3K protein in the mouse intestine results in hyperplasia and advanced neoplasia. Mice expressing constitutively active PI3K in the epithelial cells of the distal small bowel and colon rapidly developed invasive adenocarcinomas in the colon that spread into the mesentery and adjacent organs. The histological characteristics of these tumors were strikingly similar to invasive mucinous colon cancers in humans. Interestingly, these tumors formed without a benign polypoid intermediary, consistent with the lack of aberrant WNT signaling observed. Together, our findings indicate a non-canonical mechanism of colon tumor initiation that is mediated through activation of PI3K. This unique model has the potential to further our understanding of human disease and facilitate the development of therapeutics through pharmacologic screening and biomarker identification. PMID:22525701

  20. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, S N; Sanz-Pamplona, R; Brix, S; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Moreno, V

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  1. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  2. Reduced E-cadherin expression as a cause of distinctive signet-ring cell variant in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Ho Jeong; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare type of adenocarcinoma and presents with distinctive clinicopathological features. This study was performed to assess the biological characteristics of colorectal SRCC regarding the E-cadherin expression. Seventeen patients with primary colorectal SRCC were identified and their clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. The mean age of the 17 patients was 45.3 yr (14-68). Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and beta-catenin were performed in ten colorectal SRCCs and in 30 ordinary colorectal adenocarcinomas as control. Primary colorectal SRCC occurred in 0.7% of 2,388 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Most patients had advanced stage tumor at surgery (stage III and IV, AJCC: 82%). Five-year survival rate was 16%. Peritoneal seeding was the most common recurrence pattern (41%) and liver metastasis was not identified. All SRCCs showed a markedly reduced or absent expression of E-cadherin on immunohistochemical staining, whereas seven (23.3%) of ordinary carcinomas showed reduced expression, thereby indicating a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.005). In immunohistochemical staining for beta-catenin, eight of ten SRCCs showed reduced membrane expression that did not attain statistical significance compared to ordinary adenocarcinomas. It is suggested that aberrant E-cadherin expression may explain the distinct clinicopathological features in primary colorectal SRCC. PMID:11850584

  3. Microtopographic Inspection and Fractal Analysis of Skin Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Hipolito, Alberto Valencia; Gutierrez, Gustavo Fidel; Chanona, Jorge; Gallegos, Eva Ramón

    2008-04-01

    ) corresponding to some neoplasia is higher (1.334+/-0.072) than those for healthy skin (1.091+/-0.082). A significant difference between the fractal dimensions of neoplasia and healhty skin (>0.001) was registered. The FD of microtopography maps (FDm) can also distinguish between healthy and malignant tissue in general (2.277+/-0.070 to 2.309+/-0.040), but not discriminate the different types of skin neoplasias. The combination of the rugometric evaluation and fractal geometry characterization provides valuable information about the malignity of skin lesions and type of lesion.

  4. Surgical interventions for high grade vulval intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Sonali; Pepas, Litha; Nordin, Andy; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a pre-malignant condition of the vulval skin. This uncommon chronic skin condition of the vulva is associated with a high risk of recurrence and the potential to progress to vulval cancer. The condition is complicated by its’ multicentric and multifocal nature. The incidence of this condition appears to be rising particularly in the younger age group. There is a lack of consensus on the optimal surgical treatment method. However, the rationale for surgical treatment of VIN has been to treat symptoms and exclude underlying malignancy with the continued aim of preservation of vulval anatomy and function. Repeated treatments affect local cosmesis and cause psychosexual morbidity thus impacting on the patients’ quality of life. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgical interventions for high grade VIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 3, 2010, Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to September 2010. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared surgical interventions, in adult women diagnosed with high grade vulval intraepithelial neoplasia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We found only one RCT which included 30 women that met our inclusion criteria and this trial reported data on carbon dioxide laser (CO2 laser) versus ultrasonic surgical aspiration (USA). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of disease recurrence after one year follow-up, pain, presence of scarring, dysuria or burning, adhesions, infection, abnormal discharge and eschar between women who received CO2 laser and those who received USA. The trial

  5. MicroRNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sippy; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA (including microRNA) associated gene silencing have been identified as a major characteristic in human cancers. These alterations may occur more frequently than genetic mutations and play a key role in silencing tumor suppressor genes or activating oncogenes, thereby affecting multiple cellular processes. In recent years, studies have shown that microRNAs, that act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression are frequently deregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC), via aberrant DNA methylation. Over the past decade, technological advances have revolutionized the field of epigenetics and have led to the identification of numerous epigenetically dysregulated miRNAs in CRC, which are regulated by CpG island hypermethylation and DNA hypomethylation. In addition, aberrant DNA methylation of miRNA genes holds a great promise in several clinical applications such as biomarkers for early screening, prognosis, and therapeutic applications in CRC. PMID:27573897

  6. APC mutations in colorectal tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Papadopoulos, N; McKinley, A J; Farrington, S M; Curtis, L J; Wyllie, A H; Zheng, S; Willson, J K; Markowitz, S D; Morin, P; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B; Dunlop, M G

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of genetic instability [replication error (RER) phenotype] on APC (adenomatous polyposis coli), a gene thought to initiate colorectal tumorigenesis. The prevalence of APC mutations was similar in RER and non-RER tumors, indicating that both tumor types share this step in neoplastic transformation. However, in a total of 101 sequenced mutations, we noted a substantial excess of APC frameshift mutations in the RER cases (70% in RER tumors versus 47% in non-RER tumors, P < 0.04). These frameshifts were characteristic of mutations arising in cells deficient in DNA mismatch repair, with a predilection for mononucleotide repeats in the RER tumors (P < 0.0002), particularly (A)n tracts (P < 0.00007). These findings suggest that the genetic instability that is reflected by the RER phenotype precedes, and is responsible for, APC mutation in RER large bowel tumors and have important implications for understanding the very earliest stages of neoplasia in patients with tumors deficient in mismatch repair. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8799152

  7. Multi Texture Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Continuum Using Multispectral Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Bouridane, Ahmed; Toews, Matthew; Hassan, Lama; Tanougast, Camel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper proposes to characterize the continuum of colorectal cancer (CRC) using multiple texture features extracted from multispectral optical microscopy images. Three types of pathological tissues (PT) are considered: benign hyperplasia, intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. Materials and Methods In the proposed approach, the region of interest containing PT is first extracted from multispectral images using active contour segmentation. This region is then encoded using texture features based on the Laplacian-of-Gaussian (LoG) filter, discrete wavelets (DW) and gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). To assess the significance of textural differences between PT types, a statistical analysis based on the Kruskal-Wallis test is performed. The usefulness of texture features is then evaluated quantitatively in terms of their ability to predict PT types using various classifier models. Results Preliminary results show significant texture differences between PT types, for all texture features (p-value < 0.01). Individually, GLCM texture features outperform LoG and DW features in terms of PT type prediction. However, a higher performance can be achieved by combining all texture features, resulting in a mean classification accuracy of 98.92%, sensitivity of 98.12%, and specificity of 99.67%. Conclusions These results demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of combining multiple texture features for characterizing the continuum of CRC and discriminating between pathological tissues in multispectral images. PMID:26901134

  8. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b associated with lichen nitidus.

    PubMed

    Altaykan, Asli; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel; Emre, Serap; Orhan, Diclehan; Güçer, Safak; Erkin, Gül

    2007-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2B syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited endocrine disorder with rare skin manifestations. We report the case of a 19-year-old Turkish girl who presented with skin-colored flat papules scattered all over the trunk and extremities. Additionally, she had marfanoid habitus, thick lips, and multiple flesh-colored papules over the inner eyelids and oral mucosa. Histopathological examination of one of the trunk lesions was consistent with lichen nitidus. Her past medical history was significant for medullary thyroid carcinoma. Genetic testing showed a point mutation in exon 16 at codon 918 (M918T) in the RET proto-oncogene. Based on all these findings, MEN type 2B was diagnosed. To the best of our knowledge we report the first case of MEN type 2B associated with lichen nitidus. PMID:17540634

  9. Use of tamoxifen in the control of canine mammary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dobson, J M; Bostock, D E

    1993-11-27

    Ninety-three bitches which had undergone mammary tumour surgery were entered into a clinical trial to examine the effects of ovariohysterectomy (spaying) at the time of mammary surgery and the use of the drug tamoxifen in preventing the recurrence of the tumour and/or the development of new mammary tumours. Twenty-three of the bitches which had been spayed were allocated tamoxifen but only 18 of them complied with the treatment and in nine of these the treatment was stopped owing to side effects (mostly oestrogenic). Too few animals were studied to draw conclusions about the possible preventative effects of tamoxifen on mammary neoplasia, but the high percentage of bitches affected by oestrogen-like side effects may reduce the compliance of owners and prevent tamoxifen being widely used in dogs. PMID:8116156

  10. Is bacterial vaginosis associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Boyle, D C M; Barton, S E; Uthayakumar, S; Hay, P E; Pollock, J W; Steer, P J; Smith, J R

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has produced conflicting results regarding the association of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). These studies have been weakened in their conclusions mainly by failure to adequately control for the presence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One proposed mechanism suggesting that carcinogenic nitrosamines acting either independently or via human papilloma virus (HPV) has not been fully tested previously. We undertook a prospective, case-controlled, cross-sectional study where the presence of STIs, in particular human papillomavirus (HPV) which is known to be associated with the development of CIN, was controlled for. Women with BV were not found to have CIN more frequently than women with normal vaginal flora and the quantities of nitrosamines produced by women with BV did not differ significantly from women without BV. We thus found that BV is not associated with CIN. PMID:12657117

  11. Photodynamic therapy of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) high grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Belotto, Renata; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer and associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in target cells that will generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon illumination, inducing the death of abnormal tissue and PDT with less damaging to normal tissues than surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy and seems to be a promising alternative procedure for CIN treatment. The CIN high grades (II and III) presents potential indications for PDT due the success of PDT for CIN low grade treatment. The patients with CIN high grade that were treated with new clinic protocol shows lesion regression to CIN low grade 60 days after the treatment. The new clinical protocol using for treatment of CIN high grade shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  12. Cerebral oligodendroglioma mimicking intraventricular neoplasia in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Levine, Jonathan M; Eden, Kristin B; Watson, Victoria E; Griffin, John F; Edwards, John F; Porter, Brian F

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendroglioma is one of the most common primary central nervous system neoplasms of dogs. It is often diagnosed in older, brachycephalic breeds, and although its typical clinical features and neuroanatomic location have been well described, less common presentations may hinder its diagnosis. We describe 3 cases of canine cerebral oligodendroglioma that clinically and grossly present as intraventricular tumors. Histologic findings in all cases were typical of oligodendroglioma. Neoplastic cells were uniformly immunoreactive for Olig2 and negative for neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. In addition to the immunopositivity for Olig2, a cluster of morphologically distinct neoplastic cells in one of the cases was immunoreactive for synaptophysin, and the case was diagnosed as an oligodendroglioma with neurocytic differentiation. Based on these findings, oligodendroglioma should be included as a differential diagnosis for intraventricular neoplasia in dogs. Furthermore, oligodendroglioma with ventricular involvement should be differentiated from central neurocytoma by immunohistochemistry. PMID:25943126

  13. A metastatic ovarian angiosarcoma mimicking hematologic neoplasia at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gaiolla, Rafael Dezen; Duarte, Ivison Xavier; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare aggressive neoplasms of vascular endothelial origin with a high metastatic rate and poor prognosis. Involvement of the bone marrow by the angiosarcoma is exceedingly uncommon, and there have only been a few cases reported in the literature to date. Clinical manifestations and common laboratory findings of bone marrow involvement can mimic other more common bone marrow-replacing neoplasias such as lymphomas and acute leukemia. A definitive diagnosis is difficult to make from cytologic material, probably due to an associated bone marrow fibrosis, and requires bone marrow trephine biopsy with an immunohistochemical profile. Here we had the opportunity to study a case of metastatic angiosarcoma with positive cytologic findings and an unusual presentation that challenged its primary diagnosis. PMID:24847252

  14. A Metastatic Ovarian Angiosarcoma Mimicking Hematologic Neoplasia at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gaiolla, Rafael Dezen; Duarte, Ívison Xavier; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare aggressive neoplasms of vascular endothelial origin with a high metastatic rate and poor prognosis. Involvement of the bone marrow by the angiosarcoma is exceedingly uncommon, and there have only been a few cases reported in the literature to date. Clinical manifestations and common laboratory findings of bone marrow involvement can mimic other more common bone marrow-replacing neoplasias such as lymphomas and acute leukemia. A definitive diagnosis is difficult to make from cytologic material, probably due to an associated bone marrow fibrosis, and requires bone marrow trephine biopsy with an immunohistochemical profile. Here we had the opportunity to study a case of metastatic angiosarcoma with positive cytologic findings and an unusual presentation that challenged its primary diagnosis. PMID:24847252

  15. Post-genomics of bone metabolic dysfunctions and neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-02-01

    Post-genomic research on osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells, in contrast to that on many other cell types, has only been undertaken recently. Nevertheless, important information has been gained from these investigations on the mechanisms involved in osteoblast differentiation and on markers relevant for tissue regeneration and therapeutic validation of drugs, hormones and growth factors. These protein indicators may also have a diagnostic and prognostic value for bone dysfunctions and tumors. Some reviews have already focused on the application of transcriptomics and/or proteomics for exploring skeletal biology and related disorders. The main goal of the present review is to systematically summarize the most relevant post-genomic studies on various metabolic bone diseases (osteoporosis, Paget's disease and osteonecrosis), neoplasias (osteosarcoma) and metabolic conditions that indirectly affect bone tissue, such as alkaptonuria. PMID:22246652

  16. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 509: Management of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is an increasingly common problem, particularly among women in their 40s. The term VIN is used to denote high-grade squamous lesions and is subdivided into usual-type VIN (including warty, basaloid, and mixed VIN) and differentiated VIN. Usual-type VIN is commonly associated with carcinogenic genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) and other HPV persistence risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and immunocompromised status, whereas differentiated VIN usually is not associated with HPV and is more often associated with vulvar dermatologic conditions, such as lichen sclerosus. Biopsy is indicated for any pigmented vulvar lesion. Treatment is indicated for all cases of VIN. When occult invasion is not a concern, VIN can be treated with surgical therapy, laser ablation, or medical therapy. After resolution, women should be monitored at 6 and 12 months and annually thereafter. PMID:22015906

  17. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  18. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  19. Clinical applications of next-generation sequencing in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Lee, Sug-Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Like other solid tumors, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genomic disorder in which various types of genomic alterations, such as point mutations, genomic rearrangements, gene fusions, or chromosomal copy number alterations, can contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease. The advent of a new DNA sequencing technology known as next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the speed and throughput of cataloguing such cancer-related genomic alterations. Now the challenge is how to exploit this advanced technology to better understand the underlying molecular mechanism of colorectal carcinogenesis and to identify clinically relevant genetic biomarkers for diagnosis and personalized therapeutics. In this review, we will introduce NGS-based cancer genomics studies focusing on those of CRC, including a recent large-scale report from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We will mainly discuss how NGS-based exome-, whole genome- and methylome-sequencing have extended our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis. We will also introduce the unique genomic features of CRC discovered by NGS technologies, such as the relationship with bacterial pathogens and the massive genomic rearrangements of chromothripsis. Finally, we will discuss the necessary steps prior to development of a clinical application of NGS-related findings for the advanced management of patients with CRC. PMID:24187453

  20. Laparoscopic wedge resection of synchronous gastric intraepithelial neoplasia and stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Xie, Kun; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ke

    2010-10-21

    Synchronous occurrence of epithelial neoplasia and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach is uncommon. Only rare cases have been reported in the literature. We present here a 60-year-old female case of synchronous occurrence of gastric high-level intraepithelial neoplasia and GIST with the features of 22 similar cases and detailed information reported in the English-language literature summarized. In the present patient, epithelial neoplasia and GIST were removed en bloc by laparoscopic wedge resection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case treated by laparoscopic wedge resection. PMID:20954290

  1. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  2. Growth and Invasion of Sporadic Colorectal Adenocarcinomas in Terms of Genetic Change

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Seon Ae; Choi, Eun Young; Cho, Dong Hyung; Jang, Se Jin; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2010-01-01

    Integrative genetic changes were examined in relation to tumor growth and progression of sporadic colorectal cancers. Ninety-two sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 12 human colorectal cancer cell lines were evaluated. Genetic changes in representative steps of colorectal tumorigenesis were determined. Biological characteristics, i.e., clinicopathologic parameters, expression of invasion-associated molecules, and in vitro invasion and migration, in association with these changes were further analyzed. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and/or Wnt-activated alterations occurred in 66% patients, whereas mismatch repair (MMR) defects and/or RAF-mediated alterations were identified in 47% patients. The crossover rate between these two alterations was 26%. Differential mRNA expression of ARK5 was closely associated with that of MMP2, MMP9, and S100A4 (P≤0.044-0.001). Additionally, enhanced ARK5 mRNA expression was more frequent in tumors displaying RAF-mediated alterations and crossover pathways (P=0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Upregulation of CEA mRNA was more common in the advanced stages (P=0.034), while VEGF expression was greater in poorly differentiated or mucinous tumors (P=0.042). The high expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 were closely associated with invasion and migration of colorectal tumors and cell lines. Our results conclusively show that specific pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis are closely associated with characteristic tumor growth and invasion. PMID:20191032

  3. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeng Jin; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMRT) on cortisol level, the Stress Arousal Checklist (SACL) score, blood pressure, and heart rate in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Forty-six patients were divided into control and experimental groups. Cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before surgery and between 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. on the first, third, and fifth days after surgery. SACL score was measured before surgery and on the fifth day after surgery at the same time points. PMRT was performed twice a day for 5 days. Analyses of covariance with advanced covariate levels and t tests showed that PMRT helps colorectal cancer patients achieve a lower stress response and provides an important basis for stress control. PMID:26945016

  4. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC. PMID:26811627

  5. Venous Thromboembolism Following Colorectal Surgery for Suspected or Confirmed Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Brenton; Hitos, Kerry; Fletcher, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Surgery for colorectal cancer conveys a high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The effect of thromboprophylactic regimens of varying duration on the incidence of VTE was assessed in 417 patients undergoing surgery between 2005 and 2009 for colorectal cancer. Low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) was used in 52.7% of patients, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in 35.3%, and 10.7% received LDUH followed by LMWH. Pharmacological prophylaxis was continued after hospitalisation in 31.6%. Major bleeding occurred in 4% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.9%. The incidence of symptomatic VTE from hospital admission for surgery to 12 months after was 2.4%. There were no in-hospital VTE events. The majority of events occurred in the three-month period after discharge, but there were VTE events up to 12 months, especially in patients with more advanced cancer and multiple comorbidities. PMID:22084669

  6. Need for simulation in laparoscopic colorectal surgery training.

    PubMed

    Celentano, Valerio

    2015-09-27

    The dissemination of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) has been slow despite increasing evidence for the clinical benefits, with a prolonged learning curve being one of the main restrictions for a prompt uptake. Performing advanced laparoscopic procedures requires dedicated surgical skills and new simulation methods designed precisely for LCS have been established: These include virtual reality simulators, box trainers, animal and human tissue and synthetic materials. Studies have even demonstrated an improvement in trainees' laparoscopic skills in the actual operating room and a staged approach to surgical simulation with a combination of various training methods should be mandatory in every colorectal training program. The learning curve for LCS could be reduced through practice and skills development in a riskfree setting. PMID:26425266

  7. Need for simulation in laparoscopic colorectal surgery training

    PubMed Central

    Celentano, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The dissemination of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) has been slow despite increasing evidence for the clinical benefits, with a prolonged learning curve being one of the main restrictions for a prompt uptake. Performing advanced laparoscopic procedures requires dedicated surgical skills and new simulation methods designed precisely for LCS have been established: These include virtual reality simulators, box trainers, animal and human tissue and synthetic materials. Studies have even demonstrated an improvement in trainees’ laparoscopic skills in the actual operating room and a staged approach to surgical simulation with a combination of various training methods should be mandatory in every colorectal training program. The learning curve for LCS could be reduced through practice and skills development in a riskfree setting. PMID:26425266

  8. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:25418900

  9. Metachronous pancreatic cancer originating from disseminated founder pancreatic intraductal neoplasias (PanINs).

    PubMed

    Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Sasajima, Junpei; Chiba, Shin-Ichi; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Muraki, Miho; Hanaoka, Hideki; Furukawa, Takahisa; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo; Mizukami, Yusuke

    2015-04-01

    Clonal populations originated from benign-looking 'founder cells' may spread widely within pancreas instead of being localized in situ before frank pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) can be detected. Metachronous PDA is not common event, and we here sought to define potent origin of multiple PDAs developed in a woman using advanced genetics technologies. Curative resection of pancreatic head tumour was performed; however, 'recurrent' lesions in the remnant pancreas were found 3.5 years later and total pancreatectomy was subsequently performed. The metachronous lesions were morphologically similar to the primary PDA. Using a next-generation sequencing and digital PCR, all three PDAs were shown to possess rare somatic mutations in KRAS (p.T58I & p.Q61H). Curiously, identical KRAS mutations were found in low-grade 'intraepithelial' lesions, which localized in normal area of the pancreas and one of them possessed p53 mutation, which was also found in the PDAs. The footprint of the tumour evolution marked by mutational profiling supports a human correlate to the mouse models of 'dissemination' occurring at the earliest stages of pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:27499895

  10. Metachronous pancreatic cancer originating from disseminated founder pancreatic intraductal neoplasias (PanINs)

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Sasajima, Junpei; Chiba, Shin‐ichi; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Muraki, Miho; Hanaoka, Hideki; Furukawa, Takahisa; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clonal populations originated from benign‐looking ‘founder cells' may spread widely within pancreas instead of being localized in situ before frank pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) can be detected. Metachronous PDA is not common event, and we here sought to define potent origin of multiple PDAs developed in a woman using advanced genetics technologies. Curative resection of pancreatic head tumour was performed; however, ‘recurrent' lesions in the remnant pancreas were found 3.5 years later and total pancreatectomy was subsequently performed. The metachronous lesions were morphologically similar to the primary PDA. Using a next‐generation sequencing and digital PCR, all three PDAs were shown to possess rare somatic mutations in KRAS (p.T58I & p.Q61H). Curiously, identical KRAS mutations were found in low‐grade ‘intraepithelial' lesions, which localized in normal area of the pancreas and one of them possessed p53 mutation, which was also found in the PDAs. The footprint of the tumour evolution marked by mutational profiling supports a human correlate to the mouse models of ‘dissemination' occurring at the earliest stages of pancreatic neoplasia.

  11. Gut Microbiome and Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Keku, Temitope O.

    2015-01-01

    The trillions of bacteria that naturally reside in the human gut collectively constitute the complex system known the gut microbiome, a vital player for the host’s homeostasis and health. However, there is mounting evidence that dysbiosis, a state of pathological imbalance in the gut microbiome is present in many disease states. In this review, we present recent insights concerning the gut microbiome’s contribution to the development of colorectal adenomas and the subsequent progression to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the United States alone, CRC is the second leading cause of cancer deaths. As a result, there is a high interest in identifying risk factors for adenomas, which are intermediate precursors to CRC. Recent research on CRC and the microbiome suggest that modulation of the gut bacterial composition and structure may be useful in preventing adenomas and CRC. We highlight the known risk factors for colorectal adenomas and the potential mechanisms by which microbial dysbiosis may contribute to the etiology of CRC. We also underscore novel findings from recent studies on the gut microbiota and colorectal adenomas along with current knowledge gaps. Understanding the microbiome may provide promising new directions towards novel diagnostic tools, biomarkers, and therapeutic interventions for CRC. PMID:24855012

  12. Minilaparoscopic Colorectal Resections: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Bona, S.; Molteni, M.; Montorsi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resections have been shown to provide short-term advantages in terms of postoperative pain, general morbidity, recovery, and quality of life. To date, long-term results have been proved to be comparable to open surgery irrefutably only for colon cancer. Recently, new trends keep arising in the direction of minimal invasiveness to reduce surgical trauma after colorectal surgery in order to improve morbidity and cosmetic results. The few reports available in the literature on single-port technique show promising results. Natural orifices endoscopic techniques still have very limited application. We focused our efforts in standardising a minilaparoscopic technique (using 3 to 5 mm instruments) for colorectal resections since it can provide excellent cosmetic results without changing the laparoscopic approach significantly. Thus, there is no need for a new learning curve as minilaparoscopy maintains the principle of instrument triangulation. This determines an undoubted advantage in terms of feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure without increasing operative time. Some preliminary experiences confirm that minilaparoscopic colorectal surgery provides acceptable results, comparable to those reported for laparoscopic surgery with regard to operative time, morbidity, and hospital stay. Randomized controlled studies should be conducted to confirm these early encouraging results. PMID:22548166

  13. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  14. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  15. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  16. Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: An Update (with Special Reference to Indian Scenario).

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, G S

    2014-04-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, being already declared as gold standard technique, laparoscopic surgery has advanced far and wide, touching almost every corner of the abdomen. This advancement has gradually expanded to colorectal surgery which is done for malignant diseases as well. However, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has not been accepted as quickly as was laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This is because of its steep learning curve, concerns with oncological outcomes, lack of randomized control trials (RCTs) and initial reports on high port site recurrences which occurred after curative resections. But all these initial concerns have been overcome by doing a series of RCTs globally, in the past decade, that revealed that laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignant disease offered short term benefits without compromising on oncological principles of radicality of resection, tumour resection margins and completeness of lymph node harvesting as compared to those of open surgery. Favourable post-operative results with respect to less blood loss, less pain, lesser surgical site infections, lesser requirement of analgesics, early return of bowel function and shorter hospital stay in patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resections were obtained in studies done on individual series, including those done in India and more recently, in large trials. An update on recent studies done on laparoscopic colorectal surgery by reviewing many RCTs and individual series, including our experiences, was made, to support the advantages of this procedure which were obtained when it was carried out by skilled hands. PMID:24959478

  17. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nicole R.; Hauch, Adam T.; Hu, Tian; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Robotic approaches have become increasingly used for colorectal surgery. The aim of this study is to examine the safety and efficacy of robotic colorectal procedures in an adult population. Study Design: A systematic review of articles in both PubMed and Embase comparing laparoscopic and robotic colorectal procedures was performed. Clinical trials and observational studies in an adult population were included. Approaches were evaluated in terms of operative time, length of stay, estimated blood loss, number of lymph nodes harvested, and perioperative complications. Mean net differences and odds ratios were calculated to examine treatment effect of each group. Results: Two hundred eighteen articles were identified, and 17 met the inclusion criteria, representing 4,342 patients: 920 robotic and 3,422 in the laparoscopic group. Operative time for the robotic approach was 38.849 minutes longer (95% confidence interval: 17.944 to 59.755). The robotic group had lower estimated blood loss (14.17 mL; 95% confidence interval: –27.63 to –1.60), and patients were 1.78 times more likely to be converted to an open procedure (95% confidence interval: 1.24 to 2.55). There was no difference between groups with respect to number of lymph nodes harvested, length of stay, readmission rate, or perioperative complication rate. Conclusions: The robotic approach to colorectal surgery is as safe and efficacious as conventional laparoscopic surgery. However, it is associated with longer operative time and an increased rate of conversion to laparotomy. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to examine the cost-effectiveness of robotic colorectal surgery before it can be adopted as the new standard of care. PMID:25489216

  18. The Spatial Predilection for Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I.-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs) are easily missed with conventional white-light endoscopy. This study aimed to assess whether early ESCNs have a spatial predilection and the patterns of recurrence after endoscopic treatment. We analyzed the circumferential and longitudinal location of early ESCNs, as well as their correlations with exposure to carcinogens in a cohort of 162 subjects with 248 early ESCNs; 219 of which were identified by screening and 29 by surveillance endoscopy. The circumferential location was identified using a clock-face orientation, and the longitudinal location was identified according to the distance from the incisor. The most common circumferential and longitudinal distributions of the early ESCNs were found in the 6 to 9 o’clock quadrant (38.5%) and at 26 to 30 cm from the incisor (41.3%), respectively. A total of 163 lesions (75%) were located in the lower hemisphere arc, and 149 (68.4%) were located at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor. One hundred eleven (51%) early ESCNs were centered within the “hot zone” (i.e., lower hemisphere arc of the esophagus at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor), which comprised 20% of the esophageal area. Exposure to alcohol, betel nut, or cigarette was risk factors for the development of early ESCNs in the lower hemisphere. After complete endoscopic treatment, the mean annual incidence of metachronous tumors was 10%. In addition, 43% of the metachronous recurrent neoplasias developed within the “hot zone.” Cox regression analysis revealed that the index tumor within the hot zone (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–8.68; P = 0.02) and the presence of numerous Lugol-voiding lesions in the esophageal background mucosa were independent predictors for metachronous recurrence (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.36–15.56; P = 0.01). We identified a hot zone that may be used to enhance the detection of early ESCNs during endoscopic screening and surveillance

  19. Raltitrexed (Tomudex): an alternative drug for patients with colorectal cancer and 5-fluorouracil associated cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Köhne, C. H.; Thuss-Patience, P.; Friedrich, M.; Daniel, P. T.; Kretzschmar, A.; Benter, T.; Bauer, B.; Dietz, R.; Dörken, B.

    1998-01-01

    Two patients with proven 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-associated cardiotoxicity were treated with the specific thymidylate synthase inhibitor raltitrexed safely, without evidence of cardiotoxicity. Raltitrexed might be an alternative for patients with advanced colorectal cancer and 5-FU-associated cardiotoxicity. 5-FU cardiotoxicity is not due to the antineoplastic mechanisms via thymidilate synthase. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9528843

  20. Overview of robotic colorectal surgery: Current and future practical developments

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudipta; Evans, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionised colorectal surgery by offering reduced morbidity and mortality over open surgery, while maintaining oncological and functional outcomes with the disadvantage of additional practical challenges. Robotic surgery aids the surgeon in overcoming these challenges. Uptake of robotic assistance has been relatively slow, mainly because of the high initial and ongoing costs of equipment but also because of limited evidence of improved patient outcomes. Advances in robotic colorectal surgery will aim to widen the scope of minimal access surgery to allow larger and more complex surgery through smaller access and natural orifices and also to make the technology more economical, allowing wider dispersal and uptake of robotic technology. Advances in robotic endoscopy will yield self-advancing endoscopes and a widening role for capsule endoscopy including the development of motile and steerable capsules able to deliver localised drug therapy and insufflation as well as being recharged from an extracorporeal power source to allow great longevity. Ultimately robotic technology may advance to the point where many conventional surgical interventions are no longer required. With respect to nanotechnology, surgery may eventually become obsolete. PMID:26981188

  1. Overview of robotic colorectal surgery: Current and future practical developments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sudipta; Evans, Charles

    2016-02-27

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionised colorectal surgery by offering reduced morbidity and mortality over open surgery, while maintaining oncological and functional outcomes with the disadvantage of additional practical challenges. Robotic surgery aids the surgeon in overcoming these challenges. Uptake of robotic assistance has been relatively slow, mainly because of the high initial and ongoing costs of equipment but also because of limited evidence of improved patient outcomes. Advances in robotic colorectal surgery will aim to widen the scope of minimal access surgery to allow larger and more complex surgery through smaller access and natural orifices and also to make the technology more economical, allowing wider dispersal and uptake of robotic technology. Advances in robotic endoscopy will yield self-advancing endoscopes and a widening role for capsule endoscopy including the development of motile and steerable capsules able to deliver localised drug therapy and insufflation as well as being recharged from an extracorporeal power source to allow great longevity. Ultimately robotic technology may advance to the point where many conventional surgical interventions are no longer required. With respect to nanotechnology, surgery may eventually become obsolete. PMID:26981188

  2. A Drosophila Model of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Read, Renee D.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Novak, Nancy; Armstrong, Jon R.; Cagan, Ross L.

    2005-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase lead to the familial cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2). Mammalian tissue culture studies suggest that RetMEN2 mutations significantly alter Ret-signaling properties, but the precise mechanisms by which RetMEN2 promotes tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. To determine the signal transduction pathways required for RetMEN2 activity, we analyzed analogous mutations in the Drosophila Ret ortholog dRet. Overexpressed dRetMEN2 isoforms targeted to the developing retina led to aberrant cell proliferation, inappropriate cell fate specification, and excessive Ras pathway activation. Genetic analysis indicated that dRetMEN2 acts through the Ras-ERK, Src, and Jun kinase pathways. A genetic screen for mutations that dominantly suppress or enhance dRetMEN2 phenotypes identified new genes that are required for the phenotypic outcomes of dRetMEN2 activity. Finally, we identified human orthologs for many of these genes and examined their status in human tumors. Two of these loci showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) within both sporadic and MEN2-associated pheochromocytomas, suggesting that they may contribute to Ret-dependent oncogenesis. PMID:15965261

  3. Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids as genetic models of induced neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Kazianis, S

    2001-01-01

    Fishes of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfishes and swordtails) are small, internally fertilizing, livebearing, and derived from freshwater habitats in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. Scientists have used these fishes in cancer research studies for more than 70 yr. The genus is presently composed of 22 species that are quite divergent in their external morphology. Most cancer studies using Xiphophorus use hybrids, which can be easily produced by artificial insemination. Phenotypic traits, such as macromelanophore pigment patterns, are often drastically altered as a result of lack of gene regulation within hybrid fishes. These fish can develop large exophytic melanomas as a result of upregulated expression of these pigment patterns. Because backcross hybrid fish are susceptible to the development of melanoma and other neoplasms, they can be subjected to potentially deleterious chemical and physical agents. It is thus possible to use gene mapping and cloning methodologies to identify and characterize oncogenes and tumor suppressors implicated in spontaneous or induced neoplasia. This article reviews the history of cancer research using Xiphophorus and recent developments regarding DNA repair capabilities, mapping, and cloning of candidate genes involved in neoplastic phenotypes. The particular genetic complexity of melanoma in these fishes is analyzed and reviewed. PMID:11581522

  4. Pregnancy in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 equals multiple complications

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Megha; Gupta, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a rare inherited disorder caused by mutations in the tumour suppressor gene MEN 1. It is characterised by a predisposition towards the development of parathyroid, anterior pituitary and entero-pancreatic tumours. Clinically, MEN 1 is defined following development of two out of these three tumours. There have been no published cases of the management of MEN 1 in pregnancy. We report the first case of a 31-year-old primigravida with a confirmed diagnosis of MEN 1 prior to conception. Due to the rare nature of MEN 1, there are no guidelines on how such women should be managed. The main issues were to assess and manage potential complications, such as hypercalcaemia, diabetes mellitus and the symptoms from a pituitary tumour as well the issues around a gastrinoma and monitor fetal well-being. A Caesarean section was performed at 35 weeks gestation for a growth-restricted fetus with raised umbilical artery Dopplers. The neonate was treated with intravenous calcium secondary to hypocalcaemia. The patient and neonate recovered well. We have demonstrated successful management of a woman with MEN 1 who completed her pregnancy with few complications and a healthy neonate. It is vital for such women to be managed in the context of a multidisciplinary team setting to optimise maternal and fetal outcomes.

  5. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.E.; van Belle, G.; LoGerfo, J.P.

    1987-08-07

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship.

  6. Challenges in automated detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Yeshwanth; Yang, Shuyu; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda; Phillips, Benny; Long, Rodney

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) is a precursor to invasive cervical cancer, which annually accounts for about 3700 deaths in the United States and about 274,000 worldwide. Early detection of CIN is important to reduce the fatalities due to cervical cancer. While the Pap smear is the most common screening procedure for CIN, it has been proven to have a low sensitivity, requiring multiple tests to confirm an abnormality and making its implementation impractical in resource-poor regions. Colposcopy and cervicography are two diagnostic procedures available to trained physicians for non-invasive detection of CIN. However, many regions suffer from lack of skilled personnel who can precisely diagnose the bio-markers due to CIN. Automatic detection of CIN deals with the precise, objective and non-invasive identification and isolation of these bio-markers, such as the Acetowhite (AW) region, mosaicism and punctations, due to CIN. In this paper, we study and compare three different approaches, based on Mathematical Morphology (MM), Deterministic Annealing (DA) and Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), respectively, to segment the AW region of the cervix. The techniques are compared with respect to their complexity and execution times. The paper also presents an adaptive approach to detect and remove Specular Reflections (SR). Finally, algorithms based on MM and matched filtering are presented for the precise segmentation of mosaicism and punctations from AW regions containing the respective abnormalities.

  7. Brain metastases from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: review of pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Piura, E; Piura, B

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is rare with about 222 cases documented in the literature and an incidence of about 11% in living GTN patients. Brain metastasis from GTN was part of a disseminated disease in 90% of patients, single metastases in the brain - 80% and located in the cerebrum - 90%. Brain metastasis was the only manifestation of metastatic GTN in 11.3% of patients, appeared synchronously with metastatic GTN in other sites of the body - 30.6% and was diagnosed from 0.3 to 60 months after diagnosis of metastatic GTN in other sites (most often in the lung) - 58.1%. Overall, 83.9% of patients with brain metastases from GTN had also lung metastases from GTN. Brain metastases from GTN showed a greater tendency to be hemorrhagic compared to brain metastases from other primaries. In patients with brain metastases from GTN, the best outcome was achieved with multimodal therapy including craniotomy, whole brain radiotherapy, and EP-EMA or EMA-CO chemotherapy. Nonetheless, brain metastasis from GTN is a grave disease with a median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of about 12 months. PMID:25118474

  8. Oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity in pancreatic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, DJ; Murphy, EA; Desgrosellier, JS; Mielgo, A; Lau, SKM; Barnes, LA; Lesperance, J; Huang, M; Schmedt, C; Tarin, D; Lowy, AM; Cheresh, DA

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies and is characterized by activating mutations of Kras, present in 95% of patients. More than 60% of pancreatic cancers also display increased c-Src activity, which is associated with poor prognosis. Although loss of tumor suppressor function (for example, p16, p53, Smad4) combined with oncogenic Kras signaling has been shown to accelerate pancreatic duct carcinogenesis, it is unclear whether elevated Src activity contributes to Kras-dependent tumorigenesis or is simply a biomarker of disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that in the context of oncogenic Kras, activation of c-Src through deletion of C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) results in the development of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) by 5–8 weeks. In contrast, deletion of CSK alone fails to induce neoplasia, while oncogenic Kras expression yields PDA at low frequency after a latency of 12 months. Analysis of cell lines derived from Ras/Src-induced PDA’s indicates that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity may lead to genomic instability, yet Ras/Src-driven tumor cells remain dependent on Src signaling and as such, Src inhibition suppresses growth of Ras/Src-driven tumors. These findings demonstrate that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperate to accelerate PDA onset and support further studies of Src-directed therapies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21242978

  9. Imiquimod in cervical, vaginal and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia: a review.

    PubMed

    de Witte, C J; van de Sande, A J M; van Beekhuizen, H J; Koeneman, M M; Kruse, A J; Gerestein, C G

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is in the vast majority of patients accountable for the development of vulvar, cervical and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, CIN, VAIN); precursors of vulvar, cervical and vaginal cancers. The currently preferred treatment modality for high grade VIN, CIN and VAIN is surgical excision. Nevertheless surgical treatment is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and recurrence is not uncommon. The aim of this review is to present evidence on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of imiquimod (an immune response modifier) in HPV-related VIN, CIN and VAIN. A search for papers on the use of imiquimod in VIN, CIN and VAIN was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases. Data was extracted and reviewed. Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed; 16 on VIN, 3 on CIN and 2 on VAIN. Complete response rates in VIN ranged from 5 to 88%. Although minor adverse effects were frequently reported, treatment with imiquimod was well tolerated in most patients. Studies on imiquimod treatment of CIN and VAIN are limited and lack uniformly defined endpoints. The available evidence however, shows encouraging effect. Complete response rates for CIN 2-3 and VAIN 1-3 ranged from 67 to 75% and 57 to 86% respectively. More randomized controlled trials on the use of imiquimod in CIN, VAIN and VIN with extended follow-up are necessary to determine the attributive therapeutic value in these patients. PMID:26335596

  10. Cytopathological Features of a Severe Type of Corneal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Hideki; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Yokoi, Norihiko; Yamasaki, Kenta; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the cytopathological features of corneal intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) through the investigation of cytokeratin expression pattern, keratinization, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Patient and Methods Corneal tissue excised from a CIN patient was examined in this study. Cryosections of the excised CIN epithelial tissue were examined by immunostaining analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins, keratinization-related proteins, Ki-67, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins. Subcellular localization of F-actin was also analyzed using phalloidin. For the detection of apoptotic cells, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the expression level of hTERT in the CIN epithelium. Results The CIN epithelium exhibited a significantly altered cytokeratin expression pattern compared to normal corneas with an upregulated expression of keratinization-related proteins. The CIN epithelium also demonstrated an increased number of Ki-67-positive cells with an upregulated expression of hTERT, while exhibiting an increased number of apoptotic cells. EMT did not occur in the CIN epithelium. Conclusion CIN epithelium seems to be slightly dedifferentiated from the corneal epithelial lineage. The status of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the CIN epithelium was significantly altered from that of normal corneal epithelium, but its malignancy level does not appear to be as high as that of metastasis-competent malignant cancers. PMID:27462252

  11. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  12. Screening, Surveillance, and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Long, Kevin C; Menon, Raman; Bastawrous, Amir; Billingham, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia has been increasing, especially in high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, and those who are immunosuppressed. Several studies with long-term follow-up have suggested that rate of progression from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer is ∼ 5%. This number is considerably higher for those at high risk. Anal cytology has been used to attempt to screen high-risk patients for disease; however, it has been shown to have very little correlation to actual histology. Patients with lesions should undergo history and physical exam including digital rectal exam and standard anoscopy. High-resolution anoscopy can be considered as well, although it is of questionable time and cost-effectiveness. Nonoperative treatments include expectant surveillance and topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. Operative therapies include wide local excision and targeted ablation with electrocautery, infrared coagulation, or cryotherapy. Recurrence rates remain high regardless of treatment delivered and surveillance is paramount, although optimal surveillance regimens have yet to be established. PMID:26929753

  13. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-27

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  14. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia--is treatment better than observation?

    PubMed

    Orchard, M; Roman, A; Parvaiz, A C

    2013-01-01

    Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN) is an increasingly common condition for which the best treatment has not been well established. Traditional management was based on a 'watch and wait' strategy, but as the natural history of AIN and its progression to anal cancer is becoming better understood, more active treatment strategies are warranted. A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol to address the question whether treatment is indicated in patients with AIN. A total of 169 papers were identified using the defined search criteria. This included only one randomised controlled trial. Case series were therefore also included to help answer the question. The details of the papers were tabulated including relevant outcomes and study weaknesses. We conclude that treatment of high grade AIN, particularly in high risk groups is recommended to try to avoid progression to anal cancer. Treatment options that have shown some benefit include topical use of imiquimod cream or ablation directed by high resolution anoscopy. PMID:23643642

  15. Current status of pharmacological treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Reyhan; Chandel, Shammy; Sarotra, Pooja; Medhi, Bikash

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To review the clinical trials for the development in drugs for chemotherapeutic treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: A systematic review identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing drugs for the treatment of CRC or adenomatous polyps from www.clinicaltrials.gov. Various online medical databases were searched for relevant publications. RESULTS: Combination treatment regimens of standard drugs with newer agents have been shown to improve overall survival, disease-free survival, time to progression and quality of life compared to that with standard drugs alone in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. The FOLFOXIRI regimen has been associated with a significantly higher response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival compared to the FOLFIRI regimen. CONCLUSION: Oxaliplatin plus intravenous bolus fluorouracil and leucovorin has been shown to be superior for disease-free survival when compared to intravenous bolus fluorouracil and leucovorin. In addition, oxaliplatin regimens were more likely to result in successful surgical resections. First line treatment with cetuximab plus fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan has been found to reduce the risk of metastatic progression in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-positive colorectal cancer with unresectable metastases. The addition of bevacizumab has been shown to significantly increase overall and progression-free survival when given in combination with standard therapy. PMID:24936228

  16. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Han

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the elderly. However, elderly patients with CRC tend to be under-presented in clinical trials and undertreated in clinical practice. Advanced age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective therapy in elderly patients with CRC. The best guide about optimal cancer treatment can be provided by comprehensive geriatric assessment. Elderly patients with stage III colon cancer can enjoy the same benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin or capecitabine as younger patients, without a substantial increase in toxicity. With conflicting results of retrospective studies and a lack of data available from randomized studies, combined modality treatment should be used with great caution in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic CRC. For elderly patients who are frail or vulnerable, however, monotherapy or a stop-and-go strategy may be desirable. The use of targeted therapies in older patients with metastatic CRC appears to be promising in view of their better efficacy and toxicity. Treatment should be individualized based on the nature of the disease, the physiologic or functional status, and the patient’s preference. PMID:25954089

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2015.

    PubMed

    Provenzale, Dawn; Jasperson, Kory; Ahnen, Dennis J; Aslanian, Harry; Bray, Travis; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Erwin, Deborah; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Gupta, Samir; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Klapman, Jason B; Larson, David W; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Rao, M Sambasiva; Regenbogen, Scott E; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary A; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A; Darlow, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colorectal Cancer Screening provide recommendations for selecting individuals for colorectal cancer screening, and for evaluation and follow-up of colon polyps. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2015 NCCN Colorectal Cancer Screening panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were the state of evidence for CT colonography and stool DNA testing, bowel preparation procedures for colonoscopy, and guidelines for patients with a positive family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26285241

  18. Transarterial Therapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Bhutiani, Neal; Martin, Robert C G

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, hepatic arterial therapies (HAT) had been used for colorectal liver metastases after failure of first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. HAT has gained greater acceptance in patients with liver-dominant colorectal metastases after failure of surgery or systemic chemotherapy. The current data demonstrate that HAT is a safe and effective option for preoperative downsizing, optimizing the time to surgery, limiting non-tumor-bearing liver toxicity, and improving overall survival after surgery in patients with colorectal liver-only metastases. The aim of this review is to present the current data for HAT in liver-only and liver-dominant colorectal liver metastases. PMID:27017870

  19. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-07-26

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response. PMID:27380134

  20. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response. PMID:27380134

  1. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  2. A Possible New Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Mutation in a Patient with a Prototypic Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Buzzola, Rino; Kurukulasuriya, Lilamani Romayne; Touza, Mariana; Litofsky, Norman S.; Brietzke, Stephen; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1 syndrome is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of tumors involving two or more endocrine glands. These tumors include pheochromocytoma, adrenal cortical and neuroendocrine tumors including (bronchopulmonary, thymic, gastric), lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas, and meningiomas. MEN-4 is very rare and has been characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid and anterior pituitary tumors in association with tumors of the adrenals, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Summary We report the case of a 40-year-old male without significant family history of endocrine disease who was found to have primary hyperparathyroidism, a pituitary tumor causing acromegaly, thyroid cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cysts. We posit that this represents a new version of MEN-4. While renal tumors (angiomyolipoma) have been reported as part of the MEN-4 phenotype, to our knowledge, this is the first case reported of the association of MEN-1 and/or MEN-4 phenotype with this unique constellation of tumors, including renal cell carcinoma. Interestingly, this patient tested negative (DNA sequencing/deletion) for MEN-1 (menin), MEN-4 (CDKN1B) and VHL genes. Key Message Thus, while this case has clinical characteristics consistent with either MEN-1 or MEN-4, it may represent a unique genetic variant. PMID:26989398

  3. Ovarian metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Birnkrant, A; Sampson, J; Sugarbaker, P H

    1986-11-01

    Controversies exist regarding the surgical treatment of the ovaries in women with primary colorectal cancer. A review of the authors' experience and the surgical literature reveals an incidence of ovarian metastases from colorectal cancer of approximately 6 percent. This problem may occur somewhat more frequently in premenopausal women. Resection of the ovaries at the time of colectomy is unlikely to affect survival. Removal of the ovaries at the time of bowel resection will prevent repeat laparotomy to resect an ovarian mass in approximately 2 percent of women with large bowel cancer. Oophorectomy should be performed in all postmenopausal females at the time of primary resection. Oophorectomy should be performed in premenopausal women if any gross abnormality of the ovary is detected or if peritoneal implants are seen at the time of primary resection. PMID:3533472

  4. Telomere function in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Frías, Cristina; Morán, Alberto; de Juan, Carmen; Ortega, Paloma; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Benito, Manuel; Iniesta, Pilar

    2009-10-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Tumour cells acquire the hallmarks of cancer during the carcinogenic selection process. Cell immortality is one of the principal features acquired during this process which involves the stabilization of telomere length. It is achieved mainly, by telomerase activation. Thus, the discovery of telomeres and telomerase allowed an understanding of the mechanisms by which cells can become immortalized. Different studies have shown that tumour cells have shorter telomeres than nontumour cells and have detected telomerase activity in the majority of tumours. Survival studies have determined that telomere maintenance and telomerase activity are associated with poor prognosis. Taking into account all the results achieved by different groups, quantification and evaluation of telomerase activity and measurement of telomere length may be useful methods for additional biologic and prognostic staging of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:21160767

  5. Subnuclear Proteomics in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; de Wit, Meike; Mongera, Sandra; Carvalho, Beatriz; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99% confidence interval at the protein level) with an average coefficient of variance for the number of normalized spectral counts per protein of 30%. This indicates a good reproducibility of the entire work flow from biochemical isolation to nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Second, using spectral counting combined with statistics, we identified proteins that are significantly enriched in the nuclear matrix fraction relative to two earlier fractions (the chromatin-binding and intermediate filament fractions) isolated from six colorectal tissue samples. The total data set contained 2,059 non-redundant proteins. Gene ontology mining and protein network analysis of nuclear matrix-enriched proteins revealed enrichment for proteins implicated in “RNA processing” and “mRNA metabolic process.” Finally, an explorative comparison of the nuclear matrix proteome in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues revealed many proteins previously implicated in oncogenesis as well as new candidates. A subset of these differentially expressed proteins also exhibited a corresponding change at the mRNA level

  6. [Colorectal Carcinoma with Suspected Lynch Syndrome: A Multidisciplinary Algorithm].

    PubMed

    Schneider, R; Schneider, C; Büttner, R; Reinacher-Schick, A; Tannapfel, A; Fürst, A; Rüschoff, J; Jakobeit, C; Royer-Pokora, B; Möslein, G

    2015-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent hereditary cancer syndrome, accounting for approximately 3-5 % of all colorectal cancers. In addition, it is the most frequent predisposing hereditary cause of endometrial cancer and is also associated with gastric cancer, ovarian cancer, cancer of the urinary tract as well as several other cancers. In clinical practise Lynch syndrome is frequently not detected and many clinicians admit uncertainties regarding diagnostic procedures. Also, counselling of patients is considered difficult regarding therapeutic - especially prophylactic surgical and chemopreventive options and recommendations. Based on a review of available literature we discuss optimized strategies for improved detection of suspected Lynch syndrome patients. The aim of this review is to establish a clinical algorithm of how to proceed on a diagnostic level and to discuss surgical options at the time of a colorectal cancer. In order to identify patients with Lynch syndrome, family history should be ascertained and evaluated in regards to fulfilment of the Amsterdam-II- and/or the revised Bethesda criteria. Subsequently immunohistochemical staining for the mismatch-repair-genes, BRAF testing for MLH1 loss of expression, as well as testing for microsatellite instability in some, followed by genetic counselling and mutation analysis when indicated, is recommended. Pathological identification of suspected Lynch syndrome is readily feasible and straightforward. However, the need of performing these analyses in the tumor biopsy at the time of (gastroenterological) diagnosis of CRC neoplasia is essential, in order to offer patients the option of a prophylactically extended surgery and - as recommended in the German S3 guidelines - to discuss the option of a merely prophylactical hysterectomy and oophorectomy (if postmenopausal) in women. Close cooperation between gastroenterologists, pathologists and surgeons is warranted, so that patients may benefit from options of

  7. Dietary Intakes of Red Meat, Poultry, and Fish During High School and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in Women

    PubMed Central

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Bernstein, Adam M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Wu, Kana

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent diet may be etiologically relevant for colorectal carcinogenesis. We examined the association between meat and fish intakes during adolescence and the risk of colorectal adenomas later in life among 19,771 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II. Subjects had completed a validated food frequency questionnaire in 1998 (when aged 34–51 years) about their diets during high school and subsequently underwent at least 1 lower-bowel endoscopy during the study period (1998–2007). During this period, 1,494 subjects were diagnosed with colorectal adenomas. Intake of red meat during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk when comparing those in the highest versus lowest category of intake (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 1.35). Similarly, intake of fish during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.78, 1.17). Intake of poultry during adolescence was associated with a lower risk of total colorectal (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.99), distal (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.99), rectal (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.90), and advanced (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.93) adenomas. Replacement of 1 serving per day of red meat with 1 serving per day of poultry or fish was associated with 41% and 35% decreased risks for rectal adenomas and advanced adenomas, respectively. Our findings do not suggest an association between red meat intake during adolescence and colorectal adenomas later in life, but higher poultry intake during this time was associated with a lower risk of colorectal adenomas. PMID:23785116

  8. A genotype-directed phase I–IV dose-finding study of irinotecan in combination with fluorouracil/leucovorin as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marcuello, E; Páez, D; Paré, L; Salazar, J; Sebio, A; del Rio, E; Baiget, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infusional fluorouracil/leucovorin (FU/LV) plus irinotecan (FOLFIRI) is one of the standard first-line options for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Irinotecan is converted into 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) by a carboxylsterase and metabolised through uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1). The UGT1A1*28 allele has been associated with the risk of developing severe toxicities. The present trial was designed to define the maximum tolerated dose according to UGT1A1 genotype. This report focuses on the results of tolerance to different escalated doses of FOLFIRI first-line of chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients undergoing first-line treatment for mCRC and eligible for treatment with FOLFIRI were classified according to UGT1A1 genotype. A total of 94 patients were eligible for dose escalation of irinotecan. The starting dose of biweekly irinotecan was 180 mg m−2 for the *1/*1, 110 mg m−2 for the *1/*28 and 90 mg m−2 for the *28/*28 genotypes. Results: The dose of irinotecan was escalated to 450 mg m−2 in patients with the *1/*1 genotype, to 390 mg m−2 in those with the *1/*28 genotype and to 150 mg m−2 in those with the *28/*28 genotype. Neutropenia and diarrhoea were the most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the recommended dose of 180 mg m−2 for irinotecan in FOLFIRI is considerably lower than the dose that can be tolerated for patients with the UGT1A1 *1/*1 and *1/*28 genotypes. The maximum tolerable dose (MTD) in patients with a high-risk UGT1A1 *28/*28 genotype is 30% lower than the standard dose of 180 mg m−2. PMID:21654688

  9. Systemic Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Mayer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common non-cutaneous malignancy in the United States and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death. Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition. Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months. For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs. For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence. Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease. PMID:18471507

  10. Liver Metastases in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Folprecht, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Resection of colorectal liver metastases is a treatment standard because patients experience long-term disease-free survival or are even cured after undergoing this procedure. Improved surgical techniques for liver resection in combination with downsizing liver metastases by chemotherapy, interventions to induce liver hypertrophy before resection, and the use of ablative techniques have allowed us to expand the indications for liver surgery and local treatment in situations with limited metastatic colorectal cancer. Resectability and identification of patients who might benefit from liver surgery and local ablative techniques are key factors for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Despite the wide acceptance of liver surgery and ablative techniques, there are many open questions on the management of limited metastatic disease, such as which patients benefit from an aggressive surgical approach, what the indications for ablative and other local techniques are, and what the role of chemotherapy is for patients with resectable or resected disease. Unfortunately, results of randomized trials are only available for a limited number of these questions. PMID:27249722

  11. ADAMTS Expression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Filou, Serafula; Korpetinou, Aggeliki; Kyriakopoulou, Dora; Bounias, Dimitrios; Stavropoulos, Michael; Ravazoula, Panagiota; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Vynios, Demitrios H.

    2015-01-01

    ADAMTSs are a family of secreted proteinases that share the metalloproteinase domain with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). By acting on a large panel of extracellular substrates, they control several cell functions such as fusion, adhesion, proliferation and migration. Through their thrombospondin motifs they also possess anti-angiogenic properties. We investigated whether ADAMTSs participate in colorectal cancer progression and invasion. Their expression was investigated at both mRNA and protein levels. Using RT-PCR, the expression of ADAMTS-1, -4, -5 and ADAMTS-20 was estimated in colorectal tumors of different cancer stage and anatomic site and 3 cell lines of different aggressiveness. An overexpression of ADAMTS-4 and -5 was observed, especially in tissue samples, whereas ADAMTS-1 and -20 were found to be down-regulated. Western blot analysis further supported the RT-PCR findings, revealing in addition the degradation of ADAMTS-1 and -20 in cancer. In situ expression and localization of ADAMTS-1, -4, -5 and -20 was also investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. Our data suggest a positive correlation between ADAMTS-4 and -5 expression and cancer progression, in contrast with the anti-angiogenic members of the family, ADAMTS-1 and -20, which were found to be down-regulated. Our findings support the notion that overexpression of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in colorectal cancer might be a possible invasive mechanism of cancer cells in order to degrade proteoglycans of ECM. PMID:25786261

  12. Novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sachin Gopalkrishna; Fuloria, Jyotsna

    2016-01-01

    Over the past couple of decades considerable progress has been made in the management of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC) leading to a significant improvement in five-year survival. Although part of this success has been rightly attributed to aggressive surgical management and advances in other adjunct treatments, our understanding of the pathogenesis of cancer and emergence of newer molecular targets for colon cancer has created a powerful impact. In this review article we will discuss various targeted therapies in the management of mCRC. Newer agents on the horizon soon to be incorporated in clinical practice will be briefly reviewed as well. PMID:26798440

  13. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  14. Prevalence and features of colorectal lesions among Hispanics: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Lee, Edward; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ghuman, Amita; Nouraie, Mehdi; Brim, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of colorectal adenoma and carcinoma in an inner city Hispanic population. METHODS: We reviewed the reports of 1628 Hispanic patients who underwent colonoscopy at Howard University from 2000 to 2010. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenoma ≥ 1 cm in size, adenomas with villous histology, high grade dysplasia and/or invasive cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 statistics and t-test. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 54 years, 64.2% were females. Polyps were observed in 489 (30.0%) of patients. Adenoma prevalence was 16.8% (n = 273), advanced adenoma 2.4% (n = 39), and colorectal cancer 0.4% (n = 7). Hyperplastic polyps were seen in 6.6% of the cohort (n = 107). Adenomas predominantly exhibited a proximal colonic distribution (53.7%, n = 144); while hyperplastic polyps were mostly located in the distal colon (70%, n = 75). Among 11.7% (n = 191) patients who underwent screening colonoscopy, the prevalence of colorectal lesions was 21.4% adenoma, 2.6% advanced adenoma; and 8.3% hyperplastic polyps. CONCLUSION: Our data showed low colorectal cancer prevalence among Hispanics in the Washington DC area. However, the pre-neoplastic pattern of colonic lesions in Hispanics likely points toward a shift in this population that needs to be monitored closely through large epidemiological studies. PMID:26673447

  15. Natural history of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer - pathobiological pathways with clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Konstantinos A; Majeed, Ali W; Bird, Nigel C

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer hepatic metastases represent the final stage of a multi-step biological process. This process starts with a series of mutations in colonic epithelial cells, continues with their detachment from the large intestine, dissemination through the blood and/or lymphatic circulation, attachment to the hepatic sinusoids and interactions with the sinusoidal cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, stellate cells and pit cells. The metastatic sequence terminates with colorectal cancer cell invasion, adaptation and colonisation of the hepatic parenchyma. All these events, termed the colorectal cancer invasion-metastasis cascade, include multiple molecular pathways, intercellular interactions and expression of a plethora of chemokines and growth factors, and adhesion molecules, such as the selectins, the integrins or the cadherins, as well as enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases. This review aims to present recent advances that provide insights into these cell-biological events and emphasizes those that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting. PMID:24744570

  16. Fecal DNA testing for colorectal cancer screening: Molecular targets and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Amaninder; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J; Oikonomou, Katerina G; Moshenyat, Yitzchak

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of colorectal cancer with effective screening is essential for reduction of cancer-specific mortality. The addition of fecal DNA testing in the armamentarium of screening methods already in clinical use launches a new era in the noninvasive part of colorectal cancer screening and emanates from a large number of previous and ongoing clinical investigations and technological advancements. In this review, we discuss the molecular rational and most important genetic alterations hallmarking the early colorectal carcinogenesis process. Also, representative DNA targets-markers and key aspects of their testing at the clinical level in comparison or/and association with other screening methods are described. Finally, a critical view of the strengths and limitations of fecal DNA tests is provided, along with anticipated barriers and suggestions for further exploitation of their use. PMID:26483873

  17. Psychosocial issues in colorectal cancer survivorship: the top ten questions patients may not be asking

    PubMed Central

    Averyt, Jennifer C.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in colorectal cancer screening and treatment have increased survivorship significantly in recent years. This has led to an increased emphasis on the need for continuing patient care long after cancer treatment is completed. Colorectal cancer survivors may face a number of psychosocial issues following treatment, including cancer-related distress, adjustment to physical changes following treatment, and challenges related to returning to work. Although there are many resources available to assist with these challenges, many patients may not seek this information from their providers during follow-up care visits. This article highlights some of the most common patient concerns related to survivorship in colorectal cancer and serves as a reminder to ask about these concerns throughout the course of treatment and follow-up care. PMID:25276412

  18. Capecitabine: indications and future perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassata, A; Procoplo, G; Alù, M; Ferrari, L; Ferrario, E; Beretta, E; Longarini, R; Busto, G; De Candis, D; Bajetta, E

    2001-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines remain the most important drugs in the treatment of breast and colorectal carcinoma, but response rates and survival time have been disappointing. Optimal administration is by continuous intravenous infusion, which makes it cumbersome to use and compromises patient independence. Recently, a number of new agents, including fluorouracil prodrugs and selective dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase inhibitors, have been studied, with promising results. Capecitabine is the first in a new class of fluoropyrimidines. It is an oral, tumor-activated anticancer drug whose activity mimics that of continuously infused 5-fluorouracil. Capecitabine circumvents dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase catabolism and appears to be at least as active against metastatic colorectal and breast cancer as conventionally administered intravenous 5-fluorouracil, with significantly less toxicity, an improved quality of life, and lesser cost. Capecitabine may ultimately provide enhanced antitumor activity to fluorouracil-containing regimes for advanced colorectal and breast cancer. PMID:11989587

  19. Diagnosis of gastric epithelial neoplasia: Dilemma for Korean pathologists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Mee; Cho, Mee-Yon; Sohn, Jin Hee; Kang, Dae Young; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Woo Ho; Jin, So-Young; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Chang, Hee Kyung; Yu, Eunsil; Jung, Eun Sun; Chang, Mee Soo; Joo, Jong Eun; Joo, Mee; Kim, Youn Wha; Park, Do Youn; Kang, Yun Kyung; Park, Sun Hoo; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Young Bae; Park, Ho Sung; Chae, Yang Seok; Kwon, Kye Won; Chang, Hee Jin

    2011-06-01

    The histopathological diagnosis of gastric mucosal biopsy and endoscopic mucosal resection/endoscopic submucosal dissection specimens is important, but the diagnostic criteria, terminology, and grading system are not the same in the East and West. A structurally invasive focus is necessary to diagnose carcinoma for most Western pathologists, but Japanese pathologists make a diagnosis of cancer based on severe dysplastic cytologic atypia irrespective of the presence of invasion. Although the Vienna classification was introduced to reduce diagnostic discrepancies, it has been difficult to adopt due to different concepts for gastric epithelial neoplastic lesions. Korean pathologists experience much difficulty making a diagnosis because we are influenced by Japanese pathologists as well as Western medicine. Japan is geographically close to Korea, and academic exchanges are active. Additionally, Korean doctors are familiar with Western style medical terminology. As a result, the terminology, definitions, and diagnostic criteria for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia are very heterogeneous in Korea. To solve this problem, the Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists has made an effort and has suggested guidelines for differential diagnosis: (1) a diagnosis of carcinoma is based on invasion; (2) the most important characteristic of low grade dysplasia is the architectural pattern such as regular distribution of crypts without severe branching, budding, or marked glandular crowding; (3) if nuclear pseudostratification occupies more than the basal half of the cryptal cells in three or more adjacent crypts, the lesion is considered high grade dysplasia; (4) if severe cytologic atypia is present, careful inspection for invasive foci is necessary, because the risk for invasion is very high; and (5) other structural or nuclear atypia should be evaluated to make a final decision such as cribriform pattern, papillae, ridges, vesicular nuclei

  20. Association between folate status and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, W; Hao, M; Wang, Y; Feng, N; Wang, Z; Wang, W; Wang, J; Ding, L

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To investigate the effect of folate status on cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) progression and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV). Subjects/Methods: We evaluated 20 000 sexually active women aged <65 years in Yangqu County by using a questionnaire; the subjects were also screened using the ThinPrep cytologic test (TCT). Patients with abnormal TCT results (other than glandular cell abnormalities) who were willing to provide informed consent were further diagnosed using colposcopy and histopathological examination. We investigated 247 cases of low-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 125 cases of high-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 877 controls. A 24-item food frequency questionnaire was filled out by the investigator to estimate the consumption of dietary folate. Positivity for hrHPV from residual exfoliated cervical cells was tested; serum folate was also measured. Results: The hrHPV infection rate in HSIL patients (77.6%) was higher than that in LSIL (33.2%) and control (32.0%) patients. Dietary folate intakes in controls, LSIL and HSIL were 306.9±176.6, 321.8±168.0 and 314.7±193.8 μg/kcal, respectively. The levels of serum folate in controls, LSIL and HSIL were 18.2±7.9, 15.9±7.1 and 14.3±7.5 nmol/l, respectively. Increased CIN correlated with higher rates of hrHPV infection and lower levels of serum folate. Conclusions: Low levels of serum folate may increase the risk of CIN progression. Furthermore, potential synergy may exist between low serum folate levels and hrHPV infection to promote CIN development. PMID:27026426

  1. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  2. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF PHARYNGEAL NEOPLASIA IN 25 DOGS.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, Gregorio; Zotti, Alessandro; Alberti, Monica; Rossi, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to investigate head tumors in dogs, however little information is available for lesions of the pharyngeal area. The purpose of this multicentric, retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe the CT findings in a sample of dogs with pathologically confirmed pharyngeal neoplasia and determine whether any CT features allowed differentiation of tumor type. Location of lesions, size and shape, margins, relationship with surrounding structures and vessels, attenuation characteristics and enhancement pattern, regional lymph node changes, and presence of metastasis were recorded by three observers (1 DECVDI). The effect of final diagnosis on each CT feature was tested. A total of 25 dogs were included: 15 with carcinomas, five sarcomas, four melanomas, and one lymphoma. The oropharynx and laryngopharynx were more frequently involved. Among tumor groups, lesions were of similar size, irregularly shaped, had ill-defined margins, and had moderate-to-marked heterogeneous contrast enhancement. Lysis of hyoid bones was recorded in two carcinomas and infiltration of the lingual artery occurred in one case. Marked medial retropharyngeal lymphoadenomegaly was recorded in 11 of 14 carcinomas, in all sarcomas and in two of four melanomas. The single lymphoma case showed ill-defined thickening of the oropharyngeal and laryngeal wall with retropharyngeal and mandibular lymphadenomegaly. Lung metastases were found in two of five sarcomas and two of four melanomas. Findings from the current study did not support the hypothesis that CT features could be used to predict pharyngeal tumor type in dogs. However, CT was helpful for determining mass extension, lymph node involvement, and distant metastatic spread. PMID:26173553

  3. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  4. [The premalignant disease of the endometrium: endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Francz, Mónika

    2008-03-01

    The WHO 1994 classification for endometrial hyperplasias is based on the morphologic features of the lesions. This system characterizes the nuclear cytologic morphology as typical or atypical and describes the glandular architectural pattern as simple or complex. The main problem of this classification is the poor reproducibility. Although the predictive value of the atypical category is high, there are many typical hyperplasia cases with cancer progression. Modern molecular data related to endometrial tumorigenesis and precise computerized morphometric analysis have identified the lesion that may be considered as a precursor of endometrioid adenocarcinoma. By definition, this endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) is a clonal proliferation of architecturally and cytologically altered endometrial glands which are prone to malignant transformation to endometrioid (type I) endometrial adenocarcinoma. The morphometric basis of EIN diagnosis is the D-score (DS), which is a logical combination of three morphometric features that represent the glandular complexity, glandular volume and cytological alterations. PTEN inactivation and K-ras mutation are the earliest genetic changes that can be revealed in these lesions. Hyperplasia cases that do not fit into the EIN categories are considered as benign or hormonal endometrial hyperplasia. This is the theoretical basis of a new classification system in premalignant endometrial diseases. Retrospective clinical data proved the high predictive value of the EIN scheme, so the decision on therapy can be more established. The reproducibility is excellent with application of precise definitions and PTEN immunohistochemistry. In the "Blue book" published in 2003 the WHO introduces the new morphometric- and molecular-based EIN system, and recommends it as an alternative classification method. PMID:18403295

  5. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  6. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  7. RAGE mediates S100A4-induced cell motility via MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling and is a prognostic biomarker for human colorectal cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, Mathias; Okhrimenko, Anna; Marcinkowski, Patrick; Osterland, Marc; Herrmann, Pia; Smith, Janice; Heizmann, Claus W.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Survival of colorectal cancer patients is strongly dependent on development of distant metastases. S100A4 is a prognostic biomarker and inducer for colorectal cancer metastasis. Besides exerting intracellular functions, S100A4 is secreted extracellularly. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one of its interaction partners. The impact of the S100A4-RAGE interaction for cell motility and metastasis formation in colorectal cancer has not been elucidated so far. Here we demonstrate the RAGE-dependent increase in migratory and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells via binding to extracellular S100A4. We show the direct interaction of S100A4 and RAGE, leading to hyperactivated MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling. The S100A4-RAGE axis increased cell migration (P<0.005) and invasion (P<0.005), which was counteracted with recombinant soluble RAGE and RAGE-specific antibodies. In colorectal cancer patients, not distantly metastasized at surgery, high RAGE expression in primary tumors correlated with metachronous metastasis, reduced overall (P=0.022) and metastasis-free survival (P=0.021). In summary, interaction of S100A4-RAGE mediates S100A4-induced colorectal cancer cell motility. RAGE by itself represents a biomarker for prognosis of colorectal cancer. Thus, therapeutic approaches targeting RAGE or intervening in S100A4-RAGE-dependent signaling early in tumor progression might represent alternative strategies restricting S100A4-induced colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:24952599

  8. Racial and ethnic factors in the genetic pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Carethers, J M

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer can develop by two distinct pathogenic mechanisms: one involving chromosomal breakage and aneuploidy (called chromosomal instability) and one involving mutations at DNA micro-satellite sequences (termed micro-satellite instability). Relatively few reports consider these mechanisms of colorectal cancer development across racial or ethnic groups. Available data indicate a moderate increase in colorectal cancer risk among Ashkenazi Jews who have a mutational polymorphism at codon 1307 in the APC gene. In American blacks, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of right-sided colonic tumors and an earlier age of onset of colorectal cancer. In addition, blacks have the highest colon cancer incidence in the United States among ethnic groups and have poorer 5-year survival rates compared with whites. While some differences may be attributed to health care access and socioeconomic differences, these do not completely explain all the variances. In the chromosomal instability pathway, there are polymorphisms within the P53 gene that are more prevalent in blacks, but the significance of these polymorphisms is not fully known. Blacks are more likely to demonstrate micro-satellite instability in their tumors; however, the mechanism for this phenomenon in blacks is unexplored. Differences in diet among racial and ethnic groups and polymorphic variations in drug metabolizing or acetylation genes have not been adequately cataloged. Identification of genetic and environmental factors among racial and ethnic groups should offer some insights into the observed epidemiologic data and advance opportunities to better understand the control and development of colorectal cancer. PMID:10826011

  9. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  10. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia disease progression is associated with increased vaginal microbiome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, A.; MacIntyre, D. A.; Lee, Y. S.; Smith, A.; Marchesi, J. R.; Lehne, B.; Bhatia, R.; Lyons, D.; Paraskevaidis, E.; Li, J. V.; Holmes, E.; Nicholson, J. K.; Bennett, P. R.; Kyrgiou, M.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary for cervical carcinogenesis. Although evidence suggests that the vaginal microbiome plays a functional role in the persistence or regression of HPV infections, this has yet to be described in women with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). We hypothesised that increasing microbiome diversity is associated with increasing CIN severity. llumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to characterise the vaginal microbiota of women with low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (LSIL; n = 52), high-grade (HSIL; n = 92), invasive cervical cancer (ICC; n = 5) and healthy controls (n = 20). Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed an increased prevalence of microbiomes characterised by high-diversity and low levels of Lactobacillus spp. (community state type-CST IV) with increasing disease severity, irrespective of HPV status (Normal = 2/20,10%; LSIL = 11/52,21%; HSIL = 25/92,27%; ICC = 2/5,40%). Increasing disease severity was associated with decreasing relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. The vaginal microbiome in HSIL was characterised by higher levels of Sneathia sanguinegens (P < 0.01), Anaerococcus tetradius (P < 0.05) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (P < 0.05) and lower levels of Lactobacillus jensenii (P < 0.01) compared to LSIL. Our results suggest advancing CIN disease severity is associated with increasing vaginal microbiota diversity and may be involved in regulating viral persistence and disease progression. PMID:26574055

  11. Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2B and RET proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is an autosomal dominant complex oncologic neurocristopathy including medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, gastrointestinal disorders, marphanoid face, and mucosal multiple ganglioneuromas. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the major cause of mortality in MEN 2B syndrome, and it often appears during the first years of life. RET proto-oncogene germline activating mutations are causative for MEN 2B. The 95% of MEN 2B patients are associated with a point mutation in exon 16 (M918/T). A second point mutation at codon 883 has been found in 2%-3% of MEN 2B cases. RET proto-oncogene is also involved in different neoplastic and not neoplastic neurocristopathies. Other RET mutations cause MEN 2A syndrome, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, or Hirschsprung's disease. RET gene expression is also involved in Neuroblastoma. The main diagnosis standards are the acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa and the molecular analysis of RET. In our protocol the rectal biopsy is, therefore, the first approach. RET mutation detection offers the possibility to diagnose MEN 2B predisposition at a pre-clinical stage in familial cases, and to perform an early total prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical treatment of MEN 2B is total thyroidectomy with cervical limphadenectomy of the central compartment of the neck. When possible, this intervention should be performed with prophylactic aim before 1 year of age in patients with molecular genetic diagnosis. Recent advances into the mechanisms of RET proto-oncogene signaling and pathways of RET signal transduction in the development of MEN 2 and MTC will allow new treatment possibilities. PMID:22429913

  12. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled

  13. Combining large area fluorescence with multiphoton microscopy for improved detection of oral epithelial neoplasia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia representing the complex microstructural organization of mucosa, potentially providing high specificity for detection of neoplasia, but is limited by small imaging area. Large area fluorescence methods on the other hand show high sensitivity appropriate for screening but are hampered by low specificity. In this study, we apply MPAM-SHGM following guidance from large area fluorescence, by either autofluorescence or a targeted metabolic fluorophore, as a potentially clinically viable approach for detection of oral neoplasia. Sites of high neoplastic potentially were identified by large area red/green autofluorescence or by a fluorescently labelled deoxy-glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to highlight areas of high glucose uptake across the buccal pouch of a hamster model for OSCC. Follow-up MPAM-SHGM was conducted on regions of interests (ROIs) to assess whether microscopy would reveal microscopic features associated with neoplasia to confirm or exclude large area fluorescence findings. Parameters for analysis included cytologic metrics, 3D epithelial connective tissue interface metrics (MPAM-SHGM) and intensity of fluorescence (widefield). Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology and graded by a pathologist. A small sample of human ex vivo tissues were also imaged. A generalized linear model combining image metrics from large area fluorescence and volumetric MPAM-SHGM indicated the ability to delineate normal and inflammation from neoplasia.

  14. Association of Intrauterine Device (IUD) and Cervical Neoplasia - A Study in a Poor Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, Chibuike Ogwuegbu; Ozumba, Benjamin Chukwuma; Oguanuo, Theophilus Chimezie; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a contraceptive method used by women of reproductive age group. However, there are conflicting reports on the association between IUD and cervical neoplasia. These controversies may further hamper the poor uptake of modern contraception in Nigeria. Aim This study was therefore aimed at evaluating the association between IUD and cervical neoplasia. Materials and Methods This was a case control study in which Pap smear results of 156 participants on IUD were compared with those of 156 non-users of modern contraception. The participants who were found to have abnormal cervical smear cytology results were further subjected to colposcopy. Biopsy specimens for histology were collected from the participants with obvious cervical lesions or those with suspicious lesions on colposcopy. The results were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% level of confidence. Results Seven (4.5%) and 2(1.3%) of participants using IUD had Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) 1 and CIN 2 respectively. Also, 5(3.2%) and 1(0.6%) of non-users of modern contraception had CIN 1 and CIN 2 respectively. The prevalence of cervical neoplasia among all the participants was 4.8%. Although, the proportion of women who had CIN was more among participants using IUD than non-users of modern contraception, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion There was no significant association between IUD and cervical neoplasia in this study. PMID:27504358

  15. Forty-Year Analysis of Colonoscopic Surveillance Program for Neoplasia in Ulcerative Colitis: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Ho Ryan; Rutter, Matthew D; Askari, Alan; Lee, Gui Han; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Moorghen, Morgan; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Saunders, Brian P; Graham, Trevor A; Hart, Ailsa L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study provides an overview of the largest and longest-running colonoscopic surveillance program for colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Data were obtained from medical records, endoscopy, and histology reports. Primary end points were defined as death, colectomy, withdrawal from surveillance, or censor date (1 January 2013). Results: A total of 1,375 UC patients were followed up for 15,234 patient-years (median, 11 years per patient). CRC was detected in 72 patients (incidence rate (IR), 4.7 per 1,000 patient-years). Time-trend analysis revealed that although there was significant decrease in incidence of colectomy performed for dysplasia (linear regression, R=−0.43; P=0.007), IR of advanced CRC and interval CRC have steadily decreased over past four decades (Pearson's correlation, −0.99; P=0.01 for both trends). The IR of early CRC has increased 2.5-fold in the current decade compared with past decade (χ2, P=0.045); however, its 10-year survival rate was high (79.6%). The IR of dysplasia has similarly increased (χ2, P=0.01), potentially attributable to the recent use of chromoendoscopy that was twice more effective at detecting dysplasia compared with white-light endoscopy (χ2, P<0.001). CRCs were frequently accompanied by synchronous CRC or spatially distinct dysplasia (37.5%). Finally, the risk of CRC was not significantly different between “indefinite” or low-grade dysplasia (log-rank, P=0.78). Conclusions: Colonoscopic surveillance may have a significant role in reducing the risk of advanced and interval CRC while allowing more patients to retain their colon for longer. Given the ongoing risk of early CRC, patients with any grade of dysplasia who are managed endoscopically should be monitored closely with advanced techniques. PMID:25823771

  16. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  17. Economic Burden of Colorectal Cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ju-Young; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. Results The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Conclusions Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention. PMID:24744825

  18. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  19. Fecal Microbiota, Fecal Metabolome, and Colorectal Cancer Interrelations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rashmi; Ahn, Jiyoung; Sampson, Joshua N.; Shi, Jianxin; Yu, Guoqin; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Hayes, Richard B.; Goedert, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Investigation of microbe-metabolite relationships in the gut is needed to understand and potentially reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Methods Microbiota and metabolomics profiling were performed on lyophilized feces from 42 CRC cases and 89 matched controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify statistically independent associations with CRC. First principal coordinate-component pair (PCo1-PC1) and false discovery rate (0.05)-corrected P-values were calculated for 116,000 Pearson correlations between 530 metabolites and 220 microbes in a sex*case/control meta-analysis. Results Overall microbe-metabolite PCo1-PC1 was more strongly correlated in cases than in controls (Rho 0.606 vs 0.201, P = 0.01). CRC was independently associated with lower levels of Clostridia, Lachnospiraceae, p-aminobenzoate and conjugated linoleate, and with higher levels of Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, p-hydroxy-benzaldehyde, and palmitoyl-sphingomyelin. Through postulated effects on cell shedding (palmitoyl-sphingomyelin), inflammation (conjugated linoleate), and innate immunity (p-aminobenzoate), metabolites mediated the CRC association with Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas by 29% and 34%, respectively. Overall, palmitoyl-sphingomyelin correlated directly with abundances of Enterobacteriaceae (Gammaproteobacteria), three Actinobacteria and five Firmicutes. Only Parabacteroides correlated inversely with palmitoyl-sphingomyelin. Other lipids correlated inversely with Alcaligenaceae (Betaproteobacteria). Six Bonferroni-significant correlations were found, including low indolepropionate and threnoylvaline with Actinobacteria and high erythronate and an uncharacterized metabolite with Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusions Feces from CRC cases had very strong microbe-metabolite correlations that were predominated by Enterobacteriaceae and Actinobacteria. Metabolites mediated a direct CRC association with Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas, but not an inverse

  20. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  1. [Esophageal, gastric and colorectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Stolte, M

    2001-01-01

    The new WHO-classification of the tumours of the digestive System replaces the "blue books", and are now dealt with completely in a single book. In addition to the histological features of the lesions, the new classification also contains information on epidemiology, aetiology, endoscopy, genetic susceptibility, molecular genetics, prognosis and predictive factors. The erstwhile mostly black-and-white histological photographs have at last again been replaced by numerous colour photographs and supplemented by endoscopic and macroscopic pictures. The changes to the individual tumour classifications are only few. The former classification of the malignant lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract has now been replaced by the classification of these lesions that has long been in use. New additions are the gastrointestinal tract has long been in use. New additions are the gastrointestinal stroma tumours (GIST) and the gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumour (GANT). To the epithelial tumours of the oesophagus have now been added the basaloid squamous cell tumours of the vermiform appendix and the colorectum have now been added the serrated adenoma and the small-cell carcinoma. The following new chapter have been included: adenocarcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction, secondary carcinomas of the stomach, secondary tumours of the small bowel and colon, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis, familial adenomatosis coli, and HNPCC. For the first time the intra-epithelial neoplasias in chronic inflammatory bowel disease have been differentiated, i.e. adenomas distinguished from the dysplasias, while the latter term has now been replaced by the term "intra-epithelial neoplasias". In comparison with the former "blue books", the new WHO-classification, prepared by presentatives of numerous disciplines--for the first time including clinicians--has taken on the character of a text book. PMID:11894400

  2. Association of Streptococcus bovis presence in colonic content with advanced colonic lesion

    PubMed Central

    Paritsky, Maya; Pastukh, Nina; Brodsky, Diana; Isakovich, Natalya; Peretz, Avi

    2015-01-01

    pathogenetic role in the development of neoplasia or constitutes an epiphenomenon of colorectal neoplasms. There was a clear relationship between positivity for S. bovis in colonic suction fluid and findings of malignant tumors and large polyps in the colon. CONCLUSION: There is an association between S. bovis bacteremia and malignant colonic lesions; this should prompt for development of a reliable screening method for advanced colonic lesions. PMID:25987793

  3. Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking and the Risk of Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Cornelia L.; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Burke, Alyce E.; Hoffman, Sandra C.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Diener-West, Marie; Comstock, George W.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Evidence links active cigarette smoking to cervical neoplasia, but much less is known about the role of passive smoking. Using a prospective cohort design, we examined personal cigarette smoking and household passive smoke exposure in relation to the risk of cervical neoplasia. METHODS Cohorts were established based on data collected on the smoking status of all household members during private censuses of Washington County, Maryland in 1963 (n = 24,792) and 1975 (n = 26,381). Using the Washington County Cancer Registry, the occurrence of cervical neoplasia in the two cohorts was ascertained from 1963–1978 and from 1975–1994. Poisson regression models were fitted to estimate the relative risk of developing cervical neoplasia associated with active and passive smoking in both cohorts. The referent category for all comparisons was never smokers not exposed to passive smoking. RESULTS The adjusted relative risk and 95% confidence limits for passive smoking was 2.1 (1.3, 3.3) in the 1963 cohort and 1.4 (0.8, 2.4) in the 1975 cohort. The adjusted relative risk and 95% confidence limits for current smoking were 2.6 (1.7, 4.1) and 1.7 (1.1, 2.6) in the 1963 and 1975 cohort, respectively. CONCLUSION The associations were in the direction of increased risk for both passive smoking and current active smoking in both the 1963 and 1975 cohorts, but were stronger in the 1963 cohort. The results of this long-term, prospective cohort study corroborate the association between active cigarette smoking and cervical neoplasia and provide evidence that passive smoking is a risk factor for cervical neoplasia. PMID:15625160

  4. Association of HPV infection and Chlamydia trachomatis seropositivity in cases of cervical neoplasia in Midwest Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva Barros, Narriman Kennia; Costa, Maria Cecília; Alves, Rosane Ribeiro Figueiredo; Villa, Luísa Lina; Derchain, Sophie Françoise Mauricette; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos; Dos Santos Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida; Rabelo-Santos, Silvia Helena

    2012-07-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered the main etiological agent for cervical neoplasia. However, the presence of a single type HPV infection alone is unlikely to be sufficient to cause cervical cancer. There is epidemiologic evidence suggesting that HPV and Chlamydia trachomatis play a central role in the etiology of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and subsequent cervical cancer. To evaluate the HPV prevalence and the seropositivity for C. trachomatis in women referred to the colposcopy clinic due to an abnormal cervical smear and to examine the effect of this association on the severity of cervical neoplasia. Following enrollment, 131 patients underwent colposcopy and biopsies when necessary. HPV DNA was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyping was performed by reverse line-blot hybridization assay. C. trachomatis seropositivity was tested by ELISA for the detection of IgG antibodies. The prevalence of HPV infection was 86.3%. Seropositivity for C. trachomatis was 26%. Thirty-one women (27.4%) were positive for C. trachomatis antibodies and HPV-DNA. The most prevalent HPV type in C. trachomatis-seropositive women were HPV 16 (51.6%) and this HPV type was present mainly in neoplasia cases. Positivity for HPV, particularly HPV types 16 and 18, and C. trachomatis seropositivity was significantly associated with a diagnosis of high grade neoplasia. Borderline significance was observed after adjustment for HPV. C. trachomatis seropositivity is associated with high grade neoplasia in women infected with HPV, mainly when the types 16 and 18 were involved. PMID:22585734

  5. Medical interventions for high grade vulval intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pepas, Litha; Kaushik, Sonali; Bryant, Andrew; Nordin, Andy; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a pre-malignant condition of the vulval skin; its incidence is increasing in women under 50 years. VIN is graded histologically as low grade or high grade. High grade VIN is associated with infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and may progress to invasive disease. There is no consensus on the optimal management of high grade VIN. The high morbidity and high relapse rate associated with surgical interventions call for a formal appraisal of the evidence available for less invasive but effective interventions for high grade VIN. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of medical interventions for high grade VIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to September 2010). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed medical interventions, in adult women diagnosed with high grade VIN. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible the data were synthesised in a meta-analysis. Main results Four trials met our inclusion criteria: three assessed the effectiveness of topical imiquimod versus placebo in women with high grade VIN; one examined low versus high dose indole-3-carbinol in similar women. Meta-analysis of three trials found that the proportion of women who responded to treatment at 5 to 6 months was much higher in the group who received topical imiquimod than in the group who received placebo (relative risk (RR) = 11.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.21 to 44.51). A single trial showed similar results at 12 months in (RR = 9.10, 95% CI 2.38 to 34.77). Only one trial reported

  6. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mager, Lukas F; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. He