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Sample records for advanced colorectal neoplasia

  1. Advanced colorectal neoplasia risk stratification by penalized logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yunzhi; Yu, Menggang; Wang, Sijian; Chappell, Richard; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. To facilitate the efficiency of colorectal cancer screening, there is a need to stratify risk for colorectal cancer among the 90% of US residents who are considered "average risk." In this article, we investigate such risk stratification rules for advanced colorectal neoplasia (colorectal cancer and advanced, precancerous polyps). We use a recently completed large cohort study of subjects who underwent a first screening colonoscopy. Logistic regression models have been used in the literature to estimate the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia based on quantifiable risk factors. However, logistic regression may be prone to overfitting and instability in variable selection. Since most of the risk factors in our study have several categories, it was tempting to collapse these categories into fewer risk groups. We propose a penalized logistic regression method that automatically and simultaneously selects variables, groups categories, and estimates their coefficients by penalizing the [Formula: see text]-norm of both the coefficients and their differences. Hence, it encourages sparsity in the categories, i.e. grouping of the categories, and sparsity in the variables, i.e. variable selection. We apply the penalized logistic regression method to our data. The important variables are selected, with close categories simultaneously grouped, by penalized regression models with and without the interactions terms. The models are validated with 10-fold cross-validation. The receiver operating characteristic curves of the penalized regression models dominate the receiver operating characteristic curve of naive logistic regressions, indicating a superior discriminative performance.

  2. (1)H NMR Spectroscopy of Fecal Extracts Enables Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Aurelien; Dona, Anthony C; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Tournigand, Christophe; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Lebaleur, Yann; Sobhani, Iradj; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing cause of mortality in developing countries, warranting investigation into its etiopathogenesis and earlier diagnosis. Here, we investigated the fecal metabolic phenotype of patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia and controls using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR as well as Wif-1 methylation levels in stools, serum, and urine and correlated to the metabolic profile of each patient. The predictivity of the model was 0.507 (Q(2)Y), and the explained variance was 0.755 (R(2)Y). Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia demonstrated increased fecal concentrations of four short-chain fatty acids (valerate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and decreased signals relating to β-glucose, glutamine, and glutamate. The predictive accuracy of the multivariate (1)H NMR model was higher than that of the guaiac-fecal occult blood test and the Wif-1 methylation test for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia. Correlation analysis between fecal metabolites and bacterial profiles revealed strong associations between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum species with short-chain fatty acids concentration and inverse correlation between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and glucose. These preliminary results suggest that fecal metabonomics may potentially have a future role in a noninvasive colorectal screening program and may contribute to our understanding of the role of these dysregulated molecules in the cross-talk between the host and its bacterial microbiota.

  3. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced

  4. Derivation and validation of a scoring system to stratify the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Imperiale, Thomas F.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Glowinski, Elizabeth A.; Ransohoff, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several methods are recommended equally strongly for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk persons. Risk stratification would enable tailoring of screening within this group, with less invasive tests (sigmoidoscopy or occult blood tests) for lower-risk persons and colonoscopy for higher-risk persons. Objective To create a risk index for advanced neoplasia (colorectal cancer and adenomas or serrated polyps ≥1.0 cm, villous histology, or high-grade dysplasia) anywhere in the colorectum, using the most common risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Multiple endoscopy units, primarily in the Midwest. Patients Persons aged 50 to 80 years undergoing initial screening colonoscopy (December 2004 to September 2011). Measurements Derivation and validation of a risk index based on points from regression coefficients for age, sex, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, and family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 2993 persons in the derivation set, prevalence of advanced neoplasia was 9.4%. Risks for advanced neoplasia in persons at very low, low, intermediate, and high risk were 1.92% (95% CI, 0.63% to 4.43%), 4.88% (CI, 3.79% to 6.18%), 9.93% (CI, 8.09% to 12.0%), and 24.9% (CI, 21.1% to 29.1%), respectively (P < 0.001). Sigmoidoscopy to the descending colon in the low-risk groups would have detected 51 of 70 (73% [CI, 61% to 83%]) advanced neoplasms. Among 1467 persons in the validation set, corresponding risks for advanced neoplasia were 1.65% (CI, 0.20% to 5.84%), 3.31% (CI, 2.08% to 4.97%), 10.9% (CI, 8.26% to 14.1%), and 22.3% (CI, 16.9% to 28.5%), respectively (P < 0.001). Sigmoidoscopy would have detected 21 of 24 (87.5% [CI, 68% to 97%]) advanced neoplasms. Limitations Split-sample validation; results apply to first-time screening. Conclusion This index stratifies risk for advanced neoplasia among average-risk persons by identifying lower-risk groups for which noncolonoscopy strategies may be

  5. Favorable lifestyle before diagnosis associated with lower risk of screen-detected advanced colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Markus D; de Lange, Thomas; Botteri, Edoardo; Nguyen, Dung-Hong; Evensen, Helge; Steen, Chloé B; Hoff, Geir; Bernklev, Tomm; Hjartåker, Anette; Berstad, Paula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between adherence to health recommendations and detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. METHODS: A total of 14832 women and men were invited to CRC screening, 6959 in the fecal immunochemical test arm and 7873 in the flexible sigmoidoscopy arm. These were also sent a self-reported lifestyle questionnaire to be completed prior to their first CRC screening. A lifestyle score was created to reflect current adherence to healthy behaviors in regard to smoking, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol consumption and food consumption, and ranged from zero (poorest) to six (best). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%CIs were calculated using multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between the single lifestyle variables and the lifestyle score and the probability of detecting ACN. RESULTS: In all 6315 women and men completed the lifestyle questionnaire, 3323 (53%) in the FIT arm and 2992 (47%) in the FS arm. This was 89% of those who participated in screening. ACN was diagnosed in 311 (5%) participants of which 25 (8%) were diagnosed with CRC. For individuals with a lifestyle score of two, three, four, and five-six, the ORs (95%CI) for the probability of ACN detection were 0.82 (0.45-1.16), 0.43 (0.28-0.73), 0.41 (0.23-0.64), and 0.41 (0.22-0.73), respectively compared to individuals with a lifestyle score of zero-one. Of the single lifestyle factors, adherence to non-smoking and moderate alcohol intake were associated with a decreased probability of ACN detection compared to being a smoker or having a high alcohol intake 0.53 (0.42-0.68) and 0.63 (0.43-0.93) respectively. CONCLUSION: Adopted healthy behaviors were inversely associated with the probability of ACN detection. Lifestyle assessment might be useful for risk stratification in CRC screening. PMID:27468217

  6. Validity of APCS score as a risk prediction score for advanced colorectal neoplasia in Chinese asymptomatic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Jianyu; Wu, Yongdong; Lu, Di; Zhao, Haiying; Wang, Zhenjie; Xu, Tianming; Yang, Hong; Qian, Jiaming; Li, Jingnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score is a risk-stratification tool that helps predict the risk for advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in asymptomatic Asian populations, but has not yet been assessed for its validity of use in Mainland China. The aim of the study was to assess the validity of APCS score in asymptomatic Chinese population, and to identify other risk factors associated with ACN. Asymptomatic subjects (N = 1010) who underwent colonoscopy screening between 2012 and 2014 in Beijing were enrolled. APCS scores based on questionnaires were used to stratify subjects into high, moderate, and average-risk tiers. Cochran–Armitage test for trend was used to assess the association between ACN and risk tiers. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed with ACN as the outcome, adjusting for APCS score, body mass index, alcohol consumption, self-reported diabetes, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as independent variables. The average age was 53.5 (standard deviation 8.4) years. The prevalence of ACN was 4.1% overall, and in the high, moderate, and average-risk tiers, the prevalence was 8.8%, 2.83%, and 1.55%, respectively (P < 0.001). High-risk tier had 3.3 and 6.1-fold increased risk of ACN as compared with those in the moderate and average-risk tiers, respectively. In univariate analysis, high-risk tier, obesity, diabetes, and alcohol consumption were associated with ACN. In multivariate analysis, only high-risk tier was an independent predictor of ACN. The APCS score can effectively identify a subset of asymptomatic Chinese population at high risk for ACN. Further studies are required to identify other risk factors, and the acceptability of the score to the general population will need to be further examined. PMID:27741134

  7. The discriminatory capability of existing scores to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia: a prospective colonoscopy study of 5,899 screening participants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C. S.; Ching, Jessica Y. L.; Ng, Simpson; Lam, Thomas Y. T.; Luk, Arthur K. C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S. M.; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Chan, Francis K. L.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of seven existing risk scoring systems in predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic Chinese cohort. We prospectively recruited 5,899 Chinese subjects aged 50–70 years in a colonoscopy screening programme(2008–2014). Scoring systems under evaluation included two scoring tools from the US; one each from Spain, Germany, and Poland; the Korean Colorectal Screening(KCS) scores; and the modified Asia Pacific Colorectal Screening(APCS) scores. The c-statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values(PPVs), and negative predictive values(NPVs) of these systems were evaluated. The resources required were estimated based on the Number Needed to Screen(NNS) and the Number Needed to Refer for colonoscopy(NNR). Advanced neoplasia was detected in 364 (6.2%) subjects. The German system referred the least proportion of subjects (11.2%) for colonoscopy, whilst the KCS scoring system referred the highest (27.4%). The c-statistics of all systems ranged from 0.56–0.65, with sensitivities ranging from 0.04–0.44 and specificities from 0.74–0.99. The modified APCS scoring system had the highest c-statistics (0.65, 95% C.I. 0.58–0.72). The NNS (12–19) and NNR (5-10) were similar among the scoring systems. The existing scoring systems have variable capability to predict advanced neoplasia among asymptomatic Chinese subjects, and further external validation should be performed. PMID:26838178

  8. Innate immunity gene polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited variation in genes that regulate innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to colorectal neoplasia risk. To evaluate this association, we conducted a nested case–control study of 451 colorectal cancer cases, 694 colorectal advanced adenoma cases and 696 controls of European descent within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 935 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 98 genes were evaluated. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association with colorectal neoplasia. Sixteen SNPs were associated with colorectal neoplasia risk at P < 0.01, but after adjustment for multiple testing, only rs2838732 (ITGB2) remained suggestively associated with colorectal neoplasia (ORper T allele = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.57–0.83, P = 7.7 × 10–5, adjusted P = 0.07). ITGB2 codes for the CD18 protein in the integrin beta chain family. The ITGB2 association was stronger for colorectal cancer (ORper T allele = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.30–0.55, P = 2.4 × 10− 9) than for adenoma (ORper T allele = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.69–1.03, P = 0.08), but it did not replicate in the validation study. The ITGB2 rs2838732 association was significantly modified by smoking status (P value for interaction = 0.003). Among never and former smokers, it was inversely associated with colorectal neoplasia (ORper T allele = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.37–0.69 and ORper T allele = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.54–0.95, respectively), but no association was seen among current smokers. Other notable findings were observed for SNPs in BPI/LBP and MYD88. Although the results need to be replicated, our findings suggest that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes may be related to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23803696

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and 18F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic 18F-FDG uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The 18F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal 18F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy. Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result. 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive 18F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-09-01

    Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer.A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic F-FDG uptake on F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy.Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result.F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  11. The prevalence and characteristics of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Renehan, A G; Bhaskar, P; Painter, J E; O'Dwyer, S T; Haboubi, N; Varma, J; Ball, S G; Shalet, S M

    2000-09-01

    An increased prevalence of colorectal neoplasia has been reported in acromegalic patients, and recommendations have been made for early colonoscopic screening and regular surveillance. This assumption, however, is frequently drawn from studies using selected control populations. To clarify colonoscopic management in these patients, we undertook a 2-center prospective screening colonoscopy study in 122 acromegalics (age range, 25-82 yr). In the absence of ideal age-matched controls, we calculated prevalence rates of occult adenocarcinomas and adenomas in the general population using cumulative data in the published literature from 8 autopsy studies (model 1, n = 3,559) and 4 screening colonoscopy studies (model 2, n= 810), applying linear regression models. Of the 115 patients with complete examinations, adenocarcinomas were discovered in 3 (2.6%), and at least 1 adenoma was found in 11, giving an overall prevalence of neoplasia of 12% (14 of 115). Prevalence rates for age bands 30-40, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and 70+ yr were 0%, 8%, 12%, 20%, and 21%, respectively. Compared with the 2 control models, the prevalence of occult colorectal cancer was not significantly increased (acromegalics vs. models 1 and 2, 2.6% vs. 2.3% and 0.9%), nor was there an increase in the prevalence of adenomas in any age band. Pathological characteristics showed some differences, in that adenomas in acromegalics tended to be right sided (68% vs. 57% and 56%), larger (for > or =10 mm, 27% vs. 13% and 9%), and of advanced histology (for tubulovillous, 27% vs. 4% and 22%). No associations were found between the presence of colonic neoplasia and the duration of disease, total GH exposure, cure status, and serum insulin-like growth factor I. This study has failed to demonstrate an increased prevalence of neoplasia in acromegalic patients compared with the expected prevalence in the general population and questions the need for an aggressive colonoscopic screening policy.

  12. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  13. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  14. Development of a Novel Scoring System for Predicting the Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a novel scoring system to screen subjects who have a high risk for colorectal neoplasia. Study Design and Setting We retrospectively analyzed 1061 subjects undergoing total colonoscopy (TCS) for the first time at Gihoku Kosei Hospital. The characteristics and habits of the subjects were analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk score was established according to each odds ratio of the individual risk factors, and the correlations between the sum of the risk scores and the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia for each individual were evaluated. Results Age 45–59 (risk score: 2 points) and ≥60 (3 points), male gender (1 point), and habitual alcohol consumption ≥21g daily (1 point) were extracted as the significant risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. When the risk groups were determined by summing up these risk scores, the prevalence rates of colorectal neoplasia were 8.8% for the low risk group (0–2 points), 30.5% for the low-moderate risk group (3 points), 39.1% for the high-moderate risk group (4 points), and 57.6% for the high risk group (5 points). In comparison with the low risk group, the odds ratio of the low-moderate risk, the high-moderate risk, and the high risk groups were 4.6, 6.7, and 14.1 folds, respectively. Conclusion Our scoring system, which linearly correlates with the prevalence rate of colorectal neoplasia, may be an effective tool for screening the subjects who have a high risk for colorectal neoplasia. These subjects, therefore, should be recommended to undergo TCS. PMID:27284907

  15. Folate-genetics and colorectal neoplasia: What we know and need to know next

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of folate involves a complex network of polymorphic enzymes that may explain a proportion of the risk associated with colorectal neoplasia. Over 60 observational studies primarily in non-Hispanic White populations have been conducted on selected genetic variants in specific genes, MTH...

  16. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0

  17. Annexin A10 expression in colorectal cancers with emphasis on the serrated neoplasia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Jung Ho; Rhee, Ye-Young; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kim, Tae-You; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate the utility of Annexin A10 as a surrogate marker of the serrated neoplasia pathway in invasive colorectal cancers (CRCs). METHODS: A total of 1133 primary CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Seoul National University Hospital between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled. Expression of Annexin A10 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray and paired to our findings on clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics of each individual. CpG island methylator phenotype was determined by MethyLight assay and microsatellite instability was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. KRAS and BRAF mutation status was evaluated by direct sequencing and allele-specific PCR. Univariate and stage-specific survival analyses were performed to reveal the prognostic value of Annexin A10 expression. RESULTS: Annexin A10 expression was observed in 66 (5.8%) of the 1133 patients. Annexin A10 expression was more commonly found in females and was associated with proximal location, ulcerative gross type, advanced T category, N category and TNM stage. CRCs with Annexin A10 expression showed an absence of luminal necrosis, luminal serration and mucin production. CRCs with Annexin A10 expression were associated with CpG island methylator phenotype, microsatellite instability and BRAF mutation. In survival analysis, Annexin A10 expression was associated with poor overall survival and progression-free survival, especially in stage IV CRCs. CONCLUSION: Annexin A10 expression is associated with poor clinical behavior and can be used a supportive surrogate marker of the serrated neoplasia pathway in invasive CRCs. PMID:26361422

  18. Management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Aytac, Erman; Ozuner, Gokhan; Isik, Ozgen; Gorgun, Emre; Stocchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience on management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period (< 6 mo), between 8/1997 and 4/2013, in our department were reviewed. Patient characteristics, operations, fetal health and follow-up during pregnancy, type of delivery and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: Eight patients met our study criteria. Median age at the time of diagnosis of colorectal cancer was 31 years. Median follow-up after surgery was 36 mo. Median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 wk. Three patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy and underwent surgery prior to delivery. None of the patients received adjuvant treatment during pregnancy. Five patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer within a median of 2.1 mo after delivery and underwent surgery. No adverse neonatal outcomes were noted. All deliveries were at term (2 cesarean sections) except for one preterm delivery following low anterior resection on the 34th week of pregnancy. CONCLUSION: There has been a significant delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer which is probably due to overlap of symptoms and signs between these tumors and a normal pregnancy. Surgery for colorectal cancer during pregnancy can be performed safely without compromising maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:27559434

  19. Targeted therapy of colorectal neoplasia with rapamycin in peptide-labeled pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles

    PubMed Central

    Khondee, Supang; Rabinsky, Emily F.; Owens, Scott R.; Joshi, Bishnu P.; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Many powerful drugs have limited clinical utility because of poor water solubility and high systemic toxicity. Here, we formulated a targeted nanomedicine, rapamycin encapsulated in pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles labeled with a new ligand for colorectal neoplasia, LTTHYKL peptide. CPC;Apc mice that spontaneously develop colonic adenomas were treated with free rapamycin, plain rapamycin micelles, and peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles via intraperitoneal injection for 35 days. Endoscopy was performed to monitor adenoma regression in vivo. We observed complete adenoma regression at the end of therapy. The mean regression rate for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles was significantly greater than that for plain rapamycin micelles, P<0.01. On immunohistochemistry, we observed a significant reduction in phospho-S6 but not β-catenin expression and reduced tumor cell proliferation, suggesting greater inhibition of downstream mTOR signaling. We observed significantly reduced renal toxicity for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles compared to that of free drug, and no other toxicities were found on chemistries. Together, this unique targeted micelle represents a potential therapeutic for colorectal neoplasia with comparable therapeutic efficacy to rapamycin free drug and significantly less systemic toxicity. PMID:25483425

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of colorectal neoplasia located on the suture line of anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Horii, Joichiro; Uraoka, Toshio; Goto, Osamu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2014-08-01

    Although endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) can remove gastrointestinal neoplasia even with severe fibrosis into the submucosa, the safety and efficacy of ESD for colorectal neoplasia (CRN) located on the suture line of anastomosis (SLA) has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ESD for CRN located on the SLA, performed by a highly skilled endoscopist. Three consecutive patients with CRN located on the SLA were treated with ESD. In all cases, ESD was safely performed without any adverse events. The median tumor size of the resected CRN was 30 mm (range 12-75 mm) and the median procedure time was 150 min (range 50-150 min). Curative resection was achieved in two cases without local recurrence during a 12-month observation period. In one case, the CRN were resected in an almost en bloc fashion, but a decision was made to spare the edge of the CRN that was directly on the SLA in order to avoid delayed perforation, and this edge was instead removed with hemostatic forceps. Although the surveillance colonoscopy revealed a small residual neoplasia, it was curatively treated by endoscopically. In all cases, ESD managed to avoid the need for repetitive surgery. This case series suggests the feasibility of ESD performed by a highly skilled endoscopist as a curative treatment for the CRN located on the SLA.

  1. How significant is the association between metabolic syndrome and prevalence of colorectal neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Suchanek, Stepan; Grega, Tomas; Ngo, Ondrej; Vojtechova, Gabriela; Majek, Ondrej; Minarikova, Petra; Brogyuk, Nagyija; Bunganic, Bohus; Seifert, Bohumil; Dusek, Ladislav; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been rising in developed countries. The association between these two diseases has been widely studied and reported. Less evidence is available about the relationship between MS and CRC precancerous lesions (adenomatous polyps, adenomas). The aim of this paper is to present an overview of our scientific understanding of that topic and its implication in clinical practice. One of the principal goals of current CRC secondary prevention efforts is to detect and remove the precancerous lesions in individuals with an average CRC risk to prevent the development of invasive cancer. MS is not currently considered a high-risk CRC factor and is therefore not included in the guidelines of organized screening programs. However, in light of growing scientific evidence, the approach to patients with MS should be changed. Metabolic risk factors for the development of adenomas and cancers are the same - obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Therefore, the key issue in the near future is the development of a simple scoring system, easy to use in clinical practice, which would identify individuals with high metabolic risk of colorectal neoplasia and would be used for individual CRC secondary prevention strategies. Currently, such scoring systems have been published based on Asian (Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening Score; APCS) and Polish populations.

  2. How significant is the association between metabolic syndrome and prevalence of colorectal neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Suchanek, Stepan; Grega, Tomas; Ngo, Ondrej; Vojtechova, Gabriela; Majek, Ondrej; Minarikova, Petra; Brogyuk, Nagyija; Bunganic, Bohus; Seifert, Bohumil; Dusek, Ladislav; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-09-28

    The incidence and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been rising in developed countries. The association between these two diseases has been widely studied and reported. Less evidence is available about the relationship between MS and CRC precancerous lesions (adenomatous polyps, adenomas). The aim of this paper is to present an overview of our scientific understanding of that topic and its implication in clinical practice. One of the principal goals of current CRC secondary prevention efforts is to detect and remove the precancerous lesions in individuals with an average CRC risk to prevent the development of invasive cancer. MS is not currently considered a high-risk CRC factor and is therefore not included in the guidelines of organized screening programs. However, in light of growing scientific evidence, the approach to patients with MS should be changed. Metabolic risk factors for the development of adenomas and cancers are the same - obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Therefore, the key issue in the near future is the development of a simple scoring system, easy to use in clinical practice, which would identify individuals with high metabolic risk of colorectal neoplasia and would be used for individual CRC secondary prevention strategies. Currently, such scoring systems have been published based on Asian (Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening Score; APCS) and Polish populations. PMID:27688652

  3. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  4. How significant is the association between metabolic syndrome and prevalence of colorectal neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Suchanek, Stepan; Grega, Tomas; Ngo, Ondrej; Vojtechova, Gabriela; Majek, Ondrej; Minarikova, Petra; Brogyuk, Nagyija; Bunganic, Bohus; Seifert, Bohumil; Dusek, Ladislav; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been rising in developed countries. The association between these two diseases has been widely studied and reported. Less evidence is available about the relationship between MS and CRC precancerous lesions (adenomatous polyps, adenomas). The aim of this paper is to present an overview of our scientific understanding of that topic and its implication in clinical practice. One of the principal goals of current CRC secondary prevention efforts is to detect and remove the precancerous lesions in individuals with an average CRC risk to prevent the development of invasive cancer. MS is not currently considered a high-risk CRC factor and is therefore not included in the guidelines of organized screening programs. However, in light of growing scientific evidence, the approach to patients with MS should be changed. Metabolic risk factors for the development of adenomas and cancers are the same - obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Therefore, the key issue in the near future is the development of a simple scoring system, easy to use in clinical practice, which would identify individuals with high metabolic risk of colorectal neoplasia and would be used for individual CRC secondary prevention strategies. Currently, such scoring systems have been published based on Asian (Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening Score; APCS) and Polish populations. PMID:27688652

  5. Fusobacterium nucleatum associates with stages of colorectal neoplasia development, colorectal cancer and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, L; Schmid, J; Ebert, M; Soucek, P; Kunicka, T; Liska, V; Bruha, J; Neary, P; Dezeeuw, N; Tommasino, M; Jenab, M; Prehn, J H M; Hughes, D J

    2014-08-01

    Commensal bacteria in the colon may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Recent studies from North America showed that Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) infection is over-represented in disease tissue versus matched normal tissue in CRC patients. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of DNA extracted from colorectal tissue biopsies and surgical resections of three European cohorts totalling 122 CRC patients, we found an over-abundance of Fn in cancerous compared to matched normal tissue (p < 0.0001). To determine whether Fn infection is an early event in CRC development, we assayed Fn in colorectal adenoma (CRA) tissue from 52 Irish patients. While for all CRAs the Fn level was not statistically significantly higher in disease versus normal tissue (p = 0.06), it was significantly higher for high-grade dysplasia (p = 0.015). As a secondary objective, we determined that CRC patients with low Fn levels had a significantly longer overall survival time than patients with moderate and high levels of the bacterium (p = 0.008). The investigation of Fn as a potential non-invasive biomarker for CRC screening showed that, while Fn was more abundant in stool samples from CRC patients compared to adenomas or controls, the levels in stool did not correlate with cancer or adenoma tissue levels from the same individuals. This is the first study examining Fn in the colonic tissue and stool of European CRC and CRA patients, and suggests Fn as a novel risk factor for disease progression from adenoma to cancer, possibly affecting patient survival outcomes. Our results highlight the potential of Fn detection as a diagnostic and prognostic determinant in CRC patients.

  6. Calcium Intake and Ion Transporter Genetic Polymorphisms Interact in Human Colorectal Neoplasia Risk in a 2-Phase Study123

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiangzhu; Liang, Ji; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Ness, Reid M.; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Guoliang; Wiese, Dawn; Zhang, Bing; Smalley, Walter E.; Edwards, Todd L.; Giovannucci, Edward; Zheng, Wei; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The kidney-specific sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) protein encoded by solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) is the direct downstream effector of the inward-rectifier potassium channel (ROMK) encoded by potassium inwardly-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 1 (KCNJ1), both of which are critical for calcium reabsorption in the kidney. Objective: We hypothesized that polymorphisms in KCNJ1, SLC12A1, and 7 other genes may modify the association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia risk. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase study in 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. Results: In phase I, we identified 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly interacted with calcium intake in adenoma risk. In phase II, rs2855798 in KCNJ1 was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, the P values for interactions between calcium intake and rs2855798 were 1 × 10−4 for all adenoma and 5 × 10−3 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with no variant allele but was significantly associated with a 41% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried at least 1 variant allele in KCNJ1. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 52% among those with at least 1 variant allele. The P values for interactions between calcium intake and combined SNPs from the KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 genes were 7.5 × 10−5 for adenoma and 9.9 × 10−5 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with nonvariant alleles in 2 genes but was significantly associated with a 34% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried a variant allele in 1 of the genes. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 64% among those with variant alleles in both genes. Conclusion: These findings, if confirmed, will be critical for the development of personalized

  7. CAHM, a long non-coding RNA gene hypermethylated in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Mitchell, Susan M; Graham, Lloyd D; McEvoy, Aidan; Thomas, Melissa L; Baker, Rohan T; Ross, Jason P; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ho, Thu; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-08-01

    The CAHM gene (Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HyperMethylated), previously LOC100526820, is located on chromosome 6, hg19 chr6:163 834 097-163 834 982. It lacks introns, encodes a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and is located adjacent to the gene QKI, which encodes an RNA binding protein. Deep bisulphite sequencing of ten colorectal cancer (CRC) and matched normal tissues demonstrated frequent hypermethylation within the CAHM gene in cancer. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to characterize additional tissue samples. With a threshold of 5% methylation, the CAHM assay was positive in 2/26 normal colorectal tissues (8%), 17/21 adenomas (81%), and 56/79 CRC samples (71%). A reverse transcriptase-qPCR assay showed that CAHM RNA levels correlated negatively with CAHM % methylation, and therefore CAHM gene expression is typically decreased in CRC. The CAHM qMSP assay was applied to DNA isolated from plasma specimens from 220 colonoscopy-examined patients. Using a threshold of 3 pg methylated genomic DNA per mL plasma, methylated CAHM sequences were detected in the plasma DNA of 40/73 (55%) of CRC patients compared with 3/73 (4%) from subjects with adenomas and 5/74 (7%) from subjects without neoplasia. Both the frequency of detection and the amount of methylated CAHM DNA released into plasma increased with increasing cancer stage. Methylated CAHM DNA shows promise as a plasma biomarker for use in screening for CRC.

  8. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  9. THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINATED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER TO MALE F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLORECTAL NEOPLASIA BY A MIXTURE HIGH IN BROMINA TED TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING W A TER TO MALE F344/N RA TS.

    Abstract:

    The THMs are the most widely distributed and concentrated of the chlorine disinfection by-products (D...

  10. Usefulness of analysis of p53 alteration and observation of surface microstructure for diagnosis of ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Fujimori, T; Chiba, T

    2003-03-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have a higher incidence of colorectal cancer. UC-associated colorectal cancer is thought to develop in patients with preexisting UC-associated dysplasia. It is crucial to diagnose UC-associated dysplasia and early stage of cancer in patients with long-standing UC for the purpose of treatment of UC-associated neoplasia. However, it is difficult to detect UC-associated dysplasia and the early stage of cancer endoscopically, and to discriminate these neoplasias from inflammatory regenerative epithelium pathologically. The aim of this study was to clarify whether observation of the surface microstructure could aid in the detection of UC-associated neopalsia, and whether analysis of genetic alterations could be used to discriminate between UC-associated neoplasia and inflammatory regenerative epithelium. Tissue samples were obtained from colectomy specimens from eight cases of UC-associated neoplasia. We examined the surface microstructure of these tissues using stereomicroscopy. We also investigated mutation of K-ras codon 12 using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and alteration of the p53 gene, using immunohistochemistry and PCR-single stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). The surface microstructure of UC-associated neoplasia revealed a packed distribution of oval and/or, club-shaped and/or, branch-shaped pits and a villous appearance. Nuclear accumulation of p53 protein occurred in 59.5% of UC-associated neoplasia. Mutations of the p53 exon 5-8 were detected in 95.2% of UC-associated neoplasia, and these mutations were detected in 92.9% of UC-associated neoplasia that showed negative p53 immunohistochemical staining. Mutations of the p53 exon 5-8 in regenerative epithelium occurred infrequently. The K-ras mutation rate in UC-associated neoplasia was 7.4%. In conclusion, immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP analysis of p53 would be useful tools for pathological discrimination

  11. New Insights into the Mechanism of Action of Aspirin in the Prevention of Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Luigia; López Contreras, Luilli Antonio; Sacco, Angela; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical studies have shown that the chronic administration of aspirin, even at the lowdoses (75-100 mg daily) recommended for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanism of action of aspirin as an antineoplastic agent remains controversial. However, data of clinical pharmacology and several features of the chemopreventive effect of aspirin, emerged from clinical trials, suggest that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin plays a central role in its anticancer effects. In addition to their contribution to tumor metastasis, platelets may play a role in the early phases of tumorigenesis. In response to lifestyle and environment factors, intestinal epithelial damage/ dysfunction may be associated with platelet activation, initially as a mechanism to repair the damage. However, if the platelet response is unconstrained, it may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation. Altogether these events lead to alter the normal functions of intestinal epithelial cells and may translate into cellular transformation through several mechanisms, including the overexpression of cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which are considered early events in colorectal tumorigenesis. Thus, antiplatelet agents may play a role in the prevention of CRC by modifying epigenetic events involved in early phases of colorectal tumorigenesis. Finally, we carried out a critical review of the literature on off-target mechanisms of aspirin action as anticancer drug. PMID:26369679

  12. In-vivo classification of colorectal neoplasia using high-resolution microendoscopy: improvement with experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil D.; Perl, Daniel; Lee, Michelle H.; Chang, Shannon S; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Zhou, Elinor; Mitcham, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a novel, low-cost “optical biopsy” technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The study aim was to evaluate the learning curve of HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. Methods In a prospective cohort fashion, a total of 162 polyps from 97 patients at a single tertiary care center were imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). Histopathology was the gold standard for comparison. Diagnostic accuracy was examined at three intervals over time throughout the study; the initial interval included the first 40 polyps, the middle interval included the next 40 polyps examined, and the final interval included the last 82 polyps examined. Results Sensitivity increased significantly from the initial interval (50%) to the middle interval (94%, p = 0.02) and the last interval (97%, p = 0.01). Similarly, specificity was 69% for the initial interval but increased to 92% (p = 0.07) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.02) in the last interval. Overall accuracy was 63% for the initial interval and then improved to 93% (p = 0.003) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.0007) in the last interval. Conclusions In conclusion, this in-vivo study demonstrates that an endoscopist without prior colon HRME experience can achieve greater than 90% accuracy for identifying neoplastic colorectal polyps after 40 polyps imaged. HRME is a promising modality to complement white-light endoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. PMID:25753782

  13. [Recent advance in chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Aiba, K

    1996-04-01

    Chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer is reviewed stressing the historical development of combination chemotherapy and the application of a new idea called biochemical modulation based upon a preclinical biochemical and molecular pharmacological rationale. While 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a key drug for more than three decades, many a combination chemotherapy with 5-FU and other drugs such as methyl-CCNU, vincristine, streptozocin, mitomycin C and so on has been studied extensively only to show no significant improvement compared with monotherapy with 5-FU. Recently, the mechanisms of 5-FU action have been recognized more in detail biochemically, and it enabled us to try the drug in a more optimal way. For example, bolus i.v. infusion of 5-FU can produce a response rate of around 10% to 15% at most for advanced colorectal cancer. On the other hand, a more continuous mode of i.v. infusion, typically known as protracted i.v. infusion lasting up to 6 weeks or more, can produce the response rate of up to 40%. The difference underlying the mechanisms of action in these typical two administrative methods is that the main target can be RNA-directed cytotoxicity in the bolus type infusion and it can be shifted toward DNA-directed cytotoxicity in the continuous type infusion through the inhibition of thymidylate synthase (TS) enzyme activity which is relevant to DNA de novo synthesis. More importantly, investigations using clinical materials imply that DNA-directed cytotoxicity may be more relevant in a clinical setting, showing consistent findings between bench-top experiments and the clinical outcome. Given a precise knowledge about the mechanisms of 5-FU action, we could have developed a new type combination chemotherapy called biochemical modulation which manipulates non-cytotoxic agents or cytotoxic agents in non-cytotoxic level as modulators enhancing cytotoxicity of 5-FU biochemically. Among modulators, leucovorin (LV) has been shown to have a pivotal role in

  14. Molecular Pathologic Epidemiology of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Emerging Transdisciplinary and Interdisciplinary Field

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a complex disease resulting from somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations, including locus-specific CpG island methylation and global DNA or LINE-1 hypomethylation. Global molecular characteristics such as microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), global DNA hypomethylation, and chromosomal instability cause alterations of gene function in a genome-wide scale. Activation of oncogenes including KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA affects intracellular signaling pathways and has been associated with CIMP and MSI. Traditional epidemiology research has investigated various factors in relation to an overall risk of colon and/or rectal cancer. However, colorectal cancers comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases with different sets of genetic and epigenetic alterations. To better understand how a particular exposure influences the carcinogenic process, somatic molecular changes and tumor biomarkers have been studied in relation to the exposure of interest. Moreover, an investigation of interactive effects of tumor molecular changes and the exposures of interest on tumor behavior (prognosis or clinical outcome) can lead to a better understanding of tumor molecular changes, which may be prognostic or predictive tissue biomarkers. These new research efforts represent “Molecular Pathologic Epidemiology”, which is a multidisciplinary field of investigations of the interrelationship between exogenous and endogenous (e.g., genetic) factors, tumoral molecular signatures and tumor progression. Furthermore, integrating genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with molecular pathologic investigation is a promising area. Examining the relationship between susceptibility alleles identified by GWAS and specific molecular alterations can help elucidate the function of these alleles and provide insights into whether susceptibility alleles are truly causal. Although there are challenges, molecular pathologic epidemiology has unique strengths

  15. Advances in small bowel neuroendocrine neoplasia Banck and Small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Banck, Michaela S.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review this review aims at summarizing progress in clinical trials and basic science redefining the diagnosis and treatment of well differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NET). Recent findings Two clinical trials demonstrated antitumor activity of the long-acting somatostatin analogues octreotide LAR and lanreotide for advanced SI-NET. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus is another treatment option for patients with SI-NET, but awaits definitive proof of benefit in the ongoing RADIANT-4 study. Two whole exome/genome-sequencing studies reported in the past year provided the first genome-wide analysis of large sets of SI-NET at nucleotide resolution. Candidate therapeutically relevant alterations were found to affect SRC, SMAD genes, AURKA, EGFR, HSP90, and PDGFR as well as mutually exclusive amplification of AKT1 or AKT2 and other alterations of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling genes. The gene CDKN1B is inactivated by small insertions/deletions in 8% of patients with SI-NET suggesting cell cycle inhibitors as new candidate drugs for SI-NET. Circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived RNA in the blood are promising clinical tests for SI-NET. Summary Clinical and genomic research may merge in the near future to re-shape clinical trials and to define the ‘personalized’ treatment options for patients with SI-NET. PMID:24441281

  16. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  17. Detection of serological biomarkers by proximity extension assay for detection of colorectal neoplasias in symptomatic individuals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the potential of biomarkers to aid in early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is recognized and numerous biomarker candidates have been reported in the literature, to date only few molecular markers have been approved for daily clinical use. Methods In order to improve the translation of biomarkers from the bench to clinical practice we initiated a biomarker study focusing on a novel technique, the proximity extension assay, with multiplexing capability and the possible additive effect obtained from biomarker panels. We performed a screening of 74 different biomarkers in plasma derived from a case–control sample set consisting of symptomatic individuals representing CRC patients, patients with adenoma, patients with non-neoplastic large bowel diseases and healthy individuals. Results After statistical evaluation we found 12 significant indicators of CRC and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Transferrin Receptor-1 (TFRC), Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), Osteopontin (OPN/SPP1) and cancer antigen 242 (CA242) showed additive effect. This biomarker panel identified CRC patients with a sensitivity of 56% at 90% specificity and thus the performance is sufficiently high to further investigate this combination of five proteins as serological biomarkers for detection of CRC. Furthermore, when applying the indicators to identify early-stage CRC a combination of CEA, TFRC and CA242 resulted in a ROC curve with an area under the curve of 0.861. Conclusions Five plasma protein biomarkers were found to be potential CRC discriminators and three of these were additionally found to be discriminators of early-stage CRC. These explorative data in symptomatic individuals demonstrates the feasibility of the multiplex proximity extension assay for screening of potential serological protein biomarkers and warrants independent analyses in a larger sample cohort, including asymptomatic individuals, to

  18. Calcium/magnesium intake ratio, but not magnesium intake, interacts with genetic polymorphism in relation to colorectal neoplasia in a two-phase study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangzhu; Shrubsole, Martha J; Ness, Reid M; Hibler, Elizabeth A; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Guoliang; Jiang, Ming; Hou, Lifang; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Zhang, Bing; Smalley, Walter E; Edwards, Todd L; Giovannucci, Edward L; Zheng, Wei; Dai, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Some studies suggest that the calcium to magnesium ratio intakes modify the associations of calcium or magnesium with risk of colorectal adenoma, adenoma recurrence, and cancer. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a key role in the regulation of homeostasis for both calcium and magnesium. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in PTH and 13 other genes may modify the association between the calcium/magnesium intake ratio and colorectal neoplasia risk. We conducted a two-phase study including 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. In Phase I, we identified 19 SNPs that significantly interacted with the calcium/magnesium intake ratio in adenoma risk. In Phase II, rs11022858 in PTH was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, we found high calcium/magnesium intake ratio tended to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal adenoma (P for trend, 0.040) among those who carried the TT genotype in rs11022858. In stratified analyses, calcium intake (≥ 1000 mg/d) was significantly associated with 64% reduced adenoma risk (OR = 0.36 (95% CI : 0.18-0.74)) among those homozygous for the minor allele (TT genotype) (P for trend, 0.012), but not associated with risk in other genotypes (CC/TC). Conversely, we found that highest magnesium intake was significantly associated with 27% reduced risk (OR = 0.73 (95% CI : 0.54-0.97)) of colorectal adenoma (P for trend, 0.026) among those who possessed the CC/TC genotypes, particularly among those with the TC genotype, whereas magnesium intake was not linked to risk among those with the TT genotype. These findings, if confirmed, will help for the development of personalized prevention strategies for colorectal cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early identification of cervical neoplasia with Raman spectroscopy and advanced methods for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Phillip R. T.; Smith, Daniel D. W.; Mazilu, Michael; Cormack, Iain; Riches, Andrew C.; Herrington, C. Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-02-01

    Early detection of malignant tumours, or their precursor lesions, can dramatically improve patient outcome. High risk human Papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV16, infection can lead to the initiation and development of uterine cervical neoplasia. Bearing this in mind the identification of the effects of HPV infection may have clinical value. In this manuscript we investigate the application of Raman microspectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV in cultured cells when compared with normal cells. We also investigate the effect of sample fixation, which is a common clinical practice, on the ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect the presence of HPV. Raman spectra were acquired from Primary Human Keratinocytes (PHK), PHK expressing the E7 gene of HPV 16 (PHK E7) and CaSki cells, an HPV16 containing cervical carcinoma derived cell line. The average Raman spectra display variations, mostly in peaks relating to DNA and proteins, consistent with HPV gene expression and the onset of neoplasia in both live and fixed samples. Principle component analysis was used to objectively discriminate between the cells types giving sensitivities up to 100% for the comparison between PHK and CaSki. These results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between cell lines representing different stages of cervical neoplasia. Furthermore Raman spectroscopy was able to identify cells expressing the HPV 16 E7 gene suggesting the approach may be of value in clinical practice. Finally this technique was also able to detect the effects of the virus in fixed samples demonstrating the compatibility of this technique with current cervical screening methods. However if Raman spectroscopy is to make a significant impact in clinical practice the long acquisition times must be addressed. In this report we examine the potential for beam shaping and advanced to improve the signal to noise ration hence subsequently facilitating a reduction in acquisition time.

  20. Neoplasia: The Second Decade

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2008-01-01

    This issue marks the end of the 10-year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth in both number of submitted and published articles in Neoplasia. Neoplasia was first published in 1999. During the past 10 years, Neoplasia has dynamically adapted to the needs of the cancer research community as technologies have advanced. Neoplasia is currently providing access to articles through PubMed Central to continue to facilitate rapid broad-based dissemination of published findings to the scientific community through an Open Access model. This has in part helped Neoplasia to achieve an improved impact factor this past year, demonstrating that the manuscripts published by Neoplasia are of great interest to the overall cancer research community. This past year, Neoplasia received a record number of articles for review and has had a 21% increase in the number of published articles. PMID:19048110

  1. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  2. Cytokine gene polymorphisms, cytokine levels and the risk of colorectal neoplasia in a screened population of Northeast Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, U; Shebl, FM; Palmer, AJ; Berry, S; Hold, GL; El-Omar, EM; Rabkin, CS

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Cytokine gene polymorphisms modify expression and their circulating protein levels reflect inflammatory response. Chronic inflammation plays key role in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia (CRN) associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear if inflammation is a cause or effect of tumours in sporadic CRN. We therefore investigated association of cytokine gene polymorphisms and circulating cytokine levels on risk of CRN in North East Scotland, which has a high incidence of CRN. Methods We recruited two groups of subjects from a screening colonoscopy cohort, either pre-procedure or 3–24 months post-procedure. Participants with (CRN) were compared to participants with no evidence of CRN (controls). Blood-derived DNA was used to genotype polymorphisms in IL1B, IL1-RN, IL6, IL8, IL10, PTGS2 and TNFA genes. Circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) and 6 cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-alpha) were measured. In order to examine effect of CRN resection on marker levels, we used propensity score matching. Results There were 884 subjects eligible for analysis, including 388 CRN cases and 496 controls. Cases were older (mean age 64 vs. 62 yrs, p<0.01) and more likely to be male (67% vs. 55%, p<0.001). Controls were more likely to be regular users of NSAID (p<0.0001). Compared to homozygous carriage of respective common alleles, pro-inflammatory CC genotypes of IL1B-31 C>T [OR (95% CI) 1.68 (1.03–2.73)] and PTGS2-765 C>G [OR (95% CI) 2.97 (1.05–8.46)] were each associated with increased CRN risk. Conversely, carriage of the A allele of IL8-251 A>T was associated with lower CRN risk compared to the TT genotype [ORs (95% CI) 0.60 (0.41–0.86) for heterozygous, 0.88 (0.57–1.37) for homozygous, and 0.68 (0.48–0.95) for heterozygous and homozygous combined]. Compared to post-procedure cases, IL8, TNFα, and CRP levels were significantly higher in pre-procedure cases, but IL4 and IL

  3. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Christopher R.; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M.; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  4. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Klempner, Samuel J; Garrett, Christopher R; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Chiu, Vi K

    2015-10-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  5. Serum miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b are promising biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Atsushi; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Nishida, Naoshi; Honjo, Hajime; Ida, Hiroshi; Kou, Tadayuki; Kusaka, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Yu; Makato, Yagi; Higurashi, Takuma; Yukawa, Norio; Amanuma, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Osamu; Muto, Manabu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as promising diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC), but their usefulness for detecting early colorectal neoplasms (CRNs) remains unclear. This study aimed to identify serum miRNA biomarkers for the identification of patients with early CRNs. Experimental Design A cohort of 237 serum samples from 160 patients with early CRNs (148 precancerous lesions and 12 cancers) and 77 healthy subjects was analyzed in a three-step approach that included: a comprehensive literature review for published biomarkers, a screening phase, and a validation phase. RNA was extracted from sera, and levels of miRNAs were examined by real-time RT-PCR. Results Nine miRNAs (miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20a, miR-21, miR-24, miR-29a, miR-92 and miR-125b) were selected as candidate biomarkers for initial analysis. In the screening phase, serum levels of miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b were significantly higher in patients with early CRN compared to healthy controls. Elevated levels of miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b were confirmed in the validation phase using an independent set of subjects. Area under the curve (AUC) values for serum miR-21, miR-29a, miR-125b, and their combined score in discriminating early CRN patients from healthy controls were 0.706, 0.741, 0.806 and 0.827 respectively. Serum levels of miR-29a and miR-125b were significantly higher in patients who only had small CRNs (≤5mm) compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions Since serum levels of miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b discriminated early CRN patients from healthy controls, our data highlight the potential clinical use of these molecular signatures for noninvasive screening of patients with colorectal neoplasia. PMID:26038573

  6. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  7. Racial disparities in advanced stage colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kristin; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Lewin, David N.; Williamson, Grace; Oppenheimer, Stephanie; Ford, Marvella E.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Berger, Franklin G.; Bolick, Susan W.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence and lower survival from colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to European Americans (EA). In the present study, statewide, population-based data from South Carolina Central Cancer Registry (SCCCR) is used to investigate the relationship between race and age on advanced stage CRC survival. Methods The study population was comprised of 3865 advanced pathologically documented colon and rectal adenocarcinoma cases diagnosed between 01 January 1996 and 31 December 2006: 2673 (69%) EA and 1192 (31%) AA. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to generate median survival time and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by race, age, and gender. Factors associated with survival were evaluated by fitting Cox proportional hazards (CPH) regression models to generate Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% CI. Results We observed a significant interaction between race and age on CRC survival (p = 0.04). Among younger patients (< 50 years), AA race was associated with a 1.34 (95% CI 1.06-1.71) higher risk of death compared to EA. Among older patients, we observed a modest increase risk of death among AA men compared to EA (HR 1.16 (95% CI 1.01-1.32) but no difference by race among women (HR 0.94 (95% CI 0.82-1.08)). Moreover, we observed that the disparity in survival has worsened over the past 15 years. Conclusions Future studies that integrate clinical, molecular, and treatment-related data are needed for advancing understanding of the racial disparity in CRC survival, especially for those < 50 years old. PMID:23296454

  8. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  9. [News and perspectives in the treatment of advanced gastric and colorectal cancers].

    PubMed

    Diciolla, A; Cristina, V; De Micheli, R; Digklia, A; Wagner, A D

    2015-05-20

    Colorectal and gastric cancers are the fourth and third leading causes of cancer death world-wide. Unfortunately, gastric cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage after becoming metastatic in distant sites, so that palliative therapy is the mainstay of treatment. Major progress in the understanding of the biology, the development of valid biomarkers and molecular targeted drugs have improved the treatment options and prognosis of both cancers significantly in the last years. Here, we review the current standards of care for patients with advanced and metastatic colorectal and gastric cancer and outline the perspectives for the future.

  10. Advanced oxidation protein products and total antioxidant activity in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Avinash, S S; Anitha, M; Vinodchandran; Rao, Gayathri M; Sudha, K; Shetty, Beena V

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and percent hemolysis (that indirectly indicates the degree of membrane damage secondary to lipid peroxidation) in colorectal carcinoma. Glutathione (GSH), total thiols and albumin were measured to determine the antioxidant status. Considering the dynamic interaction between various antioxidants in the body, we measured the total antioxidant activity (AOA). Globulin was measured to assess the inflammatory response secondary to oxidative stress. Investigations were conducted in 45 cases of recently diagnosed primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. As control, 45 age and sex matched healthy persons were chosen. GSH was estimated in whole blood, percent hemolysis in RBC suspension and other parameters in plasma. We observed a very high significant increase (P<0.001) in AOPP, percent hemolysis and a highly significant increase (P<0.01) in globulin in colorectal carcinoma. We observed a very high significant decrease (P<0.001) in whole blood GSH, total thiols, albumin, AOA and a significant decrease (P<0.05) in plasma GSH in colorectal carcinoma. A very high significant negative correlation between percent hemolysis and AOA and an apparent negative correlation between total thiols and AOPP was seen in colorectal carcinoma. This demonstrated oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant status and secondary inflammatory response in colorectal carcinoma.

  11. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  12. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  13. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  14. Evaluation of serum nucleoside diphosphate kinase A for the detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; De Chiara, Loretta; Barcia-Castro, Leticia; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2016-01-01

    We previously described the over-expression of nucleoside diphosphate kinase A (NDKA) in tumours and serum from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, suggesting its use as biomarker. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum NDKA to detect advanced neoplasia (CRC or advanced adenomas). Furthermore, the performance of NDKA was compared with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT). The study population included a case-control cohort and a screening cohort (511 asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT). Serum NDKA was elevated in CRC patients in the case-control cohort (p = 0.002). In the screening cohort, NDKA levels were higher for advanced adenomas (p = 0.010) and advanced neoplasia (p = 0.006) compared to no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated NDKA was associated with severe characteristics of adenomas (≥3 lesions, size ≥ 1 cm or villous component). Setting specificity to 85%, NDKA showed a sensitivity of 30.19% and 29.82% for advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia, respectively. NDKA combined with FIT (100 ng/mL cut-off) detected advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia with 45.28% and 49.12% sensitivity, with specificity close to 90%. The combination of serum NDKA and FIT can improve the detection of advanced neoplasia, mainly for lesions located on the proximal colon, in asymptomatic individuals with CRC family-risk. PMID:27222072

  15. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  16. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options.

  17. Well differentiated follicular thyroid neoplasia: impact of molecular and technological advances on detection, monitoring and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gianoukakis, Andrew G; Giannelli, Silvana M; Salameh, Wael A; McPhaul, Laron W

    2011-01-30

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for follicular thyroid cell oncogenesis has been advanced significantly in recent years. Specific genetic alterations and the molecular pathways they affect have been associated with particular histologic subtypes of well-differentiated thyroid cancer and are now being evaluated for their utility as clinical tools with diagnostic, prognostic and even therapeutic relevance. This paper focuses on the most common and clinically relevant genetic alterations shown to be consistently associated with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We review the impact of recent molecular and technological advances on thyroid cancer standard of care and the practice of clinical medicine.

  18. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments. PMID:26855534

  19. Advances in the endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J.Q.; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus is a well-recognised precursor of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma is continuing to rise in the Western world with dismal survival rates. In recent years, efforts have been made to diagnose Barrett’s earlier and improve surveillance techniques in order to pick up cancerous changes earlier. Recent advances in endoscopic therapy for early Barrett’s cancers have shifted the paradigm away from oesophagectomy and have yielded excellent results. PMID:26918175

  20. Morphological Characteristics and Location of Missed, Advanced Colorectal Neoplasms after Colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Takuji; Uno, Koji; Tanaka, Kiyohito; Ueda, Yuki; Sakiyama, Naokuni; Nishida, Kensei; Rokutan, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of advanced colorectal neoplasms after colonoscopy, likely to have been missed on the previous colonoscopy. We reviewed a total of 5,768 consecutive colonoscopies performed from April 2010 to September 2013 in 4,841 patients, and analyzed advanced colorectal neoplasms after colonoscopy, particularly focusing on their morphological characteristics and locations, as compared with primary lesions, defined as lesions detected in their first colonoscopy or in a subsequent colonoscopy >5 years after the previous one. Of the 5,768 examinations, 922 advanced neoplasms (including 217 cancers with ≥T2) were detected, and 167 lesions (18.1%) were diagnosed within 5 years after a previous colonoscopy (post-colonoscopy advanced neoplasms). The incidence of right-sided lesions in the post-colonoscopy advanced neoplasms (48.5%, 81/167) was significantly higher than in the primary lesions (34.0%, 257/755; p <0.001). We excluded 217 cancers with ≥T2 from the morphological analysis to characterize early-stage post-colonoscopy advanced neoplasms. The incidence of non-polypoid lesions in the post-colonoscopy advanced neoplasms (25.6%, 41/160) was significantly higher than that in the primary lesions (12.3%, 67/545; p <0.001). These findings suggest that extra attention should be paid to non-polypoid, right-sided advanced colorectal neoplasms during screening and surveillance colonoscopy. J. Med. Invest. 63: 163-170, August, 2016.

  1. Systematic genomic identification of colorectal cancer genes delineating advanced from early clinical stage and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The initial assessment of colorectal cancer involves clinical staging that takes into account the extent of primary tumor invasion, determining the number of lymph nodes with metastatic cancer and the identification of metastatic sites in other organs. Advanced clinical stage indicates metastatic cancer, either in regional lymph nodes or in distant organs. While the genomic and genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to some degree, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis. Methods We compiled multiple genomic data types (mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation status) as well as clinical meta-data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We used an elastic-net regularized regression method on the combined genomic data to identify genetic aberrations and their associated cancer genes that are indicators of clinical stage. We ranked candidate genes by their regression coefficient and level of support from multiple assay modalities. Results A fit of the elastic-net regularized regression to 197 samples and integrated analysis of four genomic platforms identified the set of top gene predictors of advanced clinical stage, including: WRN, SYK, DDX5 and ADRA2C. These genetic features were identified robustly in bootstrap resampling analysis. Conclusions We conducted an analysis integrating multiple genomic features including mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation. This integrated approach in which one considers all of these genomic features performs better than any individual genomic assay. We identified multiple genes that robustly delineate advanced clinical stage, suggesting their possible role in colorectal cancer metastatic progression. PMID:24308539

  2. [Advances of minimally invasive technique in colorectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xishan

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal surgery is rapidly developing in the direction of minimally invasive surgery and functional surgery. New technology and ideas are constantly emerging recently. Laparoscopic colon surgery has already been recommended by NCCN guideline. However, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery still needs to wait for survival and recurrence rates of long-term follow-up data for verification. In recent years, with the rapid progression of imaging equipment of laparoscope, the new 3D laparoscopic system will process image more quickly, and surgeons can get space depth feeling like open surgery only with a pair of glasses. The new 3D laparoscopic system has many advantages, and can also shorten the learning curve of the beginners. But it does not mean the traditional 2D laparoscopy has been out of date. It is admitted that dialectical view on the development of the technology and equipment is still required. New things also need the accumulation of time and validation, and the deficiency of imaging system remains to be improved. At present, the robotic colorectal cancer surgery is still in its infancy, and its application is relatively common in colon surgery. In respect of robotic rectal cancer surgery, it still lacks of long-term follow-up survival results for verification. To reduce physical and psychological trauma for patients is the goal of the surgeon. Surgeons are experiencing the change from minimally invasion to non-invasion. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and natural orifice specimen extraction surgery (NOSES) arise at the historic moment. Among them, transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) incorporates the concepts of NOTES, anal minimally invasive surgery and total mesorectum excision, guaranteeing the radical cure and no scar of abdomen, but it still needs multicenter, large sample and long-term follow-up clinical data to prove its safety, efficacy and indication. Therefore, surgical procedure is transforming from conventional

  3. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1–14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  4. Targeting BRAF aberrations in advanced colorectal carcinoma: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a global health problem with profound mortality and morbidity effects particularly in the advanced/metastatic setting. Because of the recent understanding of the biology of this disease, many candidate targets have come into light for therapeutic evaluation. The current review is about evaluating the preclinical and clinical aspects of BRAF as a therapeutic target in this disease. The available clinical results suggest that while the use of unselective RAF inhibitors (e.g., sorafenib) has been ineffective in the management of advanced CRC patients with KRAS mutation, combination of selective BRAF inhibitors plus EGFR inhibitors may represent a good therapeutic strategy in BRAF-mutant CRC. PMID:26616508

  5. Interval colorectal carcinoma: An unsolved debate

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Mark; Neto, Antonio Galvao; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC), as the third most common new cancer diagnosis, poses a significant health risk to the population. Interval CRCs are those that appear after a negative screening test or examination. The development of interval CRCs has been shown to be multifactorial: location of exam-academic institution versus community hospital, experience of the endoscopist, quality of the procedure, age of the patient, flat versus polypoid neoplasia, genetics, hereditary gastrointestinal neoplasia, and most significantly missed or incompletely excised lesions. The rate of interval CRCs has decreased in the last decade, which has been ascribed to an increased understanding of interval disease and technological advances in the screening of high risk individuals. In this article, we aim to review the literature with regard to the multifactorial nature of interval CRCs and provide the most recent developments regarding this important gastrointestinal entity. PMID:26668498

  6. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for flat or sessile colorectal neoplasia > 20 mm: A European single-center series of 182 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Malte; Hildenbrand, Ralf; Oyama, Tsuneo; Sido, Bernd; Yahagi, Naohisa; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an attractive method for en bloc resection of larger flat neoplastic lesions. Experience with this method is limited in the Western World. Patients and methods: A total of 182 consecutive flat or sessile colorectal lesions (cecum n = 43; right-sided colon n = 65; left-sided colon n = 11, rectum: n = 63) with a size > 20 mm (mean 41.0 ± 17.4 mm) were resected in 178 patients. The data were recorded prospectively. Results: ESD was technically feasible in 85.2 % of patients with a mean procedure time of 127.5 min (± 99.8) min and a complication rate of 11.5 % (microperforation 9.3 %, delayed bleeding 2.7 %, no case of emergency surgery, 30-day mortality rate 0 %). For 155 successfully completed procedures the en bloc and R0 resection rates were 88.4 and 62.6 %. Efficacy was better for smaller lesions (20 mm to 49 mm; n = 131) than for larger lesions (50 mm to 140 mm; n = 51) with R0 rates of 70.8 vs. 40.5 % (P < 0.001) and procedure times of 92.7 ± 62.4 minutes vs. 217.0 ± 120.9 minutes (P < 0,001). Conclusions: This series confirms the efficacy of ESD for en bloc resection of colorectal lesions > 20 mm. Results are satisfactory for lesions up to 50 mm. ESD for larger lesions was associated with low R0 resection rates and very long procedure times. The clinical consequences of microperforations were minor and do not argue against the spread of ESD in the West. Meeting presentations: The data were presented in part at DDW 2014, Chicago IL, USA (Gastrointest Endosc 2014; 79: AB536) PMID:27540580

  7. Distinct features between MLH1-methylated and unmethylated colorectal carcinomas with the CpG island methylator phenotype: implications in the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Bae, Jeong Mo; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2016-03-22

    The presence or absence of MLH1 methylation may critically affect the heterogeneity of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Here, we investigated the differential characteristics of CIMP-high (CIMP-H) CRCs according to MLH1 methylation status. To further confirm the MLH1-dependent features in CIMP-H CRC, an independent analysis was performed using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In our CIMP-H CRC samples, MLH1-methylated tumors were characterized by older patient age, proximal colonic location, mucinous histology, intense lymphoid reactions, RUNX3/SOCS1 promoter methylation, BRAF mutations, and microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) status. By contrast, MLH1-unmethylated tumors were associated with earlier age of onset, increased distal colorectal localization, adverse pathologic features, and KRAS mutations. In the TCGA dataset, the MLH1-silenced CIMP-H CRC demonstrated proximal location, MSI-H status, hypermutated phenotype, and frequent BRAF mutations, but the MLH1-non-silenced CIMP-H CRC was significantly associated with high frequencies of KRAS and APC mutations. In conclusion, the differential nature of CIMP-H CRCs depends primarily on the MLH1 methylation status. Based on the current knowledge, the sessile serrated adenoma/polyp may be the major precursor of MLH1-methylated CIMP-H CRCs, whereas MLH1-unmethylated CIMP-H CRCs may develop predominantly from KRAS-mutated traditional serrated adenomas and less commonly from BRAF-mutated traditional serrated adenomas and/or sessile serrated adenomas/polyps. PMID:26883113

  8. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  9. Rate and Risk Factors of the Advanced Adenomas Among Diminutive Colorectal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Aktekin, Ali; Comunoglu, Nil; Odabasi, Mehmet; Muftuoglu, Tolga; Gurleyik, Gunay; Abanonu, Gul Babacan

    2015-12-01

    Only 49 % of diminutive colorectal polyps are neoplastic, but a tiny percentage contains advanced histology. We aimed to determine the rate of advanced diminutive polyps and to evaluate the influence of age, gender, number, and localization. Patients undergoing a videocolonoscopy in October 2010 and April 2012 were collected prospectively. Subjects with polyps ≤5 mm in diameter were recruited into the study. The presence of a villous component of >25 % and a high degree of dysplasia were categorized as polyps with advanced histology. Two hundred eight diminutive polyps were identified in 102 patients. Twenty (9.6 %) diminutive polyps in 13 (12.74 %) patients showed advanced histology. The probability of having an advanced diminutive polyp was higher in patients who have more than one polyp or have polyps localized all along the colon or only to the distal part (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002). Having more than one polyp increases the likelihood of having advanced diminutive polyp according to a multivariate analysis (p = 0.003). Polyps accompanying any dysplastic diminutive polyp, being one of multiple polyps, and distributed all along the colon or localized to only the distal part have an increased probability of being an advanced diminutive polyp (p < 0.001, p = 0.047, p < 0.001, and p = 0.008). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that only any accompanying dysplastic diminutive polyp increases the probability of a polyp being advanced diminutive (p = 0.034). Diminutive polyps could have advanced histology. Multiple polyps located in the whole colorectum or to the distal part or accompanying any advanced polyps may harbor an advanced histology and should be removed.

  10. KRAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In February 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on evidence-based reviews of the literature surrounding three pharmacogenomic tests. This project came about when Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) asked MAS to provide evidence-based analyses on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three oncology pharmacogenomic tests currently in use in Ontario. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these technologies. These have been completed in conjunction with internal and external stakeholders, including a Provincial Expert Panel on Pharmacogenomics (PEPP). Within the PEPP, subgroup committees were developed for each disease area. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed by the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and is summarized within the reports. The following reports can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Gene Expression Profiling for Guiding Adjuvant Chemotherapy Decisions in Women with Early Breast Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis K-RAS testing in Treatment Decisions for Advanced Colorectal Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis. Objective The objective of this systematic review is to determine the predictive value of KRAS testing in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with two anti-EGFR agents, cetuximab and panitumumab. Economic analyses are also being conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of KRAS testing. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is usually defined as stage IV disease according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer

  11. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lines, K.E.; Stevenson, M.; Thakker, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  12. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancerous (malignant) tumors or grow excessively without forming tumors. Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes are caused by ... This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names corticotropin H.P. ACTHAR GEL epinephrine ADRENALIN Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia ...

  13. Molecular testing to optimize therapeutic decision making in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In recent years, therapeutic advances have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease. Along with the addition of new treatments, an increasing body of literature explores the potential benefit of using molecular testing to define tumor, circulating, or host biomarkers of benefit to specific treatment strategies. At present, testing for specific mutations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS and NRAS has become accepted practice to select patients for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted agents. Additionally, testing for the BRAF V600E mutation is used to refine decisions based on patient prognosis. The presence of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) *28 polymorphism is associated with toxicity from irinotecan, although it has not been universally applied. Nonetheless, molecular markers to predict response and toxicity of cytotoxic therapy are evolving. While the development of selection biomarkers for anti-angiogenic treatments has not proved fruitful to date, improved development strategies and novel targeted agents are anticipated to revolutionize the approach to treatment of advanced CRC in the near future. This review summarizes currently available data to select treatment strategies in patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27034809

  14. Molecular testing to optimize therapeutic decision making in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Semrad, Thomas J; Kim, Edward J

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In recent years, therapeutic advances have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease. Along with the addition of new treatments, an increasing body of literature explores the potential benefit of using molecular testing to define tumor, circulating, or host biomarkers of benefit to specific treatment strategies. At present, testing for specific mutations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS and NRAS has become accepted practice to select patients for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted agents. Additionally, testing for the BRAF V600E mutation is used to refine decisions based on patient prognosis. The presence of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) *28 polymorphism is associated with toxicity from irinotecan, although it has not been universally applied. Nonetheless, molecular markers to predict response and toxicity of cytotoxic therapy are evolving. While the development of selection biomarkers for anti-angiogenic treatments has not proved fruitful to date, improved development strategies and novel targeted agents are anticipated to revolutionize the approach to treatment of advanced CRC in the near future. This review summarizes currently available data to select treatment strategies in patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27034809

  15. Prostate cancer patients may have an increased risk of coexisting advanced colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Baeg, Myong Ki; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Pumsoo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Patients being treated for prostate cancer (PCa) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, whether PCa patients are inherently at a higher risk of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs) is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of CRNs in PCa patients. Materials and methods Patients who had been diagnosed with PCa at a tertiary medical center and had colonoscopy within 1 year of the PCa diagnosis were investigated. Patients were propensity-matched 1:2 by age and body mass index to asymptomatic control subjects who had undergone colonoscopy for routine health screening. CRN was defined as histological confirmation of an adenoma or adenocarcinoma component. Advanced CRN was defined as any of the following: 1) histological findings of high-grade dysplasia, 2) inclusion of villous features, 3) tumor ≥1 cm in size, or 4) presence of an adenocarcinoma. Risk factors for CRN and advanced CRN were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results A total of 191 patients diagnosed with PCa had colonoscopies within 1 year of PCa diagnosis. Of these, 23 patients with a history of previous malignancy and seven with incomplete colonoscopies were excluded, leaving 161 patients in the PCa group. Although presence of PCa was not a significant risk factor for CRN by multivariate analysis, PCa was a significant risk factor for advanced CRN (odds ratio [OR] 3.300; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.766–6.167; P<0.001). Other significant risk factors for advanced CRN were age (OR 1.050; 95% CI 1.003–1.009; P=0.036) and body mass index (OR 1.205; 95% CI 1.067–1.361; P=0.003), whereas aspirin use (OR 0.414; 95% CI 0.173–0.990; P=0.047) was a preventive factor. Conclusion The risk of advanced CRN may be significantly increased in patients with PCa. Patients with PCa should have a colonoscopy at the time of PCa diagnosis.

  16. Prostate cancer patients may have an increased risk of coexisting advanced colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Baeg, Myong Ki; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Pumsoo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Patients being treated for prostate cancer (PCa) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, whether PCa patients are inherently at a higher risk of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs) is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of CRNs in PCa patients. Materials and methods Patients who had been diagnosed with PCa at a tertiary medical center and had colonoscopy within 1 year of the PCa diagnosis were investigated. Patients were propensity-matched 1:2 by age and body mass index to asymptomatic control subjects who had undergone colonoscopy for routine health screening. CRN was defined as histological confirmation of an adenoma or adenocarcinoma component. Advanced CRN was defined as any of the following: 1) histological findings of high-grade dysplasia, 2) inclusion of villous features, 3) tumor ≥1 cm in size, or 4) presence of an adenocarcinoma. Risk factors for CRN and advanced CRN were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results A total of 191 patients diagnosed with PCa had colonoscopies within 1 year of PCa diagnosis. Of these, 23 patients with a history of previous malignancy and seven with incomplete colonoscopies were excluded, leaving 161 patients in the PCa group. Although presence of PCa was not a significant risk factor for CRN by multivariate analysis, PCa was a significant risk factor for advanced CRN (odds ratio [OR] 3.300; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.766–6.167; P<0.001). Other significant risk factors for advanced CRN were age (OR 1.050; 95% CI 1.003–1.009; P=0.036) and body mass index (OR 1.205; 95% CI 1.067–1.361; P=0.003), whereas aspirin use (OR 0.414; 95% CI 0.173–0.990; P=0.047) was a preventive factor. Conclusion The risk of advanced CRN may be significantly increased in patients with PCa. Patients with PCa should have a colonoscopy at the time of PCa diagnosis. PMID:27672332

  17. Recent advances in active specific cancer vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Itoh, Kyogo; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-06-01

    Cloning techniques to identify genes and peptides of tumor-associated antigens have created new possibilities for the immunotherapy of patients with advanced cancer. Here, we review recent clinical trials of specific cancer vaccines, mainly HLA-restricted peptides, and epitope-encoding vectors for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Many researchers initially focused on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as an immunologic target antigen that is overexpressed on virtually all CRCs. A recombinant vaccine containing the CEA gene and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with CEA peptide was administered to patients with CEA-elevated CRC. Although CEA-specific responses were detected, the clinical responses were limited. Recently, new types of clinical trials--namely, a personalized protocol to take into account the immunological diversity of cytotoxic T cell responses among patients and a novel cancer-testis antigen protocol that uses multiple peptides derived from genes identified by the cDNA array method--have been introduced. The personalized protocol seemed to be better than the classical (non-personalized) protocol in terms of clinical response and survival. Novel cancer-testis antigen protocols that use multiple CRC-derived peptides were recently conducted in patients with advanced CRC. The preliminary study yielded promising results regarding specific T cell responses to peptides and survival benefits. In this review, we summarize these results and discuss future perspectives. PMID:22339221

  18. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  19. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy with irinotecan or oxaliplatin-involved regimen for untreated metastatic advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Luhong; Bai, Jianling; Huang, Huaying; Tang, Cuiju; Yang, Jinsong; Zhou, Baoning; Gong, Yongling; Duanmu, Zhong; Chen, Jinfei

    2010-01-01

    A large number of randomized controlled trials involving chemotherapy in the management of advanced colorectal cancer were conducted. 5-FU/LV in combination with irinotecan (IRI) or oxaliplatin (OXA) was used. The aim of the meta-analysis was to compare and evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the two therapeutic approaches for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A literature search, study selection and assessment, data collection, and analysis were undertaken by two reviewers according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing IRI versus OXA, in combination with 5-FU/LV in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer were performed. Seven studies involving 2,107 patients met the inclusion criteria. The OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen showed a significant increase in survival by lower hazard ratios (HR) [HR 1.28; 95% CI (1.13-1.45)] and was associated with lower toxicities. The OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen was superior or equal to the IRI + 5-FU/LV regimen in prolonging time to progression and median survival. The IRI + 5-FU/LV regimen resulted in higher hazard ratios in nausea vomiting/emesis and diarrhea [HR 1.99, 95% CI (1.19-3.31); HR 1.83, 95% CI (1.38-2.44)] and lower hazard ratios in paresthesia, sensory neuropathy, and thrombocytopenia [HR 0.09, 95% CI (0.03-0.23); HR 0.04 95% CI (0.01-0.13); HR 0.19 95% CI (0.05-0.64)] than the OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen. Compared with IRI, OXA is more appropriate for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer when combined with 5-FU/LV. OXA + 5-FU/LV should be considered as the first-line standard of care for advanced CRC patients.

  20. [Study of the Efficacy of Aprepitant in FOLFOX/FOLFIRI for Elderly Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hanaka, Junichi; Takahashi, Misaki; Nakayama, Hiromichi; Terashima, Teruaki

    2016-05-01

    For patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, sufficient supportive antiemetic therapy is important for maintaining the quality of life. Although there are many studies on antiemetic support therapy for high emetic risk regimens, studies on moderately emetic risk regimens are scarce. FOLFOX and FOLFIRI are generic regimens for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer; evidence for antiemetic supportive therapy at the time of this treatment is scarce. In addition, research on patients over 65 years of age is limited. Among the advanced colorectal cancer patients who received treatment with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI at Koyama Memorial Hospital, patients older than 65 years of age were selected in order to assess the effectiveness of aprepitant as an antiemetic supportive therapy. Aprepitant was used in combination with granisetron and dexamethasone in 14 patients. After 5 days of treatment, complete control rate of emesis was 100%, and complete control rate of nausea was 64.3%. Our results suggest that aprepitant can be used as a safe antiemetic supportive therapy in elderly advanced colorectal cancer patients undergoing FOLFOX and FOLFIRI, as well as granisetron and dexamethasone. PMID:27210087

  1. Serum CD26 is related to histopathological polyp traits and behaves as a marker for colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Serum CD26 (sCD26) levels were previously found diminished in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients compared to healthy donors, suggesting its potential utility for early diagnosis. Therefore we aimed to estimate the utility of the sCD26 as a biomarker for CRC and advanced adenomas in a high-risk group of patients. The relationship of this molecule with polyp characteristics was also addressed. Methods sCD26 levels were measured by ELISA in 299 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who had undergone a colonoscopy. Patients were diagnosed as having no colorectal pathology, non-inflammatory or inflammatory bowel disease, polyps (hyperplastic, non-advanced and advanced adenomas) or CRC. Results At a 460 ng/mL cut-off, the sCD26 has a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% (95% CI, 64.5-93.0%) and 72.3% (95% CI, 65.0-77.2%) for CRC regarding no or benign colorectal pathology. Clinicopathological analysis of polyps showed a relationship between the sCD26 and the grade of dysplasia and the presence of advanced adenomas. Hence, a 58.0% (95% CI, 46.5-68.9%) sensitivity detecting CRC and advanced adenomas was obtained, with a specificity of 75.5% (95% CI, 68.5-81.0%). Conclusions Our preliminary results show that measurement of the sCD26 is a non-invasive and reasonably sensitive assay, which could be combined with others such as the faecal occult blood test for the early diagnosis and screening of CRC and advanced adenomas. Additional comparative studies in average-risk populations are necessary. PMID:20584285

  2. Distribution of KRAS and BRAF mutations in Moroccan patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marchoudi, N; Amrani Hassani Joutei, H; Jouali, F; Fekkak, J; Rhaissi, H

    2013-12-01

    Targeted therapies have an increasing importance in digestive oncology. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the distribution of KRAS and BRAF mutations in Moroccan patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) in order to introduce targeted therapy in the arsenal of therapeutic modalities for management of this cancer in Morocco. In this study, 92 samples obtained from patients with CRC were tested for the presence of the nine most common mutations in the KRAS gene and BRAF gene. Among the tested patients, 76.09% of patients had wt-KRAS genotype and 23.91% were KRAS mutants and the majority of mutations would result in an amino acid substitution of glycine by aspartic acid (68.2%) The predominant mutations are G>A transitions and G>T transversions. Around 5% (5.43%) of the tested patients bore the V600E mutation in BRAF gene. Only one patient showing to have the V600E mutation in BRAF was also mutated-KRAS. Summing up the results about the KRAS and the BRAF mutation carriers from our study, the portion of potentially non responsive patients for the anti-EGFR treatment is 28.26%.

  3. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Marc C.; Vugts, Danielle J.; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R.; Schuit, Robert C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus AMS; Verheul, Henk M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq 89Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients 89Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with 89Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without 89Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC. PMID:26309164

  4. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Menke-van der Houven van Oordt, Catharina Willemien; Gootjes, Elske C; Huisman, Marc C; Vugts, Danielle J; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R; Schuit, Robert C; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S; van Dongen, Guus Ams; Verheul, Henk M W

    2015-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of (89)Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq (89)Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC.

  5. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m2), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m2) after few treatment cycles. PMID:24187619

  6. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m(2)), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m(2)) after few treatment cycles.

  7. Lymph node staging in colorectal cancer: Old controversies and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Annika; Langner, Cord

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction based on tumor stage reflected by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) tumor node metastasis (TNM) system is currently regarded as the strongest prognostic parameter for patients with colorectal cancer. For affected patients, the indication for adjuvant therapy is mainly guided by the presence of regional lymph node metastasis. In addition to the extent of surgical lymph node removal and the thoroughness of the pathologist in dissecting the resection specimen, several parameters that are related to the pathological work-up of the dissected nodes may affect the clinical significance of lymph node staging. These include changing definitions of lymph nodes, involved lymph nodes, and tumor deposits in different editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM system as well as the minimum number of nodes to be dissected. Methods to increase the lymph node yield in the fatty tissue include methylene blue injection and acetone compression. Outcome prediction based on the lymph node ratio, defined as the number of positive lymph nodes divided by the total number of retrieved nodes, may be superior to the absolute numbers of involved nodes. Extracapsular invasion has been identified as additional prognostic factor. Adding step sectioning and immunohistochemistry to the pathological work-up may result in higher accuracy of histological diagnosis. The clinical value of more recent technical advances, such as sentinel lymph node biopsy and molecular analysis of lymph nodes tissue still remains to be defined. PMID:24379568

  8. Efficacy of prophylactic anti-diarrhoeal treatment in patients receiving Campto for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffour, J; Gourgou, S; Seitz, J F; Senesse, P; Boutet, O; Castera, D; Kramar, A; Ychou, M

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of combined prophylactic and curative anti-diarrhoeal medication in advanced colorectal patients treated by irinotecan. Thirty-four pre-treated eligible patients were evaluated. There were 44% women, the median age was 65 and 38% of the patients had a 0 performance status. The patients received sucralfate(4g/d) and nifuroxazide(600 mg/d) prophylactic treatment on days 0-7. In the case of severe diarrhoea, preventive treatment was replaced by loperamide(12 mg/d) and diosmectite (9 g/d). Grade 3 delayed diarrhoea occurred in 18% of patients (90% CI: [9.5-28.9]) and 4.6% of cycles. No grade 4 delayed diarrhoea was observed. Twenty-nine patients (85%) received the preventive treatment at cycle 1, while 14% (90% CI: [6.2-25.7]) experienced grade 3 delayed diarrhoea in 3.7% of cycles for a median 4.5 days. The objective response rate was 8% (90% CI [1.4-23.1]) among the 25 assessable patients. Preventive combined treatment is effective in reducing the incidence of severe delayed diarrhoea, and it should be proposed to patients treated with mono-therapy Campto(r) and evaluated in poly-chemotherapy protocols. PMID:12552984

  9. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  10. Efficacy and safety analysis of chemotherapy for advanced colitis-associated colorectal cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nio, Kenta; Higashi, Daijiro; Kumagai, Hozumi; Arita, Shuji; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakashima, Koji; Shibata, Yoshihiro; Esaki, Motohiro; Manabe, Tatsuya; Nagai, Shuntaro; Ueki, Takashi; Nakano, Michitaka; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Hirahashi, Minako; Oda, Yoshinao; Esaki, Taito; Mitsugi, Kenji; Futami, Kitaro; Akashi, Koichi; Baba, Eishi

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy for advanced colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) has been insufficiently evaluated. The goal of this study was to clarify the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy for CAC in Japan. CAC patients who were treated with chemotherapy between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively examined. Twenty-nine patients (median age, 48 years; 23 men) were assessed. Eighteen patients had ulcerative colitis, and 11 had Crohn's disease. Three ulcerative colitis and four Crohn's disease patients were in the active disease phase. Primary tumors were located in the rectum/anus (n=16), the left colon (n=9), or the right colon (n=4). Palliative or adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 13 and 16 patients, respectively. First-line palliative chemotherapy regimens were as follows: fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX; n=6), FOLFOX+bevacizumab (n=3), and others (n=4). Adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were S-1 (n=7), oxaliplatin-based (n=4) and others (n=5). In palliative chemotherapy, the objective response rate was 15%, and the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 182 and 315 days, respectively. In adjuvant chemotherapy, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 78%. Grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) were observed in 16 patients (55%). Active and remission inflammatory bowel disease patients suffered grade 3/4 nonhematological AEs at an incidence of 71 and 23%, respectively (P<0.01). Dose reduction was required in 11 patients (38%), eight of whom required it for hematological AEs. Adjuvant chemotherapy for CAC exhibited sufficient efficacy, whereas modest efficacy was shown for palliative chemotherapy for CAC. AEs, particularly nonhematological AEs, were closely associated with disease activity of colitis.

  11. Advances in targeted and immunobased therapies for colorectal cancer in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Heng Fong; Yip, Wai Kien; Fifis, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies require information on specific defective signaling pathways or mutations. Advances in genomic technologies and cell biology have led to identification of new therapeutic targets associated with signal-transduction pathways. Survival times of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can be extended with combinations of conventional cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies. Targeting EGFR- and VEGFR-signaling systems has been the major focus for treatment of metastatic CRC. However, there are still limitations in their clinical application, and new and better drug combinations are needed. This review provides information on EGFR and VEGF inhibitors, new therapeutic agents in the pipeline targeting EGFR and VEGFR pathways, and those targeting other signal-transduction pathways, such as MET, IGF1R, MEK, PI3K, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and death-receptor signaling pathways for treatment of metastatic CRC. Additionally, multitargeted approaches in combination therapies targeting negative-feedback loops, compensatory networks, and cross talk between pathways are highlighted. Then, immunobased strategies to enhance antitumor immunity using specific monoclonal antibodies, such as the immune-checkpoint inhibitors anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1, as well as the challenges that need to be overcome for increased efficacy of targeted therapies, including drug resistance, predictive markers of response, tumor subtypes, and cancer stem cells, are covered. The review concludes with a brief insight into the applications of next-generation sequencing, expression profiling for tumor subtyping, and the exciting progress made in in silico predictive analysis in the development of a prescription strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:27099521

  12. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. METHODS We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40’s and 50’s age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. RESULTS We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P < 0.005). Literature review disclosed 17 relevant studies. As expected, in both Asian and Western populations, the risks for overall adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher in the 50's age group as compared to the 40's age group in a similar fashion. The result of the current study were similar to previous studies on Western populations. A substantially higher rate of adenoma, was observed in studies conducted among Asian populations in both age groups. CONCLUSION The higher rate of colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population.

  13. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. METHODS We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40’s and 50’s age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. RESULTS We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P < 0.005). Literature review disclosed 17 relevant studies. As expected, in both Asian and Western populations, the risks for overall adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher in the 50's age group as compared to the 40's age group in a similar fashion. The result of the current study were similar to previous studies on Western populations. A substantially higher rate of adenoma, was observed in studies conducted among Asian populations in both age groups. CONCLUSION The higher rate of colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population. PMID:27621582

  14. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening.

  15. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  16. Assessing Individual Risk for High-Risk Colorectal Adenoma at First-Time Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A.; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective U.S. studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio[OR]=9.41), and 6.6% vs 2.1% for women (OR=3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the U.S. population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  17. Development and validation of a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Di Maso, Marianna; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma (ACA) recurrence after endoscopic polypectomy. METHODS: Out of 3360 patients who underwent colon polypectomy at University of Foggia between 2004 and 2008, data of 843 patients with 1155 ACAs was retrospectively reviewed. Surveillance intervals were scheduled by guidelines at 3 years and primary endpoint was considered 3-year ACA recurrence. Baseline clinical parameters and the main features of ACAs were entered into a Cox regression analysis and variables with P < 0.05 in the univariate analysis were then tested as candidate variables into a stepwise Cox regression model (conditional backward selection). The regression coefficients of the Cox regression model were multiplied by 2 and rounded in order to obtain easy to use point numbers facilitating the calculation of the score. To avoid overoptimistic results due to model fitting and evaluation in the same dataset, we performed an internal 10-fold cross-validation by means of bootstrap sampling. RESULTS: Median lesion size was 16 mm (12-23) while median number of adenomas was 2.5 (1-3), whereof the number of ACAs was 1.5 (1-2). At 3 years after polypectomy, recurrence was observed in 229 ACAs (19.8%), of which 157 (13.5%) were metachronous neoplasms and 72 (6.2%) local recurrences. Multivariate analysis, after exclusion of the variable “type of resection” due to its collinearity with other predictive factors, confirmed lesion size, number of ACAs and grade of dysplasia as significantly associated to the primary outcome. The score was then built by multiplying the regression coefficients times 2 and the cut-off point 5 was selected by means of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In particular, 248 patients with 365 ACAs fell in the higher-risk group (score ≥ 5) where 3-year recurrence was detected in 174 ACAs (47.6%) whereas the remaining 595 patients with 690 ACAs were included in the low-risk group (score < 5) where 3

  18. Treatment of advanced colorectal cancer with high-dose intensity folinic acid and 5-fluorouracil plus supportive care.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, R; Lorenzi, M; Aquino, A; Marsili, S; Frediani, B; Palazzuoli, V; Marzocca, G; Botta, G; Tani, F; De Martino, A

    1995-11-01

    This randomised clinical trial, involving patients with advanced colorectal cancer, was carried out to compare the effectiveness of accelerated folinic acid (FA) plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with that of the conventional regimen of 5-FU alone. Both regimens were administered with simulataneous supportive care. 185 patients were eligible: 94 were randomly allocated to receive FA 200 mg/m2 i.v. plus 5-FU 400 mg/m2 i.v. on days 1-5 every 3 weeks; and 91 to receive 5-FU 400 mg/m2 i.v. on days 1-5 every 4 weeks. The response rate was 33.3% in the accelerated FA/5-FU and 18.6% in the 5-FU arm (P = 0.045). Median survival was 13.5 months in the FA/5-FU arm and 7.5 months in the 5-FU arm (P = 0.039). Toxicity was mild and slightly more pronounced in the FA/5-FU arm (P = 0.078). This study indicates that, in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, accelerated chemotherapy with FA and 5-FU and simultaneous supportive care is capable of achieving a higher response rate and longer survival than conventional 5-FU alone, without severe toxicity. PMID:8562173

  19. Detection Rate, Distribution, Clinical and Pathological Features of Colorectal Serrated Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hai-Long; Chen, Xue; Du, Shao-Chun; Song, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Xu, Meng-Que; Wang, Si-Nan; Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal serrated polyp is considered as histologically heterogeneous lesions with malignant potential in western countries. However, few Asian studies have investigated the comprehensive clinical features of serrated polyps in symptomatic populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the features of colorectal serrated polyps in a Chinese symptomatic population. Methods: Data from all consecutive symptomatic patients were documented from a large colonoscopy database and were analyzed. Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis were used for the data processing. Results: A total of 9191 (31.7%) patients were detected with at least one colorectal polyp. The prevalence of serrated polyps was 0.53% (153/28,981). The proportions of hyperplastic polyp (HP), sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P), and traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) of all serrated polyps were 41.2%, 7.2%, and 51.6%, respectively, which showed a lower proportion of HP and SSA/P and a higher proportion of TSA. Serrated polyps appeared more in males and elder patients while there was no significant difference in the subtype distribution in gender and age. The proportions of large and proximal serrated polyps were 13.7% (21/153) and 46.4% (71/153), respectively. In total, 98.9% (89/90) serrated adenomas were found with dysplasia. Moreover, 14 patients with serrated polyps were found with synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia, and large serrated polyps (LSPs) (odds ratio: 3.446, 95% confidence interval: 1.010–11.750, P < 0.05), especially large HPs, might have an association with synchronous advanced neoplasia (AN). Conclusions: The overall detection rate of colorectal serrated polyps in Chinese symptomatic patient population was low, and distribution pattern of three subtypes is different from previous reports. Moreover, LSPs, especially large HPs, might be associated with an increased risk of synchronous AN. PMID:27748334

  20. A phase II study of capecitabine and lapatinib in advanced refractory colorectal adenocarcinoma: A Wisconsin Oncology Network study

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel; Jumonville, Alcee; Schelman, William R; Mulkerin, Daniel; Lubner, Sam; Richter, Katie; Winterle, Natalie; Wims, Mary Beth; Dietrich, Leah; Winkler, J. Mitchell; Volk, Michael; Kim, KyungMann; Holen, Kyle D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prognosis remains poor after progression on first-line chemotherapy for colorectal adenocarcinoma, and inactivation of the EGFR pathway with monoclonal antibodies is an effective treatment strategy in selected patients with metastatic disease. Lapatinib is an oral EGFR and HER-2 dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has not shown significant activity in metastatic colorectal cancer. However, lapatinib may act synergistically with capecitabine in anticancer effects. Methods This was an open-label, non-randomized phase II study of lapatinib 1,250 mg orally daily and capecitabine 2,000 mg/m2 by mouth split into twice-daily dosing for 14 days of a 21 days cycle. Inclusion criteria included metastatic or locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum with progression by RECIST on or within six months of receiving a fluoridopyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-containing regimen. Prior EGFR monoclonal antibody was permitted. K-ras testing was not routinely performed and was not a part of the study protocol. Results Twenty nine patients (16 M; 13 F) were enrolled in this study. There were no complete or partial responses. 41.4% of patients achieved stable disease as a best response. Median overall survival was 6.8 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 22%, and median progression-free survival was 2.1 months. The combination produced few grade 3 and no grade 4 toxicities. No grade 3 toxicity occurred in more than 10% of patients. Conclusions Although capecitabine and lapatinib is well tolerated, it is not an effective regimen in patients with refractory colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:22811876

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  2. Current targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Andrew; O’Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, John; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Treatment strategies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have undergone dramatic changes in the past decade and despite improved patient outcomes, there still exist areas for continued development. The introduction of targeted agents has provided clinicians with additional treatment options in mCRC, however, results have been mixed at best. These novel therapies were designed to interfere with specific molecules involved in the cellular carcinogenesis pathway and ultimately deliver a more focused treatment. Currently, their use in mCRC has been limited primarily as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy regimens. This review explores the relevant cell-signaling networks in colorectal cancer, provides focus on the current targeted agent armamentarium approved for use in mCRC and explores the usefulness of predictive mCRC biomarkers. PMID:27482287

  3. Germline variation in NCF4, an innate immunity gene, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Bríd M.; Zanetti, Krista A.; Robles, Ana I.; Schetter, Aaron J.; Goodman, Julie; Hayes, Richard B.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Gunter, Marc J.; Yeager, Meredith; Burdette, Laurie; Berndt, Sonja I.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal adenoma and cancer; however, few key inflammatory genes mediating this relationship have been identified. In this study, we investigated the association of germline variation in innate immunity genes in relation to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Our study was based on the analysis of samples collected from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We investigated the association between 196 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 20 key innate immunity genes with risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer in 719 adenoma cases, 481 cancer cases and 719 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After Bonferroni correction, the AG/GG genotype of rs5995355, which is upstream of NCF4, was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 2.43, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.73 – 3.39; P<0.0001). NCF4 is part of the NAPDH complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and the innate immune response. While not definitive, our analyses suggest that the variant allele does not affect expression of NCF4, but rather modulates activity of the NADPH complex. Additional studies on the functional consequences of rs5995355 in NCF4 may help to clarify the mechanistic link between inflammation and colorectal cancer. PMID:23982929

  4. Derivation and validation of a prediction rule for estimating advanced colorectal neoplasm risk in average-risk Chinese.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan-Cai; Yu, En-Da; Xiao, Yi; Bai, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Xing; He, Li-Ping; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Jiang, Xue-Liang; Xu, Hui-Min; Fan, Hong; Ge, Zhi-Zheng; Lv, Nong-Hua; Huang, Zhi-Gang; Li, You-Ming; Ma, Shu-Ren; Chen, Jie; Li, Yan-Qing; Xu, Jian-Ming; Xiang, Ping; Yang, Li; Lin, Fu-Lin; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2012-03-15

    No prediction rule is currently available for advanced colorectal neoplasms, defined as invasive cancer, an adenoma of 10 mm or more, a villous adenoma, or an adenoma with high-grade dysplasia, in average-risk Chinese. In this study between 2006 and 2008, a total of 7,541 average-risk Chinese persons aged 40 years or older who had complete colonoscopy were included. The derivation and validation cohorts consisted of 5,229 and 2,312 persons, respectively. A prediction rule was developed from a logistic regression model and then internally and externally validated. The prediction rule comprised 8 variables (age, sex, smoking, diabetes mellitus, green vegetables, pickled food, fried food, and white meat), with scores ranging from 0 to 14. Among the participants with low-risk (≤3) or high-risk (>3) scores in the validation cohort, the risks of advanced neoplasms were 2.6% and 10.0% (P < 0.001), respectively. If colonoscopy was used only for persons with high risk, 80.3% of persons with advanced neoplasms would be detected while the number of colonoscopies would be reduced by 49.2%. The prediction rule had good discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.74, 95% confidence interval: 0.70, 0.78) and calibration (P = 0.77) and, thus, provides accurate risk stratification for advanced neoplasms in average-risk Chinese. PMID:22328705

  5. A Phase I Study of EKB-569 in Combination with Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laheru, Dan; Croghan, Gary; Bukowski, Ronald; Rudek, Michelle; Messersmith, Wells; Erlichman, Charles; Pelley, Robert; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross; Boni, Joseph; Abbas, Richat; Martins, Patricia; Zacharchuk, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), characterize the principal toxicities, and assess the pharmacokinetics of EKB-569, an oral selective irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, in combination with capecitabine in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Experimental Design Patients were treated with EKB-569 daily for 21days and capecitabine twice daily for14 days of a 21-day cycle. The dose levels of EKB-569 (mg/day) and capecitabine (mg/m2 twice daily) assessed were 25/750, 50/750, 50/1,000 and 75/1,000. An expanded cohort was enrolled at the MTD to better study toxicity and efficacy. Samples of plasma were collected to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the agents. Treatment efficacy was assessed every other cycle. Results A total of 37 patients, the majority of whom had prior chemotherapy, received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. Twenty patients were treated at the MTD, 50 mg EKB-569, daily and 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea and rash. No patients had complete or partial responses but 48% had stable disease. The conversion of capecitabine to 5-fluorouracil was higher for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine (321 ± 151 ng*h/mL) than for capecitabine alone (176 ± 62 ng*hours/mL; P = 0.0037). Conclusion In advanced colorectal cancer, 50 mg EKB-569 daily can be safely combined with 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice a day. A statistically significant increase in plasma levels of 5-fluorouracil for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine may be due to the single-dose versus multiple-dose exposure difference, variability in exposure or a potential drug interaction. PMID:18765554

  6. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  7. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    procedure. Efforts to improve the practice of colonoscopy will be described. Another limitation of the current practice is the inability to detect polypoid neoplasia that is hidden from view under white light imaging by the natural folds that occur within the colon. A device to overcome this limitation will also be described. Efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening (and thereby decrease the death rate of this second leading cause of cancer death in the United States) are progressing in many arenas. The researcher, basic or clinical, should maintain an up to date overview of the field and how each new technological advance is likely to have a role in the screening and early detection of colorectal cancer.

  8. Prognostic impact and the relevance of PTEN copy number alterations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Price, Timothy J; Hardingham, Jennifer E; Lee, Chee K; Townsend, Amanda R; Wrin, Joseph W; Wilson, Kate; Weickhardt, Andrew; Simes, Robert J; Murone, Carmel; Tebbutt, Niall C

    2013-06-01

    Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression may be prognostic in colorectal cancer (CRC) and may have a correlation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression via hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) alpha, and the PI3K/mTOR pathways. We therefore have explored the prognostic association of PTEN loss and the potential that PTEN loss may be predictive of outcome with bevacizumab. Patients enrolled in the AGITG MAX trial, a randomized Phase III trial of capecitabine (C) +/- bevacizumab (B) (+/- mitomycin C [M]) with available tissues were analyzed for PTEN expression (loss vs. no loss) as assessed using a Taqman® copy number assay (CNA). Of the original 471 patients enrolled, tissues from 302 (64.1%) patients were analyzed. PTEN loss was observed in 38.7% of patients. There was no relationship between PTEN loss and KRAS or BRAF mutation. PTEN status was not prognostic for progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in multivariate analyses adjusting for other baseline factors; loss versus no loss PFS hazard ratio (HR) 0.9 (0.7-1.16), OS HR 1.04 (0.79-1.38). PTEN was not prognostic when assessed by KRAS and BRAF status. By using the comparison of C versus CB+CBM, PTEN status was not significantly predictive of the effectiveness of B for PFS or OS. PTEN status was not prognostic for survival in advanced colorectal cancer, irrespective of KRAS or BRAF status. PTEN status did not significantly predict different benefit with bevacizumb therapy.

  9. Therapeutic targeting of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway: novel targeted therapies and advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the USA, and more effective treatment of CRC is therefore needed. Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this malignancy have led to the development of novel molecule-targeted therapies. Among the most recent classes of targeted therapies being developed are inhibitors targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. As one of the most frequently deregulated pathways in several human cancers, including CRC, aberrant PI3K signaling plays an important role in the growth, survival, motility and metabolism of cancer cells. Targeting this pathway therefore has considerable potential to lead to novel and more effective treatments for CRC. Preclinical and early clinical studies have revealed the potential efficacy of drugs that target PI3K signaling for the treatment of CRC. However, a major challenge that remains is to study these agents in phase III clinical trials to see whether these early successes translate into better patient outcomes. In this review we focus on providing an up-to-date assessment of our current understanding of PI3K signaling biology and its deregulation in the molecular pathogenesis of CRC. Advances in available agents and challenges in targeting the PI3K signaling pathway in CRC treatment will be discussed and placed in the context of the currently available therapies for CRC. PMID:22973417

  10. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Results Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network

  11. Risk Factors of Advanced Adenoma in Small and Diminutive Colorectal Polyp

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to review the clinicopathological characteristics of diminutive (≤ 5 mm) and small polyps (> 5 mm but < 10 mm) and to evaluate the risk factors of advanced adenoma for polyps of diameter < 10 mm in the colon. The medical records of 4,711 patients who underwent first colonoscopy at outpatient clinics or health promotion center were reviewed retrospectively. We analyzed the presence and risk factors of advanced adenoma, which was defined as a villous or tubulovillous polyp, high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma histologically. Total 5,058 polyps were detected in the 4,711 patients, and 93.0% (4,704/5,058) polyps were < 10 mm in size. Among them, advanced adenoma was noted in 0.6% (28/4,704) with a villous component in 19, high-grade dysplasia in 3, and adenocarcinoma in 6. Advanced and non-advanced adenomas differed significantly in age group, gender, and polyp size. Multivariate analysis showed that an advanced age (> 65 years), a male gender, and a polyp size of > 5 mm were risk factors of advanced adenoma. The incidence of advanced adenoma in polyps of < 10 mm was 0.6%. Polyp size, male gender, and age of > 65 years are independent risk factors of advanced adenoma. PMID:27510386

  12. A phase II randomised trial of 5-fluorouracil with or without interferon alpha-2a in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Piga, A.; Cascinu, S.; Latini, L.; Marcellini, M.; Bavosi, M.; Acito, L.; Bascioni, R.; Giustini, L.; Francini, G.; Pancotti, A.; Rossi, G.; Del Papa, M.; Carle, F.; Cellerino, R.

    1996-01-01

    With the association of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and alpha-interferon (IFN), objective responses as high as 26 63% have been reported in untreated patients with advanced colorectal cancer. However, grade 3-4 toxicity has also been reported. We have conducted a prospective phase II randomised study comparing 5-FU to 5-FU + IFN, to investigate whether the addition of IFN to a weekly 5-FU regimen devoid of significant toxicity used at our institutions could improve the effectiveness of 5-FU while maintaining acceptable toxicity. Patients with histologically proven advanced colorectal carcinoma were randomised to receive 5-FU 500 mg m-2 intravenous (i.v.) bolus on days 1-5 followed by 5-FU 500 mg m-2 i.v. bolus weekly from day 15, with or without IFN alpha-2a intramuscularly (i.m.) 1.5 mU daily on days 6-12 and 3 mU i.m. daily thereafter. The treatment was administered on an outpatient basis. Response was evaluated every 3 months, and treatment continued until progression or after two consecutive judgements of stable disease. Response rate was the main end point of the study. Of 141 patients eligible, 72 were randomised to 5-FU alone (arm A) and 69 to 5-FU + IFN (arm B). Responses were 9/72 (12.5%) in arm A and 6/69 (8.7%) in arm B; complete responses were three in arm A and two in arm B. Progression-free survival (median 4 months) and survival (median 12 months) were identical in the two arms. Toxicity was almost absent in arm A and moderate in arm B, represented mainly by haematological toxicity (usually leucopenia). In conclusion, overall survival was good in both arms of treatment and toxicity was moderate. While the response rate with 5-FU alone was in accord with the literature data, response to 5-FU + IFN was lower than expected. At least at this dosage and schedule, the association of 5-FU and IFN is no better than 5-FU alone and is of no clinical interest. PMID:8826868

  13. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  14. Continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil with alpha 2b interferon for advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, J. E.; Hulse, P.; Lorigan, P.; Jayson, G.; Scarffe, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty patients with symptomatic colorectal carcinoma were commenced on treatment with 5-fluorouracil (2.5 g week-1) administered by continuous intravenous infusion and alpha 2b interferon (3 x 10(6) U s.c. three times a week). Six out of 30 patients (20%) achieved a partial response. Three patients (10%) had stable disease and 21 patients (70%) progressed on treatment. Twenty patients (67%) completed ten or more weeks of treatment. In nine patients, treatment was withdrawn after 2-9 weeks because of disease progression or death. One patient's treatment was interrupted by emergency surgery. The median survival for all patients was 210 days (7 months). The principal side-effects were oral mucositis (12/30 patients), nausea (8/30 patients) and transient diarrhoea (4/30 patients), and initial constitutional symptoms due to alpha 2b interferon. The combination of low-dose continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil and low-dose alpha 2b interferon is well tolerated but has no obvious advantage over alternative infusional regimens using 5-fluorouracil as a single agent. PMID:7599051

  15. High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, David G; Liu, Lina; Brawer, Michael K; Qian, Junqi

    2004-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is considered the most likely precursor of prostatic carcinoma. The only method of detection is biopsy; prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultra-sonography. The incidence of PIN in prostate biopsies averages 9% (range, 4%–16%), representing 115,000 new cases of PIN diagnosed each year in United States. PIN has a high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeated biopsy for concurrent or subsequent invasive carcinoma. Carcinoma will develop in most patients with PIN within 10 years. PIN is associated with progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between normal prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. Androgen deprivation therapy decreases the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that this form of treatment may play a role in chemoprevention. PMID:16985598

  16. Colorectal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Giovanni; Messerini, Luca; Gafà, Roberta; Risio, Mauro

    2011-03-01

    Epithelial colorectal tumors are common pathologic entities. Their histology report should be comprehensive of a series of pathologic parameters essential for the correct clinical management of the patients. Diagnostic histologic criteria of adenomatous, serrated, inflammatory, and hamartomatous polyps and of polyposis syndromes are discussed. In addition, the pathologic features of early and advanced colorectal cancer are described and a checklist is given. Finally, molecular prognostic and predictive factors currently employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer are discussed.

  17. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  18. Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibody–antigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

  19. Associations of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with advanced or multiple colorectal adenoma risks: a colonoscopy-based case-control study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Aesun; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Chang Kim, Byung; Han, Kyung Su; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Jeongseon; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2011-09-01

    The associations between alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking habits and the risk for colorectal adenomatous polyps according to the detailed clinical information about polyps were assessed in a large colonoscopy-based study. The study enrolled participants who visited the National Cancer Center of the Republic of Korea for cancer screening between April 2007 and April 2009. In 1,242 newly diagnosed colorectal adenoma patients and 3,019 polyp-free controls, past smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.65) and current smokers (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.37, 2.11) had increased risks for adenomas compared with nonsmokers. Cigarette smoking conferred an even higher risk for advanced adenomas and 3 or more adenomas than for low-risk adenomas or a single adenoma. Dose-response relations were observed among the daily number of cigarettes smoked, the duration of smoking, the pack-years of smoking, and the risk for adenomas. A longer duration of alcohol consumption was associated with a higher risk for advanced adenomas (for >28 years of consumption: OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.64) and 3 or more adenomas (OR = 2.19, 95% CI: 1.27, 3.76). In conclusion, cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption play roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, and the association differs by the clinical features of the adenomas.

  20. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  1. Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi; Keku, Temitope O.; Martin, Christopher; Galanko, Joseph; Woosley, John T.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Satia, Jessie A.; Halabi, Susan; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The association between obesity and colorectal neoplasia may be mediated by inflammation. Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are elevated in the obese. Adipose tissue can produce and release the inflammatory cytokines that are potentially procarcinogenic. We examined circulating levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in relation to risk factors and the prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Plasma levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α were quantified in 873 participants (242 colorectal adenoma cases and 631 controls) in a colonoscopy-based cross-sectional study conducted between 1998 and 2002. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate associations between levels of inflammatory cytokines, colorectal adenomas, and known risk factors. Several known risk factors for colorectal neoplasia were associated with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines such as older age, current smoking, and increasing adiposity. The prevalence of colorectal adenomas was associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, and to a lesser degree, with CRP. For IL-6, adjusted odds ratios for colorectal adenomas were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18–2.68) for the second highest plasma level, and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.24– 2.74) for the highest level compared with the reference level. A similar association was found with TNF-α, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.54 (95% CI: 1.02–2.33) and 1.65 (95% CI: 1.09–2.50), respectively. Our findings indicate that inflammation might be involved in the early development of colorectal neoplasia, and suggest that systemic inflammatory cytokines might be an indicator of obesity and other risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:18172326

  2. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; English, J.; Colston, K. W.; Menday, P.; Moller, S.; Coombes, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:9662243

  3. Effect of combined folic acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 on colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) act in concert in the one-carbon metabolism and may protect against colorectal neoplasia. We examined the effect of combined B-vitamin treatment on the occurrence of colorectal adenoma. The Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study was a rand...

  4. Capecitabine (Xeloda) improves medical resource use compared with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin in a phase III trial conducted in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Twelves, C; Boyer, M; Findlay, M; Cassidy, J; Weitzel, C; Barker, C; Osterwalder, B; Jamieson, C; Hieke, K

    2001-03-01

    Standard therapy for advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer consists of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin (5-FU/LV) administered intravenously (i.v.). Capecitabine (Xeloda), an oral fluoropyrimidine carbamate which is preferentially activated by thymidine phosphorylase in tumour cells, mimics continuous 5-FU and is a recently developed alternative to i.v. 5-FU/LV. The choice of oral rather than intravenous treatment may affect medical resource use because the two regimens do not require the same intensity of medical intervention for drug administration, and have different toxicity profiles. Here we examine medical resource use in the first-line treatment of colorectal cancer patients with capecitabine compared with those receiving the Mayo Clinic regimen of 5-FU/LV. In a prospective, randomised phase III clinical trial, 602 patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer recruited from 59 centres worldwide were randomised to treatment with either capecitabine or the Mayo regimen of 5-FU/LV. In addition to clinical efficacy and safety endpoints, data were collected on hospital visits required for drug administration, hospital admissions, and drugs and unscheduled consultations with physicians required for the treatment of adverse events. Capecitabine treatment in comparison to 5-FU/LV in advanced colorectal carcinoma resulted in superior response rates (26.6% versus 17.9%, P=0.013) and improved safety including less stomatitis and myelosuppression. Capecitabine patients required substantially fewer hospital visits for drug administration than 5-FU/LV patients. Medical resource use analysis showed that patients treated with capecitabine spent fewer days in hospital for the management of treatment related adverse events than did patients treated with 5-FU/LV. In addition, capecitabine reduced the requirement for expensive drugs, in particular antimicrobials fluconazole and 5-HT3-antagonists to manage adverse events. As anticipated with an oral home-based therapy

  5. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  6. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  7. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  8. Colorectal dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease: a clinicopathologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew D; Riddell, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    Surveillance for neoplasia in colitis is the most challenging diagnostic colonoscopic procedure. The detection and treatment of colorectal dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease remain problematic to the point that unsuspected colorectal cancers (CRCs) are still identified. Excellent bowel preparation and use of high-resolution colonoscopes with chromoendoscopy facilitate the detection and characterization of subtle neoplasia. This approach is superior to taking random biopsy specimens and should be the standard of care for surveillance but requires adequate training. Suspicious lesions should be assessed carefully and described using objective terminology. The terms dysplasia-associated lesions/masses and flat dysplasia are best avoided because they may be open to misinterpretation. Most suspicious lesions detected during surveillance can be removed endoscopically, precluding the need for surgery. Nevertheless, endotherapy in colitis can be difficult as a result of underlying inflammation and scarring. Lesions that are not endoscopically resectable need to be removed surgically, although the possibility that some lesions might be amenable to local resection (including lymphadenectomy) rather than subtotal colectomy may need to be re-evaluated. Despite surveillance programs, patients still present clinically with CRC. This may occur because lesions are missed (possibly because of the failure to use optimal techniques), lesions are not adequately removed, patients fail to return for colonoscopy, or CRCs arise rapidly in mucosa that is minimally dysplastic and the CRCs are not recognized as being potentially invasive even on biopsy. Future advances in, for example, stool DNA assays, use of confocal endomicroscopy, or use of endoscopic ultrasound, may help in the identification of high-risk patients and the assessment of dysplastic lesions.

  9. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin CS; Ching, Jessica YL; Chan, Victor CW; Sung, Joseph JY

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  10. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  11. A Phase I Trial to Evaluate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity of Cetuximab and Lenalidomide in Advanced Colorectal and Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Erin M; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Mo, Xiaokui; Trikha, Prashant; Davis, Melanie; Paul, Bonnie; Grever, Michael; Carson, William E; Otterson, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    mAbs can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) via the innate immune system's ability to recognize mAb-coated cancer cells and activate immune effector cells. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent with the capacity to stimulate immune cell cytokine production and ADCC activity. This phase I trial evaluated the combination of cetuximab with lenalidomide for the treatment of advanced colorectal and head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). This trial included patients with advanced colorectal cancer or HNSCC. Treatment consisted of cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) i.v. every two weeks with lenalidomide given orally days 1-21 on a 28-day cycle. Three dose levels of lenalidomide were evaluated (15, 20, 25 mg). Correlative studies included measurement of ADCC, FcγRIIIA polymorphism genotyping, measurement of serum cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of immune cell subtypes. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (19 colorectal cancer, 3 HNSCC). Fatigue was the only dose-limiting toxicity. One partial response was observed and 8 patients had stable disease at least 12 weeks. The recommended phase II dose is cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) with lenalidomide 25 mg daily, days 1-21. Correlative studies demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in natural killer cytotoxic activity with increasing doses of lenalidomide. Cetuximab and lenalidomide were well tolerated. There was a lenalidomide dose-dependent increase in ADCC with higher activity in patients enrolled in cohort 3 than those enrolled in cohorts 1/2. Although response was not a primary endpoint, there was evidence of antitumor activity for the combination therapy. Further investigation of lenalidomide as an immunomodulator in solid tumors is warranted. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2244-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27458141

  12. Quantitative proteomics investigation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Reimel, Beth Ann; Crispin, David A.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Cooke, Kelly; Coleman, Joshua F.; Lane, Zhaoli; Bronner, Mary P.; Goodlett, David R.; McIntosh, Martin; Traverso, William; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer are usually diagnosed at late stages, when the disease is incurable. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 3, is believed to be the immediate precursor lesion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and would be an ideal stage to diagnose patients, when intervention and cure are possible and patients are curable. In this study, we used quantitative proteomics to identify dysregulated proteins in PanIN 3 lesions. Altogether, over 200 dysregulated proteins were identified in the PanIN 3 tissues, with a minimum of a 1.75 fold change compared to the proteins in normal pancreas. These dysregulated PanIN 3 proteins play roles in cell motility, the inflammatory response, the blood clotting cascade, the cell cycle and its regulation, and protein degradation. Further network analysis of the proteins identified c-MYC as an important regulatory protein in PanIN 3 lesions. Finally, three of the overexpressed proteins, laminin beta-1, galectin-1, and actinin-4 were validated by IHC analysis. All three of these proteins were overexpressed in the stroma or ductal epithelial cells of advanced PanIN lesions, as well as in pancreatic cancer tissue. Our findings suggest that these three proteins may be useful as biomarkers for advanced PanIN and pancreatic cancer if further validated. The dysregulated proteins identified in this study may assist in the selection of candidates for future development of biomarkers for detecting early and curable pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:19373808

  13. Neoplasia: An Anniversary of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2007-01-01

    This issue marks the 10th year anniversary of Neoplasia where we have seen exciting growth on the impact that Neoplasia has had on cancer research worldwide. Neoplasia was founded in 1999 at which time manuscripts were accepted through e-mail. In 2000, Neoplasia became the first journal to offer web-based online manuscript submission and peer-review using a custom-designed application JournalSoft. Now, the use of web-based manuscript processing has become an industry standard as it provides authors with a rapid and useful dialog exchange for improving the quality of the science and the overall speed of the review process. Moreover, during the past 10 years, the Internet has experienced a massive growth of a complex global grid of now over an estimated 1.2 billion Internet users which have resulted in a major shift in the medium of scientific communication for scholarly publishing. Neoplasia continues to evolve with the technology and has implemented a rapid time-to-publication schedule to continue dissemination of published cancer research findings quickly to the scientific community.

  14. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 in colorectal cancer family-risk population screening

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Chiara, Loretta De; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Castro, Inés; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is related to tumour development and progression in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its utility as biomarker has been suggested. The aim of our study was to measure serum MMP-9 in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients, and to analyse its diagnostic accuracy for the detection of advanced neoplasia (AN: advanced adenomas and CRC). Additionally, we compared its diagnostic capability with the most used non-invasive faecal immunochemical test (FIT). Serum MMP-9 was quantified by ELISA in 516 asymptomatic individuals that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT. MMP-9 levels were significantly related to age and gender and therefore the concentration was corrected by these confounders. Corrected MMP-9 (cMMP-9) levels were higher in individuals with advanced adenomas (AA; p-value = 0.029) and AN (p-value = 0.056) compared to individuals with no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated cMMP-9 concentration was associated with more severe characteristics of adenomas (number of lesions, size and histology). Nevertheless, the diagnostic accuracy of cMMP-9 was considerably lower than that of FIT for identifying AA (22.64% vs. 47.17% sensitivity, 90% specificity) or AN (19.30% vs. 52.63% sensitivity, 90% specificity). According to our results, serum MMP-9 cannot be considered of utility for the diagnosis of AN in CRC family-risk population screening. PMID:26264519

  15. [Overview of current modalities of colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Kajzrlíková, Ivana Mikoviny; Vítek, Petr

    2016-04-01

    There are one-step and two-steps programs for colorectal cancer screening. The aim of all screening examinations is to detect early stage of the disease in asymptomatic patient. The aim of this article is actual review of current screening modalities such as fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoideoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, blood-based tests and stool DNA tests. Colonoscopy still remains the gold standard for detection of colorectal neoplasias. In majority of countries worldwide programs for colorectal cancer screening are based on immunochemical fecal occult blood test followed by colonoscopy when positive.

  16. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  17. Gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia: Vienna revisited.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M F

    2002-07-01

    International consensus meetings in Padova and Vienna have attempted to rationalise the grading and classification of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia (GEN). With its minor adjustments, the Vienna classification of GEN seeks to be more closely in tune with patient management and it is hoped that it is not seen as fiddling around with terms but as a genuine contribution to patient care.

  18. Performance of the Fecal Immunochemical Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening Using Different Stool-Collection Devices: Preliminary Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye Young; Suh, Mina; Baik, Hyung Won; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Lee, Chan Wha; Oh, Jae Hwan; Lee, You Kyoung; Han, Dong Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We are in the process of conducting a randomized trial to determine whether compliance with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for colorectal cancer screening differs according to the stool-collection method. This study was an interim analysis of the performance of two stool-collection devices (sampling bottle vs conventional container). Methods In total, 1,701 individuals (age range, 50 to 74 years) were randomized into the sampling bottle group (intervention arm) or the conventional container group (control arm). In both groups, we evaluated the FIT positivity rate, the positive predictive value for advanced neoplasia, and the detection rate for advanced neoplasia. Results The FIT positivity rates were 4.1% for the sampling bottles and 2.0% for the conventional containers; these values were significantly different. The positive predictive values for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 11.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.4 to 25.6) and 12.0% (95% CI, −0.7 to 24.7), respectively. The detection rates for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 4.5 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 2.0 to 11.0) and 2.4 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 0.0 to 5.0), respectively. Conclusions The impact of these findings on FIT screening performance was unclear in this interim analysis. This impact should therefore be evaluated in the final analysis following the final enrollment period. PMID:27282262

  19. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  20. Ablative Therapies for Colorectal Polyps and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.; Nurkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques are gaining popularity in the management of colorectal polyps and occasionally superficial cancers. While their use is in many times palliative, they have proven to be curative in carefully selected patients with polyps or malignancies, with less morbidity than radical resection. However, one should note that data supporting local and ablative therapies for colorectal cancer is scarce and may be subject to publication bias. Therefore, for curative intent, these techniques should only be considered in highly select cases as higher rates of local recurrences have also been reported. The aim of this review is to explain the different modalities of local and ablative therapies specific to colorectal neoplasia and explain the indications and circumstances where they have been most successful. PMID:25089281

  1. Population screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    Each year in the UK, around 16,000 people die from colorectal cancer. At disease presentation, around 55% of people have advanced cancer that has spread to lymph nodes, metastasised to other organs or is so locally advanced that surgery is unlikely to be curative (Dukes' stage C or D). Overall 5-year survival for colorectal cancer in the UK is around 47-51% (compared to 64% in the USA), but only 7% at most in those presenting with metastatic disease. These facts underlie the current introduction of national bowel screening programmes in the UK. Here we assess the role of screening of the general population in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. We do not consider the screening arrangements needed for high-risk populations, including those with inflammatory bowel disease or a strong family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:17009566

  2. The Microbiome and Colorectal Neoplasia – Environmental Modifiers of Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, L.E.; Bresalier, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of colon cancer is complex, yet it is undoubtedly impacted by intestinal microbiota. Whether the contribution to colon carcinogenesis is generated through the presence of an overall dysbiosis or by specific pathogens is still a matter for debate. However, it is apparent that interactions between microbiota and the host are mediated by a variety of processes including signaling cascades, the immune system, host metabolism, and regulation of gene transcription. To fully appreciate the role of microbiota in colon carcinogenesis it will be necessary to expand efforts to define populations in niche environments, such as colonic crypts, explore cross talk between the host and the microbiota, and more completely define the metabolomic profile of the microbiota. These efforts must be pursued with appreciation that dietary substrates and other environmental modifiers mediate changes in the microbiota as well as their metabolism and functional characteristics. PMID:23949252

  3. Malignant Neoplasia of the Sex Skin in 2 Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Amanda P; Magden, Elizabeth R; Buchl, Stephanie J; Baze, Wallace B

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous malignant neoplasia within the sex skin of aged female chimpanzees. In both cases, the initial presentation resembled nonhealing traumatic wounds to the sex skin, with different degrees of infection, ulceration, and tissue necrosis. Histopathology of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in one case and of adenocarcinoma with metastasis in the other. Advanced age and previous trauma likely contributed to the development of the neoplasias in both cases; long-term sun exposure may also have contributed to the development of the squamous cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, these 2 cases represent the first reports of sex skin neoplasia in chimpanzees. PMID:27053571

  4. Malignant Neoplasia of the Sex Skin in 2 Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Beck, Amanda P; Magden, Elizabeth R; Buchl, Stephanie J; Baze, Wallace B

    2016-04-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous malignant neoplasia within the sex skin of aged female chimpanzees. In both cases, the initial presentation resembled nonhealing traumatic wounds to the sex skin, with different degrees of infection, ulceration, and tissue necrosis. Histopathology of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in one case and of adenocarcinoma with metastasis in the other. Advanced age and previous trauma likely contributed to the development of the neoplasias in both cases; long-term sun exposure may also have contributed to the development of the squamous cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, these 2 cases represent the first reports of sex skin neoplasia in chimpanzees. PMID:27053571

  5. Dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis-associated neoplasia: a promising model for the development of chemopreventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Margie Lee; Cooper, Harry Stanley; Chang, Wen-Chi Lee

    2007-09-01

    Individuals diagnosed with ulcerative colitis face a significantly increased risk of developing colorectal dysplasia and cancer during their lifetime. To date, little attention has been given to the development of a chemopreventive intervention for this high-risk population. The mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) - induced colitis represents an excellent preclinical system in which to both characterize the molecular events required for tumor formation in the presence of inflammation and assess the ability of select agents to inhibit this process. Cyclic administration of DSS in drinking water results in the establishment of chronic colitis and the development of colorectal dysplasias and cancers with pathological features that resemble those of human colitis-associated neoplasia. The incidence and multiplicity of lesions observed varies depending on the mouse strain used (ie, Swiss Webster, C57BL/6J, CBA, ICR) and the dose (0.7%-5.0%) and schedule (1-15 cycles with or without a subsequent recovery period) of DSS. The incidence of neoplasia can be increased and its progression to invasive cancer accelerated significantly by administering DSS in combination with a known colon carcinogen (azoxymethane (AOM), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-1- methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)) or iron. More recent induction of colitis-associated neoplasia in genetically defined mouse strains has provided new insight into the role of specific genes (ie, adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), p53, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Msh2) in the development of colitis-associated neoplasias. Emerging data from chemopreventive intervention studies document the efficacy of several agents in inhibiting DSS-induced neoplasia and provide great promise that colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia is a preventable disease.

  6. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  7. Streptococcus bovis bacteraemia requires rigorous exclusion of colonic neoplasia and endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Beeching, N J; Christmas, T I; Ellis-Pegler, R B; Nicholson, G I

    1985-08-01

    Twelve patients presented to the hospitals of the Auckland Hospital Board with bacteraemia caused by Streptococcus bovis in the years 1979-84. Ten had endocarditis, affecting homograft valves in two cases and the tricuspid valve in one case. Of nine patients who underwent investigation of the large bowel, only one did not have a colorectal tumour. Three had colonic adenocarcinoma and three had colorectal villous adenoma. Two, including a patient with acute hepatic failure from alcoholic cirrhosis, had colonic adenomata. Colonoscopy provided a tissue diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia despite negative radiological studies in three patients. Bacteraemia due to S. bovis should prompt rigorous investigation to exclude both endocarditis and tumours of the large bowel.

  8. Plasma miR-601 and miR-760 Are Novel Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qifeng; Huang, Zhaohui; Ni, Shujuan; Xiao, Xiuying; Xu, Qinghua; Wang, Lisha; Huang, Dan; Tan, Cong; Sheng, Weiqi; Du, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic screen methods are urgently needed to improve its survival rates. Stable circulating microRNA offers unique opportunities for the early diagnosis of several diseases, including cancers. Our aim has been to find new plasma miRNAs that can be used as biomarkers for the detection of CRC. Methodology/Principal Findings According to the results of miRNA profiling performed on pooling plasma samples form 10 CRC patients or 10 healthy controls, a panel of miRNAs (hsa-miR-10a, -19a, -22*, -24, -92a, 125a-5p, -141, -150, -188-3p, -192, -210, -221, -224*, -376a, -425*, -495, -572, -601, -720, -760 and hsa-let-7a, -7e) were deregulated in CRC plasma with fold changes >5. After large scale validation by qRT-PCR performed on another 191 independent individuals (90 CRC, 43 advanced adenoma and 58 healthy participants), we found that the levels of plasma miR-601 and miR-760 were significantly decreased in colorectal neoplasia (carcinomas and advanced adenomas) compared with healthy controls. ROC curve analysis showed that plasma miR-601 and miR-760 were of significant diagnostic value for advanced neoplasia. These two miRNAs together yield an AUC of 0.792 with 83.3% sensitivity and 69.1% specificity for separating CRC from normal controls, and yield an AUC of 0.683 with 72.1% sensitivity and 62.1% specificity in discriminating advanced adenomas from normal controls. Conclusions/Significance Plasma miR-601 and miR-760 can potentially serve as promising non-invasive biomarkers for the early detection of CRC. PMID:22970209

  9. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw L; Stockley, Tracy L; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Siu, Lillian L

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients' clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  10. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw L.; Stockley, Tracy L.; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients’ clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics.

  11. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw L.; Stockley, Tracy L.; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients’ clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  12. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  13. Marine mammal neoplasia: a review.

    PubMed

    Newman, S J; Smith, S A

    2006-11-01

    A review of the published literature indicates that marine mammal neoplasia includes the types and distributions of tumors seen in domestic species. A routine collection of samples from marine mammal species is hampered, and, hence, the literature is principally composed of reports from early whaling expeditions, captive zoo mammals, and epizootics that affect larger numbers of animals from a specific geographic location. The latter instances are most important, because many of these long-lived, free-ranging marine mammals may act as environmental sentinels for the health of the oceans. Examination of large numbers of mortalities reveals incidental proliferative and neoplastic conditions and, less commonly, identifies specific malignant cancers that can alter population dynamics. The best example of these is the presumptive herpesvirus-associated metastatic genital carcinomas found in California sea lions. Studies of tissues from St. Lawrence estuary beluga whales have demonstrated a high incidence of neoplasia and produced evidence that environmental contamination with high levels of polychlorinated biphenols and dichlorophenyl trichloroethane might be the cause. In addition, viruses are suspected to be the cause of gastric papillomas in belugas and cutaneous papillomas in Florida manatees and harbor porpoises. While experimental laboratory procedures can further elucidate mechanisms of neoplasia, continued pathologic examination of marine mammals will also be necessary to follow trends in wild populations. PMID:17099143

  14. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  15. Pilot study on workload estimate in breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer in a Medical Oncology Service at Valme hospital.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Grávalos, Cristina; Albanell, Joan; Barnadas, Agustin; Borrega, Pablo; García-Mata, Jesús; Garrido, Pilar; Gonzalez-Flores, Encarnación; Isla, Dolores; Lomas, María; Rodríguez-Lescure, Alvaro; Cruz, Juan Jesus; Alba, Emilio

    2012-11-01

    New advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and the increased incidence and prevalence of this disease have led to an increase in the number and duration of visits in Medical Oncology in the last few years. Based on the functions of a medical oncologist and the time recommended for each work activity established by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), we carried out a pilot study on the three most frequent neoplasias in our country [breast cancer (BC), lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC)], in order to determine the real time each patient requires from a physician and thus establish a recommendation on the number of medical oncologists necessary. Using the actual itinerary of the first 20 patients of 2009 in each of the three neoplasias seen at the Medical Oncology Service of the Virgen de Valme University Hospital, we measured the number of visits, the antineoplastic treatments received, the number of hospital admissions and average length of stay. During the years following the study, these data were estimated based on the natural history of each neoplasia. During the first year, the average time spent by the medical oncologist was 235, 390 and 265 min on each outpatient with BC, LC and CRC, respectively. In hospitalisation, the average oncologist/patient minutes were 40, 360 and 118 for BC, LC and CRC, respectively. Finally, the time spent on each visit or day of hospitalisation was that recommended by the SEOM, achieving an ultimate ratio of 1 oncologist for every 83 first visits.

  16. First-Line Cetuximab Plus Capecitabine in Elderly Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Outcome and Subgroup Analysis According to KRAS Status from a Spanish TTD Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Grávalos, Cristina; Rivera, Fernando; Massuti, Bartomeu; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel; Marcuello, Eugenio; Manzano, José L.; Benavides, Manuel; Hidalgo, Manuel; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Aranda, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Single-agent cetuximab is safe and active in elderly patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). A cetuximab–capecitabine combination has not previously been tested in elderly patients with advanced CRC. Material and Methods. Sixty-six patients with advanced CRC were treated with cetuximab as a 400 mg/m2 i.v. infusion followed by 250 mg/m2 i.v. weekly plus capecitabine at a dose of 1,250 mg/m2 every 12 hours. After the inclusion of 27 patients, the protocol was amended for safety reasons, reducing the dose of capecitabine to 1,000 mg/m2 every 12 hours. Thirty-nine additional patients were treated with the reduced dose of capecitabine. Results. The overall response rate was 31.8%. KRAS status was determined in 58 patients (88%). Fourteen of 29 patients with wild-type KRAS tumors responded (48.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 29.4%–67.5%), compared with six of 29 patients with mutant KRAS tumors (20.7%; 95% CI, 8.0%–39.7%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) interval was 7.1 months. The median PFS interval for patients whose tumors were wild-type KRAS was significantly longer than for those with mutant KRAS tumors (8.4 months versus 6.0 months; p = .024). The high incidence of severe paronychia (29.6%) declined (7.7%) after capecitabine dose adjustment. Conclusions. Cetuximab plus capecitabine at a dose of 1,000 mg/m2 every 12 hours may be an alternative to more aggressive regimens in elderly patients with advanced wild-type KRAS CRC. PMID:22363067

  17. Investigation of human papillomavirus DNA in colorectal carcinomas and adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavuzer, Dilek; Karadayi, Nimet; Salepci, Taflan; Baloglu, Huseyin; Dabak, Resat; Bayramicli, Oya Uygur

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been considered to be an etiological agent for anogenital cancers, such as cervical cancer and possibly a subset of cancers of the aerodigestive tract. The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of human papillomavirus DNA in colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archival tissue samples were used for DNA extraction. One hundred and six colorectal carcinomas and 62 adenomas were screened by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPV DNA with a control group of 49 cervical tissues with invasive cervical carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In the study group, we did not find HPV DNA positivity in any of all the colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. In the control group with cervical lesions, 34 out of 49 (69.4%) samples were positive for the HPV DNA. These results indicated that there was no correlation between HPV infection and colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. PMID:20082157

  18. New concepts in neoplasia as applied to diagnostic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Fenoglio-Preiser, C.M.; Weinstein, R.S.; Kaufman, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Cellular Aspects of Neoplasia; Oncogenes and Cancer; Chromosome and Oncogene Rearrangements in Leukemia and Lymphoma; Ionizing Radiation and Neoplasia; and Papillomaviruses and Neoplasia in Man.

  19. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  20. Fecal Immunochemical Tests Combined With Other Stool Tests for Colorectal Cancer and Advanced Adenoma Detection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Niedermaier, Tobias; Weigl, Korbinian; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite moderate to high detection rates of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) of colorectal cancer (CRC), detection of adenomas remains limited. Further stool tests exist, which are not used in routine practice, such as DNA or RNA markers and protein markers. We aimed at systematically investigating and summarizing evidence for diagnostic performance of combinations of FIT with other stool tests compared with FIT alone in early detection of CRC and its precursors. METHODS: We systematically reviewed studies that evaluated FITs in combination with other stool tests and compared measures of diagnostic accuracy with and without additional stool tests. PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception to May 2015. Reference lists of eligible studies were also screened. Two reviewers extracted data independently. RESULTS: Some of the reports on DNA, RNA, or tissue tests, including tests based on DNA mutations, methylation, and integrity in selected genes as well as microRNA expression, showed some improvements of diagnostic test accuracy. In contrast, so far assessed stool protein markers did generally not lead to substantial improvements in performance of FIT when added to the latter. Many marker combinations were reported only in one study each, and few studies were conducted in a true screening setting. CONCLUSIONS: Several stool markers show potential to improve performance of FITs. However, the results require confirmation in further studies, which should also evaluate the costs and cost-effectiveness of combined screening strategies. PMID:27253514

  1. Measurement of serum antibodies against NY-ESO-1 by ELISA: A guide for the treatment of specific immunotherapy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yu; Huang, Qian-Rong; Zheng, Guang-Shun; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2014-10-01

    NY-ESO-1 has been identified as one of the most immunogenic antigens; thus, is a highly attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. The present study analyzed the expression of serum antibodies (Abs) against NY-ESO-1 in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), with the aim of guiding the treatment of NY-ESO-1-based specific-immunotherapy for these patients. Furthermore, the present study was the first to evaluate the kinetic expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs and investigate the possible influencing factors. A total of 239 serum samples from 155 pathologically confirmed patients with advanced CRC (stages III and IV) were collected. The presence of spontaneous Abs against NY-ESO-1 was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results demonstrated that 24.5% (38/155) of the investigated patients were positive for NY-ESO-1-specific Abs. No statistically significant correlations were identified between the expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs and clinicopathological parameters, including age and gender, location, grading, local infiltration, lymph node status, metastatic status and K-ras mutation status (P>0.05). In 59 patients, the kinetic expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs was analyzed, of which 14 patients were initially positive and 45 patients were initially negative. Notably, 16/59 (27.1%) patients changed their expression status during the study period, and the initially positive patients were more likely to change compared with the initially negative patients (85.7 vs. 8.8%; P<0.001). Therefore, monitoring serum Abs against NY-ESO-1 by ELISA is an easy and feasible method. The high expression rate of NY-ESO-1-specific Abs in CRC patients indicates that measuring the levels of serum Abs against NY-ESO-1 may guide the treatment of NY-ESO-1-based specific immunotherapy for patients with advanced CRC.

  2. BRAF, PIK3CA, and HER2 Oncogenic Alterations According to KRAS Mutation Status in Advanced Colorectal Cancers with Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jiwon; Kwak, Yoonjin; Seo, An Na; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-EGFR antibody–based treatment is an important therapeutic strategy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC); despite this, several mutations—including KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 amplification—are associated with the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies and clinical implications of these genetic alterations in advanced CRC. Methods KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations were determined by Cobas real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 191 advanced CRC patients with distant metastasis. Microsatellite instability (MSI) status was determined by a fragmentation assay and HER2 amplification was assessed by silver in situ hybridization. In addition, KRAS mutations were investigated by the Sanger sequencing method in 97 of 191 CRC cases. Results Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were found in 104 (54.5%), 6 (3.1%), and 25 (13.1%) cases of advanced CRC, respectively. MSI-high status and HER2 amplification were observed in 3 (1.6%) and 16 (8.4%) cases, respectively. PIK3CA mutations were more frequently found in KRAS mutant type (18.3%) than KRAS wild type (6.9%) (P = 0.020). In contrast, HER2 amplifications and BRAF mutations were associated with KRAS wild type with borderline significance (P = 0.052 and 0.094, respectively). In combined analyses with KRAS, BRAF and HER2 status, BRAF mutations or HER2 amplifications were associated with the worst prognosis in the wild type KRAS group (P = 0.004). When comparing the efficacy of detection methods, the results of real time PCR analysis revealed 56 of 97 (57.7%) CRC cases with KRAS mutations, whereas Sanger sequencing revealed 49 cases (50.5%). Conclusions KRAS mutations were found in 54.5% of advanced CRC patients. Our results support that subgrouping using PIK3CA and BRAF mutation or HER2 amplification status, in addition to KRAS mutation status, is helpful for managing advanced CRC patients. PMID

  3. A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Biologic Agents in the First Line Setting for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumachev, Alexander; Yan, Marie; Berry, Scott; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Martinez, Maria C. R.; Shah, Keya; Chan, Kelvin K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRis) and bevacizumab (BEV) are used in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have directly compared their relative efficacy on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Methods We conducted a systematic review of first-line RCTs comparing (1) EGFRis vs. BEV, with chemotherapy in both arms (2) EGFRis + chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone, or (3) BEV + chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone, using Cochrane methodology. Data on and PFS and OS were extracted using the Parmar method. Pairwise meta-analyses and Bayesian network meta-analyses (NMA) were conducted to estimate the direct, indirect and combined PFS and OS hazard ratios (HRs) comparing EGFRis to BEV. Results Seventeen RCTs contained extractable data for quantitative analysis. Combining direct and indirect data using an NMA did not show a statistical difference between EGFRis versus BEV (PFS HR = 1.11 (95% CR: 0.92–1.36) and OS HR = 0.91 (95% CR: 0.75–1.09)). Direct meta-analysis (3 RCTs), indirect (14 RCTs) and combined (17 RCTs) NMA of PFS HRs were concordant and did not show a difference between EGFRis and BEV. Meta-analysis of OS using direct evidence, largely influenced by one trial, showed an improvement with EGFRis therapy (HR = 0.79 (95% CR: 0.65–0.98)), while indirect and combined NMA of OS did not show a difference between EGFRis and BEV Successive inclusions of trials over time in the combined NMA did not show superiority of EGFRis over BEV. Conclusions Our findings did not support OS or PFS benefits of EGFRis over BEV in first-line mCRC. PMID:26474403

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) in combination with 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kho, Yuhan; Jansman, Frank G A; Prins, Nicolaas H; Neef, Cees; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J

    2006-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of oxaliplatin, using a dose regimen of 85 mg/m, are lacking. A PK model may be used in future studies to investigate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and dose limiting toxicity. The purpose of this study was to construct a population PK model to describe platinum (Pt) concentrations in plasma in 33 patients with colorectal cancer. The secondary objective was to determine the relationship between the amount of Pt in 24-hour urine and the amount of Pt in fractionated urine collection periods. Plasma and urine samples were collected from patients during their first oxaliplatin treatment course. Population PK analysis was performed with WinNonMix. The model that best described the Pt concentrations in plasma was a two-compartment PK model. The elimination clearance (CL) and the elimination clearance of the peripheral compartment (CL2) (median +/- SE) were 25.2 +/- 6.3 L/hr and 68 +/- 24.8 L/hr, respectively. The median volume of distribution (V1) was determined to be 41.6 +/- 9.4 L and the median volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) was 452.5 +/- 96.4 L. The relationship between the cumulative amount of Pt in urine in the first 12 hours compared with the amount of Pt in 24 hours urine was reflected by a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.95. The cumulative Pt concentration in urine in the first 10 hours and the first 8 hours compared with 24 hours was reflected by correlation coefficients r2 = 0.93 and r2 = 0.897, respectively. This PK model could be useful in identifying predictors for PK and pharmacodynamic variability to individualize dosing. The results of this study suggest that fractionated urine samples can replace 24-hour urine collection. PMID:16628132

  5. Development of an imaging-guided CEA-pretargeted radionuclide treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: first clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, R; Boerman, O C; Goldenberg, D M; Sharkey, R M; van Herpen, C M L; Franssen, G M; McBride, W J; Chang, C-H; Rossi, E A; van der Graaf, W T A; Oyen, W J G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiolabelled antibody targeting of cancer is limited by slow blood clearance. Pretargeting with a non-radiolabelled bispecific monoclonal antibody (bsMAb) followed by a rapidly clearing radiolabelled hapten peptide improves tumour localisation. The primary goals of this first pretargeting study in patients with the anti-CEACAM5 × anti-hapten (HSG) bsMAb, TF2, and the radiolabelled hapten-peptide, IMP288, were to assess optimal pretargeting conditions and safety in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Different dose schedules were studied in four cohorts of five patients: (1) shortening the interval between the bsMAb and peptide administration (5 days vs 1 day), (2) escalating the TF2 dose (from 75 to 150 mg), and (3) reducing the peptide dose (from 100 to 25 μg). After confirmation of tumour targeting by 111In-IMP288, patients were treated with a bsMAb/177Lu-IMP288 cycle. Results: Rapid and selective tumour targeting of the radiolabelled peptide was visualised within 1 h, with high tumour-to-tissue ratios (>20 at 24 h). Improved tumour targeting was achieved with a 1-day interval between the administration of the bsMAb and the peptide and with the 25-μg peptide dose. High 177Lu-IMP288 doses (2.5–7.4 GBq) were well tolerated, with some manageable TF2 infusion reactions, and transient grades 3–4 thrombocytopaenia in 10% of the patients who received 177Lu-IMP288. Conclusion: This phase I study demonstrates for the first time that pretargeting with bsMAb TF2 and radiolabelled IMP288 in patients with CEA-expressing CRC is feasible and safe. With this pretargeting method, tumours are specifically and rapidly targeted. PMID:23860529

  6. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-09-21

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  7. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  8. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

  9. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current “gold-standard” surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett’s surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett’s mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  10. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current "gold-standard" surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett's surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett's mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  11. [Genetics of Colorectal Tumorigenesis (Possibilities of Testing and Screening Prediction of Hereditary Form of Colorectal Cancer--Lynch Syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Mľkva, I

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries. Understanding the molecular principles of its pathogenesis has recently come into focus of many oncogenetic studies. Colorectal cancer also represents an ideal model for the study of molecular basis of cancerogenesis owing to the wide availability of its precursor lesions and the existence of several notorious genetic predispositions such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome. The classical model of colorectal tumorigenesis, described by Fearon and Vogelstein, suggested the idea of a conventional progression from adenoma to carcinoma. It was based on a careful analysis of mutations occurring within particular stages of carcinogenesis with regards to their stepwise accumulations leading to neoplastic transformation of the colonic epithelium. Recently, new evidence has pointed to an alternative model of colorectal tumorigenesis introducing the concept of serrated precursors. This alternative pathway, known as the serrated pathway, has provided a new perspective on colorectal cancer development. Nowadays, three molecular pathways leading to colorectal tumorigenesis are recognized: 1. the chromosomal instability pathway typified by familial adenomatous polyposis; 2. the mutator pathway characterized by inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes such as in Lynch syndrome or a number of sporadic colorectal cancers; 3. the hypermethylation serrated neoplasia pathway characterized by excessive methylation of some CpG islands in the promoter region of certain genes (positive CpG islands methylator phenotype) (CIMP+).

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized by variable penetrance of medullary thyroid carcinoma(MTC), pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). MEN2 consists of two clinical subtypes, MEN2A and MEN2B. Familial medullary thyroid cancer is now viewed as a phenotypic variant of MEN2A with decreased penetrance for PHEO and PHPT rather than a distinct entity. All subtypes are caused by gain-of-function mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. Recognition of the clinical entity in individuals and families at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation is crucial for the management and prevention of associated malignancies. Recent guidelines released by the American Thyroid Association regarding the management of MTC will be summarized in this chapter.

  13. Update on Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is a histologically well-defined precursor to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. PanINs are remarkably common lesions, particularly in the elderly population. Molecular studies have helped establish the progression of PanIN to invasive cancer, and recently genetically engineered mouse models have been generated that recapitulate the entire spectrum of lesions from precursor to invasive pancreatic cancer. Some PanIN lesions produce lobulocentric atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma, and, when multifocal, this lobulocentric atrophy may be detectable using currently available imaging techniques such as endoscopic ultrasound. The association of acinar-ductal metaplasia with PanIN lesions has led some to hypothesize that PanINs develop from acinar cells that undergo acinar-ductal metaplasia. PMID:18787611

  14. Phase II trial of panitumumab with irinotecan as salvage therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer (TOPIC study)

    PubMed Central

    NISHI, TOMOHIRO; HAMAMOTO, YASUO; NAGASE, MICHITAKA; DENDA, TADAMICHI; YAMAGUCHI, KENSEI; AMAGAI, KENJI; MIYATA, YOSHINORI; YAMANAKA, YASUHIRO; YANAI, KAI; ISHIKAWA, TSUTOMU; KUROKI, YOSHIFUMI; FUJII, HIROFUMI

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical impact of salvage panitumumab with irinotecan for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. The present study conducted a single-arm, multicenter phase II trial for mCRC with skin toxicity prevention program. The subjects were mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS, who showed resistance to fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin and irinotecan. Panitumumab was administered at a dose of 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 60 min, and irinotecan was administered at a dose of 100–180 mg/m2 every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 90 min, depending on the preceding treatment dose. To prevent skin toxicities, a moisturizer was applied and oral antibiotics (100 mg minocycline twice daily) were initiated for 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was the response rate (RR) determined by independent reviewers. Secondary endpoints were the disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS) time, overall survival (OS) time and adverse events. A total of 35 patients were enrolled between October 2010 and March 2012. The median age was 61 years (range, 41–76 years), with 25 male and 10 female patients. The initial irinotecan dose was 150 mg/m2 in 19 patients and 180 mg/m2 in 1 patient. The remaining patients were treated with ≤120 mg/m2. A central review indicated a partial response in 8 patients (22.9%) and stable disease in 6 patients (17.1%), with an RR of 22.9% (95% confidence interval, 12.1–39.0) and a DCR of 40%. The RR of the patients with standard-dose irinotecan (150 or 180 mg/m2) was 30%, although that of low-dose irinotecan (100–120 mg/m2) was 13%. The median PFS time was 2.7 months, and the median OS time was 6.3 months. A grade 3 or above acne-like rash developed in 25.7% of patients. In conclusion, panitumumab and irinotecan as salvage therapy for mCRC KRAS wild-type patients with skin toxicity prevention exhibits limited efficacy. In particular, the effect of low-dose irinotecan with panitumumab appears to be

  15. Depth of colorectal-wall invasion and lymph-node involvement as major outcome factors influencing surgical strategy in patients with advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer with diffuse peritoneal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More information is needed on the anatomopathological outcome variables indicating the appropriate surgical strategy for the colorectal resections often needed during cytoreduction for ovarian cancer. Methods From a phase-II study cohort including 70 patients with primary advanced or recurrent ovarian cancer with diffuse peritoneal metastases treated from November 2000 to April 2009, we selected for this study the 52 consecutive patients who needed colorectal resection. Data collected included type of colorectal resection, peritoneal cancer index (PCI), histopathology (depth of bowel-wall invasion and lymph-node spread), cytoreduction rate and outcome. Correlations were tested between possible prognostic factors and Kaplan-Meier five-year overall and disease-free survival. A Cox multivariate regression model was used to identify independent variables associated with outcome. Results In the 52 patients, the optimal cytoreduction rate was 86.5% (CC0/1). In all patients, implants infiltrated deeply into the bowel wall, in 75% of the cases up to the muscular and mucosal layer. Lymph-node metastases were detected in 50% of the cases; mesenteric nodes were involved in 42.3%. Most patients (52%) had an uneventful postoperative course. Operative mortality was 3.8%. The five-year survival rate was 49.9% and five-year disease-free survival was 36.7%. Cox regression analysis identified as the main prognostic factors completeness of cytoreduction and depth of bowel wall invasion. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the major independent prognostic factors in patients with advanced ovarian cancer needing colorectal resections are completeness of cytoreduction and depth of bowel wall invasion. Surgical management and pathological assessment should be aware of and deal with dual locoregional and mesenteric lymphatic spread. PMID:23497091

  16. Laparoscopic Colorectal Training Gap in Colorectal and Surgical Residents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mark; Williamson, Paul; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an established safe procedure with demonstrated benefits. Proficiency in this specialty correlates with the volume of cases. We examined training in this surgical field for both general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents to determine whether the number of cases needed for proficiency is being realized. Methods: We examined the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Colorectal Surgeons (ABCRS) operative statistics for graduating general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents. Results: Although the number of advanced laparoscopy cases had increased for general surgery residents, there was still a significant gap in case volume between the average number of laparoscopic colorectal operations performed by graduating general surgery residents (21.6) and those performed by graduating colon and rectal surgery residents (81.9) in 2014. Conclusion: There is a gap between general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residency training for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. General surgery residents are not meeting the volume of cases necessary for proficiency in colorectal surgery. This deficit represents a structural difference in training. PMID:27493468

  17. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  18. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms in developed countries and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high index of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient--for whom there are highly effective preventive measures--but also for the patient's relatives, who may carry the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of Lynch's syndrome and serrated polyposis syndrome.

  19. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  20. A Phase II Clinical Study of mFOLFOX6 Plus Bevacizumab as First-line Therapy for Japanese Advanced/Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Tomohiro; Takano, Yoshinao; Denda, Tadamichi; Yasui, Hisateru; Takeda, Koji; Ura, Takashi; Esaki, Taito; Okuyama, Yusuke; Kondo, Ken; Takahashi, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Yasuyuki; Muro, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Objective In Japan, there had been no prospective clinical studies conducted in terms of modified FOLFOX6 + bevacizumab therapy. We performed a post-marketing Phase II multicenter clinical study to examine the efficacy and safety of this regimen as first-line therapy for Japanese patients with advanced/recurrent colorectal cancer. Methods Bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously, and then oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) and levofolinate calcium (200 mg/m2) were infused intravenously over 2 h. Subsequently, a bolus dose of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m2) was injected, followed by infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400 mg/m2) for 46 h. This regimen was repeated every 2 weeks until 24 cycles unless there was disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or patient refusal. The primary end point was the response rate. Results Among the 70 patients enrolled, two patients withdrew the study before treatment, and 68 patients were eligible for analysis of efficacy and safety. The response rate was 51.5% (95% confidence interval: 39.0–63.8%). The median progression-free survival and median overall survival time were 12.6 months (95% confidence interval: 10.4–14.5 months) and 28.5 months [95% confidence interval: 23.1 months–(not applicable)], respectively. There were no treatment-related deaths observed. The most common Grade 3 and 4 adverse events included neutropenia in 35.3% of the patients, peripheral neuropathy in 16.2% and hypertension in 16.2%. All adverse events were manageable and tolerable. The exploratory analysis of polymorphisms of three genes, ERCC1, XPD and GSTP1, did not show any trends in terms of correlation with the efficacy or safety of modified FOLFOX6 + bevacizumab therapy. Conclusions Modified FOLFOX6 + bevacizumab therapy was manageable and tolerable in Japanese patients, achieving a high response rate. PMID:23999770

  1. An internally and externally validated nomogram for predicting the risk of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, W; Uehara, K; Minamimura, K; Tanaka, C; Takii, Y; Miyauchi, H; Sadahiro, S; Fujita, K; Moriwaki, T; Nakamura, M; Takahashi, T; Tsuji, A; Shinozaki, K; Morita, S; Ando, Y; Okutani, Y; Sugihara, M; Sugiyama, T; Ohashi, Y; Sakata, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Asians, the risk of irinotecan-induced severe toxicities is related in part to UGT1A1*6 (UGT, UDP glucuronosyltransferase) and UGT1A1*28, variant alleles that reduce the elimination of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. We prospectively studied the relation between the UGT1A1 genotype and the safety of irinotecan-based regimens in Japanese patients with advanced colorectal cancer, and then constructed a nomogram for predicting the risk of severe neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. Methods: Safety data were obtained from 1312 patients monitored during the first 3 cycles of irinotecan-based regimen in a prospective observational study. In development of the nomogram, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to test the associations of candidate factors to severe neutropenia in the first cycle. The final nomogram based on the results of multivariable analysis was constructed and validated internally using a bootstrapping technique and externally in an independent data set (n=350). Results: The UGT1A1 genotype was confirmed to be associated with increased risks of irinotecan-induced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and diarrhoea. The final nomogram included type of regimen, administered dose of irinotecan, gender, age, UGT1A1 genotype, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, pre-treatment absolute neutrophil count, and total bilirubin level. The model was validated both internally (bootstrap-adjusted concordance index, 0.69) and externally (concordance index, 0.70). Conclusions: Our nomogram can be used before treatment to accurately predict the probability of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in the first cycle of therapy. Additional studies should evaluate the effect of nomogram-guided dosing on efficacy in patients receiving irinotecan. PMID:25880011

  2. A Trial of Calcium and Vitamin D for the Prevention of Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Baron, John A.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Mott, Leila A.; Rees, Judy R.; Sandler, Robert S.; Snover, Dale C.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Ivanova, Anastasia; Cole, Bernard F.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Beck, Gerald J.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Burke, Carol A.; Church, Timothy R.; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Goodman, Michael; Kim, Adam S.; Robertson, Douglas J.; Rothstein, Richard; Shaukat, Aasma; Seabrook, March E.; Summers, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiologic and preclinical data suggest that higher intake and serum levels of vitamin D and higher intake of calcium reduce the risk of colorectal neoplasia. To further study the chemopreventive potential of these nutrients, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of supplementation with vitamin D, calcium, or both for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. METHODS We recruited patients with recently diagnosed adenomas and no known colorectal polyps remaining after complete colonoscopy. We randomly assigned 2259 participants to receive daily vitamin D3 (1000 IU), calcium as carbonate (1200 mg), both, or neither in a partial 2×2 factorial design. Women could elect to receive calcium plus random assignment to vitamin D or placebo. Follow-up colonoscopy was anticipated to be performed 3 or 5 years after the baseline examinations, according to the endoscopist’s recommendation. The primary end point was adenomas diagnosed in the interval from randomization through the anticipated surveillance colonoscopy. RESULTS Participants who were randomly assigned to receive vitamin D had a mean net increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 7.83 ng per milliliter, relative to participants given placebo. Overall, 43% of participants had one or more adenomas diagnosed during follow-up. The adjusted risk ratios for recurrent adenomas were 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 1.09) with vitamin D versus no vitamin D, 0.95 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.06) with calcium versus no calcium, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.80 to 1.08) with both agents versus neither agent. The findings for advanced adenomas were similar. There were few serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Daily supplementation with vitamin D3 (1000 IU), calcium (1200 mg), or both after removal of colorectal adenomas did not significantly reduce the risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas over a period of 3 to 5 years. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (≈180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV≥106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia.

  4. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  5. The case for a genetic predisposition to serrated neoplasia in the colorectum: hypothesis and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Young, Joanne; Jass, Jeremy R

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, an alternative pathway of colorectal cancer development has been described in which serrated polyps replace the traditional adenoma as the precursor lesion. Importantly, serrated polyps and a subset of colorectal cancer show largely nonoverlapping mutation profiles to those found in adenomas and the majority of colorectal cancer. These genetic alterations include activating mutation of the BRAF proto-oncogene and widespread gene promoter hypermethylation (CpG island methylator phenotype or CIMP). Up to 15% of colorectal cancer is likely to develop on the basis of a strong genetic predisposition. The two most well-characterized syndromes, familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome), both develop via the adenoma-carcinoma pathway and together account for approximately one third of familial colorectal cancer. We have recently described 11 families in which there is evidence that the genetic predisposition to autosomal dominant colorectal cancer is linked to the serrated pathway. This condition, serrated pathway syndrome, and the related condition, hyperplastic polyposis, the presentation of which suggests a recessive mode of inheritance, represent two syndromes in which BRAF mutation and methylation co-occur within serrated precursor lesions. Further, CIMP is observed in the normal colonic mucosa of individuals with hyperplastic polyposis consistent with a field defect in epigenetic regulation. The spectrum of serrated neoplasia may also implicate the apparently sporadic and later onset subset of colorectal cancer with high levels of microsatellite instability. The tendency for these lesions to be multiple, associated with smoking, and to show frequent BRAF mutation and CIMP points to a defect that may result from interactions between the environment and a weakly penetrant genetic alteration.

  6. Differences in Epidemiologic Risk Factors for Colorectal Adenomas and Serrated Polyps by Lesion Severity and Anatomical Site

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Adams, Scott V.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a case-control design, we evaluated differences in risk factors for colorectal polyps according to histological type, anatomical site, and severity. Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative aged 20–79 years who underwent colonoscopy in Seattle, Washington, between 1998 and 2007 and comprised 628 adenoma cases, 594 serrated polyp cases, 247 cases with both types of polyps, and 1,037 polyp-free controls. Participants completed a structured interview, and polyps were evaluated via standardized pathology review. We used multivariable polytomous logistic regression to compare case groups with controls and with the other case groups. Factors for which the strength of the association varied significantly between adenomas and serrated polyps were sex (P < 0.001), use of estrogen-only postmenopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.01), and smoking status (P < 0.001). For lesion severity, prior endoscopy (P < 0.001) and age (P = 0.05) had significantly stronger associations with advanced adenomas than with nonadvanced adenomas; and higher education was positively correlated with sessile serrated polyps but not with other serrated polyps (P = 0.02). Statistically significant, site-specific associations were observed for current cigarette smoking (P = 0.05 among adenomas and P < 0.001 among serrated polyps), postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy (P = 0.01 among adenomas), and obesity (P = 0.01 among serrated polyps). These findings further illustrate the epidemiologic heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasia and may help elucidate carcinogenic mechanisms for distinct pathways. PMID:23459948

  7. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, an ancient disease: new light and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Alazzam, Mo'iad; Tidy, John; Hancock, Barry W; Powers, Hilary

    2010-02-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia is a rare malignancy, which can occur after any type of pregnancy. The incidence varies according to the geographical location and ethnic origin. Although most patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are cured by conventional chemotherapy and surgery, some suffer resistant disease and may die. New therapeutic agents are needed to reduce the toxicity associated with conventional chemotherapy and treat those with resistant or refractory disease. Molecular targeted treatment provides an exciting avenue, however, the biology of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia is not well understood. This review briefly summarises the recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis and molecular biology of this group of diseases and sheds light on molecules that could provide potential therapeutic targets.

  8. Fractal Analysis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizii, Markus; Moinfar, Farid; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) represent precursor lesions of cervical cancer. These neoplastic lesions are traditionally subdivided into three categories CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3, using microscopical criteria. The relation between grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and its fractal dimension was investigated to establish a basis for an objective diagnosis using the method proposed. Methods Classical evaluation of the tissue samples was performed by an experienced gynecologic pathologist. Tissue samples were scanned and saved as digital images using Aperio scanner and software. After image segmentation the box counting method as well as multifractal methods were applied to determine the relation between fractal dimension and grades of CIN. A total of 46 images were used to compare the pathologist's neoplasia grades with the predicted groups obtained by fractal methods. Results Significant or highly significant differences between all grades of CIN could be found. The confusion matrix, comparing between pathologist's grading and predicted group by fractal methods showed a match of 87.1%. Multifractal spectra were able to differentiate between normal epithelium and low grade as well as high grade neoplasia. Conclusion Fractal dimension can be considered to be an objective parameter to grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:25302712

  9. Variation in the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility loci and colorectal polyps by polyp type.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Hutter, Carolyn M; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N; Schwartz, Malaika R; Upton, Melissa P; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-15

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24-79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type.

  10. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  11. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  12. Adherence to surveillance guidelines after removal of colorectal adenomas: a large, community-based study

    PubMed Central

    van Heijningen, Else-Mariëtte B; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Goede, S Lucas; Dekker, Evelien; Lesterhuis, Wilco; ter Borg, Frank; Vecht, Juda; Spoelstra, Pieter; Engels, Leopold; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; Timmer, Robin; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Koornstra, Jan J; de Koning, Harry J; Kuipers, Ernst J; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine adherence to recommended surveillance intervals in clinical practice. Design 2997 successive patients with a first adenoma diagnosis (57% male, mean age 59 years) from 10 hospitals, who underwent colonoscopy between 1998 and 2002, were identified via Pathologisch Anatomisch Landelijk Geautomatiseerd Archief: Dutch Pathology Registry. Their medical records were reviewed until 1 December 2008. Time to and findings at first surveillance colonoscopy were assessed. A surveillance colonoscopy occurring within ±3 months of a 1-year recommended interval and ±6 months of a recommended interval of 2 years or longer was considered appropriate. The analysis was stratified by period per change in guideline (before 2002: 2–3 years for patients with 1 adenoma, annually otherwise; in 2002: 6 years for 1–2 adenomas, 3 years otherwise). We also assessed differences in adenoma and colorectal cancer recurrence rates by surveillance timing. Results Surveillance was inappropriate in 76% and 89% of patients diagnosed before 2002 and in 2002, respectively. Patients eligible under the pre-2002 guideline mainly received surveillance too late or were absent (57% of cases). For patients eligible under the 2002 guideline surveillance occurred mainly too early (48%). The rate of advanced neoplasia at surveillance was higher in patients with delayed surveillance compared with those with too early or appropriate timed surveillance (8% vs 4–5%, p<0.01). Conclusions There is much room for improving surveillance practice. Less than 25% of patients with adenoma receive appropriate surveillance. Such practice seriously hampers the effectiveness and efficiency of surveillance, as too early surveillance poses a considerable burden on available resources while delayed surveillance is associated with an increased rate of advanced adenoma and especially colorectal cancer. PMID:25586057

  13. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  14. Methylation pattern of ALX4 gene promoter as a potential biomarker for blood-based early detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Rasoul; Atapour, Norollah; Vatandoust, Nasimeh; Farahani, Najmeh; Ahangari, Fatemeh; Salehi, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: To develop a non-invasive screening method for colorectal cancer, we evaluated the methylation of ALX4 gene promoter in serum samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and equal number of healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In serum samples from 25 patients with colorectal cancer and 25 healthy control subjects, isolated serum free-floating DNA was treated with sodium bisulfite and analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) with primers specific for methylated or unmethylated promoter CpG island sequences of the ALX4 gene. Results: Methylation of the ALX4 gene promoter was present in the serum DNA of patients with adenoma and colorectal cancer. A sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 88% were achieved in the detection of promoter methylation in colorectal neoplasia samples. The difference in methylation status of the ALX4 promoter between the patients with colorectal neoplasia and the control group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results indicate that this serum free DNA test of methylation of the ALX4 gene promoter is a sensitive and specific method. Therefore in combination with other useful markers it seems ALX4 has the potential of a clinically useful test for the early detection of colorectal cancer. PMID:26918234

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening Based on Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Ching, Jessica Y.L.; Chan, Victor C.W.; Lam, Thomas Y.T.; Luk, Arthur K.C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Sung, Joseph J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated whether age- and gender-based colorectal cancer screening is cost-effective. Recent studies in the United States identified age and gender as 2 important variables predicting advanced proximal neoplasia, and that women aged <60 to 70 years were more suited for sigmoidoscopy screening due to their low risk of proximal neoplasia. Yet, quantitative assessment of the incremental benefits, risks, and cost remains to be performed. Primary care screening practice (2008–2015). A Markov modeling was constructed using data from a screening cohort. The following strategies were compared according to the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for 1 life-year saved: flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) 5 yearly; colonoscopy 10 yearly; FS for each woman at 50- and 55-year old followed by colonoscopy at 60- and 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, and 65-year old followed by colonoscopy at 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70-year old. All male subjects received colonoscopy at 50-, 60-, and 70-year old under strategies 3 to 5. From a hypothetical population of 100,000 asymptomatic subjects, strategy 2 could save the largest number of life-years (4226 vs 2268 to 3841 by other strategies). When compared with no screening, strategy 5 had the lowest ICER (US$42,515), followed by strategy 3 (US$43,517), strategy 2 (US$43,739), strategy 4 (US$47,710), and strategy 1 (US$56,510). Strategy 2 leads to the highest number of bleeding and perforations, and required a prohibitive number of colonoscopy procedures. Strategy 5 remains the most cost-effective when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. From the cost effectiveness analysis, FS for women and colonoscopy for men represent an economically favorable screening strategy. These findings could inform physicians and policy-makers in triaging eligible subjects for risk-based screening, especially in countries with limited colonoscopic

  16. Neither Neoplasia Nor Tuberculosis, but Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Mambie, Adeline; Wallet, Frédéric; Scherman, Laurine; Armand, Sylvie; Vervelle, Christine; Faure, Karine; Guery, Benoit; Titécat, Marie; Loïez, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Tularaemia is an emerging anthropozoonosis transmitted by contact with infected animals and through arthropod bites, inhalation, or ingestion. We describe a pulmonary nodule suggesting cancer in a 70-year-old man. Histological analysis excluded neoplasia, and bacteriological culture excluded tuberculosis. Serological testing and PCR Francisella were positive for this hunter patient, then treated by ciprofloxacin with a favourable outcome. PMID:27419157

  17. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-12-14

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  18. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  19. Characterization of Colorectal Cancer Development in Apc (min/+) Mice.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Blanc, Valerie; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2016-01-01

    The Apc (min/+) mouse provides an excellent experimental model for studying genetic, environmental, and therapeutic aspects of intestinal neoplasia in humans. In this chapter, we will describe techniques for studying colon cancer development in Apc (min/+) mice on C57BL/6J (B6) background, focusing on the roles of environmental modifiers, including Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS), high fat diet, and bile acid supplementation in the context of experimental colorectal cancer. This chapter also includes protocols describing extraction and purification of DSS-contaminated RNA, as well as sampling, harvesting, and tissue processing. The common pathologic lesions encountered in these animals are described in detail. PMID:27246043

  20. Anterior Segment Imaging in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Gargi K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anterior segment imaging have transformed the way ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is diagnosed and monitored. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) has been reported to be useful primarily in the assessment of intraocular invasion and metastasis. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) shows enlarged and irregular nuclei with hyperreflective cells in OSSN lesions and this has been found to correlate with histopathology findings. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) demonstrates thickened hyperreflective epithelium with an abrupt transition between abnormal and normal epithelium in OSSN lesions and this has also been shown to mimic histopathology findings. Although there are limitations to each of these imaging modalities, they can be useful adjunctive tools in the diagnosis of OSSN and could greatly assist the clinician in the management of OSSN patients. Nevertheless, anterior segment imaging has not replaced histopathology's role as the gold standard in confirming diagnosis. PMID:27800176

  1. Common multigenic activation in different human neoplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Hanania, N; Shaool, D; Harel, J; Wiels, J; Tursz, T

    1983-01-01

    It was previously shown that a common multigenic component, designated as tumor-specific DNA (tsDNA), was transcriptionally active in human lymphoid neoplasias and only slightly active, if at all, in normal lymphoid cells, including the Priess cell line immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus. In the Burkitt lymphoma-derived Raji cell line, tsDNA corresponded to 2500-3000 distinct transcription units, arbitrarily defined as encoding mRNA chains of 1000 kds each. In the present study, radioactive Raji cell tsDNA was isolated by a recycling procedure which eliminates transcribed DNA sequences common to both the Raji cell and the Priess cell, and was used as a probe for homologous transcripts. The major part of this probe could be hybridized to RNAs from all the human neoplasias studied: cultured cell lines derived from leukemias, malignant lymphomas or sarcomas, leukemic cells or solid tumors (sarcomas and carcinomas) recovered from patients. In contrast, only a minor portion of Raji cell tsDNA could be hybridized to RNAs from non-malignant cells, normal human lymphoid cells or fibroblasts grown in culture, fetal and chorioplacental tissues. It is concluded that a common multigenic set is activated in a wide variety of, and perhaps in all, human neoplasias. PMID:6315395

  2. Blood lipids and colorectal polyps: testing an etiologic hypothesis using phenotypic measurements and Mendelian randomization

    PubMed Central

    Passarelli, Michael N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Makar, Karen W.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Potter, John D.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Rutter, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Studies linking cholesterol levels to the development of colorectal neoplasia are inconsistent, and Mendelian randomization has been suggested as a way to help avoid problems with confounding and reverse causation. Methods We genotyped individuals who received a colonoscopy at Group Health (1998–2007) for 96 of 102 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified by the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium. Participants included 139 advanced adenoma cases, 518 non-advanced adenoma cases, 380 non-adenomatous polyp cases, and 754 polyp-free controls. All had at least one available pre-colonoscopy lipid measurement from electronic records maintained by Group Health. Results Advanced adenoma cases were more likely than controls to have higher pre-colonoscopy zenith low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol (TC) (odds ratio, OR, per 20 mg/dL LDL increase: 1.16, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.03–1.30; per 40 mg/dL TG increase: 1.09, 1.03–1.16; and per 20 mg/dL TC increase: 1.09, 1.02–1.18). For these traits, genotype-polyp ORs using weighted allele scores were not statistically significant (OR per increase in score scaled to a 20 mg/dL LDL increase: 1.17, 0.78–1.75; a 40 mg/dL TG increase: 1.12, 0.91–1.38; a 20 mg/dL TC increase: 0.99, 0.71–1.38). Conclusions Cholesterol levels may be associated with advanced adenomas, but larger studies are warranted to determine whether this association can be attributed to genetics. PMID:25618792

  3. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  4. Colorectal neoplasm and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Bhat, Mohammad Hayat; Sinha, S K; Kochar, R; Vaiphi, K

    2006-01-01

    The risk for colorectal carcinoma in acromegaly remains controversial. In our earlier study, we have demonstrated that the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Asian Indians with acromegaly is not increased and after this report, routine colonoscopy in our patients with acromegaly was abandoned. Subsequently, two consecutive young men aged 30 and 35, one 6 years after and other at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly had colorectal carcinoma respectively. None of them had family history of colonic neoplasm. These two younger patients with no other predisposition for colorectal neoplasm suggests that colonoscopy should be done in all patients with acromegaly at diagnosis and they should remain under surveillance.

  5. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery.

  6. Fusobacterium nucleatum: an emerging bug in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Y; Bhat, Ashaqullah; Fazili, Khalid M; Ganai, Bashir A

    2015-09-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a plethora of diverse microbial species, wherein certain bacteria considered as driver bacteria with procarcinogenic features contribute directly toward colonic epithelium cell damage to initiate colorectal carcinogenesis. However, some bacteria, in particular Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is otherwise a normal resident of the oral microflora and a relatively poor colonizer of the healthy gut, have also been considered to play a role in the development of colorectal cancer. Many studies have reported that F. nucleatum is associated with colorectal adenomas and advanced-stage colorectal cancer, but its precise role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we review some of the important features of F. nucleatum, its association with inflammatory bowel disease, modulation of the tumor-immune microenvironment, and E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling.

  7. Aflibercept in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Fei; Lockhart, Albert Craig

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US. In recent decades, an improved understanding of the role of the angiogenesis pathway in colorectal cancer has led to advancements in treatment. Bevacizumab has been shown to improve the progression-free survival and overall survival when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and at present is the only antiangiogenesis agent approved for the treatment of this cancer. Aflibercept is a novel angiogenesis-targeting agent, and has demonstrated efficacy in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in a recent randomized Phase III trial. Here we review the role of angiogenesis in the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, strategies for targeting angiogenesis, and the clinical development of aflibercept. PMID:22253552

  8. Fascin expression in colorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ozerhan, Ismail Hakki; Ersoz, Nail; Onguru, Onder; Ozturk, Mustafa; Kurt, Bulent; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the significance of fascin expression in colorectal carcinoma. METHODS This is a retrospective study of 167 consecutive, well-documented cases of primary colorectal adenocarcinoma for which archival material of surgical specimens from primary tumor resections were available. We chose a representative tissue sample block and examined fascin expression by immunohistochemistry using a primary antibody against “fascin”. We calculated the “immunohistochemical score (IHS)” of fascin for each case, which was calculated from the multiplication of scores for the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity. RESULTS Fascin immunoreactivity was observed in 59 (35.3%) of all cases with strong reactivity in 24 (14.4%), moderate reactivity in 25 (14.9%) and weak reactivity in 10 (6.0%) cases. Strong/moderate immunoreactivities were mostly observed in invasive fronts of the tumors or in both invasive and other areas. Fascin immunoreactivity scores were significantly higher in tumors with lymph node metastasis (p:0.002) and advanced stage presentation (p:0.007). There was no relation between fascin expression and age, gender, depth of invasion, distant metastasis or histological grade (p>0.05). There was a higher and statistically significant correlation between fascin immunoreactivity in the invasive borders of tumors and lymph node metastasis (r:0.747, p:0.005). In stage III/IV tumors, two-year survival was 92.2% in tumors without fascin immunoreactivity, and only 60.0% in tumors with a fascin IHS>10 (p:0.003). CONCLUSION These findings suggest that fascin is heterogeneously expressed in approximately one third of colorectal carcinomas with a significant association with lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and location. Moreover, these results indicate that fascin may have a role in the lymph node metastasis of colorectal carcinomas. PMID:20186299

  9. Serum sCD26 for colorectal cancer screening in family-risk individuals: comparison with faecal immunochemical test

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, O; De Chiara, L; Rodríguez-Berrocal, F J; de la Cadena, M Páez; Cubiella, J; Castro, I; Gonzalez-Mao, C; Hernandez, V; Martínez-Zorzano, V S

    2015-01-01

    Background: The development of specific screening programs for individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) is a priority. This study evaluates the diagnostic performance of serum soluble CD26 (sCD26) in family-risk individuals and compares this marker with the faecal immunochemical test for the detection of advanced neoplasia (AN) (CRC or advanced adenomas; AA). Methods: Five hundred and sixteen asymptomatic individuals with at least one first-degree relative with CRC were included. Serum sCD26 was measured in all the individuals who also underwent a colonoscopy (53 AA and four cancer cases were found) and a faecal immunochemical test. Results: Setting specificity to 90% and 95%, respectively, sCD26 showed a sensitivity of 39.6% and 28.3% for AA, and of 42.1% and 28.1% for AN. The combination of sCD26 and the faecal test detected AA and AN with a 52.8% and 56.1% sensitivity, corresponding to 93.5% specificity. Conclusions: The combination of serum sCD26 and the faecal blood test could result a valuable strategy for detecting AN in familial-risk CRC screening. PMID:25461801

  10. Endoscopic Treatment of Early Barrett's Neoplasia: Expanding Indications, New Challenges.

    PubMed

    Pech, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy of early Barrett's neoplasia is nowadays the treatment of choice and recommended over surgery in most current guidelines. Recent data suggest radiofrequency ablation of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia when confirmed by an expert pathologist. Endoscopic therapy of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and mucosal Barrett's adenocarcinoma consists of two steps: first endoscopic resection of all visible lesions, and second ablation of the remaining flat Barrett's mucosa to reduce the rate of recurrences and metachronous neoplasia. The preferred ablation method is radiofrequency ablation. In case of Barrett's adenocarcinoma with incipient submucosal invasion, endoscopic treatment can be considered curative when there are no further risk factors present. PMID:27573769

  11. A randomized study of oral nutritional support versus ad lib nutritional intake during chemotherapy for advanced colorectal and non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, W K; Nixon, D W; Daly, J M; Ellenberg, S S; Gardner, L; Wolfe, E; Shepherd, F A; Feld, R; Gralla, R; Fine, S

    1987-01-01

    One hundred ninety-two patients with previously untreated metastatic cancer (102 non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC]; 90 colorectal cancer) were randomized to receive either ad lib nutritional intake (control group) or specific nutritional intervention during a 12-week study period when chemotherapy was administered. Those patients randomized to nutritional interventions were counselled to take oral nutrients with caloric intake equal to 1.7 to 1.95 times their basal energy expenditure, depending on their pretreatment nutritional status ("standard" group). An augmented group was counselled to have a caloric intake equivalent to that of the standard group but with 25% of calories provided as protein and additional supplements of zinc and magnesium. Counselling increased caloric intake in both tumor types but reduced weight loss in the short term only for lung cancer patients. Ninety-three NSCLC patients were evaluable for tumor response to vindesine and cisplatin. Overall, only 20.4% of the patients responded, and there were no significant differences in response rates, median time to progression, or overall duration of survival between the nutrition intervention groups and the control group. The tumor response rate to time-sequenced 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and methotrexate in the 81 evaluable patients with colorectal cancer was only 14.8%, and no significant differences in tumor response rates were noted between the three groups. Furthermore, the median time to progression and overall duration of survival were not different for the control, standard, and augmented groups. Nutritional interventions using dietary counselling had no impact on the percent of planned chemotherapy dose administered, the degree of toxicity experienced by patients, or the frequency of treatment delays. A multivariate prognostic factor analysis demonstrated that for lung cancer, the percent of weight loss, serum albumin concentration, and presence of liver metastases were significant (P less

  12. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  13. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  14. Endoluminal Therapy in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Katherine A; Tsikitis, V Liana

    2016-09-01

    Appropriate endoscopic resection for colorectal polyps can present a challenge to endoscopists, as these lesions may harbor malignancy. With recent advances in endoscopy, however, we are now entering an exciting frontier of endoscopic therapy for gastrointestinal lesions. These techniques include endoluminal mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, which may be utilized on several colonic lesions. This article will discuss these principle endoscopic techniques, their outcomes, and briefly highlight their influence on endoscopic interventions, including transanal endoscopic microsurgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. PMID:27582646

  15. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  16. CEA and CA19.9 as early predictors of progression in advanced/metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, Roberto; Licchetta, Antonella; Roviello, Giandomenico; Pascucci, Alessandra; Francini, Edoardo; Bargagli, Gianluca; Conca, Raffaele; Miano, Salvatora Tindara; Marzocca, Giuseppe; Francini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the changes of the tumor markers CEA and CA19.9 as early predictors of progression in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients participating in a clinical study and receiving chemotherapy and bevacizumab (Bev). Seventy-two patients had high baseline CEA or CA19.9 serum levels. By ROC analyses, the areas under the curves were 0.83 for variable CEA cutoff values for distinguishing progressive disease (PD) versus stable disease (SD)/partial remission (PR)/complete remission (CR), and 0.80 for variable CA19.9 cutoff values for distinguishing PD versus SD/PR/CR. Rises in CEA and CA19.9 may early signal the occurrence of progression in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy and Bev. PMID:22236191

  17. Is height a risk factor for colorectal adenoma?

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Although it is generally known that the risk for all types of cancer increases with adult height, combined and for several common site-specific cancers (including colon and rectal), evidence is limited for adenomas, which are precursors to colorectal cancer. We evaluated the association between height and risk of colorectal adenoma at various stages of the adenoma-carcinoma pathway. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using data from patients who had undergone a complete colonoscopy as part of a health examination at the Health Promotion Center of Samsung Medical Center between October 13, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A total of 1,347 male subjects were included in our study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between height and colorectal adenoma. Results: Each 5-cm increase in height was associated with 1.6% and 5.3% higher risks of advanced colorectal adenoma and high-risk colorectal adenoma, respectively, but associations were not significant after adjusting for age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome, alcohol intake, smoking, family history of colorectal cancer, and regular aspirin use (p = 0.840 and p = 0.472, respectively). Conclusions: No clear association was found between colorectal adenoma risk and height. Unlike other site-specific tumors reported to have a consistent relationship with height, the association between colorectal tumor and height remains controversial. PMID:26701232

  18. Aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Arends, M J; Buckley, C H; Wells, M

    1998-01-01

    Early epidemiological studies of cervical neoplasia suggested a causal relation with sexual activity and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have emerged as prime suspects as venerally transmitted carcinogens. HPVs fall into two broad camps: low risk types, associated with cervical condylomas and CIN 1; and high risk types (mostly 16 and 18), found in 50-80% of CIN 2 and CIN 3 lesions, and 90% of cancers. This association with cancer is very strong, with odds ratios of > 15 (often much higher) in case-control studies that are methodologically sound. An infrequently detected third group of intermediate risk type HPVs is associated with all grades of CIN and occasionally with cancers. HPVs have also been detected in a wide range of asymptomatic controls, indicating that other events are required for development of neoplasia such as viral persistence and/or altered expression of viral genes, often following integration of the viral genome. This leaves the two major viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, directly coupled to viral enhancers and promoters, allowing their continued expression after integration. High risk HPV E7 proteins bind and inactivate the Rb protein, whereas E6 proteins bind p53 and direct its rapid degradation. A range of putative cofactors has been implicated in progression: HLA type, immunosuppression, sex steroid hormones, and smoking; most of these cofactors appear to influence progression to CIN 3. The natural history includes progression to CIN 3 in 10% of CIN 1 and 20% of CIN 2 cases, whereas at least 12% of CIN 3 cases progress to invasive carcinoma. Cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) often coexists with squamous CIN, and the premalignant potential of high grade CGIN is not in doubt, but the natural history of low grade CGIN remains uncertain. A high proportion of CGIN lesions and adenocarcinomas are HPV positive, and HPV18 has been implicated more in glandular than in squamous lesions. A strong clinical case for the application of HPV

  19. Management of hemopoietic neoplasias during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Paydas, Semra

    2016-08-01

    Hemopoietic neoplasias are unique cancers generally affecting bone marrow, and requires a special attention for disease control and also their complications. When these neoplastic disorders accompany to pregnancy there are many risks both for mother and foetus. Diagnostic difficulties due to the limited use of imaging modalities is essential in pregnant women. On the other hand suboptimal using of the anti-neoplastic drugs and their higher toxicity in mother and foetus must be considered in the management of these neoplastic disorders. Due to the lack of therapeutic guidelines in these cases, team approach is essential and therapy requires to the use the art of medicine. PMID:27283927

  20. Chemoresistant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cp, Sudha; M, Sahana

    2014-07-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a disease of women in reproductive age. It is one of the most chemotherapy responsive and highly curable cancer. It is diagnosed when there is clinical, radiologic, pathologic, and/or hormonal evidence of persistent or relapsed gestational trophoblastic disease. In most instances, it is cured by surgical evacuation of the uterus. If persistent, it is treated with chemotherapy which provides response in >90% of the cases. In the unresponsive persistent cases and if the women has completed her child bearing, hysterectomy is generally recommended. Here, we report a rare case of chemoresistant GTN which was confirmed to be placental-site trophoblastic tumour (PSTT) on biopsy.

  1. Molecular signatures of thyroid follicular neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Borup, Rehannah; Rossing, Maria; Henao, Ricardo; Yamamoto, Yohei; Krogdahl, Annelise; Godballe, Christian; Winther, Ole; Kiss, Katalin; Christensen, Lise; Høgdall, Estrid; Bennedbaek, Finn; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2010-09-01

    The molecular pathways leading to thyroid follicular neoplasia are incompletely understood, and the diagnosis of follicular tumors is a clinical challenge. To provide leads to the pathogenesis and diagnosis of the tumors, we examined the global transcriptome signatures of follicular thyroid carcinoma (FC) and normofollicular adenoma (FA) as well as fetal/microFA (fetal adenoma). Carcinomas were strongly enriched in transcripts encoding proteins involved in DNA replication and mitosis corresponding to increased number of proliferating cells and depleted number of transcripts encoding factors involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. In the latter group, the combined loss of transcripts encoding the nuclear orphan receptors NR4A1 and NR4A3, which were recently shown to play a causal role in hematopoetic neoplasia, was noteworthy. The analysis of differentially expressed transcripts provided a mechanism for cancer progression, which is why we exploited the results in order to generate a molecular classifier that could identify 95% of all carcinomas. Validation employing public domain and cross-platform data demonstrated that the signature was robust and could diagnose follicular nodules originating from different geographical locations and platforms with similar accuracy. We came to the conclusion that down-regulation of factors involved in growth arrest and apoptosis may represent a decisive step in the pathogenesis of FC. Moreover, the described molecular pathways provide an accurate and robust genetic signature for the diagnosis of FA and FC. PMID:20668010

  2. Pancreatic paracoccidioidomycosis simulating malignant neoplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Lima, Talles Bazeia; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Silva, Giovanni Faria; de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Yamashiro, Fábio da Silva; Franzoni, Letícia de Campos; Sassaki, Lígia Yukie; Romeiro, Fernando Gomes

    2013-09-14

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a systemic granulomatous disease caused by fungus, and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of intra-abdominal tumors in endemic areas. We report a rare case of paracoccidioidomycosis in the pancreas. A 45-year-old man was referred to our institution with a 2-mo history of epigastric abdominal pain that was not diet-related, with night sweating, inappetence, weight loss, jaundice, pruritus, choluria, and acholic feces, without signs of sepsis or palpable tumors. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed a solid mass of approximately 7 cm × 5.5 cm on the pancreas head. Abdominal computerized tomography showed dilation of the biliary tract, an enlarged pancreas (up to 4.5 in the head region), with dilation of the major pancreatic duct. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, and the surgical description consisted of a tumor, measuring 7 to 8 cm with a poorly-defined margin, adhering to posterior planes and mesenteric vessels, showing an enlarged bile duct. External drainage of the biliary tract, Roux-en-Y gastroenteroanastomosis, lymph node excision, and biopsies were performed, but malignant neoplasia was not found. Microscopic analysis showed chronic pancreatitis and a granulomatous chronic inflammatory process in the choledochal lymph node. Acid-alcohol resistant bacillus and fungus screening were negative. Fine-needle aspiration of the pancreas was performed under US guidance. The smear was compatible with infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We report a rare case of paracoccidioidomycosis simulating a malignant neoplasia in the pancreas head. PMID:24039371

  3. Phase II study of reintroduction of oxaliplatin for advanced colorectal cancer in patients previously treated with oxaliplatin and irinotecan: RE-OPEN study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of reintroducing oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard chemotherapy has not been verified. We performed a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of reintroducing oxaliplatin. Methods Eligible patients had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and irinotecan that achieved a response or stable disease followed by confirmed disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior oxaliplatin-based therapy. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR) after 12 weeks of treatment starting. The DCR was defined as the sum of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 (range: 35–77) years and the male/female ratio was 19/14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 84.8%. Fourteen primary tumors were in the colon and 19 were in the rectum. All patients received modified FOLFOX6 as the protocol treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment starting, the DCR was 39.4% (95% confidence interval 21.8–57.0) and the response rate (complete response and partial response) was 6.1%. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was five and the median total dose of oxaliplatin was 425 mg/m2. Median progression-free survival time was 98 days and median overall survival was 300 days. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 allergic reactions was 28.1% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was 53.1% and 0%, respectively. There were no other severe adverse events and no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion Reintroducing oxaliplatin can be both safe and effective. This may be a salvage option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who achieved a response or stable disease with prior oxaliplatin-based therapy followed by disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior

  4. Spontaneous neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus).

    PubMed

    Khoii, Mina K; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Burns, Roy B; Carmichael, K Paige; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

    2008-09-01

    Little information is available about diseases and pathology of species within the family Tenrecidae, including the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus), a Madagascan insectivore. This report summarizes necropsy and histopathologic findings of neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs. Although only four animals are included in this report, neoplasia seems to be a common and significant source of morbidity and mortality in greater hedgehog tenrecs. Types of neoplasia identified include a thyroid follicular-solid carcinoma, two urinary bladder transitional cell carcinomas, uterine endometrial polyps, and multicentric B-cell lymphoma. Due to small sample size, no etiology could be determined, but genetics, viral infection, pesticide treatment, nutrition, or other environmental factors might contribute to the development of neoplasia in this species. This is the first report of neoplasia in greater hedgehog tenrecs.

  5. Diagnostics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Main risk factors include advanced age, family history, male sex, and lifestyle factors. Screening can reduce incidence and death from colorectal cancer. Therefore, prevention and early detection are crucial in order to detect and remove pre-neoplastic adenomas and to detect cancers at early stages. Colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood tests are established tools for screening. Newer fecal immunochemical tests reveal higher sensitivities for advanced adenoma and cancer than guaiac-based hemoccult tests. Molecular stool and blood tests as well as virtual colonoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy are promising new developments so far not established as routine instruments for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and for adenoma removal. Prognosis is essentially dependent on the tumor stage at the time of the initial diagnosis. Proper staging based on imaging prior to therapy is a prerequisite. In rectal cancer, local staging is an essential requirement for the identification of appropriate candidates for neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27493942

  6. Evolving management of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Zijp, Jochem van der Voort; Hoekstra, Harald J; Basson, Marc D

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer, including total mesorectal excision, the resection of liver and lung metastasis and advances in chemoradiation and foreshadows some interventions that may lie just beyond the frontier. In particular, little is known about the intracellular and extracellular cascades that may influence colorectal cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. Although the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinases and focal adhesion associated proteins in response to integrin-mediated cell matrix binding (”outside in integrin signaling”) is well described, the stimulation of cell adhesion by intracellular signals activated by pressure prior to adhesion represents a different signal paradigm. However, several studies have suggested that increased pressure and shear stress activate cancer cell adhesion. Further studies of the pathways that regulate integrin-driven cancer cell adhesion may identify ways to disrupt these signals or block integrin-mediated adhesion so that adhesion and eventual metastasis can be prevented in the future. PMID:18609678

  7. Intraoperative augmented reality for laparoscopic colorectal surgery by intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cahill, R A; Mortensen, N J

    2010-08-01

    Advances in imaging quality and capability have been the major driver of the laparoscopic revolution that has dramatically impacted upon operative strategies and surgical patient care in recent years. Increasingly now the technological capacity is becoming available to supraselect or extend the useful clinical range of the electromagnetic spectrum beyond visible or white light. This has markedly broadened the intraprocedural optical information available at intraluminal endoscopy and there is likely to be considerable similar benefit for laparoscopy. Rather than narrow band or ultraviolet imaging however, it is the near infrared (NIR) spectrum that seems of most potential to exploit during intra-abdominal endoscopy in particular as this energy range is capable of penetrating relatively deeply into tissues such as the mesentery and bowel wall without inducing thermal damage due to heat dissipation or indeed the intracellular effects associated with higher energy, shorter wavelength energies. By incorporating the NIR spectrum alongside more conventional laparoscopic imaging, a greater appreciation of tissue architecture, character and quality is possible in particular with respect to lymphatic and vascular channel anatomy and flow dynamics and also real-time optical histology (by NIR optical coherence tomography). Such a facility may significantly aid critical intraoperative decision making during colorectal operations by informing the surgeon regarding the most biologically relevant lymphatic basin and lymph nodes for any target area of interest (especially important if considering tailored operative extent for colorectal neoplasia), the sufficiency and quality of arterial supply (and hence inform re the perfusion of stapled intestinal ends prior to reanastomosis) and perhaps even in situ pathological assessment. This article provides a state of art overview of the fascinating potential of this emergent technological capability. PMID:20802433

  8. Piecemeal Versus En Bloc Resection of Large Rectal Adenomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Colorectal Adenoma With Mild Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenoma With Severe Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenomatous Polyp; Colorectal Low Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Colorectal High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia

  9. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of a novel endoscopic fluorescence imaging modality using oral 5-aminolevulinic acid for colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruki, Eriko So; Saito, Yutaka; Abe, Seiichiro; Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Taku; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Sekine, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Five-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is being increasingly used for photodynamic diagnosis and therapy of various types of tumors including brain, urologic, and other neoplasias. The use of 5-ALA to treat Barrett’s carcinomas has been documented, but its clinical effectiveness for diagnosis of gastrointestinal tumors, particularly early cancers, remains unknown. Patients and methods: The aim of our feasibility study was to evaluate the visibility of colorectal tumors using endoscopic fluorescence imaging (EFI) after oral administration of 5-ALA. The lesions identified by direct visualization and by the spectrums produced using EFI modality with 5-ALA were compared to the clinicopathologic features of resected specimens. Results: Twenty-three patients with a total of 27 known colorectal lesions were enrolled in the study. The median tumor size was 30 mm (range 10 – 75). Eleven of the lesions were flat or depressed lesions and 16 were sessile. Red fluorescence was observed in 22 out of 27 lesions. Red fluorescence was negative in 4 out of 11 flat or depressed lesions. In comparison with histopathologic findings, the rates of red fluorescence visibility were 62.5 % in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, 77.8 % in high-grade neoplasia, and 100 % in submucosal carcinoma. Red fluorescence visibility increased with the degree of dysplasia. There were no significant adverse events identified in this study. Conclusions: This feasibility study using EFI with 5-ALA demonstrated high visibility of superficial colorectal neoplasia. EFI with 5-ALA appears to be a novel, safe technique for improving real-time colorectal tumor imaging. PMID:26793782

  10. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  11. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Press Room Contact Us Sign Up We fight for Moms Dads Uncles Aunts Friends Brothers Sisters ... on Congress. Take Action Your Guide in the Fight Free resource for stage III & stage IV colorectal ...

  12. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic fields, or radioactive substances to ... has spread to the liver. Ultrasound Ultrasound uses sound waves and their echoes to create images of the ...

  13. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  14. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; Leite, Marieli F. M.; Trujillo, Jose R.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors, especially in Gynecology. The photodynamic reaction is based on the production of reactive oxygen species after the activation of a photosensitizer. Advantages of the PDT in comparison to the surgical resection are: ambulatory treatment and tissue recovery highly satisfactory, through a non-invasive procedure. The cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I and II presents potential indications for PDT. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PDT for the diagnostics and treatment of CIN I and II. The equipment and the photosensitizer are produced in Brazil with a representative low cost. It is possible to visualize the fluorescence of the cervix and to treat the lesions, without side effects. The proposed clinical protocol shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  15. T cells, precocious aging, and familial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, H H; Schuman, S H; Goust, J M; Jorgenson, R

    1978-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with precocious aging and was found to have low levels of active and total T cells. Family history revealed a high familial incidence of cancer on both the maternal and paternal sides, and activ T cell levels were found to be low in several living family members. The patient developed osteogenic sarcoma 13 months after initial study. Since our previous studies have reported low active and total T cells in patients with cancer, the present results suggest that subjects with low active T cells should be monitored frequently to detect possible neoplasia in it early stages. They also suggest that impaired cellular immunity in humans is associated with, if not the cause of, accelerated aging. PMID:304823

  16. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  17. Chemoresistant Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    M, Sahana

    2014-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a disease of women in reproductive age. It is one of the most chemotherapy responsive and highly curable cancer. It is diagnosed when there is clinical, radiologic, pathologic, and/or hormonal evidence of persistent or relapsed gestational trophoblastic disease. In most instances, it is cured by surgical evacuation of the uterus. If persistent, it is treated with chemotherapy which provides response in >90% of the cases. In the unresponsive persistent cases and if the women has completed her child bearing, hysterectomy is generally recommended. Here, we report a rare case of chemoresistant GTN which was confirmed to be placental-site trophoblastic tumour (PSTT) on biopsy. PMID:25177610

  18. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  19. High Resolution Microendoscopy for Quantitative Diagnosis of Esophageal Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongsuk

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the esophagus account for 3.8% of all cases of cancers, with approximately 482,300 new cases reported in 2008 worldwide. In the United States alone, it is estimated that approximately 18,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 2013, and 15,210 deaths are expected. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation therapy, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often at an advanced and incurable stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective methods for early detection of esophageal neoplasia are needed. Here, quantitative classification algorithms for high resolution miscroendoscopic images were developed to distinguish between esophageal neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. A clinical study in 177 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the classification algorithm in collaboration with the Mount Sinai Medical Center in the United States, the First Hospital of Jilin University in China, and the Cancer Institute and Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science in China. The study reported a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 92%, respectively, in the training set, 87% and 97%, respectively, in the test set, and 84% and 95%, respectively, in an independent validation set. Another clinical study in 31 patients with Barrett's esophagus resulted in a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85%. Finally, a compact, portable version of the high resolution microendoscopy (HRME) device using a consumer-grade camera was developed and a series of biomedical experimental studies were carried out to assess the capability of the device.

  20. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  1. Future of Minimally Invasive Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Whealon, Matthew; Vinci, Alessio; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is slowly taking over as the preferred operative approach for colorectal diseases. However, many of the procedures remain technically difficult. This article will give an overview of the state of minimally invasive surgery and the many advances that have been made over the last two decades. Specifically, we discuss the introduction of the robotic platform and some of its benefits and limitations. We also describe some newer techniques related to robotics. PMID:27582647

  2. In vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by multimodal colposcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Qu, Yingjie; Pei, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Linlin; Zhang, Shiwu; Chang, Shufang; Smith, Zachary J.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for women in developing countries. Colposcopy plays an important role in early screening and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In this paper, we developed a multimodal colposcopy system that combines multispectral reflectance, autofluorescence, and RGB imaging for in vivo detection of CIN, which is capable of dynamically recording multimodal data of the same region of interest (ROI). We studied the optical properties of cervical tissue to determine multi-wavelengths for different imaging modalities. Advanced algorithms based on the second derivative spectrum and the fluorescence intensity were developed to differentiate cervical tissue into two categories: squamous normal (SN) and high grade (HG) dysplasia. In the results, the kinetics of cervical reflectance and autofluorescence characteristics pre and post acetic acid application were observed and analyzed, and the image segmentation revealed good consistency with the gold standard of histopathology. Our pilot study demonstrated the clinical potential of this multimodal colposcopic system for in vivo detection of cervical cancer.

  3. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  4. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  6. Update on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    DA Silva, Felipe Carneiro; Wernhoff, Patrik; Dominguez-Barrera, Constantino; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2016-09-01

    In the past two decades, significant advances have been made in our understanding of colorectal (CRC) tumors with DNA mismatch (MMR) repair deficiency. The knowledge from molecular and genetic alterations in a variety of clinical conditions has refined the disease terminology and classification. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) encompasses a spectrum of conditions that have significant phenotypic overlapping that makes clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Distinguishing among the HNPCC disorders is clinically important, as the approach to surveillance for patients and their at-risk family members differs according to risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Prospective and next-generation studies will provide valuable clinical information regarding the natural history of disease that will help differentiate the Lynch syndrome mimics and guide diagnosis and management for heterogeneous conditions currently grouped under the category of familial CRC. The review is intended to present and discuss the molecular nature of various conditions related to MMR deficiency and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. PMID:27630275

  7. Screening for pancreatic neoplasia in high-risk individuals: who, what, when, how?

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2005-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease. Most symptomatic, clinically detected PCs are advanced and not curable. Indeed, the estimated 5-year survival rate is 4%, which is attributable to late diagnosis and low resection rate. Screening of high-risk individuals and early detection of small PCs and precursor lesions might improve the outcome if curative therapy could be offered in the presymptomatic stage. This article summarizes the available published data and preliminary results and discusses the different approaches to screening for pancreatic neoplasia at 2 university-based programs in the United States.

  8. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Mandelson, Margaret T; Adams, Scott V; Wernli, Karen J; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A; Makar, Karen W

    2011-01-01

    We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms (rs1051740 and rs2234922), and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n = 519), HPs (n = 691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n = 227) and polyp-free controls (n = 772) receiving a colonoscopy from December 2004 to September 2007 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR = 2.0, 1.2-3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥ 22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.4), HPs (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.7-3.3), and both types (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.8-4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location.

  9. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  10. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after polypectomy: a consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Sidney J; Zauber, Ann G; Fletcher, Robert H; Stillman, Jonathon S; O'brien, Michael J; Levin, Bernard; Smith, Robert A; Lieberman, David A; Burt, Randall W; Levin, Theodore R; Bond, John H; Brooks, Durado; Byers, Tim; Hyman, Neil; Kirk, Lynne; Thorson, Alan; Simmang, Clifford; Johnson, David; Rex, Douglas K

    2006-01-01

    Adenomatous polyps are the most common neoplastic findings uncovered in people who undergo colorectal screening or have a diagnostic workup for symptoms. It was common practice in the 1970s for these patients to have annual follow-up surveillance examinations to detect additional new adenomas as well as missed synchronous adenomas. As a result of the National Polyp Study report in 1993, which demonstrated clearly in a randomized design that the first postpolypectomy examination could be deferred for 3 years, guidelines published by a gastrointestinal consortium in 1997 recommended that the first follow-up surveillance be 3 years after polypectomy for most patients. In 2003, these guidelines were updated, colonoscopy was recommended as the only follow-up examination, and stratification at baseline into lower and higher risk for subsequent adenomas was suggested. The 1997 and 2003 guidelines dealt with both screening and surveillance. However, it has become increasingly clear that postpolypectomy surveillance is now a large part of endoscopic practice, draining resources from screening and diagnosis. In addition, surveys have demonstrated that a large proportion of endoscopists are conducting surveillance examinations at shorter intervals than recommended in the guidelines. In the present paper, a careful analytic approach was designed addressing all evidence available in the literature to delineate predictors of advanced pathology, both cancer and advanced adenomas, so that patients can be more definitely stratified at their baseline colonoscopy into those at lower or increased risk for a subsequent advanced neoplasia. People at increased risk have either three or more adenomas, or high-grade dysplasia, or villous features, or an adenoma > or =1 cm in size. It is recommended that they have a 3-year follow-up colonoscopy. People at lower risk who have one or two small (< 1 cm) tubular adenomas with no high-grade dysplasia can have a follow-up in 5 to 10 years

  11. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues. PMID:27130618

  12. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues.

  13. [Clinical characteristics of multiple endocrine neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Conte-Devolx, Bernard; Niccoli, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 2 (MEN2) are autosomal dominant inherited multiglandular diseases with familial and individual age-related penetrance and variable expression. The most frequent endocrine features of MEN1 are parathyroid involvement (> 95%), duodeno-pancreatic endocrine tissue involvement (80%), pituitary adenoma (30%), and adrenal cortex tumors (25%), with no clear syndromic variants. Identification of the germline MEN1 mutation confirms the diagnosis, but there is no phenotype-genotype correlation. All patients with MEN2 have medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The most distinctive MEN2 variants are MEN2A (MTC+pheochromocytoma+hyperparathyroidism), MEN2B (MTC+pheo), and isolated familial MTC (FMTC). The prognosis of MEN2 is linked to the progression of MTC, which depends mainly on the stage at diagnosis and the quality of initial surgical treatment. This emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and management. The specific RET codon mutation correlates with the MEN2 syndromic variant and with the age of onset and aggressiveness of MTC. Consequently, RET mutational status should guide major management decisions, such as whether and when to perform thyroidectomy. PMID:20669560

  14. Relationship of ECL cells and gastric neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, H. L.; Brenna, E.; Sandvik, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell in the oxyntic mucosa has a key role in the regulation of gastric secretion since it synthesizes and releases the histamine regulating the acid secretion from the parietal cell. Gastrin is the main regulator of the ECL cell function and growth. Long-term hypergastrinemia induces ECL cell hyperplasia, and if continued, neoplasia. ECL cell carcinoids occur in man after long-term hypergastrinemia in conditions like pernicious anemia and gastrinoma. There is also accumulating evidence that a proportion of gastric carcinomas of the diffuse type is derived from the ECL cell. Furthermore, the ECL cell may, by producing substances with angiogenic effects (histamine and basic fibroblast growth factor), be particularly prone to develop malignant tumors. Although the general opinion is that gastrin itself has a direct effect on the oxyntic mucosal stem cell, it cannot be excluded that the general trophic effect of gastrin on the oxyntic mucosa is mediated by histamine or other substances from the ECL cell, and that the ECL cell, therefore, could play a role also in the tumorigenesis/carcinogenesis of gastric carcinomas of intestinal type. PMID:10461363

  15. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955). PMID:22280244

  16. Linkage to chromosome 2q32.2-q33.3 in familial serrated neoplasia (Jass syndrome).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aedan; Nancarrow, Derek; Clendenning, Mark; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Duggan, David; Taverna, Darin; McKeone, Diane; Walters, Rhiannon; Walsh, Michael D; Young, Bruce W; Jass, Jeremy R; Rosty, Christophe; Gattas, Michael; Pelzer, Elise; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jill; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Parry, Susan; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Tucker, Kathy; Muir, Amanda; Drini, Musa; Macrae, Finlay; Newcomb, Polly; Potter, John D; Pavluk, Erika; Lindblom, Annika; Young, Joanne P

    2011-06-01

    Causative genetic variants have to date been identified for only a small proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC). While conditions such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Lynch syndrome have well defined genetic causes, the search for variants underlying the remainder of familial CRC is plagued by genetic heterogeneity. The recent identification of families with a heritable predisposition to malignancies arising through the serrated pathway (familial serrated neoplasia or Jass syndrome) provides an opportunity to study a subset of familial CRC in which heterogeneity may be greatly reduced. A genome-wide linkage screen was performed on a large family displaying a dominantly-inherited predisposition to serrated neoplasia genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10 K SNP Array. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were performed and resulting regions of interest, as well as previously reported CRC susceptibility loci at 3q22, 7q31 and 9q22, were followed up by finemapping in 10 serrated neoplasia families. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed regions of interest at 2p25.2-p25.1, 2q24.3-q37.1 and 8p21.2-q12.1. Finemapping linkage and haplotype analyses identified 2q32.2-q33.3 as the region most likely to harbour linkage, with heterogeneity logarithm of the odds (HLOD) 2.09 and nonparametric linkage (NPL) score 2.36 (P = 0.004). Five primary candidate genes (CFLAR, CASP10, CASP8, FZD7 and BMPR2) were sequenced and no segregating variants identified. There was no evidence of linkage to previously reported loci on chromosomes 3, 7 and 9.

  17. Top-down morphogenesis of colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Kathy; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Ben-Sasson, Shmuel; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2001-01-01

    One of the fundamental tenets of oncology is that tumors arise from stem cells. In the colon, stem cells are thought to reside at the base of crypts. In the early stages of tumorigenesis, however, dysplastic cells are routinely found at the luminal surface of the crypts whereas the cells at the bases of these same crypts appear morphologically normal. To understand this discrepancy, we evaluated the molecular characteristics of cells isolated from the bases and orifices of the same crypts in small colorectal adenomas. We found that the dysplastic cells at the tops of the crypts often exhibited genetic alterations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and neoplasia-associated patterns of gene expression. In contrast, cells located at the base of these same crypts did not contain such alterations and were not clonally related to the contiguous transformed cells above them. These results imply that development of adenomatous polyps proceeds through a top-down mechanism. Genetically altered cells in the superficial portions of the mucosae spread laterally and downward to form new crypts that first connect to preexisting normal crypts and eventually replace them. PMID:11226292

  18. Genetic variability in EGFR, Src and HER2 and risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Elizabeth M; Curtin, Karen; Hsu, Li; Kulmacz, Richard J; Duggan, David J; Makar, Karen W; Xiao, Liren; Carlson, Christopher S; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2011-01-01

    The EGFR signaling pathway is involved in carcinogenesis at multiple sites, particularly colorectal cancer, and is a target of colorectal cancer chemotherapy. EGFR signaling is linked to pro-carcinogenic mechanisms, including cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and more recently prostaglandin synthesis. Genetic variability in this pathway has not yet been studied in relation to colorectal carcinogenesis. In three case-control studies of colorectal adenoma (n=485 cases/578 controls), colon cancer (n=1424 cases/1780 controls) and rectal cancer (n=583 cases/775 controls), we investigated associations between candidate SNPs, tagSNPs and haplotypes in EGFR signaling (EGFR, Src, and HER2) and risk. We also examined associations with tumor subtypes: TP53 and KRAS2 mutations, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. All three studies were genotyped using an identical Illumina GoldenGate assay, allowing thorough investigation of genetic variability across stages and locations of colorectal neoplasia. The EGFR tagSNP 142572T>C (rs3752651) CC genotype was associated with a suggested increased risk for both colon (OR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.00-1.96; p-trend=0.04) and rectal cancer (OR: 1.39; 95% CI: 0.81-2.41; p-trend=0.65). In tumor subtype analyses, the association was limited to TP53-mutated colon tumors. Using the Chatterjee 1 df Tukey test to assess gene-gene interactions, we observed a statistically significant (p<0.01) interaction between SNPs in EGFR and Src for colorectal adenoma risk. The association with EGFR 142572 should be investigated in additional studies and the significant gene-gene interaction between EGFR and Src in relation to adenoma risk suggests that these two genes are jointly affecting early stages in colorectal carcinogenesis and requires further follow-up. PMID:22199994

  19. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  20. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and RET: from neoplasia to neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, J.; Mulligan, L.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is an inherited cancer syndrome characterised by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), with or without phaeochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism. MEN 2 is unusual among cancer syndromes as it is caused by activation of a cellular oncogene, RET. Germline mutations in the gene encoding the RET receptor tyrosine kinase are found in the vast majority of MEN 2 patients and somatic RET mutations are found in a subset of sporadic MTC. Further, there are strong associations of RET mutation genotype and disease phenotype in MEN 2 which have led to predictions of tissue specific requirements and sensitivities to RET activity. Our ability to identify genetically, with high accuracy, subjects with MEN 2 has revolutionised our ability to diagnose, predict, and manage this disease. In the past few years, studies of RET and its normal ligand and downstream interactions and the signalling pathways it activates have clarified our understanding of the roles played by RET in normal cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation, as well as in disease. Here, we review the current knowledge of the normal functions of RET and the effects of mutations of this gene in tumorigenesis and in normal development.


Keywords: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2; RET; receptor tyrosine kinase PMID:11073534

  1. Clinical application of magnification endoscopy and narrow-band imaging in the upper gastrointestinal tract: new imaging techniques for detecting and characterizing gastrointestinal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kenshi; Takaki, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori; Anagnostopoulos, George K; Kaye, Philip; Ragunath, Krish

    2008-07-01

    This article introduces one of the most advanced endoscopy imaging techniques, magnification endoscopy with narrow-band imaging. This technique can clearly visualize the microvascular (MV) architecture and microsurface (MS) structure. The application of this technique is quite useful for characterizing the mucosal neoplasia in the hypopharynx, oropharynx, esophagus, and stomach. The key characteristic findings for early carcinomatous lesions are an irregular MV pattern or irregular MS pattern as visualized by this technique. Such a diagnostic system could be applied to the early detection of mucosal neoplasia throughout the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  3. [Non-serrated precursor lesions of colorectal tumours].

    PubMed

    Langner, C

    2011-11-01

    Non-serrated precursor lesions of colorectal tumours include conventional adenomas (tubular, tubulovillous and villous), inflammatory bowel disease-associated dysplasia (intraepithelial neoplasia), and hamartoma-associated dysplasia. This short review summarizes the current literature on the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, focusing on colonic stem cells and functional crypt organization, patterns of stem cell division, niche succession and clonal conversion in the formation of a monocryptal adenoma. The process of clonal interaction between neighboring crypts as well as the development of large monoclonal adenomas from small polyclonal precursor lesions is discussed in detail. Finally, the molecular pathogenesis as well as the clinical significance of inflammatory bowel disease- and hamartoma-associated carcinogenesis is addressed.

  4. [Heredity in renal and prostatic neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Prayer Galetti, T; D'Arrigo, L; De Zorzi, L; Patarnello, T

    1997-09-01

    There is an ever growing report of data supporting the evidence that accumulated genetic changes underlie the development of neoplasia. The paradigma of this multistep process is colon cancer were cancer onset is associated, over decades, with at least seven genetic events. The number of genetic alterations increases moving from adenomatous lesions to colon cancer and, although the genetic alterations occur according to a preferred sequence, the total accumulation of changes rather than their sequential order is responsible of tumor biological behavior. It is noteworthy that, at least for this neoplasia, carcinogenesis appears to arise as a result of the mutational activation of oncogenes coupled with the mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In some cases mutant suppressor genes appear to exert a phenotypic effect even when present in the heterozygous state thus been non "recessive" at the cellular level. The general features of this model may apply also to renal cell cancer (RCC) and prostate cancer (CaP). Extensive literature exists on the cytogenetic and molecular findings in RCC. Only 2% of RCC are familiar, but molecular genetic studies of these cancers have provided important informations on RCC pathogenesis. As with other cancers, familiar RCC is characterized by an early age of onset and frequent multicentricity. A pathological classification useful in studying these patients subdivide renal cancers in papillary (pRCC) and non papillary (RCC) neoplasms. The most common cause of inherited RCC is the Von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by retinal and cerebellar hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic cysts and RCC. Over 70% of these patients will develop an RCC by their sixth decade. In 1993 the isolation of the tumor suppressor gene in VHL disease at the level of chromosome 3p25-p26 have lead to a better understanding of RCC. Most missense mutations are associated with high risk of

  5. [Heredity in renal and prostatic neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Prayer Galetti, T; D'Arrigo, L; De Zorzi, L; Patarnello, T

    1997-09-01

    There is an ever growing report of data supporting the evidence that accumulated genetic changes underlie the development of neoplasia. The paradigma of this multistep process is colon cancer were cancer onset is associated, over decades, with at least seven genetic events. The number of genetic alterations increases moving from adenomatous lesions to colon cancer and, although the genetic alterations occur according to a preferred sequence, the total accumulation of changes rather than their sequential order is responsible of tumor biological behavior. It is noteworthy that, at least for this neoplasia, carcinogenesis appears to arise as a result of the mutational activation of oncogenes coupled with the mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In some cases mutant suppressor genes appear to exert a phenotypic effect even when present in the heterozygous state thus been non "recessive" at the cellular level. The general features of this model may apply also to renal cell cancer (RCC) and prostate cancer (CaP). Extensive literature exists on the cytogenetic and molecular findings in RCC. Only 2% of RCC are familiar, but molecular genetic studies of these cancers have provided important informations on RCC pathogenesis. As with other cancers, familiar RCC is characterized by an early age of onset and frequent multicentricity. A pathological classification useful in studying these patients subdivide renal cancers in papillary (pRCC) and non papillary (RCC) neoplasms. The most common cause of inherited RCC is the Von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by retinal and cerebellar hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic cysts and RCC. Over 70% of these patients will develop an RCC by their sixth decade. In 1993 the isolation of the tumor suppressor gene in VHL disease at the level of chromosome 3p25-p26 have lead to a better understanding of RCC. Most missense mutations are associated with high risk of

  6. Perspectives of colorectal cancer screening in Germany 2009.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian

    2009-10-15

    Adequate screening methods can decrease colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality. The guaiac test for fecal occult-blood (FOBT) is part of the German CRC Screening Program since 1970 and has evidence level Ia. In randomized multicenter-studies FOBT has an average sensitivity of 24% and decreases CRC mortality up to 30%. Immunological tests for human haemoglobin (iFOBT) show better performance characteristics than guaiac FOBT, with augmented sensitivity and specificity. However, the single tests show wide differences in diagnostic performance and iFOBT is not yet covered by insurance companies although it should replace the guaiac test for CRC screening. Visual colonoscopy, which was introduced to the German National Cancer Screening Program in 2002, is the gold standard for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. From 2003 to 2007 more than 2.8 million examinations have been documented in Germany. The prevalence of adenomas is around 20% and of CRC about 0.7% to 1.0% of the screenings. Seventy percent of the carcinomas detected during screening are in an early stage (UICC I and II). Furthermore, screening colonoscopy is a cost saving procedure with a low complication rate (0.25% overall). Insurance companies save 216€ for each screening colonoscopy mainly by prevention of neoplasia due to polypectomy. In Germany, virtual colonography by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging still lacks standardization of the hard and software. In experienced centres the sensitivity for CRC and large polyps of CT colonography is comparable to colonoscopy but in meta-analyses the ranking is lower. New technologies like computer-aided colonoscopies with sheath or double balloon techniques are coming up as well as capsule colonoscopy, which sensitivity for large polyps is about 70%. Advised by his physician, the patient can choose his most acceptable examination method from this whole set of screening tools.

  7. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  8. Pathophysiology of ocular surface squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi; Sagoo, Mandeep S.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is strongly associated with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). Africa has the highest incidence rates in the world. Most lesions occur at the limbus within the interpalpebral fissure particularly the nasal sector. The nasal limbus receives the highest intensity of sunlight. Limbal epithelial crypts are concentrated nasally and contain niches of limbal epithelial stem cells in the basal layer. It is possible that these are the progenitor cells in OSSN. OSSN arises in the basal epithelial cells spreading towards the surface which resembles the movement of corneo-limbal stem cell progeny before it later invades through the basement membrane below. UV radiation damages DNA producing pyrimidine dimers in the DNA chain. Specific CC → TT base pair dimer transformations of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene occur in OSSN allowing cells with damaged DNA past the G1-S cell cycle checkpoint. UV radiation also causes local and systemic photoimmunosuppression and reactivates latent viruses such as HPV. The E7 proteins of HPV promote proliferation of infected epithelial cells via the retinoblastoma gene while E6 proteins prevent the p53 tumour suppressor gene from effecting cell-cycle arrest of DNA-damaged and infected cells. Immunosuppression from UV radiation, HIV and vitamin A deficiency impairs tumour immune surveillance allowing survival of aberrant cells. Tumour growth and metastases are enhanced by; telomerase reactivation which increases the number of cell divisions a cell can undergo; vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that destroy the intercellular matrix between cells. Despite these potential triggers, the disease is usually unilateral. It is unclear how HPV reaches the conjunctiva. PMID:25447808

  9. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  10. [Hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic neoplasias].

    PubMed

    Wickenhauser, C

    2002-11-01

    Pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells have been defined as cells with extensive self-renewal capacity and lympho-hematopoietic differentiation potential. Clonal selection of a stem cell as a first step in the progression to neoplasia can be achieved by an alteration of this self-renewal potency. Our current understanding of the pathogenesis of the myeloproliferative disorders including acute myeloid leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), is based on the assumption that they represent a clonal disorder resulting from transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell. However, when performing methods for determining X-chromosome inactivation in female patients as a clonality marker, a significant minority of the patients with Philadelphia chromosome negative (Ph(-)) CMPD and MDS exhibit polyclonal proliferation. The implications of these results are not yet clarified and the lack of a proven target cell impairs the understanding of the underlying molecular defect. In this context, altered response to cytokine stimulation in vitro provides indirect information concerning molecular dysregulation. A subset of patients with MPD present with translocations that facilitate molecular investigation and clonality proof. They nearly always result in rearrangements of at least one transcription factor gene. Most of these fusion genes are constitutively active, sending out continuous proliferative and antiapoptotic signals or activate an overlapping set of signalling pathways. The classical example for a balanced translocation is the t(9;22) bcr-abl aberration in chronic myelogeneous leukemia. Many other karyotypic abnormalities have also been associated with CMPD and MDS and involve deletions of chromosomes 20q, 13q, 1q, 7q and 5q as well as trisomy of 8 and 9. Our increased understanding of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and the molecular basis of regulation of its self-renewal and differentiation bears a direct impact on

  11. Development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in chinchilla rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Montelongo Solís, Paola; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Cortés Trujillo, Lucero; Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to describe the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in Chinchilla rabbit by administration of estradiol. The study was performed in rabbits distributed into two groups: control and 17 β-estradiol. The determination of histological alterations and POU5F1 and c-kit proteins employed as biomarkers for the diagnosis of this neoplasia was carried out. Testicular descent and complete spermatogenesis were observed in the control group. The protein biomarkers were negative. However, in the rabbits treated with estradiol, the testes remained undescended with the gonocytes undifferentiated to spermatogonia. There were histological lesions owing to germ cell neoplasia in situ and positive to POU5F1 and c-kit proteins. These findings indicate that the chinchilla rabbit is an ideal model to study this neoplasia in which the histological characteristics and biomarkers of the disease could be clearly observed. Using this model we suggested that the persisting gonocytes could be responsible for the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ. PMID:26617392

  12. SCRIB expression is deregulated in human prostate cancer, and its deficiency in mice promotes prostate neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen B.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Dow, Lukas E.; Ryan, Andrew; Tennstedt, Pierre; Bogani, Debora; Elsum, Imogen; Greenfield, Andy; Tuveson, David A.; Simon, Ronald; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of cellular polarity is a hallmark of epithelial cancers, raising the possibility that regulators of polarity have a role in suppressing tumorigenesis. The Scribble complex is one of at least three interacting protein complexes that have a critical role in establishing and maintaining epithelial polarity. In human colorectal, breast, and endometrial cancers, expression of the Scribble complex member SCRIB is often mislocalized and deregulated. Here, we report that Scrib is indispensable for prostate homeostasis in mice. Scrib heterozygosity initiated prostate hyperplasia, while targeted biallelic Scrib loss predisposed mice to prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Mechanistically, Scrib was shown to negatively regulate the MAPK cascade to suppress tumorigenesis. Further analysis revealed that prostate-specific loss of Scrib in mice combined with expression of an oncogenic Kras mutation promoted the progression of prostate cancer that recapitulated the human disease. The clinical significance of the work in mice was highlighted by our observation that SCRIB deregulation strongly correlated with poor survival in human prostate cancer. These data suggest that the polarity network could provide a new avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21965329

  13. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer. A Phase I–II Multicenter Study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Tesselaar, Margot E.; Cats, Annemieke; Havenga, Klaas; Leer, Jan W. H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.; Jansen, Edwin P.; Van Krieken, Han H. J. M.; Wiggers, Theo; Van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of oxaliplatin added to capecitabine and radiotherapy (Capox-RT) as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Methods T3-4 rectal cancer patients received escalating doses of oxaliplatin (day 1 and 29) with a fixed dose of capecitabine of 1000 mg/m2 twice daily (days 1–14, 25–38) added to RT with 50.4 Gy and surgery after 6–8 weeks. The MTD, determined during phase I, was used in the subsequent phase II, in which R0 resection rate (a negative circumferential resection margin) was the primary end point. Results Twenty-one patients were evaluable. In the phase I part, oxaliplatin at 85 mg/m2 was established as MTD. In phase II, the main toxicity was grade III diarrhea (18%). All patients underwent surgery, and 20 patients had a resectable tumor. An R0 was achieved in 17/21 patients, downstaging to T0-2 in 7/21 and a pCR in 2/21. Conclusion Combination of Capox-RT has an acceptable acute toxicity profile and a high R0 resection rate of 81% in locally advanced rectal cancer. However the pCR rate was low. PMID:17653805

  14. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  15. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, E E; Deland, F H; Casper, S; Corgan, R L; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D M

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with 131-I at a total dose of at least 1.0 muCi. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the 131-I-labelled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with 131-I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the appraent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  16. Characteristics of and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in young adults in a screening population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Jo, Hee Bum; Kwack, Won Gun; Jeong, Yun Jin; Yoon, Yeo-Jin; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate prevalence and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in adults aged < 50 years, for whom screening is not recommended. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared prevalence and characteristics of colorectal and advanced adenomas in patients aged < 50 years who underwent colonoscopy screening with subjects aged ≥ 50 years. To evaluate risk factors for colorectal and advanced adenoma in young adults, we used multivariable logistic regression models. Colorectal neoplasm characteristics were evaluated and compared with those in older patients. RESULTS: Among 2819 patients included, prevalences of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma were 19.7% and 1.5%, respectively. As patient age increased, so did the prevalence of colorectal neoplasm. However, prevalence of advanced adenoma did not differ between age-groups 45-49 years and ≥ 50 years (OR = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.17-1.07, P = 0.070). In younger age-group (< 50 years), colorectal adenoma was significantly associated with older age, waist circumference (OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.15-2.55, P = 0.008), and current smoking (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.07-2.41, P = 0.023). Alcohol consumption was an independent risk factor for colorectal advanced adenoma (OR = 3.69, 95%CI: 1.08-12.54, P = 0.037). Multiple neoplasms and large neoplasms (≥ 1 cm) were more prevalent in subjects ≥ 50 years. CONCLUSION: Current screening strategies for colorectal cancer may need to be amended to account for patient age, especially in young subjects with abdominal obesity, current smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:26973394

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Aspirin and the risk of colorectal cancer in relation to the expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD).

    PubMed

    Fink, Stephen P; Yamauchi, Mai; Nishihara, Reiko; Jung, Seungyoun; Kuchiba, Aya; Wu, Kana; Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Markowitz, Sanford D; Chan, Andrew T

    2014-04-23

    Aspirin use reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia, at least in part, through inhibition of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, cyclooxygenase 2)-related pathways. Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-(nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) (15-PGDH, HPGD) is down-regulated in colorectal cancers and functions as a metabolic antagonist of PTGS2. We hypothesized that the effect of aspirin may be antagonized by low 15-PGDH expression in the normal colon. In the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, we collected data on aspirin use every 2 years and followed up participants for diagnoses of colorectal cancer. Duplication-method Cox proportional, multivariable-adjusted, cause-specific hazards regression for competing risks data was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) for incident colorectal cancer according to 15-PGDH mRNA expression level measured in normal mucosa from colorectal cancer resections. Among 127,865 participants, we documented 270 colorectal cancer cases from which we could assess 15-PGDH expression. Compared with nonuse, regular aspirin use was associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer that developed within a background of colonic mucosa with high 15-PGDH expression [multivariable HR, 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.71], but not with low 15-PGDH expression (multivariable HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.27) (P for heterogeneity = 0.018). Regular aspirin use was associated with lower incidence of colorectal cancers arising in association with high 15-PGDH expression, but not with low 15-PGDH expression in normal colon mucosa. This suggests that 15-PGDH expression level in normal colon mucosa may serve as a biomarker that may predict stronger benefit from aspirin chemoprevention. PMID:24760190

  19. High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia with squamous differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Melissari, M; Beltran, A Lopez; Mazzucchelli, R; Froio, E; Bostwick, D G; Montironi, R

    2006-01-01

    An unusual variant of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia with prominent and extensive squamous differentiation is described. The lesion was identified in the transition zone of a 79 year old man with a three year history of increasing urinary obstructive symptoms and a clinical diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent simple prostatectomy. Two years after surgery, prostatic biopsies showed atrophy and mild chronic inflammation, with no evidence of malignancy. This unusual intraepithelial lesion seems not to have been described before and may represent a new variant of high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) with squamous differentiation. PMID:16567473

  20. MLH1-deficient Colorectal Carcinoma With Wild-type BRAF and MLH1 Promoter Hypermethylation Harbor KRAS Mutations and Arise From Conventional Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Farchoukh, Lama; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2016-10-01

    Between 10% and 15% of colorectal carcinomas demonstrate sporadic DNA mismatch-repair protein deficiency as a result of MLH1 promoter methylation and are thought to arise from sessile serrated adenomas, termed the serrated neoplasia pathway. Although the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation is indicative of a sporadic cancer, up to 30% to 50% of colorectal carcinomas with MLH1 promoter hypermethylation will lack a BRAF mutation. We report the clinicopathologic and molecular features of MLH1-deficient colorectal carcinoma with wild-type BRAF and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation (referred to as MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinoma, n=36) in comparison with MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma (n=113) and Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n=36). KRAS mutations were identified in 31% of MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas compared with 0% of MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinomas and 37% of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinomas. When a precursor polyp was identified, MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas arose from precursor polyps resembling conventional tubular/tubulovillous adenomas in contrast to MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinomas, which arose from precursor sessile serrated adenomas (P<0.001). Both MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinoma and MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma had a predilection for the right colon compared with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (86% vs. 92% vs. 49%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in mucinous differentiation, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, Crohn-like reaction, and medullary differentiation between the 3 tumor groups. Using Kaplan-Meier survival functions, there was no significant difference in disease-specific survival between the 3 patient groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, our results indicate that MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas

  1. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  2. Association of human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression with human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Henry, M J; Stanley, M W; Cruikshank, S; Carson, L

    1989-02-01

    Human papillomavirus infection plays an important causal role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. The rate of infection with human papillomavirus as well as the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma are increased in immunosuppressed patients. We report a possible association between infection with human immunodeficiency virus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with human papillomavirus infection.

  3. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with clinical and molecular features in colorectal serrated pathway.

    PubMed

    Ito, Miki; Kanno, Shinichi; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Takahashi, Taiga; Tachibana, Mami; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Yoshii, Shinji; Takenouchi, Toshinao; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Okita, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-09-15

    Human gut microbiota is being increasingly recognized as a player in colorectal cancers (CRCs). Evidence suggests that Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) may contribute to disease progression and is associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and microsatellite instability (MSI) in CRCs; however, to date, there are no reports about the relationship between F. nucleatum and molecular features in the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. Therefore, we investigated the presence of F. nucleatum in premalignant colorectal lesions. In total, 465 premalignant lesions (343 serrated lesions and 122 non-serrated adenomas) and 511 CRCs were studied. We determined the presence of F. nucleatum and analyzed its association with molecular features including CIMP, MSI and microRNA-31 status. F. nucleatum was detected in 24% of hyperplastic polyps, 35% of sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 30% of traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) and 33% of non-serrated adenomas. F. nucleatum was more frequently detected in CIMP-high premalignant lesions than in CIMP-low/zero lesions (p = 0.0023). In SSAs, F. nucleatum positivity increased gradually from sigmoid colon to cecum (p = 0.042). F. nucleatum positivity was significantly higher in CRCs (56%) than in premalignant lesions of any histological type (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, F. nucleatum was identified in premalignant colorectal lesions regardless of histopathology but was more frequently associated with CIMP-high lesions. Moreover, F. nucleatum positivity increased according to histological grade, suggesting that it may contribute to the progression of colorectal neoplasia. Our data also indicate that F. nucleatum positivity in SSAs may support the "colorectal continuum" concept.

  4. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  5. Coffee intake and the risk of colorectal adenoma: The colorectal adenoma study in Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-07-15

    Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage which contains several potential anticarcinogenic and chemopreventive compounds, and has been hypothesized to have protective effects in colorectal neoplasia. However, the limited available data on coffee consumption in relation to colorectal adenoma (CRA), a precursor lesion to most colorectal cancers, remain largely inconsistent. In this study, we evaluated the association of coffee intake with the risk of CRA in a middle-aged Japanese population. Study subjects were selected from examinees who underwent total colonoscopy as part of a cancer screening program and responded to self-administered dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. A total of 738 patients with adenoma and 697 controls were included in the study. Coffee intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and divided into quartiles based on the distribution among controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of CRA, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. High coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of CRA, with a multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quartile of coffee intake of 0.67 (95% CI = 0.48-0.93; ptrend  = 0.02). The inverse association of coffee intake was limited to proximal (OR = 0.64; 95%CI = 0.44-0.95; ptrend  = 0.04) and distal colon adenoma (OR = 0.62; 95%CI = 0.39-0.99; ptrend  = 0.06), and appeared to be more evident with small (OR = 0.68; 95%CI = 0.49-0.96; ptrend  = 0.04) and single adenomas (OR = 0.65; 95%CI = 0.44-0.95; ptrend  = 0.02). Green tea intake was not found to be associated with CRA risk. This study provides support for the protective effect of coffee drinking on colon adenomas, a precursor of colon cancer.

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Mosconi, Stefania; Quadri, Antonello; Milesi, Laura; Labianca, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer in industrialized countries. Despite improved resection procedures and optimized adjuvant chemotherapy, local or distant recurrences occur in 22-25% of patients with stage II/III colon cancer. Approximately 30% of patients have advanced disease at presentation. The liver is the most common site of colorectal metastases and, interestingly, 20-30% of patients with colorectal cancer have liver-only metastases. The combined modality of chemotherapy and surgery increases overall survival and the chance of cure for metastatic patients, even if there is no agreement in terms of the best schedule and how long the treatment must last. In this paper, we review the role and the rationale of neoadjuvant chemotherapy within a multimodal approach, and discuss remaining questions and future directions.

  7. In vivo and in vitro hyperspectral imaging of cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojian; Zheng, Wenli; Bu, Yanggao; Chang, Shufang; Tong, Qingping; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a prevalent disease in many developing countries. Colposcopy is the most common approach for screening cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, its clinical efficacy heavily relies on the examiner's experience. Spectroscopy is a potentially effective method for noninvasive diagnosis of cervical neoplasia. In this paper, we introduce a hyperspectral imaging technique for noninvasive detection and quantitative analysis of cervical neoplasia. A hyperspectral camera is used to collect the reflectance images of the entire cervix under xenon lamp illumination, followed by standard colposcopy examination and cervical tissue biopsy at both normal and abnormal sites in different quadrants. The collected reflectance data are calibrated and the hyperspectral signals are extracted. Further spectral analysis and image processing works are carried out to classify tissue into different types based on the spectral characteristics at different stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The hyperspectral camera is also coupled with a lab microscope to acquire the hyperspectral transmittance images of the pathological slides. The in vivo and the in vitro imaging results are compared with clinical findings to assess the accuracy and efficacy of the method.

  8. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  9. Cell-based Immunotherapy for Colorectal Cancer with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cancer worldwide. Although incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are gradually decreasing in the US, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have poor prognosis with an estimated 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Over the past decade, advances in combination chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer have led to significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival. However, patients with metastatic disease gain little clinical benefit from conventional therapy, which is associated with grade 3~4 toxicity with negative effects on quality of life. In previous clinical studies, cell-based immunotherapy using dendritic cell vaccines and sentinel lymph node T cell therapy showed promising therapeutic results for metastatic colorectal cancer. In our preclinical and previous clinical studies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells treatment for colorectal cancer showed favorable responses without toxicities. Here, we review current treatment options for colorectal cancer and summarize available clinical studies utilizing cell-based immunotherapy. Based on these studies, we recommend the use CIK cell therapy as a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27162526

  10. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  11. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  12. Endocrinopathies in survivors of childhood neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Nicole; Chemaitilly, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in cancer treatments have increased the number of survivors of childhood cancers. Endocrinopathies are common complications following cancer therapy and may occur decades later. The objective of the current review is to address the main endocrine abnormalities detected in childhood cancer survivors including disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, thyroid, puberty, gonads, bone, body composition, and glucose metabolism.

  13. Endocrinopathies in Survivors of Childhood Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Nicole; Chemaitilly, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in cancer treatments have increased the number of survivors of childhood cancers. Endocrinopathies are common complications following cancer therapy and may occur decades later. The objective of the current review is to address the main endocrine abnormalities detected in childhood cancer survivors including disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, thyroid, puberty, gonads, bone, body composition, and glucose metabolism. PMID:25295241

  14. Reptile neoplasia at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden, 1901-2002.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Trupkiewicz, John G

    2006-03-01

    A retrospective study of neoplasia in reptiles held at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden was conducted. A total of 3,684 original necropsy reports for the period 1901-2002 were reviewed and revealed 86 cases of neoplasia. Original glass slides or re-cuts from paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were examined for confirmation of the original diagnosis. At necropsy, a total of six neoplasms were identified in six of 490 chelonians (1.2%), 22 neoplasms in 19 of 736 lizards (3.0%), and 58 neoplasms in 53 of 1,835 snakes (2.9%). An additional 12 neoplasms were found in biopsies of one turtle and 10 snakes. In the chelonians, all the neoplasms were seen in turtles, four of six tumors were malignant (66%) and no organ predilection was noted. For lizards, the liver was the most commonly affected organ, with 7 of 22 primary neoplasms (31%). Multiple tumor types were identified in three lizards (15%), metastasis occurred in five cases (25%), and malignant tumors were identified in 16 cases (73%). In snakes, the liver was most frequently affected by neoplasia at necropsy, with 13 of 58 primary neoplasms (22%); multiple types of neoplasm were identified in five cases (10%) and metastasis in six (9%); and 42 tumors (80%) were diagnosed as malignant. When biopsies were included for snakes, however, the skin was the most commonly affected organ, with 17 of 69 neoplasms (24%). One of five lizards (20%) and four of six snakes (66%) with metastasis also had a second primary neoplasm. Since 1967, the incidence of lizard neoplasia has increased from 0.7% to 5.9%, and snake neoplasia has increased from 2.6% to 9.3%.

  15. Colorectal cancer: from prevention to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Alex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-06-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  16. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  17. Prospective cohort comparison of flavonoid treatment in patients with resected colorectal cancer to prevent recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Hoensch, Harald; Groh, Bertram; Edler, Lutz; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate biological prevention with flavonoids the recurrence risk of neoplasia was studied in patients with resected colorectal cancer and after adenoma polypectomy. METHODS: Eighty-seven patients, 36 patients with resected colon cancer and 51 patients after polypectomy, were divided into 2 groups: one group was treated with a flavonoid mixture (daily standard dose 20 mg apigenin and 20 mg epigallocathechin-gallat, n = 31) and compared with a matched control group (n = 56). Both groups were observed for 3-4 years by surveillance colonoscopy and by questionnaire. RESULTS: Of 87 patients enrolled in this study, 36 had resected colon cancer and 29 of these patients had surveillance colonoscopy. Among the flavonoid-treated patients with resected colon cancer (n = 14), there was no cancer recurrence and one adenoma developed. In contrast the cancer recurrence rate of the 15 matched untreated controls was 20% (3 of 15) and adenomas evolved in 4 of those patients (27%). The combined recurrence rate for neoplasia was 7% (1 of 14) in the treated patients and 47% (7 of 15) in the controls (P = 0.027). CONCLUSION: Sustained long-term treatment with a flavonoid mixture could reduce the recurrence rate of colon neoplasia in patients with resected colon cancer. PMID:18407592

  18. Metastatic colorectal cancer in a cirrhotic liver with synchronous hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karass, Michael; Grossniklaus, Emily; Seoud, Talal; Kamel, Ralph; Teniola, Oluwadamilola; Oprea, Gabriela; Goldstein, Daniel A; Jain, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    We are reporting a case of a patient with a previous history of colorectal cancer (CRC) and cirrhosis, who developed concurrent liver lesions consistent with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); a case which is unique due to the low incidence of multiple cancers, particularly HCC in the setting of previous advanced colorectal carcinoma along, in a cirrhotic liver. We will review the known literature on multiple cancer rates found in patients with known colorectal carcinoma. We will then outline this particular patient's presentation, followed by a discussion as to why the particular concurrent development of HCC in the setting of previous CRC is of note.

  19. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26393651

  20. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  1. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hance, J; Rockall, T; Darzi, A

    2004-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been shown to offer many advantages to general surgical patients but has not been widely adopted for colorectal disease. Initial fears surrounding the oncological safety of laparoscopic colectomies have largely subsided but the technical challenges still remain. Surgical robots or telemanipulators present the laparoscopic surgeon with unrivaled dexterity and vision, which may allow colonic resections to be completed with greater ease. Although initial studies suggest promising results using currently available systems, it will take further time for patient benefits to be proven, therefore justifying the greater expense of operating with this new technology.

  2. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  3. Fecal immunochemical test accuracy in average-risk colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Vicent; Cubiella, Joaquin; Gonzalez-Mao, M Carmen; Iglesias, Felipe; Rivera, Concepción; Iglesias, M Begoña; Cid, Lucía; Castro, Ines; de Castro, Luisa; Vega, Pablo; Hermo, Jose Antonio; Macenlle, Ramiro; Martínez-Turnes, Alfonso; Martínez-Ares, David; Estevez, Pamela; Cid, Estela; Vidal, M Carmen; López-Martínez, Angeles; Hijona, Elisabeth; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Rodriguez-Prada, Jose Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) accuracy for colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced neoplasia (AN) detection in CRC screening. METHODS: We performed a multicentric, prospective, double blind study of diagnostic tests on asymptomatic average-risk individuals submitted to screening colonoscopy. Two stool samples were collected and the fecal hemoglobin concentration was determined in the first sample (FIT1) and the highest level of both samples (FITmax) using the OC-sensor™. Areas under the curve (AUC) for CRC and AN were calculated. The best FIT1 and FITmax cut-off values for CRC were determined. At this threshold, number needed to scope (NNS) to detect a CRC and an AN and the cost per lesion detected were calculated. RESULTS: About 779 individuals were included. An AN was found in 97 (12.5%) individuals: a CRC in 5 (0.6%) and an advanced adenoma (≥ 10 mm, villous histology or high grade dysplasia) in 92 (11.9%) subjects. For CRC diagnosis, FIT1 AUC was 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.98) and FITmax AUC was 0.95 (95%CI: 0.93-0.97). For AN, FIT1 and FITmax AUC were similar (0.72, 95%CI: 0.66-0.78 vs 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68-0.79, respectively, P = 0.34). Depending on the number of determinations and the positivity threshold cut-off used sensitivity for AN detection ranged between 28% and 42% and specificity between 91% and 97%. At the best cut-off point for CRC detection (115 ng/mL), the NNS to detect a CRC were 10.2 and 15.8; and the cost per CRC was 1814€ and 2985€ on FIT1 and FITmax strategies respectively. At this threshold the sensitivity, NNS and cost per AN detected were 30%, 1.76, and 306€, in FIT1 strategy, and 36%, 2.26€ and 426€, in FITmax strategy, respectively. CONCLUSION: Performing two tests does not improve diagnostic accuracy, but increases cost and NNS to detect a lesion. PMID:24574776

  4. The Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Gene Is Prevalent in the Colon Mucosa of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boleij, Annemarie; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Goodwin, Andrew C.; Badani, Ruchi; Stein, Ellen M.; Lazarev, Mark G.; Ellis, Brandon; Carroll, Karen C.; Albesiano, Emilia; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) produces the Bacteroides fragilis toxin, which has been associated with acute diarrheal disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and colorectal cancer (CRC). ETBF induces colon carcinogenesis in experimental models. Previous human studies have demonstrated frequent asymptomatic fecal colonization with ETBF, but no study has investigated mucosal colonization that is expected to impact colon carcinogenesis. Methods. We compared the presence of the bft gene in mucosal samples from colorectal neoplasia patients (cases, n = 49) to a control group undergoing outpatient colonoscopy for CRC screening or diagnostic workup (controls, n = 49). Single bacterial colonies isolated anaerobically from mucosal colon tissue were tested for the bft gene with touch-down polymerase chain reaction. Results. The mucosa of cases was significantly more often bft-positive on left (85.7%) and right (91.7%) tumor and/or paired normal tissues compared with left and right control biopsies (53.1%; P = .033 and 55.5%; P = .04, respectively). Detection of bft was concordant in most paired mucosal samples from individual cases or controls (75% cases; 67% controls). There was a trend toward increased bft positivity in mucosa from late- vs early-stage CRC patients (100% vs 72.7%, respectively; P = .093). In contrast to ETBF diarrheal disease where bft-1 detection dominates, bft-2 was the most frequent toxin isotype identified in both cases and controls, whereas multiple bft isotypes were detected more frequently in cases (P ≤ .02). Conclusions. The bft gene is associated with colorectal neoplasia, especially in late-stage CRC. Our results suggest that mucosal bft exposure is common and may be a risk factor for developing CRC. PMID:25305284

  5. Association between Cysticercosis and Neoplasia: A Study Based on Autopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Ribeiro, Grace Kelly Naves de Aquino; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infections including the cysticercosis induce inflammatory cells to produce free radicals and synthesize carcinogenic toxins. The cells with genetic mutations proliferate in a disorganized manner, leading to the development of neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the relation between cysticercosis and neoplasia. Patients autopsied were divided into 4 groups: patients with neoplasia and cysticercosis (NC), patients with neoplasia only (NN), patients with cysticercosis only (CC), and patients without neoplasia or cysticercosis (WW). Of 2012 autopsy reports analyzed, 0.4 showed NC. In groups CC and NC, the most common location of the parasite was the brain. There was a predominance of three or more cysticerci in groups NC and CC. In the NC group, all had malignant neoplasms, and was predominance of benign neoplasm in NN group. The digestive system was the most frequent neoplasia. By calculating odds ratio, rate of neoplasia in patients with cysticercosis was 0.74. In conclusion, the demographic profile of patients with cysticercosis and neoplasia is similar to that of patients with cysticercosis alone. The incidence of cysticercosis and neoplasia was greater in older patients suggesting that immunosenescence may contribute to development of neoplasia promoted by cysticercosis. PMID:24288510

  6. Pharmacologic resistance in colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, William A.; Swaika, Abhisek; Mody, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) persists as one of the most prevalent and deadly tumor types in both men and women worldwide. This is in spite of widespread, effective measures of preventive screening, and also major advances in treatment options. Despite advances in cytotoxic and targeted therapy, resistance to chemotherapy remains one of the greatest challenges in long-term management of incurable metastatic disease and eventually contributes to death as tumors accumulate means of evading treatment. We performed a comprehensive literature search on the data available through PubMed, Medline, Scopus, and the ASCO Annual Symposium abstracts through June 2015 for the purpose of this review. We discuss the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies now in use for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26753006

  7. [Metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma in a child with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B. Efficiency of medium-term treatment with vandetanib without thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Segura, D; Dupuis, C; Chabre, O; Piolat, C; Durand, C; Plantaz, D

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare cancer during childhood. MTC is sporadic in approximately 80% of cases and hereditary in 20%. When hereditary, it can be associated with other endocrine neoplasias and/or typical nonendocrine diseases, thus configuring the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes. Children with clinically obvious MTC belong to MEN 2A or 2B families, related to RET mutations. The standard treatment is total thyroidectomy and central neck dissection. However, treatment of advanced MTC has not yet been standardized, even if a new tyrosine kinase inhibitor specific to RET mutation has changed the outcome of such patients. Vandetanib plays a role in the treatment of children with metastatic, locally advanced and nonoperable MTC, with good tolerance. We report the 5-year treatment of an 11-year-old patient, with vandetanib and without thyroid surgery. PMID:27345554

  8. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Dairy products, polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene and colorectal adenoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hubner, Richard A; Muir, Kenneth R; Liu, Jo-Fen; Logan, Richard F A; Grainge, Matthew J; Houlston, Richard S

    2008-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) activation inhibits proliferation and angiogenesis in the colorectal epithelium, and inhibits metastasis of colorectal tumors. Polymorphisms in the VDR gene alter receptor cellular levels and functioning, and may confer altered susceptibility to colorectal neoplasia. We aimed to investigate the influence of VDR polymorphisms and dietary factors impacting on vitamin D metabolism on colorectal adenoma (CRA) recurrence. Data on dietary intakes of calcium, vitamin D and dairy products were collected from 853 participants in the United Kingdom Colorectal Adenoma Prevention trial, a randomized trial of aspirin and folate for CRA recurrence prevention. The VDR Cdx2, FokI, BsmI, ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms were genotyped in 546 participants with available DNA, and gene-diet interaction analyses performed in 480. Dairy product intake was inversely related to CRA recurrence risk independent of calcium and vitamin D [relative risk (RR) = 0.64; 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.47-0.88, for subjects in the highest compared to lowest intake tertile, p(trend) = 0.005]. Milk accounted for 60% of dairy product intake, and on analysis of milk and nonmilk dairy products separately recurrence risk in individuals in the highest tertile of milk intake was half that of lowest tertile individuals (RR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.38-0.72, p(trend) = 3.2 x 10(-5)), whereas nonmilk dairy products did not influence recurrence. VDR polymorphism genotypes and haplotypes did not directly alter recurrence risk, but the reduction in risk associated with high dairy product intake was confined to individuals with ApaI aA/AA genotype (p(interaction) = 0.02). These findings indicate dairy products, and in particular milk, have chemopreventive activity against CRA recurrence. PMID:18470879

  10. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer.

  11. Establishing the link between hepatitis B virus infection and colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lipka, Seth; Shen, Huafeng; Davis-Yadley, Ashley H.; Viswanathan, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection has been associated with malignancy, most notably hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous research has shown that hepatitis C is associated with increased colorectal adenomas and neoplasia. Currently, there are no studies on the association of CHB and colorectal adenomas. We aimed to identify a possible link between CHB and colorectal adenoma. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on 588 consecutive patients undergoing screening or diagnostic colonoscopy that were previously screened or diagnosed with hepatitis B. Comparisons between categorical variables were analyzed with Chi Square test and t-test for continuous variables. Unconditional logistic regression was used to generate age-, gender-and race-adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing medication users with non-users. Statistical analyses were performed with SAS 9.3 software. Results A total of 487 patients were analyzed in the control group vs. 71 in the hepatitis B group. The adenoma detection rate was 23.9% in hepatitis B vs. 15.9% in the non-hepatitis B group for all cause colonoscopy; however this did not reach statistical significance. There was a significantly higher number of adenomas present in the distal colon compared to control (OR =2.16; 95% CI, 1.06-4.43; P=0.04). There were no significant findings between hepatitis B infection with size, multiplicity or presence of proximal adenomas. There was a significant difference noted in regards to smoking history, BMI and age between two groups. Conclusions Although the adenoma detection rate was higher in hepatitis B population vs. the non-hepatitis B group this did not reach statistical significance. However, we did find an association between CHB infection and the presence of distal colorectal adenomas. Larger prospective studies are needed to strengthen our findings along with future studies examining hepatitis B virus (HBV) and mechanisms inducing colorectal

  12. HPP1: A transmembrane protein-encoding gene commonly methylated in colorectal polyps and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanne; Biden, Kelli G.; Simms, Lisa A.; Huggard, Phillip; Karamatic, Rozemary; Eyre, Helen J.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Herath, Nirmitha; Barker, Melissa; Anderson, Gregory J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Ramm, Grant A.; Jass, Jeremy R.; Leggett, Barbara A.

    2001-01-01

    Adenomas are the precursors of most colorectal cancers. Hyperplastic polyps have been linked to the subset of colorectal cancers showing DNA microsatellite instability, but little is known of their underlying genetic etiology. Using a strategy that isolates differentially methylated sequences from hyperplastic polyps and normal mucosa, we identified a 370-bp sequence containing the 5′ untranslated region and the first exon of a gene that we have called HPP1. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to isolate HPP1 from normal mucosa. Using reverse transcription–PCR, HPP1 was expressed in 28 of 30 (93%) normal colonic samples but in only seven of 30 (23%) colorectal cancers (P < 0.001). The 5′ region of HPP1 included a CpG island containing 49 CpG sites, of which 96% were found to be methylated by bisulfite sequencing of DNA from colonic tumor samples. By COBRA analysis, methylation was detected in six of nine (66%) adenomas, 17 of 27 (63%) hyperplastic polyps, and 46 of 55 (84%) colorectal cancers. There was an inverse relationship between methylation level and mRNA expression in cancers (r = −0.67; P < 0.001), and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment restored HPP1 expression in two colorectal cancer cell lines. In situ hybridization of HPP1 indicated that expression occurs in epithelial and stromal elements in normal mucosa but is silenced in both cell types in early colonic neoplasia. HPP1 is predicted to encode a transmembrane protein containing follistatin and epidermal growth factor-like domains. Silencing of HPP1 by methylation may increase the probability of neoplastic transformation. PMID:11120884

  13. Targeting mTOR network in colorectal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates growth factor signals with cellular nutrient and energy levels and coordinates cell growth, proliferation and survival. A regulatory network with multiple feedback loops has evolved to ensure the exquisite regulation of cell growth and division. Colorectal cancer is the most intensively studied cancer because of its high incidence and mortality rate. Multiple genetic alterations are involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, including oncogenic Ras activation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway hyperactivation, p53 mutation, and dysregulation of wnt pathway. Many oncogenic pathways activate the mTOR pathway. mTOR has emerged as an effective target for colorectal cancer therapy. In vitro and preclinical studies targeting the mTOR pathway for colorectal cancer chemotherapy have provided promising perspectives. However, the overall objective response rates in major solid tumors achieved with single-agent rapalog therapy have been modest, especially in advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination regimens of mTOR inhibitor with agents such as cytotoxic chemotherapy, inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor and Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors are being intensively studied and appear to be promising. Further understanding of the molecular mechanism in mTOR signaling network is needed to develop optimized therapeutic regimens. In this paper, oncogenic gene alterations in colorectal cancer, as well as their interaction with the mTOR pathway, are systematically summarized. The most recent preclinical and clinical anticancer therapeutic endeavors are reviewed. New players in mTOR signaling pathway, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and metformin with therapeutic potentials are also discussed here. PMID:24764656

  14. Piroxicam decreases postirradiation colonic neoplasia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Scobey, M.W.; Cassidy, K.T.; Geisinger, K.R. )

    1990-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent piroxicam on chronic radiation proctitis in the rat. Forty female Wistar rats received a 2250-cGy dose of irradiation to the distal 2 cm of the colon. Twenty received piroxicam 8.0 mg/kg orally 30 minutes before exposure and 24 hours after exposure; 20 rats served as irradiated controls. All animals were evaluated by colonoscopy 1 and 3 weeks postexposure and every third week until death or killing at 1 year. At killing, colons were removed for light microscopic examination. One year postirradiation results showed no differences in mortality, vascular changes, acute inflammation, colitis cystica profunda, or rectal stricture between the control and piroxicam-treated groups. However, at 1 year postirradiation the control group demonstrated neoplasia in 15 of 19 animals compared with eight of 20 animals in the piroxicam-treated group. The first endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasm occurred at 15 weeks postirradiation in one control irradiated rat whereas the first evidence of endoscopic neoplasm in the piroxicam-treated group did not occur until 36 weeks postirradiation. Histologic examination documented a tendency toward a greater presence of adenocarcinomas in the control group compared with the piroxicam-treated group. The authors conclude that piroxicam treatment significantly decreased the incidence of colonic neoplasia in general as well as delayed the endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasia in rats after pelvic irradiation. 41 references.

  15. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  16. Slow progression of periampullary neoplasia in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Moozar, Kouros L; Madlensky, Lisa; Berk, Terri; Gallinger, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Variable endoscopic surveillance protocols and treatment strategies have been proposed for periampullary neoplasia in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), primarily because of the lack of long-term, prospective natural history data. A total of 115 patients with FAP were followed prospectively for 10 years with periodic side-viewing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy by a single surgeon. The appearance of the duodenum was classified as stages 1 to 5. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance for age comparisons between stage groupings and Kaplan-Meier analysis for the lifetime risks of having a particular stage of duodenal polyposis. Eighty-seven patients had multiple endoscopies over an average of 6.6 years. Thirty-three subjects had a change in stage, within an average time of 3.9 years at an average age of 41 years. The risk of having stage 3 or 4 duodenal neoplasia increased exponentially after the age of 40. The degree of dysplasia did not correlate with stage at initial classification. Progression of neoplasia in the duodenum of patients with FAP is slow. The severity of duodenal polyposis increases with age and is not influenced by the initial stage. The average time for progression of adenoma to carcinoma is likely long. PMID:12504221

  17. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  18. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Troiani, Teresa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF) is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor. Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated dose yet defined. PMID:21221177

  19. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy through a Port-Catheter System as Preoperative Initial Therapy in Patients with Advanced Liver Dysfunction due to Synchronous and Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Arai, Yasuaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Miyazaki, Masaya; Shimamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of preoperative initial hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) through a port-catheter system in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases. The aim of HAIC was to improve patients' clinical condition for later surgical removal of primary colorectal cancer. Methods. Port-catheter systems were placed radiologically in 21 patients (mean age 58.6 {+-} 8.1 years) with liver dysfunction due to synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Initial HAIC of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil was administered weekly as a 5 hr continuous infusion through this system. Surgical removal of the primary lesion was planned after HAIC improved the liver function. Results. Port-catheter system placement was successful in all patients without severe complications. Patients were followed up for a median of 309 days (range 51-998 days). After starting HAIC, no severe adverse events that caused drug loss and treatment postponement or suspension were observed in any of the patients. HAIC was performed a mean of 4.5 {+-} 3.0 times and the liver function improved in all patients. Curative (n = 18) or palliative (n = 1) surgical removal of the primary lesion was performed. The remaining 2 patients died because extrahepatic metastases developed and their performance status worsened; thus, surgery could not be performed. The median survival times of all patients and the operated patients were 309 and 386 days, respectively. Conclusion. Initial HAIC administration is a safe and efficacious method for improving liver function prior to operative resection of primary colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases.

  20. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  1. [Colorectal cancer in children: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Liliana; Oscanoa, Mónica; Maza, Iván; Gerónimo, Jenny; Tarrillo, Fanny; Latorre, Alan; Frisancho, Oscar; Llatas, Juan

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is extremely infrequent in children and adolescents. There is little information about this entity, mainly case reports and review articles. We describe three cases of children with poor-differentiated colorectal carcinoma and advanced disease at onset. The presenting symptoms were abdominal pain and constipation, with a median of latency of symptoms of 4-48 months. None of these patients had operable disease at onset; having a disease progression despite therapy in two cases. This study reaffirms poor prognosis of pediatric CRC, probably due to an aggressive tumoral biology and advanced stage at diagnosis. Therapeutic guidelines are based in adult treatment; therefore, efforts should be made to improve tools in early diagnosis and future therapies for a better survival in childhood. PMID:25293994

  2. The Multidisciplinary Management of Colorectal Cancer: Present and Future Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Chelsie K; Kratz, Jeremy D; Zurbriggen, Luke D; LoConte, Noelle K; Lubner, Sam J; Uboha, Natalya; Mulkerin, Daniel; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Deming, Dustin A

    2016-09-01

    As treatment strategies for patients with colorectal cancer advance, there has now become an ever-increasing need for multidisciplinary teams to care for these patients. Recent investigations into the timing and duration of perioperative therapy, as well as, the rise of molecular profiling have led to more systemic chemotherapeutic options. The most efficacious use, in terms of timing and patient selection, of these therapies in the setting of modern operative and radiotherapy techniques requires the generation of care teams discussing cases at multidisciplinary conferences. This review highlights the role of multidisciplinary team conferences, advances in perioperative chemotherapy, current clinical biomarkers, and emerging therapeutic agents for molecular subtypes of metastatic colon cancer. As our understanding of relevant molecular subtypes increases and as data becomes available on treatment response, the treatment of colorectal cancer will become more precise and effective. PMID:27582648

  3. Can colorectal cancer be prevented or treated by oral hormone replacement therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Li, P.; Lin, J.E.; Schulz, S.; Pitari, G.M.; Waldman, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) is the receptor specifically expressed by intestinal cells for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin and diarrheagenic bacterial heat-stable enterotoxins. This tissue-specific receptor coordinates lineage-dependent regulation of epithelial homeostasis, and its disruption contributes to intestinal tumorigenesis. It coordinates regenerative and metabolic circuits by restricting the cell cycle and proliferation and programming metabolic transitions central to organizing the dynamic crypt-surface axis. Further, mice deficient in GCC signaling are more susceptible to colon cancer induced by Apc mutations or the carcinogen azoxymethane. Moreover, guanylin and uroguanylin are gene products most commonly lost, early, in colon cancer in animals and humans. The role of GCC as a tumor suppressing receptor regulating proliferation and metabolism, together with the universal loss of guanylin and uroguanylin in tumorigenesis, suggests a model in which colorectal cancer is a paracrine hormone deficiency syndrome. In that context, activation of GCC reverses the tumorigenic phenotype by limiting growth of colorectal cancer cells by restricting progression through the G1/S transition and reprogramming metabolic circuits from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, limiting bioenergetic support for rapid proliferation. These observations suggest a pathophysiological hypothesis in which GCC is a lineage-dependent tumor suppressing receptor coordinating proliferative homeostasis whose dysregulation through hormone loss contributes to neoplasia. The correlative therapeutic hypothesis suggests that colorectal cancer is a disease of hormone insufficiency that can be prevented or treated by oral supplementation with GCC ligands. PMID:20021465

  4. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility. PMID:15042511

  5. The efficacy of autofluorescence imaging in the diagnosis of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Moriichi, Kentaro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2016-08-01

    Image-enhanced endoscopy (IEE) has been developed and is applied in the clinical setting throughout the world. Most reports regarding IEE have evaluated the efficacy of narrow-band imaging (NBI) in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. Although autofluorescence imaging (AFI) is a form of IEE, its usefulness remains unclear. The present review focused on the efficacy of AFI in the diagnosis of colorectal disease, particularly neoplasia and ulcerative colitis (UC). AFI-based diagnoses are made via the subjective judgment of the color on the monitor. The efficacy of AFI in detection and differentiation in patients with colorectal neoplastic lesions remains controversial, which may be dependent on the study design and the diagnostic procedures. Although the number of the reports related to UC is very small, most suggest that AFI is effective in UC patients. AFI is distinct from other modalities in that it can quantitatively assess the lesion based on the fluorescence intensity without any morphological assessments. AFI could be useful for patients with colorectal disease. PMID:27294612

  6. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility.

  7. Experimental colon neoplasia enhanced by extract of sperm (protamine).

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R K; Quill, D S; Dudley, H A

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of colorectal tumorigenesis in inbred rats given the potent carcinogen dimethylhydrazine has shown that protamine, given before any tumours had developed, significantly enhanced the development of large bowel tumours (100% incidence). Those animals having no adjuvant therapy or who received either heparin or 5-fluorouracil (alone or in combination) had an approximate 50% incidence of such tumours. PMID:6492040

  8. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-12-27

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented.

  9. Biomolecular markers as determinants of patients selection for adjuvant chemotherapy of sporadic colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Sudoyo, Aru W

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease classified and based on genetic alteration resulting from interaction of environmental factors, individual cancer susceptibility and accumulated somatic changes of the colorectal epithelium. Advanced knowledge in genetics and epigenetics of colorectal cancer develops a hypothesis that various clinical manifestations of colorectal cancer are caused by different carcinogenesis pathways. Different carcinogenesis pathways and types of colorectal cancer appear to bring effects on different response against chemotherapy and prognosis. Chemotherapy is mainly provided for patients with stage III CRC which are also the largest proportion of CRC patients in Indonesia. However, it is also provided for some patients with high risk stage II CRC. Classically, clinical factors have been generally accepted as prognostic factors including depth of tumor invasion, regional nodal metastasis, vascular invasion, poor differentiation, and serologic tumor marker such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). However, clinical and histopathological factors themselves do not provide accurate prediction for colorectal cancer prognosis and treatment. A biomolecular marker is necessary to provide such prediction. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the molecular biological markers in order to determine either the possibility of successful treatment for colorectal cancer (predictive factor) or life-expectancy (prognostic factor). Results of several studies demonstrate different status of some molecular markers to determine successful treatment between stage II and stage III colorectal cancer. Certainly, such finding should be followed up but it shall be accepted that there will be a shift of paradigm of CRC treatment. Therefore, the success of colorectal cancer, excluding the patient's socioeconomic factors and the surgeon's skill, will depend extremely on molecular parameter and not only the stage.

  10. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, S N; Sanz-Pamplona, R; Brix, S; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Moreno, V

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  11. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  12. Squamous morules are functionally inert elements of premalignant endometrial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Lomo, Lesley; Baak, Jan P A; Eng, Charis; Ince, Tan A; Crum, Christopher P; Mutter, George L

    2009-02-01

    Squamous morules are a common component of premalignant glandular lesions that are followed by glandular, rather than squamous, carcinomas. We tested the hypothesis that the appearance of glands associated with morules predicts cancer risk, and undertook molecular testing to determine the clonal and hormonal response properties of admixed squamous and glandular elements. A total of 66 patients with squamous morules in an index endometrial biopsy had follow-up clinical data (average follow-up: interval 31 months, 2.5 biopsies) showing development of carcinoma in 11% (7/66) of cases. The histological appearance of morule-associated glands in the index biopsy was significantly associated with this clinical outcome, with the majority (71%, 5/7) of cancer occurrences following an overtly premalignant lesion (endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia) with squamous morules. Eight endometrial intraepithelial neoplasias with squamous morules were examined by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and mitotic activity (Ki-67 antigen percent stained). Glandular components had abundant estrogen and progesterone receptors, and high levels of mitotic activity in all cases. In sharp contrast, all squamous morules were devoid of sex hormone receptors and had undetectable or extremely low-proliferation rates. When mutated, the same specific PTEN mutation was detected in squamous and glandular elements, indicating that both are of common lineage. The clinical and laboratory data are consistent with a model of morule biology in which squamous morules are a hormonally incompetent subpopulation of endometrial glandular lesions. Isolated morules might result from artifactual displacement from their native glandular context, or selective hormonally induced regression of the glandular but not squamous components over time. Subsequent cancer risk, as promoted by estrogens, is greatest when the glandular component has the appearance of endometrial intraepithelial

  13. Squamous Morules Are Functionally Inert Elements of Premalignant Endometrial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Lomo, Lesley; Baak, Jan P. A.; Eng, Charis; Ince, Tan A.; Crum, Christopher P.; Mutter, George L.

    2008-01-01

    Squamous morules are a common component of premalignant glandular lesions that are followed by glandular, rather than squamous, carcinomas. We tested the hypothesis that the appearance of glands associated with morules predicts cancer risk, and undertook molecular testing to determine the clonal and hormonal response properties of admixed squamous and glandular elements. 66 patients with squamous morules in an index endometrial biopsy had followup clinical data (average followup: interval 31 months, 2.5 biopsies) showing development of carcinoma in 11% (7/66) of cases. The histological appearance of morule-associated glands in the index biopsy was significantly associated with this clinical outcome, with the majority (71%, 5/7) of cancer occurrences following an overtly premalignant lesion (Endometrial Intraepithelial Neoplasia) with squamous morules. Eight endometrial intraepithelial neoplasias with squamous morules were examined by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and mitotic activity (Ki-67 antigen percent stained). Glandular components had abundant estrogen and progesterone receptors, and high levels of mitotic activity in all cases. In sharp contrast, all squamous morules were devoid of sex hormone receptors and had undetectable or extremely low proliferation rates. When mutated, the same specific PTEN mutation was detected in squamous and glandular elements, indicating that both are of common lineage. The clinical and laboratory data are consistent with a model of morule biology in which squamous morules are a hormonally incompetent subpopulation of endometrial glandular lesions. Isolated morules might result from artifactual displacement from their native glandular context, or selective hormonally induced regression of the glandular but not squamous components over time. Subsequent cancer risk, as promoted by estrogens, is greatest when the glandular component has the appearance of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia. Even

  14. [Anesthesiologic peculiarities in bilateral pheochromocytoma and suspected multiple endocrine neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Hack, G; Mihanovic, N; Helpap, B

    1985-10-01

    Based on a case report with surgical removal of bilateral giant phaeochromocytomas with heredofamilial affliction and suspicion of multiple endocrine neoplasia type II (MEN-II syndrome) and of malignancy, the anaesthetic implications are discussed in a patient inadvertently not prepared by antiadrenergic treatment. It is pointed out that in MEN II syndrome, a combination of phaeochromocytoma and medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, surgical removal of the phaeochromocytoma merits utmost priority before thyreoidectomy. The most important laboratory parameters in the diagnosis of MEN II syndrome are pre- and postoperative determinations of calcitonin and carcinoembryonal antigen (CEA).

  15. Integumentary Disorders Including Cutaneous Neoplasia in Older Horses.

    PubMed

    Knottenbelt, Derek C

    2016-08-01

    Few skin diseases specifically or exclusively affect older horses and donkeys. Hypertrichosis (hirsutism) associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction is probably the most recognized and best understood exception and is the most common age-related skin condition in equids. Many other conditions are known to be more serious in older horses. Horses affected with immune-compromising conditions can be more severely affected by infectious diseases of the skin or heavy and pathologically significant parasitism. Neoplasia of the skin is probably more prevalent and worse in older horses, although many of the more serious skin tumors develop initially at a younger age. PMID:27329491

  16. [New challenges to the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Sun, J H

    2016-07-01

    Due to the progress of intracavitary afterloading technology and dosage of brachytherapy, a similar dose distribution as that of cervical conization can be achieved and can be applied to the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), it is called "afterloading conization" . Being adjusted the radioactive source movement and weight, low exposure doses to the ovary, endometrium and vagina can be assured. So a high quality of life after treatment could be maintained and overcomes the shortcomings of cervical conization and hysterectomy, such as anesthesia, bleeding, over or insufficient treatment, early ovarian ageing and operative complications. PMID:27531273

  17. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early Barrett’s neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Cao, Dalhia Thao; Beuvon, Frédéric; Leblanc, Sarah; Terris, Benoit; Camus, Marine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The possible benefit of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early neoplasia arising in Barrett’s esophagus remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of ESD for the treatment of early Barrett’s neoplasia. Methods All consecutive patients undergoing ESD for the resection of a visible lesion in a Barrett’s esophagus, either suspicious of submucosal infiltration or exceeding 10 mm in size, between February 2012 and January 2015 were prospectively included. The primary endpoint was the rate of curative resection of carcinoma, defined as histologically complete resection of adenocarcinomas without poor histoprognostic factors. Results Thirty-five patients (36 lesions) with a mean age of 66.2 ± 12 years, a mean ASA score of 2.1 ± 0.7, and a mean C4M6 Barrett’s segment were included. The mean procedure time was 191 ± 79 mn, and the mean size of the resected specimen was 51.3 ± 23 mm. En bloc resection rate was 89%. Lesions were 12 ± 15 mm in size, and 81% (29/36) were invasive adenocarcinomas, six of which with submucosal invasion. Although R0 resection of carcinoma was 72.4%, the curative resection rate was 66% (19/29). After a mean follow-up of 12.9 ± 9 months, 16 (45.7%) patients had required additional treatment, among whom nine underwent surgical resection, and seven further endoscopic treatments. Metachronous lesions or recurrence of cancer developed during the follow-up period in 17.2% of the patients. The overall complication rate was 16.7%, including 8.3% perforations, all conservatively managed, and no bleeding. The 30-day mortality was 0%. Conclusion In this early experience, ESD yielded a moderate curative resection rate in Barrett’s neoplasia. At present, improvements are needed if ESD is to replace piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection in the management of Barrett’s neoplasia. PMID:27087948

  18. [Gastrointestinal oncology: the genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer Prunés, Francesc

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in developed countries, and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for diagnosis, as well as specific and specialized management. In addition, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are highly effective prevention measures, but also for relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have occurred in the characterization of serrated polyposis syndrome and in the diagnosis and management of patients with Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis.

  19. MicroRNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sippy; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA (including microRNA) associated gene silencing have been identified as a major characteristic in human cancers. These alterations may occur more frequently than genetic mutations and play a key role in silencing tumor suppressor genes or activating oncogenes, thereby affecting multiple cellular processes. In recent years, studies have shown that microRNAs, that act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression are frequently deregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC), via aberrant DNA methylation. Over the past decade, technological advances have revolutionized the field of epigenetics and have led to the identification of numerous epigenetically dysregulated miRNAs in CRC, which are regulated by CpG island hypermethylation and DNA hypomethylation. In addition, aberrant DNA methylation of miRNA genes holds a great promise in several clinical applications such as biomarkers for early screening, prognosis, and therapeutic applications in CRC. PMID:27573897

  20. Colorectal cancer in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carlos Gouveia; Paquete, Ana Teresa; Pissarra, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diagnosis and deaths caused by colorectal cancer (CRC) warrant closer examination of affected patients and focus on management of CRC in Portugal. In order to assess the extent and quality of the information available in Portugal, we first analyse Portuguese cancer registries and then the management of CRC by discussing the diagnostic process and medical care provided, especially pharmaceuticals. Other cancer indications are mentioned in order to illustrate current approaches of cancer in Portugal. Current national data on cancer patients are scarce and there are divergencies in methods of data collection and treatment amongst regional cancer registries. However, the available data is sufficient enough to understand the dimension of CRC, with age-standardised incidence of 37 per 100,000 and mortality of 31 per 100,000 annually. An ongoing project is restructuring health services to improve efficiency and quality, however, some problems exist. The regional inequity of access to health care facilities and long waiting times for diagnostic examinations and surgery are major examples. Despite the non-availability of clinical guidelines, a pilot screening programme started at the beginning of 2009 in the Centre Region of the country. It is hoped that this overview will provide the basis for discussion on improvements in CRC management in Portugal and lead to better outcomes.

  1. Immunotherapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels; Zörnig, Inka; Klug, Paula; Krauss, Jürgen; Haag, Georg-Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the immune response, reflected by high T cell infiltrates in primary tumors and metastases, influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, immunotherapy concepts have been adapted from other tumor entities, which typically rely on the activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and CTLA-4). However, most of the strategies using the approved checkpoint inhibitors and/or combination strategies have more or less failed to produce impressive results in early phase trials in CRC. Therefore, a number of novel targets for checkpoint inhibition are currently in early phase clinical testing (TIM-3, Lag-3, OX40, GITR, 4-1BB, CD40, CD70). A simple activation of infiltrating T cells will not, however, lead to a meaningful anti-tumor response without modulating the environmental factors in CRC. Thus, it is absolutely necessary to improve our understanding of the complex regulation of the tumor microenvironment in CRC to design individual combination treatments leading to effective immune control. PMID:27259331

  2. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  3. Animal models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Fleet, James C

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the USA. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist.

  4. Cytomorphology and PCNA expression pattern in bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Cerastoderma edule with haemic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; De Vico, Gionata

    2013-07-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) is a pathologic condition reported in several bivalve species in different geographic areas. In this study we describe the cytomorphological features and the proliferative behaviour, assessed by the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), of HN in common cockle Cerastoderma edule and Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovicialis. In mussels the presence of at least 5 types of atypical haemocytes was detected, including A- and B-type cells, previously described in M. edulis and Mytilus sp., with predominance of A-type cells in early phases of the disease and B-type cells in more advanced stages. PCNA immunostaining was positive for 97 to 100% of the neoplastic cells, with both cytoplasmic (A cells) and nuclear patterns (B cells). Conversely, in C. edule there was no distinctive morphological cell sub-population, and staining atypical haemocytes with PCNA (range 93 to 100%) showed nuclear expression in early phases of disease and cytoplasmic expression in more advanced stages. The above findings suggest distinct histo-pathogenetic pathways for HN in mussels and common cockles.

  5. Cytomorphology and PCNA expression pattern in bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Cerastoderma edule with haemic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; De Vico, Gionata

    2013-07-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) is a pathologic condition reported in several bivalve species in different geographic areas. In this study we describe the cytomorphological features and the proliferative behaviour, assessed by the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), of HN in common cockle Cerastoderma edule and Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovicialis. In mussels the presence of at least 5 types of atypical haemocytes was detected, including A- and B-type cells, previously described in M. edulis and Mytilus sp., with predominance of A-type cells in early phases of the disease and B-type cells in more advanced stages. PCNA immunostaining was positive for 97 to 100% of the neoplastic cells, with both cytoplasmic (A cells) and nuclear patterns (B cells). Conversely, in C. edule there was no distinctive morphological cell sub-population, and staining atypical haemocytes with PCNA (range 93 to 100%) showed nuclear expression in early phases of disease and cytoplasmic expression in more advanced stages. The above findings suggest distinct histo-pathogenetic pathways for HN in mussels and common cockles. PMID:23836773

  6. The Role of MicroRNAs in Myeloproliferative Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Shaban; Azizi, Seyed Ghader; Soleimani, Masoud; Farshi, Yadollah; Kashani Khatib, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    MiRs are 17-25 nucleotide non-coding RNAs. These RNAs target approximately 80% of protein coding mRNAs. MiRs control gene expression and altered expression of them affects the development of cancer. MiRs can function as tumor suppressor via down-regulation of proto-oncogenes and may function as oncogenes by suppressing tumor suppressors. Myeloproliferative neoplasias (formerly known as chronic myeloproliferative disorders) form a class of hematologic malignancies demonstrating the expansion of stem cells in one or more hematopoietic cell lines. CML results from an acquired translocation known as BCR-ABL (Philadelphia chromosome). JAK2V617F mutation is present in over 95% of PV, 55% of ET and 65% of PMF cases. Aberrant expression of miR is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasias, pathogenesis, disease progress and response to treatment. MiRs can also be potential therapeutic targets. CML is mainly treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as Imatinib. In addition, altered function of miRs may be used as a prognostic factor in treatment. Resistance to Imatinib is currently a major clinical problem. The role of a number of miRs has been demonstrated in this resistance. Changing expression pattern of miRs can be effective in response to treatment and inhibition of drug resistance. In this paper, we set out to evaluate the effect of miRs in pathogenesis and treatment of MPN. PMID:27489593

  7. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  8. The Role of MicroRNAs in Myeloproliferative Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Shaban; Azizi, Seyed Ghader; Soleimani, Masoud; Farshi, Yadollah; Kashani Khatib, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    MiRs are 17-25 nucleotide non-coding RNAs. These RNAs target approximately 80% of protein coding mRNAs. MiRs control gene expression and altered expression of them affects the development of cancer. MiRs can function as tumor suppressor via down-regulation of proto-oncogenes and may function as oncogenes by suppressing tumor suppressors. Myeloproliferative neoplasias (formerly known as chronic myeloproliferative disorders) form a class of hematologic malignancies demonstrating the expansion of stem cells in one or more hematopoietic cell lines. CML results from an acquired translocation known as BCR-ABL (Philadelphia chromosome). JAK2V617F mutation is present in over 95% of PV, 55% of ET and 65% of PMF cases. Aberrant expression of miR is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasias, pathogenesis, disease progress and response to treatment. MiRs can also be potential therapeutic targets. CML is mainly treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as Imatinib. In addition, altered function of miRs may be used as a prognostic factor in treatment. Resistance to Imatinib is currently a major clinical problem. The role of a number of miRs has been demonstrated in this resistance. Changing expression pattern of miRs can be effective in response to treatment and inhibition of drug resistance. In this paper, we set out to evaluate the effect of miRs in pathogenesis and treatment of MPN. PMID:27489593

  9. Multi Texture Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Continuum Using Multispectral Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Bouridane, Ahmed; Toews, Matthew; Hassan, Lama; Tanougast, Camel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper proposes to characterize the continuum of colorectal cancer (CRC) using multiple texture features extracted from multispectral optical microscopy images. Three types of pathological tissues (PT) are considered: benign hyperplasia, intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. Materials and Methods In the proposed approach, the region of interest containing PT is first extracted from multispectral images using active contour segmentation. This region is then encoded using texture features based on the Laplacian-of-Gaussian (LoG) filter, discrete wavelets (DW) and gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). To assess the significance of textural differences between PT types, a statistical analysis based on the Kruskal-Wallis test is performed. The usefulness of texture features is then evaluated quantitatively in terms of their ability to predict PT types using various classifier models. Results Preliminary results show significant texture differences between PT types, for all texture features (p-value < 0.01). Individually, GLCM texture features outperform LoG and DW features in terms of PT type prediction. However, a higher performance can be achieved by combining all texture features, resulting in a mean classification accuracy of 98.92%, sensitivity of 98.12%, and specificity of 99.67%. Conclusions These results demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of combining multiple texture features for characterizing the continuum of CRC and discriminating between pathological tissues in multispectral images. PMID:26901134

  10. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  11. [Evidence of early oral feeding in colorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Villalba Ferrer, F; Bruna Esteban, M; García Coret, M J; García Romero, J; Roig Vila, J V

    2007-12-01

    There is much variability regarding time to start of enteral nutrition in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. In many instances such patients are postoperatively maintained with nasogastric intubation with the aim of preventing complications such as dehiscence, evisceration or eventration. We examine the clinical evidence regarding nasogastric tube placement and early feeding with reference to the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases.Ia and Ib evidence was obtained from meta-analyses and prospective randomized studies, where the systematic use of a gastric decompression catheter is advised against and initiation of early feeding for colorectal surgery is recommended. Fasting does not provide any benefit after gastrointestinal surgery, and the use of nasogastric tubes does not decrease postoperative complications. However, less invasive surgery and new advances in anesthesia and analgesia are contributing to a reduction in postoperative ileus.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening tests: pros and cons, and for whom?

    PubMed

    Forbes, Geoffrey M

    2008-04-01

    The past decade has seen major advances internationally in the implementation of colorectal cancer screening, influenced in differing ways by the profession, the public and by government. Relatively unique to colorectal cancer screening is the availability of so many test alternatives, which have substantial variation in methodology. While perhaps spoilt for choice, discerning the key advantages and disadvantages of each test is often difficult, depending on the perspective from which screening is viewed. Accordingly, this article provides an evaluation of screening tests as might be perceived by governments, the patient and the profession. Aligned issues such as choosing a screening test and provision of informed consent are discussed. Finally, the article identifies current problems with various screening tests that, if attended to, might change the perception of a test's value to a particular interest group. PMID:19072355

  13. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after polypectomy: a consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Sidney J; Zauber, Ann G; Fletcher, Robert H; Stillman, Jonathon S; O'Brien, Michael J; Levin, Bernard; Smith, Robert A; Lieberman, David A; Burt, Randall W; Levin, Theodore R; Bond, John H; Brooks, Durado; Byers, Tim; Hyman, Neil; Kirk, Lynne; Thorson, Alan; Simmang, Clifford; Johnson, David; Rex, Douglas K

    2006-05-01

    Adenomatous polyps are the most common neoplastic findings discovered in people who undergo colorectal screening or who have a diagnostic work-up for symptoms. It was common practice in the 1970s for these patients to have annual follow-up surveillance examinations to detect additional new adenomas and missed synchronous adenomas. As a result of the National Polyp Study report in 1993, which showed clearly in a randomized design that the first postpolypectomy examination could be deferred for 3 years, guidelines published by a gastrointestinal consortium in 1997 recommended that the first follow-up surveillance take place 3 years after polypectomy for most patients. In 2003 these guidelines were updated and colonoscopy was recommended as the only follow-up examination, stratification at baseline into low risk and higher risk for subsequent adenomas was suggested. The 1997 and 2003 guidelines dealt with both screening and surveillance. However, it has become increasingly clear that postpolypectomy surveillance is now a large part of endoscopic practice, draining resources from screening and diagnosis. In addition, surveys have shown that a large proportion of endoscopists are conducting surveillance examinations at shorter intervals than recommended in the guidelines. In the present report, a careful analytic approach was designed to address all evidence available in the literature to delineate predictors of advanced pathology, both cancer and advanced adenomas, so that patients can be stratified more definitely at their baseline colonoscopy into those at lower risk or increased risk for a subsequent advanced neoplasia. People at increased risk have either 3 or more adenomas, high-grade dysplasia, villous features, or an adenoma 1 cm or larger in size. It is recommended that they have a 3-year follow-up colonoscopy. People at lower risk who have 1 or 2 small (<1 cm) tubular adenomas with no high-grade dysplasia can have a follow-up evaluation in 5-10 years, whereas

  14. miR-153 supports colorectal cancer progression via pleiotropic effects that enhance invasion and chemotherapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Pickard, Karen; Jenei, Veronika; Bullock, Marc D; Bruce, Amanda; Mitter, Richard; Kelly, Gavin; Paraskeva, Christos; Strefford, John; Primrose, John; Thomas, Gareth J; Packham, Graham; Mirnezami, Alex H

    2013-11-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNA) have been broadly studied in cancer, comparatively less is understood about their role in progression. Here we report that miR-153 has a dual role during progression of colorectal cancer by enhancing cellular invasiveness and platinum-based chemotherapy resistance. miRNA profiling revealed that miR-153 was highly expressed in a cellular model of advanced stage colorectal cancer. Its upregulation was also noted in primary human colorectal cancer compared with normal colonic epithelium and in more advanced colorectal cancer stages compared with early stage disease. In colorectal cancer patients followed for 50 months, 21 of 30 patients with high levels of miR-153 had disease progression compared with others in this group with low levels of miR-153. Functional studies revealed that miR-153 upregulation increased colorectal cancer invasiveness and resistance to oxaliplatin and cisplatin both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations indicated that miR-153 promoted invasiveness indirectly by inducing matrix metalloprotease enzyme 9 production, whereas drug resistance was mediated directly by inhibiting the Forkhead transcription factor Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a). In support of the latter finding, we found that levels of miR-153 and FOXO3a were inversely correlated in matched human colorectal cancer specimens. Our findings establish key roles for miR-153 overexpression in colorectal cancer progression, rationalizing therapeutic strategies to target expression of this miRNA for colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:23950211

  15. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. The Mendelian colorectal cancer syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A small minority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) (≤5%) are caused by a single, inherited faulty gene. These diseases, the Mendelian colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, have been central to our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in general. Most of the approximately 13 high-penetrance genes that predispose to CRC primarily predispose to colorectal polyps, and each gene is associated with a specific type of polyp, whether conventional adenomas (APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1), juvenile polyps (SMAD4, BMPR1A), Peutz-Jeghers hamartomas (LKB1/STK11) and mixed polyps of serrated and juvenile types (GREM1). Lynch syndrome (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2), by contrast, is associated primarily with cancer risk. Major functional pathways are consistently inactivated in the Mendelian CRC syndromes: certain types of DNA repair (proofreading of DNA replication errors, mismatch repair and base excision repair) and signalling (bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt signalling and mTOR). The inheritance of the CRC syndromes also varies: most are dominant but some of the DNA repair deficiencies are recessive. Some of the Mendelian CRC genes are especially important because they play a role through somatic inactivation in sporadic CRC (APC, MLH1, SMAD4, POLE). Additional Mendelian CRC genes may remain to be discovered and searches for these genes are ongoing, especially in patients with multiple adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. PMID:26169059

  17. Microtopographic Inspection and Fractal Analysis of Skin Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Hipolito, Alberto Valencia; Gutierrez, Gustavo Fidel; Chanona, Jorge; Gallegos, Eva Ramón

    2008-04-01

    ) corresponding to some neoplasia is higher (1.334+/-0.072) than those for healthy skin (1.091+/-0.082). A significant difference between the fractal dimensions of neoplasia and healhty skin (>0.001) was registered. The FD of microtopography maps (FDm) can also distinguish between healthy and malignant tissue in general (2.277+/-0.070 to 2.309+/-0.040), but not discriminate the different types of skin neoplasias. The combination of the rugometric evaluation and fractal geometry characterization provides valuable information about the malignity of skin lesions and type of lesion.

  18. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  19. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  20. Role of surgery in colorectal liver metastases: Too early or too late?

    PubMed Central

    Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Troupis, Theodore; Patsouras, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    As colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastases become a serious public health problem, new treatment modalities are needed in order to achieve better results. In the last decade there has been very important progress in oncology, with new and more effective chemotherapeutic agents administered alone or in combination improving the resectability rate in up to 40% of patients with colorectal liver metastases. Advances in interventional radiology, in particular, with the use of portal vein embolization and radiofrequency thermal ablation are new strategies allowing major liver resections and treatment of small liver metastases or early recurrences. Surgery, however, remains the gold standard strategy with intention to treat. In this review article we will describe the advanced role of surgery in the multidisciplinary approach to colorectal liver metastases, and the clinical problems the liver surgeon has to deal with, such as the resectability of the metastases, the presence of bilobar liver lesions and extrahepatic disease, the impact of chemotherapy in already resectable liver metastases, the problem of vanishing metastases after chemotherapy and the dilemma of staged or combined liver and colon operations and which organ first in the clinical scenario of synchronous colorectal liver metastases. PMID:20653056

  1. Role of surgery in colorectal liver metastases: too early or too late?

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Troupis, Theodore; Patsouras, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2010-07-28

    As colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastases become a serious public health problem, new treatment modalities are needed in order to achieve better results. In the last decade there has been very important progress in oncology, with new and more effective chemotherapeutic agents administered alone or in combination improving the resectability rate in up to 40% of patients with colorectal liver metastases. Advances in interventional radiology, in particular, with the use of portal vein embolization and radiofrequency thermal ablation are new strategies allowing major liver resections and treatment of small liver metastases or early recurrences. Surgery, however, remains the gold standard strategy with intention to treat. In this review article we will describe the advanced role of surgery in the multidisciplinary approach to colorectal liver metastases, and the clinical problems the liver surgeon has to deal with, such as the resectability of the metastases, the presence of bilobar liver lesions and extrahepatic disease, the impact of chemotherapy in already resectable liver metastases, the problem of vanishing metastases after chemotherapy and the dilemma of staged or combined liver and colon operations and which organ first in the clinical scenario of synchronous colorectal liver metastases.

  2. Colorectal adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, M B; Greenstein, A J; Sachar, D B; Barth, J; Balasubramanian, S; Harpaz, N; Heimann, T M; Aufses, A H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to review the clinical features and estimate the long-term survival of patients with colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated a significantly increased risk of colorectal carcinoma in patients with Crohns disease. METHODS: The authors reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 30 patients with Crohn's disease admitted to The Mount Sinai Hospital between 1960 and 1989 in whom colorectal adenocarcinoma developed. All patients were operated on and follow-up was complete for all patients to 10 years after operation, to the time of death, or to the closing date of the study in December 1989. RESULTS: The 30 patients in the series had 33 colorectal adenocarcinomas; three patients (10%) presented with two synchronous cancers. The patients were relatively young (mean age, 53 years) and had long-standing Crohn's disease (duration >20 years in 87%). The 5-year actuarial survival was 44% for the overall series: 100% for stage A, 86% for stage B, 60% for stage C. All five patients with excluded bowel tumor died of large bowel cancer within 2.4 years; by contrast, the actuarial 5-year survival for patients with in-continuity tumors was 56%. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease are similar to the features of cancer in ulcerative colitis, including young age, multiple neoplasms, long duration of disease, and greater than a 50% 5-year survival rate (without excluded loops). These observations suggest the advisability of surveillance programs for Crohn's disease of the colon similar to those for ulcerative colitis of comparable duration and extent. PMID:8597513

  3. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  4. The riddle of hepatic neoplasia in brown bullheads from relatively unpolluted waters in New York State.

    PubMed

    Spitsbergen, J M; Wolfe, M J

    1995-01-01

    Since 1985, pathologists at Cornell University have investigated the causes of lesions in freshwater fish throughout New York waters in order to clarify possible impairment of fish health by environmental contaminants. Fishermen and biologists alerted us to several relatively protected reservoirs and ponds in which we have found no evidence of elevated levels of anthropogenic environmental contaminants but in which up to 100% of brown bullheads exhibited skin neoplasia. Complete necropsies and histologic study revealed that over 30% of mature brown bullheads from some of these sites had benign or malignant hepatocellular or biliary liver neoplasia. Up to 50% of brown bullheads had benign or malignant liver neoplasia in other relatively unpolluted waters with no evidence of skin neoplasia in bullheads. Multiple samplings of brown bullheads from several of these sites have revealed puzzling variability in the prevalence of skin, liver, and other neoplasia in these fish populations. The cause of these striking epizootics of neoplasia in brown bullheads in unpolluted waters in New York State remains unclear. We hypothesize that natural carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds formed in aquatic sediments or radon from geologic formations may contribute to epizootic fish neoplasia in New York waters. PMID:8772257

  5. Myeloid Neoplasias: What Molecular Analyses Are Telling Us

    PubMed Central

    Gutiyama, Luciana M.; Coutinho, Diego F.; Lipkin, Marina V.; Zalcberg, Ilana R.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, cytogenetic and molecular characterizations of hematological disorders at diagnosis and followup have been most valuable for guiding therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Genetic and epigenetic alterations detected by different procedures have been associated to different cancer types and are considered important indicators for disease classification, differential diagnosis, prognosis, response, and individualization of therapy. The search for new biomarkers has been revolutionized by high-throughput technologies. At this point, it seems that we have overcome technological barriers, but we are still far from sorting the biological puzzle. Evidence based on translational research is required for validating novel genetic and epigenetic markers for routine clinical practice. We herein discuss the importance of genetic abnormalities and their molecular pathways in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms. We also discuss how novel genomic abnormalities may interact and reassess concepts and classifications of myeloid neoplasias. PMID:23056961

  6. Atypical clinical manifestations of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Marek, Bogdan; Okopień, Bogusław

    2009-03-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary tumor syndrome characterized by a genetic predisposition to develop a variety of neuroendocrine tumors and hormone excess syndromes. The major components of MEN1 are hyperparathyroidism due to multiple parathyroid adenomas or hyperplasia, duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and pituitary adenomas, most often producing prolactin. Physicians' inadequate knowledge of this clinical entity and sometimes its atypical presentation result in a probable significant underdiagnosis of MEN1. This describes the case of a 65-year-old female in whom primary hyperparathyroidism, limited to only one parathyroid gland, was preceded by acromegaly that was diagnosed 23 years earlier. This case shows that MEN1 manifests itself even in older groups and hyperparathyroidism may not be the first symptom of this syndrome. Therefore, we believe that all subjects who, regardless of age, gender and initial manifestation present with whichever the major symptom should be followed up regularly for the early detection of MEN1. PMID:19514648

  7. Gallbladder Papillary Neoplasia Associated With Intrahepatic Carcinoma and Pancreaticobiliary Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Vivian; Roda, Rodrigo; Pedrosa, Moises Salgado

    2012-01-01

    Papillary carcinoma is a rare tumor of the gallbladder. Papillary mucinous lesions of the intra- and extra-hepatic biliary tract (BT- IPMN) have been recognized. However the gallbladder is not included, except for the diffuse papillomatosis, where the sequence biliary papillomatosis to papillary carcinoma is proposed. We report a simultaneous case of gallbladder papillary neoplasia and intrahepatic duct carcinoma in situ associated with pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM). We proposed that double location, in our case, is more likely explained by a diffuse biliopancreatic tree disease leading to synchronous tumors arising in amenable duct. It was verified absence of continuity between gallbladder and intrahepatic bile duct site of involvement, absence of lymph node metastasis or venous involvement. This case report supports the concept of a proliferative and neoplastic process involving simultaneously the biliary tree and gallbladder associated with PBM.

  8. Thyroid neoplasia following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Jarosz, H.; Calandra, D.; McCall, A.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1987-06-01

    The question of thyroid neoplasia following high-dose radiation treatment to the neck and mediastinum for malignant neoplasms such as Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and young adults has been raised recently. Five patients, 19 to 39 years old, were operated on for thyroid neoplasms that developed following cervical and mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had papillary carcinomas and two had follicular adenomas. The latency period between radiation exposure and the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasm ranged from eight to 16 years. This limited series provided strong support for the recommendation that children and young adults who are to receive high-dose radiation therapy to the head, neck, and mediastinum should receive suppressive doses of thyroxine prior to radiation therapy in order to suppress thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and then be maintained on a regimen of suppression permanently.

  9. Is bacterial vaginosis associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Boyle, D C M; Barton, S E; Uthayakumar, S; Hay, P E; Pollock, J W; Steer, P J; Smith, J R

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has produced conflicting results regarding the association of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). These studies have been weakened in their conclusions mainly by failure to adequately control for the presence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One proposed mechanism suggesting that carcinogenic nitrosamines acting either independently or via human papilloma virus (HPV) has not been fully tested previously. We undertook a prospective, case-controlled, cross-sectional study where the presence of STIs, in particular human papillomavirus (HPV) which is known to be associated with the development of CIN, was controlled for. Women with BV were not found to have CIN more frequently than women with normal vaginal flora and the quantities of nitrosamines produced by women with BV did not differ significantly from women without BV. We thus found that BV is not associated with CIN. PMID:12657117

  10. A Metastatic Ovarian Angiosarcoma Mimicking Hematologic Neoplasia at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gaiolla, Rafael Dezen; Duarte, Ívison Xavier; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare aggressive neoplasms of vascular endothelial origin with a high metastatic rate and poor prognosis. Involvement of the bone marrow by the angiosarcoma is exceedingly uncommon, and there have only been a few cases reported in the literature to date. Clinical manifestations and common laboratory findings of bone marrow involvement can mimic other more common bone marrow-replacing neoplasias such as lymphomas and acute leukemia. A definitive diagnosis is difficult to make from cytologic material, probably due to an associated bone marrow fibrosis, and requires bone marrow trephine biopsy with an immunohistochemical profile. Here we had the opportunity to study a case of metastatic angiosarcoma with positive cytologic findings and an unusual presentation that challenged its primary diagnosis. PMID:24847252

  11. Photodynamic therapy of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) high grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Belotto, Renata; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer and associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in target cells that will generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon illumination, inducing the death of abnormal tissue and PDT with less damaging to normal tissues than surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy and seems to be a promising alternative procedure for CIN treatment. The CIN high grades (II and III) presents potential indications for PDT due the success of PDT for CIN low grade treatment. The patients with CIN high grade that were treated with new clinic protocol shows lesion regression to CIN low grade 60 days after the treatment. The new clinical protocol using for treatment of CIN high grade shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  12. Uterine arteriovenous malformations following gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Touhami, Omar; Gregoire, Jean; Noel, Patricia; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Plante, Marie

    2014-10-01

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) following gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a rare condition. It can be associated with chronic vaginal bleeding or life-threatening heavy bleeding, even after complete resolution of the tumor following chemotherapy. This analysis aimed to perform an extensive systematic review highlighting clinical symptoms, imaging, management and prognosis of this rare complication of GTN. We also describe an additional case of uterine AVM following GTN. We conducted a literature search using Medline, Embase and Cochrane library to analyze the clinical data of 49 published cases of uterine AVM following GTN. Median age of the women diagnosed with AVM was 29 years (range 15-49). Median gravidity was 2 (range 1-8) and 50% of women were nulligravida. Complete molar pregnancy was the most common initial gestational trophoblastic diagnosis (48%). Overall, 44 patients (88%) were symptomatic and presented with chronic or acute abnormal vaginal bleeding. Only 3 patients had an undetectable HCG level at the time of uterine AVM diagnosis. Hypo-echoic space in the myometrium is the most relevant finding on ultrasonography but the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis of AVMs is angiographic examination. Uterine artery embolization was the most common treatment option performed in 82% of the patients and was successful in controlling the bleeding in 85% of cases. We identified 20 pregnancies after successful embolization of uterine AVM following a GTN and 90% of them were successful. Because of the risk of life-threatening heavy bleeding, the diagnosis of uterine AVM should always be considered in patients with a history of recurrent unexplained vaginal bleeding after gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Angiographic embolization is successful in the majority of cases and does not appear to compromise future pregnancy.

  13. [VULVAR INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA--TERMINOLOGY, SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Ganovska, A; Kovachev, S

    2015-01-01

    The term vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) was introduced for first time in 1986 year from the International Society for the Study of Vulvar Disease (ISSVD). With this term are denoted precancer vulvar conditions. According to a classification dated 1986 depending on the degree of affection of multilayered squamous epithelial vulvar precancerous lesion are subdivided into three groups: VINI, VIN2 and VIN3. Subsequently VIN1 is determinate as a lesion which there isn't oncogenic potential. These types of changes often are result from irritation or viral infection which leads to benign condylomata acuminate. Compare to lesions with VIN require histological signs for high grade intraepithelial neoplasia as nuclear pleomorphism, increased mitotic activity, atypical mitotic activity and disordered architecture of squamous cells epithelium. These fundamental morphologic characterizations lead to revision and subsequent change of the current classification. In 2004 ISSVD changed the classification. It included lesions like VIN2 and VIN3, but they are subdivided in two groups: the usual type VIN and the differentiated VIN. They have different etiology, morphology, oncogenic potential and prognosis. The usual type VIN is associated with infection of high risk types of human papilloma virus and is a more frequently met form of VIN. A very good prognosis is characteristic for it. The differentiated VIN is met in postmenopausal women of about 70 with frequency of about 2-5%. It originated from vulvar dermatosis like lichen scierosus and there is a high oncogenic potential and worse prognosis. The treatment of VIN may be surgical and by medicines. The frequency of recurrences after treatment is 30-50% which required frequently follows up. The aim of this literature review is to introduce present terminological classification of VIN, as well as basic clinical, diagnostically and curative methods in treat of the both types of this precancerous.

  14. Overview of robotic colorectal surgery: Current and future practical developments

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudipta; Evans, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionised colorectal surgery by offering reduced morbidity and mortality over open surgery, while maintaining oncological and functional outcomes with the disadvantage of additional practical challenges. Robotic surgery aids the surgeon in overcoming these challenges. Uptake of robotic assistance has been relatively slow, mainly because of the high initial and ongoing costs of equipment but also because of limited evidence of improved patient outcomes. Advances in robotic colorectal surgery will aim to widen the scope of minimal access surgery to allow larger and more complex surgery through smaller access and natural orifices and also to make the technology more economical, allowing wider dispersal and uptake of robotic technology. Advances in robotic endoscopy will yield self-advancing endoscopes and a widening role for capsule endoscopy including the development of motile and steerable capsules able to deliver localised drug therapy and insufflation as well as being recharged from an extracorporeal power source to allow great longevity. Ultimately robotic technology may advance to the point where many conventional surgical interventions are no longer required. With respect to nanotechnology, surgery may eventually become obsolete. PMID:26981188

  15. Current concepts in colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A; Gerner, Eugene W

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer chemoprevention, or chemoprophylaxis, is a drug-based approach to prevent colorectal cancer. Preventing colorectal adenomas with currently available agents demonstrates the promise of pharmacologic strategies directed at critical regulatory pathways. However, agent toxicity, lesion breakthrough and competing efficacy from endoscopy procedures challenge population-based implementation. This article reviews the role of colorectal cancer chemoprevention in the context of existing screening and surveillance guidelines and practice. Emphasis is placed on the role of the colorectal adenoma as a cancer precursor and its surrogacy in assessing individual risk and for evaluating chemoprevention efficacy. We discuss the importance of risk stratification for identifying subjects at moderate-to-high risk for colorectal cancer who are most likely to benefit from chemoprevention at an acceptable level of risk. PMID:19673624

  16. Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Colon Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guofeng; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    For both men and women, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, primarily as a consequence of limited therapies for metastatic disease. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor with diverse functions in detoxification of xenobiotics, inflammatory responses, and tissue homeostasis. Emerging evidence indicates that AhR also plays an important role in regulating intestinal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Here, we review both the pro- and anti-carcinogenic properties of AhR signaling and its potential role as a therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:26264025

  17. [The alternative way of colorectal cancer developing. The histogenetic and molecular features of serrated lesions (review, continued)].

    PubMed

    Ageĭkina, N V; Duvanskiĭ, V A; Kniazev, M V; Mal'kov, P G; Danilova, N V; Kharlova, O A

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of colorectal cancer can be traced in two ways: from conventional adenomas with the APC-gene mutation (model Fearon-Vogelstein) and the "serrated way", that has a unique genetic profile and morphological characteristics at the early stages. These neoplasms are determined from 7 to 9%. The risk of developing cancer of them is 7.5-15%. Precursors of epithelial neoplasia are aberrant crypts foci. About 20% of colorectal cancer demonstrated the common defects in DNA methylation (CIMP-positive profile), mutations BRAF (KRAS)--oncogenes, microsatellite instability (MSI). The serrated lesions may have these mutations. Serrated polyposis syndrome has specific genetic changes associated with biallelic mutation MUTYH also. Risk of colorectal cancer is very high in this syndrome and is more than 50%. Often the synchronous or metachronous cancers presence. They are usually accompanied by MSI-H and represented serrated morphology too. Understanding epigenetic ways and molecular features of serrated lesions gives an knowledge of their clinical significance and provides the evidence for the treatment and monitoring of patients with this disease. This review is devoted to these issues.

  18. A population-based study of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: evidence of pathologic and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Warden, G; Harnett, D; Green, J; Wish, T; Woods, M O; Green, R; Dicks, E; Rahman, P; Zhai, G; Parfrey, P

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) may be the result of Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, a syndrome of unknown etiology called familial colorectal cancer type-X (FCCTX), or familial serrated neoplasia associated with the colorectal cancer (CRC) somatic BRAF mutation. To determine the cause of HNPCC in the founder population of the island of Newfoundland, we studied 37 families with LS and 29 families without LS who fulfilled the Amsterdam I criteria. In non-LS, four index CRCs were BRAF mutation positive, one of which was microsatellite instable. Geographic clustering of LS families caused by three different founder mutations in MSH2 was observed. Nine unique MMR mutations in four MMR genes were identified in single families distributed in different geographic isolates. The geographic distribution of non-LS was similar to LS. The coefficient of relatedness using genotype data was significantly higher for non-LS than for all CRC. Extensive genealogic investigation failed to connect non-LS families and in some clusters pathologic CRC heterogeneity was observed. We conclude that non-LS HNPCC may be a heterogeneous disorder with different pathogenic pathways, and that the geographic distribution is consistent with multiple different mutations in unknown CRC susceptibility gene(s).

  19. Genetic Heterogeneity in Colorectal Cancer and its Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Barranha, Rui; Costa, José Luís; Carneiro, Fátima; Machado, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the development of complementary diagnostic exams and modern targeted therapies, colorectal cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this context, a lot of research has been conducted in the last years to find new markers of poor prognosis. The existence of a complex tumour architecture formed by multiple subclones genetically heterogeneous has been increasingly considered in recent studies as an element of particular importance. This feature seems to influence factors as relevant as the representativeness of tumour biopsies for genetic diagnosis and the efficacy of targeted therapies.There is growing evidence suggesting a relation between genetic heterogeneity and the patientsâ prognosis. The widespread use of next-generation sequencing techniques will allow a better understanding of the true degree of genetic heterogeneity in colorectal tumours, its causes and impact on the course of the disease. In this review we intend to analyse the recent findings related to the genetic heterogeneity of colorectal cancer, as well as its major clinical implications.

  20. [Signet ring cell colorectal carcinom - case report].

    PubMed

    Matkovčík, Z; Hlad, J

    2015-08-01

    Signet ring cell colorectal carcinoma is a rare aggressive tumor. The incidence of this desease is very low in young patients and accounts up to 1% of all surgical patients with colorectal cancer. The infrequency of the disease among young patients makes the diagnosis more difficult and the prognosis less favourable. Biopsy results are crucial for verification of signet ring cell carcinoma. Treatment is similar as in other types of colorectal cancer. We report a case of signet ring cell colon cancer in a 22 years old female patient.The aim of this paper is to point out this rare case of infrequent colorectal cancer in a young female patient. PMID:26395957

  1. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M.; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer “epigenome” has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:26216839

  2. Development of a reactive stroma associated with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in EAF2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Laura E; Ai, Junkui; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Wang, Yujuan; Wang, Dan; Eisermann, Kurtis; Rigatti, Lora H; O'Malley, Katherine J; Ma, Hei M; Wang, Xinhui; Dar, Javid A; Parwani, Anil V; Simons, Brian W; Ittman, Michael M; Li, Luyuan; Davies, Benjamin J; Wang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-responsive tumor suppressor frequently deleted in advanced prostate cancer that functions as a transcription elongation factor of RNA Pol II through interaction with the ELL family proteins. EAF2 knockout mice on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background developed late-onset lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, B-cell lymphoma and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In order to further characterize the role of EAF2 in the development of prostatic defects, the effects of EAF2 loss were compared in different murine strains. In the current study, aged EAF2(-/-) mice on both the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ backgrounds exhibited mPIN lesions as previously reported on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background. In contrast to the 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J mixed genetic background, the mPIN lesions in C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ EAF2(-/-) mice were associated with stromal defects characteristic of a reactive stroma and a statistically significant increase in prostate microvessel density. Stromal inflammation and increased microvessel density was evident in EAF2-deficient mice on a pure C57BL/6J background at an early age and preceded the development of the histologic epithelial hyperplasia and neoplasia found in the prostates of older EAF2(-/-) animals. Mice deficient in EAF2 had an increased recovery rate and a decreased overall response to the effects of androgen deprivation. EAF2 expression in human cancer was significantly down-regulated and microvessel density was significantly increased compared to matched normal prostate tissue; furthermore EAF2 expression was negatively correlated with microvessel density. These results suggest that the EAF2 knockout mouse on the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ genetic backgrounds provides a model of PIN lesions associated with an altered prostate microvasculature and reactive stromal compartment corresponding to that reported in human prostate tumors.

  3. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response. PMID:27380134

  4. [The role of intestinal microflora and probiotic bacteria in prophylactic and development of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Ewa; Złotkowska, Dagmara; Pijagin, Mariola E

    2013-08-09

    The gut microbiota comprises a large and diverse range of microorganisms whose activities have a significant impact on health. It interacts with its host at both the local and systemic level, resulting in a broad range of beneficial or detrimental outcomes for nutrition, infections, xenobiotic metabolism, and cancer. The current paper reviews research on the role of intestinal microflora in colorectal cancer development. Especially a protective effect of beneficial bacteria and probiotics on the risk of cancer development is highly discussed. There is substantial experimental evidence that the beneficial gut bacteria and their metabolism have the potential to inhibit the development and progression of neoplasia in the large intestine. Most of the data derive, however, from experimental and animal trials. Over a dozen well-documented animal studies have been published, wherein it has been clearly revealed that some lactic acid bacteria, especially lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, inhibit initiation and progression of colorectal cancer. Studies on cancer suppression in humans as a result of the consumption of probiotics are still sparse. Nevertheless, some epidemiological and interventional studies seem to confirm the bacterial anticancerogenic activity also in human gut. The mechanism by which probiotics may inhibit cancer development is unknown. Probiotics increase the amount of beneficial bacteria and decrease the pathogen level in the gut, consequently altering metabolic, enzymatic and carcinogenic activity in the intestine, decreasing inflammation and enhancing immune function, which may contribute to cancer defense.

  5. Colorectal carcinoma: Importance of colonic environment for anti-cancer response and systemic immunity.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Luca; Stepankova, Renata; Grobarova, Valeria; Kozakova, Hana; Rossmann, Pavel; Klimesova, Klara; Benson, Veronika; Sima, Petr; Fiserova, Anna; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2009-12-01

    The intestinal environment is considered to play an important role both in colorectal tumor development and in the evolution and modulation of mucosal immunity. Studies in animals reared in germ-free (GF, without any intestinal microflora) versus conventional (CV, with regular microflora in bowel) conditions can aid in clarifying the influence of bacteria on carcinogenesis and anti-cancer immune responses in situ. The lower incidence of colon cancers and better immunological parameters in GF animals versus CV ones after chemically-induced carcinogenesis raises questions about specific characteristics of the immunological networks in each respective condition. Different levels of tolerance/regulatory mechanisms in the GF versus CV animals may influence the development of immune responses not only at the level of mucosal, but also at the systemic, immunity. We hypothesize that GF animals can better recognize and respond to evolving neoplasias in the bowel as a consequence of their less-tolerogenic immunity (i.e., due to their more limited exposure to antigens to become tolerated against at the intestinal level). In this paper, we review the role of bacteria in modulating gut environment and mucosal immunity, their importance in cancer development, and aspects of immune regulation (both at local and systemic level) that can be modified by bacterial microflora. Lastly, the use of GF animals in comparison with conventionally-raised animals is proposed as a suitable and potent model for understanding the inflammatory network and its effect on cancer immunity especially during colorectal cancer development.

  6. Anastomotic dehiscence (AD) in colorectal cancer surgery: mechanical anastomosis versus manual anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Oprescu, C; Beuran, M; Nicolau, AE; Negoi, I; Venter, MD; Morteanu, S; Oprescu-Macovei, AM

    2012-01-01

    disease, anastomotic dehiscence incidence was of 13.8% (4/29) when using mechanical suture and 8.3% (1/12) when using manual suturing. The period required for postoperative resumption of intestinal transit was of 3.12 days for mechanical suturing and 3.93 days in case of manual suture. The mean time (MT) to perform the ileocolic and colocolic mechanical anastomosis is 9 ± 2 minutes. If anastomosis is “cured" with surjet wire or separate threads, MT is 11 ± 5 minutes. MT to perform the ileocolic and colocolic manual anastomosis is 9 ± 3 minutes for surjet wire and 18 ± 5 minutes for separate threads. MT to perform the colorectal mechanical anastomosis is 15 ± 4 minutes. MT to perform the colorectal manual anastomosis is 30 ± 7 minutes (using separate threads). Detailing the nature of the surgical reinterventions, we have found: 7 reinterventions for AD post mechanical anastomoses (1 case of suture defect, 2 cases of resection and re-anastomoses, 4 cases with external branching stoma); 5 reinterventions for AD post manual anastomoses (0 cases of suture defect, 1 case of resection with re-anastomosis, 4 cases of external shunt stoma). In the analyzed group, we recorded a total of 57 deaths from a total of 714 cases resulting in a mortality rate of 7.98%. Conclusions: Mechanical suture technique is not ideal for making digestive sutures. With the exception of low colorectal anastomoses where mechanical sutures are preferable, we cannot claim the superiority of mechanical anastomoses over those manually made, for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23346248

  7. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  8. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  9. Allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, S.E.; Fearon, E.R.; Tersmette, K.W.F.; Enterline, J.P.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Yusuke; White, R. )

    1989-06-02

    Clinical and pathological associations with molecular genetic alterations were studied in colorectal carcinomas from 83 patients. Fractional allelic loss, a measure of allelic deletions throughout the genome, and allelic deletions of specific chromosomal arms (the short arm of 17 and long arm of 18) each provided independent prognostic information by multivariate analysis when considered individually with Dukes' classification. Distant metastasis was significantly associated with high fractional allelic loss and with deletions of 17p and 18q. Mutations of ras proto-oncogenes and deletions of 5q had no prognostic importance. Statistically significant associations were also found between allelic losses and a family history of cancer, left-sided tumor location, and absence of extracellular tumor mucin. Allelic deletion analysis thus identified subsets of colorectal carcinoma with increased predilection for distant metastasis and cancer-related death. Further studies may define a subset of genetic alterations that can be used clinically to help assess prognosis.

  10. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  11. The diagnostics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swiderska, Magdalena; Choromańska, Barbara; Dąbrowska, Ewelina; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Choromańska, Katarzyna; Szczurko, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Piotr; Dadan, Jacek; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. CRC has an estimated incidence of more than 1,000,000 new cases annually worldwide. Approximately one out of three people who develop CRC dies from the disease. Furthermore, CRC often affects inhabitants of industrialized countries in comparison to less developed countries. Several markers of colon cancer, including CEA, CA-19-9, TPS, TAG-72 and lysosomal hydrolases, have been identified and are now being adopted in routine clinical practice. Increased values of these markers are often the first signal of recurrence or metastases, which is useful in prediction and prognosis of clinical outcome of patients with CRC. Determination of the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in body fluids may bring some hope of improving diagnosis of colorectal cancer. However, it has to be remembered that currently the most effective diagnostic method of CRC is endoscopy. PMID:24876814

  12. The impact of new technology on surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Gregory B; Breen, David J; Monson, John RT

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology continue at a rapid pace and affect all aspects of life, including surgery. We have reviewed some of these advances and the impact they are having on the investigation and management of colorectal cancer. Modern endoscopes, with magnifying, variable stiffness and localisation capabilities are making the primary investigation of colonic cancer easier and more acceptable for patients. Imaging investigations looking at primary, metastatic and recurrent disease are shifting to digital data sets, which can be stored, reviewed remotely, potentially fused with other modalities and reconstructed as 3 dimensional (3D) images for the purposes of advanced diagnostic interpretation and computer assisted surgery. They include virtual colonoscopy, trans-rectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy. Once a colorectal carcinoma is diagnosed, the treatment options available are expanding. Colonic stents are being used to relieve large bowel obstruction, either as a palliative measure or to improve the patient’s overall condition before definitive surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery and minimally invasive techniques are being used with similar outcomes and a lower mortality, morbidity and hospital stay than open trans-abdominal surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery allows precise excision of both benign and early malignant lesions in the mid and upper rectum. Survival of patients with inoperable hepatic metastases following radiofrequency ablation is encouraging. Robotics and telemedicine are taking surgery well into the 21st century. Artificial neural networks are being developed to enable us to predict the outcome for individual patients. New technology has a major impact on the way we practice surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:11819841

  13. Focusing the Spotlight on the Zebrafish Intestine to Illuminate Mechanisms of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobert, Viola H; Mouradov, Dmitri; Heath, Joan K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, encompassing colon and rectal cancer, arises from the epithelial lining of the large bowel. It is most prevalent in Westernised societies and is increasing in frequency as the world becomes more industrialised. Unfortunately, metastatic colorectal cancer is not cured by chemotherapy and the annual number of deaths caused by colorectal cancer, currently 700,000, is expected to rise. Our understanding of the contribution that genetic mutations make to colorectal cancer, although incomplete, is reasonably well advanced. However, it has only recently become widely appreciated that in addition to the ongoing accumulation of genetic mutations, chronic inflammation also plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of this disease. While a robust and tractable genetic model of colorectal cancer in zebrafish, suitable for pre-clinical studies, is not yet available, the identification of genes required for the rapid proliferation of zebrafish intestinal epithelial cells during development has highlighted a number of essential genes that could be targeted to disable colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, appreciation of the utility of zebrafish to study intestinal inflammation is on the rise. In particular, zebrafish provide unique opportunities to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental factors on the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier function. With currently available tools, the interplay between epigenetic regulators, intestinal injury, microbiota composition and innate immune cell mobilisation can be analysed in exquisite detail. This provides excellent opportunities to define critical events that could potentially be targeted therapeutically. Further into the future, the use of zebrafish larvae as hosts for xenografts of human colorectal cancer tissue, while still in its infancy, holds great promise that zebrafish could one day provide a practical, preclinical personalized medicine platform for the rapid assessment of the

  14. Focusing the Spotlight on the Zebrafish Intestine to Illuminate Mechanisms of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobert, Viola H; Mouradov, Dmitri; Heath, Joan K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, encompassing colon and rectal cancer, arises from the epithelial lining of the large bowel. It is most prevalent in Westernised societies and is increasing in frequency as the world becomes more industrialised. Unfortunately, metastatic colorectal cancer is not cured by chemotherapy and the annual number of deaths caused by colorectal cancer, currently 700,000, is expected to rise. Our understanding of the contribution that genetic mutations make to colorectal cancer, although incomplete, is reasonably well advanced. However, it has only recently become widely appreciated that in addition to the ongoing accumulation of genetic mutations, chronic inflammation also plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of this disease. While a robust and tractable genetic model of colorectal cancer in zebrafish, suitable for pre-clinical studies, is not yet available, the identification of genes required for the rapid proliferation of zebrafish intestinal epithelial cells during development has highlighted a number of essential genes that could be targeted to disable colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, appreciation of the utility of zebrafish to study intestinal inflammation is on the rise. In particular, zebrafish provide unique opportunities to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental factors on the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier function. With currently available tools, the interplay between epigenetic regulators, intestinal injury, microbiota composition and innate immune cell mobilisation can be analysed in exquisite detail. This provides excellent opportunities to define critical events that could potentially be targeted therapeutically. Further into the future, the use of zebrafish larvae as hosts for xenografts of human colorectal cancer tissue, while still in its infancy, holds great promise that zebrafish could one day provide a practical, preclinical personalized medicine platform for the rapid assessment of the

  15. Dietary Intakes of Red Meat, Poultry, and Fish During High School and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in Women

    PubMed Central

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Bernstein, Adam M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Wu, Kana

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent diet may be etiologically relevant for colorectal carcinogenesis. We examined the association between meat and fish intakes during adolescence and the risk of colorectal adenomas later in life among 19,771 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II. Subjects had completed a validated food frequency questionnaire in 1998 (when aged 34–51 years) about their diets during high school and subsequently underwent at least 1 lower-bowel endoscopy during the study period (1998–2007). During this period, 1,494 subjects were diagnosed with colorectal adenomas. Intake of red meat during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk when comparing those in the highest versus lowest category of intake (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 1.35). Similarly, intake of fish during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.78, 1.17). Intake of poultry during adolescence was associated with a lower risk of total colorectal (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.99), distal (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.99), rectal (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.90), and advanced (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.93) adenomas. Replacement of 1 serving per day of red meat with 1 serving per day of poultry or fish was associated with 41% and 35% decreased risks for rectal adenomas and advanced adenomas, respectively. Our findings do not suggest an association between red meat intake during adolescence and colorectal adenomas later in life, but higher poultry intake during this time was associated with a lower risk of colorectal adenomas. PMID:23785116

  16. Systemic Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Mayer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common non-cutaneous malignancy in the United States and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death. Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition. Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months. For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs. For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence. Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease. PMID:18471507

  17. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  18. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  19. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  20. Prevalence and features of colorectal lesions among Hispanics: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Lee, Edward; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ghuman, Amita; Nouraie, Mehdi; Brim, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of colorectal adenoma and carcinoma in an inner city Hispanic population. METHODS: We reviewed the reports of 1628 Hispanic patients who underwent colonoscopy at Howard University from 2000 to 2010. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenoma ≥ 1 cm in size, adenomas with villous histology, high grade dysplasia and/or invasive cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 statistics and t-test. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 54 years, 64.2% were females. Polyps were observed in 489 (30.0%) of patients. Adenoma prevalence was 16.8% (n = 273), advanced adenoma 2.4% (n = 39), and colorectal cancer 0.4% (n = 7). Hyperplastic polyps were seen in 6.6% of the cohort (n = 107). Adenomas predominantly exhibited a proximal colonic distribution (53.7%, n = 144); while hyperplastic polyps were mostly located in the distal colon (70%, n = 75). Among 11.7% (n = 191) patients who underwent screening colonoscopy, the prevalence of colorectal lesions was 21.4% adenoma, 2.6% advanced adenoma; and 8.3% hyperplastic polyps. CONCLUSION: Our data showed low colorectal cancer prevalence among Hispanics in the Washington DC area. However, the pre-neoplastic pattern of colonic lesions in Hispanics likely points toward a shift in this population that needs to be monitored closely through large epidemiological studies. PMID:26673447

  1. The Spatial Predilection for Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I.-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs) are easily missed with conventional white-light endoscopy. This study aimed to assess whether early ESCNs have a spatial predilection and the patterns of recurrence after endoscopic treatment. We analyzed the circumferential and longitudinal location of early ESCNs, as well as their correlations with exposure to carcinogens in a cohort of 162 subjects with 248 early ESCNs; 219 of which were identified by screening and 29 by surveillance endoscopy. The circumferential location was identified using a clock-face orientation, and the longitudinal location was identified according to the distance from the incisor. The most common circumferential and longitudinal distributions of the early ESCNs were found in the 6 to 9 o’clock quadrant (38.5%) and at 26 to 30 cm from the incisor (41.3%), respectively. A total of 163 lesions (75%) were located in the lower hemisphere arc, and 149 (68.4%) were located at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor. One hundred eleven (51%) early ESCNs were centered within the “hot zone” (i.e., lower hemisphere arc of the esophagus at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor), which comprised 20% of the esophageal area. Exposure to alcohol, betel nut, or cigarette was risk factors for the development of early ESCNs in the lower hemisphere. After complete endoscopic treatment, the mean annual incidence of metachronous tumors was 10%. In addition, 43% of the metachronous recurrent neoplasias developed within the “hot zone.” Cox regression analysis revealed that the index tumor within the hot zone (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–8.68; P = 0.02) and the presence of numerous Lugol-voiding lesions in the esophageal background mucosa were independent predictors for metachronous recurrence (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.36–15.56; P = 0.01). We identified a hot zone that may be used to enhance the detection of early ESCNs during endoscopic screening and surveillance

  2. Sinonasal Neoplasia – Clinicopathological Profile And Importance of Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sarawagi, Radha; Raghuwanshi, Sameer; Yadav, Pankaj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal cavity and Paranasal sinus malignancies are very rare, in which maxillary sinus is the commonest, followed by ethmoid, frontal and sphenoid sinus. Computed Tomography (CT) & Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) play a key role in diagnosis, staging and management of paranasal sinuses and nasal pathologies. Multiplanar imaging in CT helps better imaging of critical anatomical areas. Aim of our study was to study the incidence, clinical features, CT features and its importance in the management of sinonasal neoplasms. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital of MP, India. Consecutive 40 histologically proven cases of sinonasal neoplasia who visited the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Radiotherapy are included in our study. Demography and clinical features were recorded. Cases of nasal and paranasal sinus masses diagnosed on CT attending ENT and Radiotherapy OPD or admitted in the Radiotherapy ward forms the material of this study. This included patients of both sexes and all ages. Histopathological examination was asked to confirm the diagnosis made on CT. Results There were total 40 cases of sinonasal neoplasia among which 24 were benign. Almost all the benign cases were seen in the age group <40 y with mean age of 20 y and most of the malignant cases were seen in the age group above 40 y with mean age of 55 y. In our study we found male preponderance with male female ratio of 4:1 in both benign and malignant conditions. The commonest presenting symptoms of the patients with sinonasal masses in our study was nasal obstruction (75%) and nasal discharge (67.5%) followed by nasal mass (65%), epistaxis (62.5%) and headache (60%). Angiofibroma and papilloma were the commonest benign lesions. Commonest malignant lesion was squamous cell carcinoma. Of the malignant Sinonasal tumours studied in our series, maxillary sinus was involved in 13, ethmoid sinuses and nasal cavity in 10 cases each, and frontal

  3. Racial and ethnic factors in the genetic pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Carethers, J M

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer can develop by two distinct pathogenic mechanisms: one involving chromosomal breakage and aneuploidy (called chromosomal instability) and one involving mutations at DNA micro-satellite sequences (termed micro-satellite instability). Relatively few reports consider these mechanisms of colorectal cancer development across racial or ethnic groups. Available data indicate a moderate increase in colorectal cancer risk among Ashkenazi Jews who have a mutational polymorphism at codon 1307 in the APC gene. In American blacks, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of right-sided colonic tumors and an earlier age of onset of colorectal cancer. In addition, blacks have the highest colon cancer incidence in the United States among ethnic groups and have poorer 5-year survival rates compared with whites. While some differences may be attributed to health care access and socioeconomic differences, these do not completely explain all the variances. In the chromosomal instability pathway, there are polymorphisms within the P53 gene that are more prevalent in blacks, but the significance of these polymorphisms is not fully known. Blacks are more likely to demonstrate micro-satellite instability in their tumors; however, the mechanism for this phenomenon in blacks is unexplored. Differences in diet among racial and ethnic groups and polymorphic variations in drug metabolizing or acetylation genes have not been adequately cataloged. Identification of genetic and environmental factors among racial and ethnic groups should offer some insights into the observed epidemiologic data and advance opportunities to better understand the control and development of colorectal cancer. PMID:10826011

  4. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  5. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  6. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  7. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.E.; van Belle, G.; LoGerfo, J.P.

    1987-08-07

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship.

  8. Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids as genetic models of induced neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Kazianis, S

    2001-01-01

    Fishes of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfishes and swordtails) are small, internally fertilizing, livebearing, and derived from freshwater habitats in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. Scientists have used these fishes in cancer research studies for more than 70 yr. The genus is presently composed of 22 species that are quite divergent in their external morphology. Most cancer studies using Xiphophorus use hybrids, which can be easily produced by artificial insemination. Phenotypic traits, such as macromelanophore pigment patterns, are often drastically altered as a result of lack of gene regulation within hybrid fishes. These fish can develop large exophytic melanomas as a result of upregulated expression of these pigment patterns. Because backcross hybrid fish are susceptible to the development of melanoma and other neoplasms, they can be subjected to potentially deleterious chemical and physical agents. It is thus possible to use gene mapping and cloning methodologies to identify and characterize oncogenes and tumor suppressors implicated in spontaneous or induced neoplasia. This article reviews the history of cancer research using Xiphophorus and recent developments regarding DNA repair capabilities, mapping, and cloning of candidate genes involved in neoplastic phenotypes. The particular genetic complexity of melanoma in these fishes is analyzed and reviewed. PMID:11581522

  9. Laboratory management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: proposing a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Herfs, Michael; Crum, Christopher P

    2013-03-01

    Since the discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 in early 80s, the link between HPV and cervical cancer has been established with certainty, a function of the discovery and cloning of a range of HPV types associated with both cancer precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or CIN) and carcinomas and extensive epidemiologic, clinical, pathologic, and experimental data. These accumulated results have culminated in new paradigms of cancer prevention through screening and triage. Despite this, the management of women with CIN is still suboptimal and the overtreatment of these conditions still occurs, largely due to the lack of clarity regarding which precancerous lesions are most likely to progress in grade. Recently, a discrete population of cuboidal cells was discovered at the cervical squamocolumnar junction, the anatomic site where the large majority of HPV-related (pre)neoplastic lesions develop. These cells seem to be embryonic in nature and participate both in benign metaplasias and the initial phase of precancer development. This review summarizes the historical evolution of precursor management, assesses the potential role of this and other discoveries in segregating lower from higher-risk precursors, and examines their potential impact on the management of women with real or potential cervical cancer precursors.

  10. Committee Opinion No. 675 Summary: Management of Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is an increasingly common problem, particularly among women in their 40s. Although spontaneous regression has been reported, VIN should be considered a premalignant condition. Immunization with the quadrivalent or 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine, which is effective against human papillomavirus genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18, and 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, respectively, has been shown to decrease the risk of vulvar high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) (VIN usual type) and should be recommended for girls aged 11-12 years with catch-up through age 26 years if not vaccinated in the target age. There are no screening strategies for the prevention of vulvar cancer through early detection of vulvar HSIL (VIN usual type). Detection is limited to visual assessment with confirmation by histopathology when needed. Treatment is recommended for all women with vulvar HSIL (VIN usual type). Because of the potential for occult invasion, wide local excision should be performed if cancer is suspected, even if biopsies show vulvar HSIL. When occult invasion is not a concern, vulvar HSIL (VIN usual type) can be treated with excision, laser ablation, or topical imiquimod (off-label use). Given the relatively slow rate of progression, women with a complete response to therapy and no new lesions at follow-up visits scheduled 6 months and 12 months after initial treatment should be monitored by visual inspection of the vulva annually thereafter. PMID:27661648

  11. Committee Opinion No.675: Management of Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is an increasingly common problem, particularly among women in their 40s. Although spontaneous regression has been reported, VIN should be considered a premalignant condition. Immunization with the quadrivalent or 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine, which is effective against human papillomavirus genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18, and 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, respectively, has been shown to decrease the risk of vulvar high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) (VIN usual type) and should be recommended for girls aged 11-12 years with catch-up through age 26 years if not vaccinated in the target age. There are no screening strategies for the prevention of vulvar cancer through early detection of vulvar HSIL (VIN usual type). Detection is limited to visual assessment with confirmation by histopathology when needed. Treatment is recommended for all women with vulvar HSIL (VIN usual type). Because of the potential for occult invasion, wide local excision should be performed if cancer is suspected, even if biopsies show vulvar HSIL. When occult invasion is not a concern, vulvar HSIL (VIN usual type) can be treated with excision, laser ablation, or topical imiquimod (off-label use). Given the relatively slow rate of progression, women with a complete response to therapy and no new lesions at follow-up visits scheduled 6 months and 12 months after initial treatment should be monitored by visual inspection of the vulva annually thereafter. PMID:27661656

  12. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Is Associated With Genital Tract Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mhatre, Mohak; McAndrew, Thomas; Carpenter, Colleen; Burk, Robert D.; Einstein, Mark H.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies demonstrate increased prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease in HIV-infected individuals and an increased risk of HIV acquisition in HPV-infected individuals. The mechanisms underlying this synergy are not defined. We hypothesize that women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) will exhibit changes in soluble mucosal immunity that may promote HPV persistence and facilitate HIV infection. Methods The concentrations of immune mediators and endogenous anti-Escherichia coli activity in genital tract secretions collected by cervicovaginal lavage were compared in HIV-negative women with high-risk HPV-positive (HRHPV+) CIN-3 (n = 37), HRHPV+ CIN-1 (n = 12), or PAP-negative control subjects (n = 57). Results Compared with control subjects, women with CIN-3 or CIN-1 displayed significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 (P < 0.002) and significantly lower levels of anti-inflammatory mediators and antimicrobial peptides, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (P < 0.01), and human β defensins 2 and 3 (P < 0.02). There was no significant difference in endogenous anti-E. coli activity after controlling for age and sample storage time. Conclusion HRHPV+ CIN is characterized by changes in soluble mucosal immunity that could contribute to HPV persistence. The observed mucosal inflammation suggests a mechanism that may also contribute to the epidemiologic link between persistent HPV and HIV. PMID:22801340

  13. Brain metastases from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: review of pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Piura, E; Piura, B

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is rare with about 222 cases documented in the literature and an incidence of about 11% in living GTN patients. Brain metastasis from GTN was part of a disseminated disease in 90% of patients, single metastases in the brain - 80% and located in the cerebrum - 90%. Brain metastasis was the only manifestation of metastatic GTN in 11.3% of patients, appeared synchronously with metastatic GTN in other sites of the body - 30.6% and was diagnosed from 0.3 to 60 months after diagnosis of metastatic GTN in other sites (most often in the lung) - 58.1%. Overall, 83.9% of patients with brain metastases from GTN had also lung metastases from GTN. Brain metastases from GTN showed a greater tendency to be hemorrhagic compared to brain metastases from other primaries. In patients with brain metastases from GTN, the best outcome was achieved with multimodal therapy including craniotomy, whole brain radiotherapy, and EP-EMA or EMA-CO chemotherapy. Nonetheless, brain metastasis from GTN is a grave disease with a median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of about 12 months.

  14. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  15. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, T E; van Belle, G; LoGerfo, J P

    1987-08-01

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship.

  16. Fecal Microbiota, Fecal Metabolome, and Colorectal Cancer Interrelations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rashmi; Ahn, Jiyoung; Sampson, Joshua N.; Shi, Jianxin; Yu, Guoqin; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Hayes, Richard B.; Goedert, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Investigation of microbe-metabolite relationships in the gut is needed to understand and potentially reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Methods Microbiota and metabolomics profiling were performed on lyophilized feces from 42 CRC cases and 89 matched controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify statistically independent associations with CRC. First principal coordinate-component pair (PCo1-PC1) and false discovery rate (0.05)-corrected P-values were calculated for 116,000 Pearson correlations between 530 metabolites and 220 microbes in a sex*case/control meta-analysis. Results Overall microbe-metabolite PCo1-PC1 was more strongly correlated in cases than in controls (Rho 0.606 vs 0.201, P = 0.01). CRC was independently associated with lower levels of Clostridia, Lachnospiraceae, p-aminobenzoate and conjugated linoleate, and with higher levels of Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, p-hydroxy-benzaldehyde, and palmitoyl-sphingomyelin. Through postulated effects on cell shedding (palmitoyl-sphingomyelin), inflammation (conjugated linoleate), and innate immunity (p-aminobenzoate), metabolites mediated the CRC association with Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas by 29% and 34%, respectively. Overall, palmitoyl-sphingomyelin correlated directly with abundances of Enterobacteriaceae (Gammaproteobacteria), three Actinobacteria and five Firmicutes. Only Parabacteroides correlated inversely with palmitoyl-sphingomyelin. Other lipids correlated inversely with Alcaligenaceae (Betaproteobacteria). Six Bonferroni-significant correlations were found, including low indolepropionate and threnoylvaline with Actinobacteria and high erythronate and an uncharacterized metabolite with Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusions Feces from CRC cases had very strong microbe-metabolite correlations that were predominated by Enterobacteriaceae and Actinobacteria. Metabolites mediated a direct CRC association with Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas, but not an inverse

  17. A Possible New Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Mutation in a Patient with a Prototypic Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Buzzola, Rino; Kurukulasuriya, Lilamani Romayne; Touza, Mariana; Litofsky, Norman S.; Brietzke, Stephen; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1 syndrome is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of tumors involving two or more endocrine glands. These tumors include pheochromocytoma, adrenal cortical and neuroendocrine tumors including (bronchopulmonary, thymic, gastric), lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas, and meningiomas. MEN-4 is very rare and has been characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid and anterior pituitary tumors in association with tumors of the adrenals, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Summary We report the case of a 40-year-old male without significant family history of endocrine disease who was found to have primary hyperparathyroidism, a pituitary tumor causing acromegaly, thyroid cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cysts. We posit that this represents a new version of MEN-4. While renal tumors (angiomyolipoma) have been reported as part of the MEN-4 phenotype, to our knowledge, this is the first case reported of the association of MEN-1 and/or MEN-4 phenotype with this unique constellation of tumors, including renal cell carcinoma. Interestingly, this patient tested negative (DNA sequencing/deletion) for MEN-1 (menin), MEN-4 (CDKN1B) and VHL genes. Key Message Thus, while this case has clinical characteristics consistent with either MEN-1 or MEN-4, it may represent a unique genetic variant. PMID:26989398

  18. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  19. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mager, Lukas F; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies.

  20. Dehydroglyasperin D Inhibits the Proliferation of HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Direct Interaction With Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Jeong, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite recent advances in therapy, colorectal cancer still has a grim prognosis. Although licorice has been used in East Asian traditional medicine, the molecular properties of its constituents including dehydroglyasperin D (DHGA-D) remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the inhibitory effect of DHGA-D on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and identify the primary signaling molecule targeted by DHGA-D. Methods: We evaluated anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The target protein of DHGA-D was identified by Western blot analysis with a specific antibody, and direct interaction between DHGA-D and the target protein was confirmed by kinase and pull-down assays. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and further Western blot analysis was performed to identify the signaling pathway involved. Results: DHGA-D significantly suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent HT-29 colorectal cancer cell proliferation. DHGA-D directly suppressed phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity and subsequent Akt phosphorylation and bound to the p110 subunit of PI3K. DHGA-D also significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest, together with the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and retinoblastoma phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression. Conclusions: DHGA-D has potent anticancer activity and targets PI3K in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report to detail the molecular basis of DHGA-D in suppressing colorectal cancer cell growth. PMID:27051646

  1. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  2. Inflammatory networks underlying colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Audrey; Zinger, Adar; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation is emerging as one of the hallmarks of cancer, yet its role in most tumors remains unclear. Whereas a minority of solid tumors are associated with overt inflammation, long-term treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is remarkably effective in reducing cancer rate and death. This indicates that inflammation might have many as-yet-unrecognized facets, among which an indolent course might be far more prevalent than previously appreciated. In this Review, we explore the various inflammatory processes underlying the development and progression of colorectal cancer and discuss anti-inflammatory means for its prevention and treatment.

  3. Extended evaluation of a phase 1/2 trial on dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival after immunizations with an advanced-generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine in late-stage colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balint, Joseph P; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Rice, Adrian; Latchman, Yvette; Xu, Younong; Messerschmidt, Gerald L; Chaudhry, Arvind; Morse, Michael A; Jones, Frank R

    2015-08-01

    A phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival on metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients after immunotherapy with an advanced-generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine was performed. We report our extended observations on long-term overall survival and further immune analyses on a subset of treated patients including assessment of cytolytic T cell responses, T regulatory (Treg) to T effector (Teff) cell ratios, flow cytometry on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and determination of HLA-A2 status. An overall survival of 20 % (median survival 11 months) was observed during long-term follow-up, and no long-term adverse effects were reported. Cytolytic T cell responses increased after immunizations, and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were induced whether or not patients were HLA-A2 positive or Ad5 immune. PBMC samples from a small subset of patients were available for follow-up immune analyses. It was observed that the levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific CMI activity decreased from their peak values during follow-up in five patients analyzed. Preliminary results revealed that activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in a post-immunization sample exhibiting high CMI activity. Treg to Teff cell ratios were assessed, and samples from three of five patients exhibited a decrease in Treg to Teff cell ratio during the treatment protocol. Based upon the favorable safety and immunogenicity data obtained, we plan to perform an extensive immunologic and survival analysis on mCRC patients to be enrolled in a randomized/controlled clinical trial that investigates Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) as a single agent with booster immunizations. PMID:25956394

  4. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  5. Role of surgery for colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Antonio; Vacante, Marco; Ambrosino, Immacolata; Cristaldi, Erika; Pietrapertosa, Giuseppe; Basile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of subjects with colorectal cancer is expected to grow in the next future decades and surgery represents the most successful treatment modality for these patients. Anyway, currently elderly subjects undergo less elective surgical procedures than younger patients mainly due to the high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Some authors suggest extensive surgery, including multistage procedures, as carried out in younger patients while others promote less aggressive surgery. In older patients, laparoscopic-assisted colectomy showed a number of advantages compared to conventional open surgery that include lower stress, higher rate of independency after surgery, quicker return to prior activities and a decrease in costs. The recent advances in chemotherapy and the introduction of new surgical procedures such as the endoluminal stenting, suggest the need for a revisitation of surgical practice patterns and the role of palliative surgery, mainly for patients with advanced disease. In this article, we discuss the current role of surgery for elderly patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:27721923

  6. Oncogenic association of specific human papillomavirus types with cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, A T; Temple, G F; Kurman, R J; Jenson, A B; Lancaster, W D

    1987-10-01

    Molecular hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from 190 cervical biopsy specimens from women in the United States, Brazil, and Peru revealed viral sequences in 2 (9%) of 23 biopsy specimens of normal mature squamous epithelium, 7 (44%) of 16 biopsy specimens of metaplastic squamous epithelia, 60 (77%) of 78 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 57 (89%) of 64 invasive squamous carcinomas, and 8 (89%) of 9 endocervical adenocarcinomas. HPV typing by DNA hybridization revealed HPV 6 and HPV 11 sequences in metaplastic squamous epithelia, CIN I, and CIN II, but not in CIN III lesions or invasive carcinomas. HPV 16 was detected in metaplastic epithelium and in nearly half of the invasive squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. It was present in 31% of CIN lesions, increasing in frequency with the severity of CIN from 20% of CIN I to 50% of CIN III. HPV 16 showed a striking difference in geographic distribution, being detected in 36% of the carcinomas from the United States compared to 64% of the carcinomas from Brazil and Peru. HPV 18 was found in metaplastic epithelia and in 17% of carcinomas but in only 1% of CIN lesions. HPV 31 was not found in metaplastic epithelium but was present in 6% of carcinomas and in 18% of CIN lesions. In addition, a group of uncharacterized HPVs, not corresponding to any of the probes used, was found in 5% of normal and metaplastic epithelia and in 18% of CIN and 19% of invasive cancers. These results suggest that individual HPV types that infect the cervix have varying degrees of oncogenic association. HPV 6 and HPV 11 appear to have very little oncogenic association, HPV 31 has low oncogenic association, and HPV 16 and HPV 18 have high oncogenic association. PMID:2821311

  7. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  8. Association between folate status and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, W; Hao, M; Wang, Y; Feng, N; Wang, Z; Wang, W; Wang, J; Ding, L

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To investigate the effect of folate status on cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) progression and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV). Subjects/Methods: We evaluated 20 000 sexually active women aged <65 years in Yangqu County by using a questionnaire; the subjects were also screened using the ThinPrep cytologic test (TCT). Patients with abnormal TCT results (other than glandular cell abnormalities) who were willing to provide informed consent were further diagnosed using colposcopy and histopathological examination. We investigated 247 cases of low-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 125 cases of high-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 877 controls. A 24-item food frequency questionnaire was filled out by the investigator to estimate the consumption of dietary folate. Positivity for hrHPV from residual exfoliated cervical cells was tested; serum folate was also measured. Results: The hrHPV infection rate in HSIL patients (77.6%) was higher than that in LSIL (33.2%) and control (32.0%) patients. Dietary folate intakes in controls, LSIL and HSIL were 306.9±176.6, 321.8±168.0 and 314.7±193.8 μg/kcal, respectively. The levels of serum folate in controls, LSIL and HSIL were 18.2±7.9, 15.9±7.1 and 14.3±7.5 nmol/l, respectively. Increased CIN correlated with higher rates of hrHPV infection and lower levels of serum folate. Conclusions: Low levels of serum folate may increase the risk of CIN progression. Furthermore, potential synergy may exist between low serum folate levels and hrHPV infection to promote CIN development. PMID:27026426

  9. RAP1 GTPase Overexpression is Associated with Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pascoal-Xavier, Marcelo Antonio; Figueiredo, Anna Carolina Cançado; Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Calzavara-Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Costa, Marcelo Azevedo; Reis, Ilka Afonso; Bonjardim, Claudio Antônio; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2015-01-01

    RAP1 (RAS proximate 1), a small GTP-binding protein of the RAS superfamily, is a putative oncogene that is highly expressed in several malignant cell lines and types of cancers, including some types of squamous cell carcinoma. However, the participation of RAP1 in cervical carcinogenesis is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional study of paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies to determine the association of RAP1 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Standard and quantitative immunohistochemistry assessment of RAP1 expression in fixed tissue was performed on 183 paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies that were classified as normal or non-dysplastic mucosa (NDM) (n = 33); CIN grade 1 (n = 84) and CIN grade 2/3 (n = 66). A gradual increase in RAP1 expression in NDM < CIN 1 < CIN 2/3 (p<0.001) specimens was observed and was in agreement with the histopathologic diagnosis. A progressive increase in the RAP1 expression levels increased the risk of CIN 1 [odds ratio (OR) = 3.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-10.64] 3.5 fold and the risk of CIN 2/3 (OR = 19.86, 95% CI 6.40-70.79) nearly 20 fold when compared to NDM. In addition, stereotype ordinal regression analysis showed that this progressive increase in RAP1 expression more strongly impacted CIN 2/3 than CIN 1. Our findings suggest that RAP1 may be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of CIN. PMID:25856570

  10. Gigantism in sibling unrelated to multiple endocrine neoplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, A; Teramoto, A; Yamada, S; Kitanaka, S; Tanaka, T; Sanno, N; Osamura, R Y; Kirino, T

    1994-11-01

    The cases of gigantism sisters with somatotroph adenomas unrelated to multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) Type 1 are reported. The sisters grew rapidly since they were 5 or 6 years old and were diagnosed to have gigantism with pituitary adenoma by computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging. A serum endocrinological examination showed the elevated growth hormone values. After thyroxine-releasing hormone stimulation, growth hormone values exhibited a paradoxical rise. They were supposed to be unrelated to MEN Type 1, because analysis of the 11th chromosomes and the other endocrine functions were normal. They were operated on by the transphenoidal method. Immunohistochemical staining of both tumor specimens confirmed somatotroph adenomas. Pituitary adenoma associated with MEN Type 1 is a well-recognized entity. However, the sporadic occurrence of pituitary adenoma unrelated to MEN Type 1, especially in siblings, is extremely rare. Fifteen cases of pituitary adenomas in siblings were described in the literature. As for gigantism, only two brothers were reported. Our case of gigantism sisters is the second sporadic case. In our review of the isolated cases of pituitary adenoma in siblings described in the literature, 12 (70%) of 17 cases including ours are acromegaly or gigantism. This incidence is much higher than that of MEN Type 1 patients with pituitary adenomas. The cause of the familial occurrence of pituitary adenomas is still unclear, although autosomal recessive inheritance has been suggested. It has been stated that point mutations in codon 201 or 227 of the Gs alpha gene located in chromosome 20 were found in about 35 to 40% of somatotroph adenomas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7838348

  11. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-16

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  12. Cushing’s Syndrome in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, William F.; Varghese, Sarah; Marx, Stephen J.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective In patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Cushing’s syndrome (CS) from endogenous hypercortisolism can result from pituitary, adrenal, or other endocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to characterize the range of presentations of CS in a large series of MEN1 patients. Design Retrospective review of NIH Clinical Center inpatient records over an approximately 40 year period. Patients 19 patients (8 males, 11 females) with CS and MEN1. Measurements Biochemical, imaging, surgical, and pathological findings. Results An etiology was determined for 14 of the 19 patients with CS and MEN1: 11 (79%) had Cushing’s disease (CD) and three (21%) had ACTH-independent CS due to adrenal tumors, frequencies indistinguishable from sporadic CS. Three of 11 MEN1 patients with CD (27%) had additional non-ACTH secreting pituitary microadenomas identified at surgery, an incidence 10-fold higher than in sporadic CD. Ninety-one percent of MEN1 patients with CD were cured after surgery. Two of three MEN1 patients with ACTH-independent CS (67%) had adrenocortical carcinoma. One patient with adrenal cancer and another with adrenal adenoma were cured by unilateral adrenalectomy. No case of ectopic ACTH secretion was identified in our patient cohort. The etiology of CS could not be defined in five patients; in three of these, hypercortisolism appeared to resolve spontaneously. Conclusions The tumor multiplicity of MEN1 can be reflected in the anterior pituitary, MEN1-associated ACTH-independent CS may be associated with aggressive adrenocortical disease, and an etiology for CS in MEN1 may be elusive in a substantial minority of patients. PMID:21916912

  13. Gigantism in sibling unrelated to multiple endocrine neoplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, A; Teramoto, A; Yamada, S; Kitanaka, S; Tanaka, T; Sanno, N; Osamura, R Y; Kirino, T

    1994-11-01

    The cases of gigantism sisters with somatotroph adenomas unrelated to multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) Type 1 are reported. The sisters grew rapidly since they were 5 or 6 years old and were diagnosed to have gigantism with pituitary adenoma by computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging. A serum endocrinological examination showed the elevated growth hormone values. After thyroxine-releasing hormone stimulation, growth hormone values exhibited a paradoxical rise. They were supposed to be unrelated to MEN Type 1, because analysis of the 11th chromosomes and the other endocrine functions were normal. They were operated on by the transphenoidal method. Immunohistochemical staining of both tumor specimens confirmed somatotroph adenomas. Pituitary adenoma associated with MEN Type 1 is a well-recognized entity. However, the sporadic occurrence of pituitary adenoma unrelated to MEN Type 1, especially in siblings, is extremely rare. Fifteen cases of pituitary adenomas in siblings were described in the literature. As for gigantism, only two brothers were reported. Our case of gigantism sisters is the second sporadic case. In our review of the isolated cases of pituitary adenoma in siblings described in the literature, 12 (70%) of 17 cases including ours are acromegaly or gigantism. This incidence is much higher than that of MEN Type 1 patients with pituitary adenomas. The cause of the familial occurrence of pituitary adenomas is still unclear, although autosomal recessive inheritance has been suggested. It has been stated that point mutations in codon 201 or 227 of the Gs alpha gene located in chromosome 20 were found in about 35 to 40% of somatotroph adenomas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF PHARYNGEAL NEOPLASIA IN 25 DOGS.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, Gregorio; Zotti, Alessandro; Alberti, Monica; Rossi, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to investigate head tumors in dogs, however little information is available for lesions of the pharyngeal area. The purpose of this multicentric, retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe the CT findings in a sample of dogs with pathologically confirmed pharyngeal neoplasia and determine whether any CT features allowed differentiation of tumor type. Location of lesions, size and shape, margins, relationship with surrounding structures and vessels, attenuation characteristics and enhancement pattern, regional lymph node changes, and presence of metastasis were recorded by three observers (1 DECVDI). The effect of final diagnosis on each CT feature was tested. A total of 25 dogs were included: 15 with carcinomas, five sarcomas, four melanomas, and one lymphoma. The oropharynx and laryngopharynx were more frequently involved. Among tumor groups, lesions were of similar size, irregularly shaped, had ill-defined margins, and had moderate-to-marked heterogeneous contrast enhancement. Lysis of hyoid bones was recorded in two carcinomas and infiltration of the lingual artery occurred in one case. Marked medial retropharyngeal lymphoadenomegaly was recorded in 11 of 14 carcinomas, in all sarcomas and in two of four melanomas. The single lymphoma case showed ill-defined thickening of the oropharyngeal and laryngeal wall with retropharyngeal and mandibular lymphadenomegaly. Lung metastases were found in two of five sarcomas and two of four melanomas. Findings from the current study did not support the hypothesis that CT features could be used to predict pharyngeal tumor type in dogs. However, CT was helpful for determining mass extension, lymph node involvement, and distant metastatic spread. PMID:26173553

  15. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled

  16. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia disease progression is associated with increased vaginal microbiome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, A.; MacIntyre, D. A.; Lee, Y. S.; Smith, A.; Marchesi, J. R.; Lehne, B.; Bhatia, R.; Lyons, D.; Paraskevaidis, E.; Li, J. V.; Holmes, E.; Nicholson, J. K.; Bennett, P. R.; Kyrgiou, M.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary for cervical carcinogenesis. Although evidence suggests that the vaginal microbiome plays a functional role in the persistence or regression of HPV infections, this has yet to be described in women with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). We hypothesised that increasing microbiome diversity is associated with increasing CIN severity. llumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to characterise the vaginal microbiota of women with low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (LSIL; n = 52), high-grade (HSIL; n = 92), invasive cervical cancer (ICC; n = 5) and healthy controls (n = 20). Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed an increased prevalence of microbiomes characterised by high-diversity and low levels of Lactobacillus spp. (community state type-CST IV) with increasing disease severity, irrespective of HPV status (Normal = 2/20,10%; LSIL = 11/52,21%; HSIL = 25/92,27%; ICC = 2/5,40%). Increasing disease severity was associated with decreasing relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. The vaginal microbiome in HSIL was characterised by higher levels of Sneathia sanguinegens (P < 0.01), Anaerococcus tetradius (P < 0.05) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (P < 0.05) and lower levels of Lactobacillus jensenii (P < 0.01) compared to LSIL. Our results suggest advancing CIN disease severity is associated with increasing vaginal microbiota diversity and may be involved in regulating viral persistence and disease progression. PMID:26574055

  17. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia disease progression is associated with increased vaginal microbiome diversity.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A; MacIntyre, D A; Lee, Y S; Smith, A; Marchesi, J R; Lehne, B; Bhatia, R; Lyons, D; Paraskevaidis, E; Li, J V; Holmes, E; Nicholson, J K; Bennett, P R; Kyrgiou, M

    2015-11-17

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary for cervical carcinogenesis. Although evidence suggests that the vaginal microbiome plays a functional role in the persistence or regression of HPV infections, this has yet to be described in women with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). We hypothesised that increasing microbiome diversity is associated with increasing CIN severity. llumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to characterise the vaginal microbiota of women with low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (LSIL; n = 52), high-grade (HSIL; n = 92), invasive cervical cancer (ICC; n = 5) and healthy controls (n = 20). Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed an increased prevalence of microbiomes characterised by high-diversity and low levels of Lactobacillus spp. (community state type-CST IV) with increasing disease severity, irrespective of HPV status (Normal = 2/20,10%; LSIL = 11/52,21%; HSIL = 25/92,27%; ICC = 2/5,40%). Increasing disease severity was associated with decreasing relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. The vaginal microbiome in HSIL was characterised by higher levels of Sneathia sanguinegens (P < 0.01), Anaerococcus tetradius (P < 0.05) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (P < 0.05) and lower levels of Lactobacillus jensenii (P < 0.01) compared to LSIL. Our results suggest advancing CIN disease severity is associated with increasing vaginal microbiota diversity and may be involved in regulating viral persistence and disease progression.

  18. How big is this neoplasia? live colonoscopic size measurement using the Infocus-Breakpoint.

    PubMed

    Chadebecq, F; Tilmant, C; Bartoli, A

    2015-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the reference medical examination for early diagnosis and treatment of colonic diseases. This minimally invasive technique allows endoscopists to explore the colon cavity and remove neoplasias - abnormal growths of tissue - which may develop into malignant tumors. The size, shape and appearance of a neoplasia are essential cues for diagnostic. However, the size is difficult to estimate because the absolute scale of the observed tissue is not directly conveyed in the 2D colonoscopic images. An erroneous size estimate may lead to inappropriate treatment. There currently exist no solutions to reproducible neoplasia size measurement adapted to colonoscopy. We propose a colonoscopic size measurement system for neoplasias. By using a simple planar geometry, the key technical problem is reduced to resolving scale. Our core contribution is introducing the Infocus-Breakpoint (IB) that allows us to resolve scale from a regular colonoscopic video. We define the IB as the lower limit of the colonoscope's depth of field. The IB corresponds to a precise colonoscope to tissue distance, called the reference depth, which we calibrate preoperatively. We detect the IB intraoperatively thanks to two novel modules: deformable Blur-Estimating Tracking (BET) and Blur-Model Fitting (BMF). With our system, the endoscopist may interactively measure the length and area of a neoplasia in a 2D colonoscopic image directly. Our system needs no hardware modification to standard monocular colonoscopes, yet reaching a size measurement accuracy of the order of a millimeter, as shown on several phantom and patient datasets.

  19. Combining large area fluorescence with multiphoton microscopy for improved detection of oral epithelial neoplasia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia representing the complex microstructural organization of mucosa, potentially providing high specificity for detection of neoplasia, but is limited by small imaging area. Large area fluorescence methods on the other hand show high sensitivity appropriate for screening but are hampered by low specificity. In this study, we apply MPAM-SHGM following guidance from large area fluorescence, by either autofluorescence or a targeted metabolic fluorophore, as a potentially clinically viable approach for detection of oral neoplasia. Sites of high neoplastic potentially were identified by large area red/green autofluorescence or by a fluorescently labelled deoxy-glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to highlight areas of high glucose uptake across the buccal pouch of a hamster model for OSCC. Follow-up MPAM-SHGM was conducted on regions of interests (ROIs) to assess whether microscopy would reveal microscopic features associated with neoplasia to confirm or exclude large area fluorescence findings. Parameters for analysis included cytologic metrics, 3D epithelial connective tissue interface metrics (MPAM-SHGM) and intensity of fluorescence (widefield). Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology and graded by a pathologist. A small sample of human ex vivo tissues were also imaged. A generalized linear model combining image metrics from large area fluorescence and volumetric MPAM-SHGM indicated the ability to delineate normal and inflammation from neoplasia.

  20. Association of Intrauterine Device (IUD) and Cervical Neoplasia - A Study in a Poor Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, Chibuike Ogwuegbu; Ozumba, Benjamin Chukwuma; Oguanuo, Theophilus Chimezie; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a contraceptive method used by women of reproductive age group. However, there are conflicting reports on the association between IUD and cervical neoplasia. These controversies may further hamper the poor uptake of modern contraception in Nigeria. Aim This study was therefore aimed at evaluating the association between IUD and cervical neoplasia. Materials and Methods This was a case control study in which Pap smear results of 156 participants on IUD were compared with those of 156 non-users of modern contraception. The participants who were found to have abnormal cervical smear cytology results were further subjected to colposcopy. Biopsy specimens for histology were collected from the participants with obvious cervical lesions or those with suspicious lesions on colposcopy. The results were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% level of confidence. Results Seven (4.5%) and 2(1.3%) of participants using IUD had Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) 1 and CIN 2 respectively. Also, 5(3.2%) and 1(0.6%) of non-users of modern contraception had CIN 1 and CIN 2 respectively. The prevalence of cervical neoplasia among all the participants was 4.8%. Although, the proportion of women who had CIN was more among participants using IUD than non-users of modern contraception, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion There was no significant association between IUD and cervical neoplasia in this study. PMID:27504358

  1. Spectral classifier design with ensemble classifiers and misclassification-rejection: application to elastic-scattering spectroscopy for detection of colonic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Castanon, David A.; Singh, Satish K.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2011-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy has shown potential as a real-time, in vivo, diagnostic tool for identifying neoplasia during endoscopy. We present the development of a diagnostic algorithm to classify elastic-scattering spectroscopy (ESS) spectra as either neoplastic or non-neoplastic. The algorithm is based on pattern recognition methods, including ensemble classifiers, in which members of the ensemble are trained on different regions of the ESS spectrum, and misclassification-rejection, where the algorithm identifies and refrains from classifying samples that are at higher risk of being misclassified. These “rejected” samples can be reexamined by simply repositioning the probe to obtain additional optical readings or ultimately by sending the polyp for histopathological assessment, as per standard practice. Prospective validation using separate training and testing sets result in a baseline performance of sensitivity = .83, specificity = .79, using the standard framework of feature extraction (principal component analysis) followed by classification (with linear support vector machines). With the developed algorithm, performance improves to Se ∼ 0.90, Sp ∼ 0.90, at a cost of rejecting 20–33% of the samples. These results are on par with a panel of expert pathologists. For colonoscopic prevention of colorectal cancer, our system could reduce biopsy risk and cost, obviate retrieval of non-neoplastic polyps, decrease procedure time, and improve assessment of cancer risk. PMID:21721830

  2. Spectral classifier design with ensemble classifiers and misclassification-rejection: application to elastic-scattering spectroscopy for detection of colonic neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Castanon, David A.; Singh, Satish K.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2011-06-01

    Optical spectroscopy has shown potential as a real-time, in vivo, diagnostic tool for identifying neoplasia during endoscopy. We present the development of a diagnostic algorithm to classify elastic-scattering spectroscopy (ESS) spectra as either neoplastic or non-neoplastic. The algorithm is based on pattern recognition methods, including ensemble classifiers, in which members of the ensemble are trained on different regions of the ESS spectrum, and misclassification-rejection, where the algorithm identifies and refrains from classifying samples that are at higher risk of being misclassified. These ``rejected'' samples can be reexamined by simply repositioning the probe to obtain additional optical readings or ultimately by sending the polyp for histopathological assessment, as per standard practice. Prospective validation using separate training and testing sets result in a baseline performance of sensitivity = .83, specificity = .79, using the standard framework of feature extraction (principal component analysis) followed by classification (with linear support vector machines). With the developed algorithm, performance improves to Se ~ 0.90, Sp ~ 0.90, at a cost of rejecting 20-33% of the samples. These results are on par with a panel of expert pathologists. For colonoscopic prevention of colorectal cancer, our system could reduce biopsy risk and cost, obviate retrieval of non-neoplastic polyps, decrease procedure time, and improve assessment of cancer risk.

  3. Dependence receptors and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehlen, Patrick; Tauszig-Delamasure, Servane

    2014-11-01

    The research on colorectal cancer (CRC) biology has been leading the oncology field since the early 1990s. The search for genetic alterations has allowed the identification of the main tumour suppressors or oncogenes. Recent work obtained in CRC has unexpectedly proposed the existence of novel category of tumour suppressors, the so-called 'dependence receptors'. These transmembrane receptors behave as Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde with two opposite sides: they induce a positive signalling (survival, proliferation, differentiation) in presence of their ligand, but are not inactive in the absence of their ligand and rather trigger apoptosis when unbound. This trait confers them a conditional tumour suppressor activity: they eliminate cells that grow abnormally in an environment offering a limited quantity of ligand. This review will describe how receptors such as deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), uncoordinated 5 (UNC5), rearranged during transfection (RET) or TrkC constrain CRC progression and how this dependence receptor paradigm may open up therapeutical perspectives. PMID:25163468

  4. Genetic architecture of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3-5%) of cases arise from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late onset 'sporadic' disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years, genome wide association studies have discovered that over 40 genetic regions are associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC, and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies and development of higher throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarising the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC, and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. Subsequently these new insights will lead to improved treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:26187503

  5. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-01-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  6. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Raminder Kaur; Khangura, Charanpreet Kaur; Desai, Anagha; Goyert, Gregory; Sangha, Roopina

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity. PMID:26770850

  7. Mass Spectrometry-Based N-Glycomics of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Manveen K.; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. An increased molecular understanding of the CRC pathology is warranted to gain insights into the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of the disease. Altered protein glycosylation patterns are associated with most diseases including malignant transformation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics have accelerated glycomics research and present a new paradigm for cancer biomarker discovery. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics and glycomics, therefore, hold considerable promise to improve the discovery of novel biomarkers with utility in disease diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the emerging field of glycomics to present a comprehensive review of advances in technologies and their application in studies aimed at discovering novel glycan-based biomarkers. We will also discuss some of the challenges associated with using glycans as biomarkers. PMID:26690136

  8. Review on the immunotherapy strategies against metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Lucia; Delbue, Serena; Ferrante, Pasquale; Bregni, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies throughout the world and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Western countries. Recent progress in CRC treatment options, such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and target therapy, has improved the prognosis, but advanced disease with recurrence or distant metastasis is usually incurable and has an unfavorable prognosis. The introduction of immunotherapy-associated strategies, both active and passive, to the treatment of CRC aims to overcome the limits of classical treatments. We review the state of the art for CRC with respect to different immunotherapeutic approaches, such as the use of cancer vaccines and/or adoptive cellular therapy, their most current advances and limitations and perspectives for further improvements. PMID:27605072

  9. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-05-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  10. Preoperative staging of colorectal cancer: CT vs. integrated FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Chung, Tae Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2008-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging is essential in determining the optimal therapeutic planning for individual patients. The computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer, even if controversial, may be useful for planning surgery and/or neoadjuvant therapy, particularly when local tumor extension into adjacent organs or distant metastases are detected. There have been significant changes in the CT technology with the advent of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner. Advances in CT technology have raised interest in the potential role of CT for detection and staging of colorectal cancer. In recent studies, MDCT with MPR images has shown promising accuracy in the evaluation of local extent and nodal involvement of colorectal cancer. Combined PET/CT images have significant advantages over either alone because it provides both functional and anatomical data. Therefore, it is natural to expect that PET/CT would improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of colorectal cancer. The most significant additional information provided by PET/CT relates to the accurate detection of distant metastases. For the evaluation of patients with colorectal cancer, CT has relative advantages over PET/CT in regard to the depth of tumor invasion through the wall, extramural extension, and regional lymph node metastases. PET/CT should be performed on selected patients with suggestive but inconclusive metastatic lesions with CT. In addition, PET/CT with dedicated CT protocols, such as contrast-enhanced PET/CT and PET/CT colonography, may replace the diagnostic CT for the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer.

  11. Computational Identification of Novel Stage-Specific Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Ramar, Karthick; Ramalingam, Satish

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that the conversion of normal colon epithelium to adenoma and then to carcinoma stems from acquired molecular changes in the genome. The genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to a certain extent, and much remains to be known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with the advancement of colorectal cancer from one stage to the next. Here in this study we attempted to identify novel cancer genes that could underlie the stage-specific progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer. We conducted a stage-based meta-analysis of the voluminous tumor genome-sequencing data and mined using multiple approaches for novel genes driving the progression to stage-II, stage-III and stage-IV colorectal cancer. The consensus of these driver genes seeded the construction of stage-specific networks, which were then analyzed for the centrality of genes, clustering of subnetworks, and enrichment of gene-ontology processes. Our study identified three novel driver genes as hubs for stage-II progression: DYNC1H1, GRIN2A, GRM1. Four novel driver genes were identified as hubs for stage-III progression: IGF1R, CPS1, SPTA1, DSP. Three novel driver genes were identified as hubs for stage-IV progression: GSK3B, GGT1, EIF2B5. We also identified several non-driver genes that appeared to underscore the progression of colorectal cancer. Our study yielded potential diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer as well as novel stage-specific drug targets for rational intervention. Our methodology is extendable to the analysis of other types of cancer to fill the gaps in our knowledge. PMID:27243824

  12. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ishita; Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A "Pubmed" search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  13. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  14. RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF CASES OF NEOPLASIA IN A CAPTIVE POPULATION OF EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Olds, June E; Burrough, Eric R; Fales-Williams, Amanda J; Lehmkuhl, Aaron; Madson, Darin; Patterson, Abby J; Yaeger, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Reports of neoplasia in Chiroptera species are rare. (6, 10) This retrospective study describes five types of neoplasia identified within a captive population of male Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) housed in a zoo from 2004 through November of 2014. Tumor types identified include fibrosarcoma, cutaneous lymphoma, benign focal bronchioloalveolar neoplasm, anaplastic sarcoma, and sebaceous epithelioma. To the author's knowledge, aside from a recent report of focal brochioloalveolar adenoma, (8) these tumor types have not previously been described in the Rousettus species, nor in chiropterans in general. Based upon these findings and other recent publications regarding R. aegyptiacus, neoplasia does appear to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in captive members of this megachiropterid species. PMID:26056887

  15. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  16. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  17. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  18. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  19. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  20. Common Inflammatory Disorders and Neoplasia of the Ileal Pouch: A Review of Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Collinsworth, Amy L.; Liu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the standard restorative procedure after proctocolectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who require colectomy. The ileal pouch is susceptible to a variety of insults including mechanical injury, ischemia, fecal stasis, and infectious agents. In addition, the development of recurrent and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and neoplasia may occur in the ileal pouch. Although clinical, endoscopic, and radiographic examination can diagnose many ileal pouch diseases, histologic examination plays an essential role in diagnosis and management, particularly in cases with antibiotic refractory chronic pouchitis and pouch neoplasia. PMID:27785322

  1. Industrial risk factors for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lashner, B.A.; Epstein, S.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in the United States, and its incidence rates have sharply increased recently, especially in males. Industrial exposures, both occupational and environmental, are important colorectal cancer risk factors that are generally unrecognized by clinicians. Migration studies have documented that colorectal cancer is strongly associated with environmental risk factors. The causal role of occupational exposures is evidenced by a substantial literature associating specific work practices with increased colorectal cancer risks. Industrially related environmental exposures, including polluted drinking water and ionizing radiation, have also been associated with excess risks. Currently, there is a tendency to attribute colorectal cancer, largely or exclusively, to dietary and other lifestyle factors, thus neglecting these industrially related effects. Concerted efforts are needed to recognize the causal role of industrial risk factors and to encourage government and industry to reduce carcinogenic exposures. Furthermore, cost-effective screening programs for high-risk population groups are critically needed to further reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. 143 references.

  2. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  3. Depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy for noninvasive diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard Alan

    Oral cancer is the 11th most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx account for more than 7,500 deaths each year in the United States alone. Major advances have been made in the management of oral cancer through the combined use of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, improving the quality of life for many patients; however, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often occurs at a late stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective, noninvasive methods for early diagnosis of oral neoplasia are needed. Here a method is presented to noninvasively evaluate oral lesions using depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy (DSOS). A ball lens coupled fiber-optic probe was developed to enable preferential targeting of different depth regions in the oral mucosa. Clinical studies of the diagnostic performance of DSOS in 157 subjects were carried out in collaboration with the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. An overall sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 89% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue relative to histopathology. Based on these results a compact, portable version of the clinical DSOS device with real-time automated diagnostic capability was developed. The portable device was tested in 47 subjects and a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 83% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue. The diagnostic potential of multimodal platforms incorporating DSOS was explored through two pilot studies. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with widefield imaging was carried out in 29 oral cancer patients, resulting in a combined sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 69%. Widefield imaging and spectroscopy performed slightly better in combination than each method performed independently. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with the optical contrast agents 2-NBDG, EGF-Alexa 647, and proflavine was carried out in resected tissue

  4. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Baseline Dietary Knowledge of Colorectal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the dietary knowledge, attitudes and potential barriers to change of patients attending a colorectal outpatient clinic. Design: Use of a semistructured interview to generate qualitative and quantitative data. Setting: A regional colorectal outpatient clinic within Edinburgh. Method: Patients attending clinic with colorectal…

  5. Long-term Use of Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Curhan, Gary C.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2005-01-01

    Context Randomized trials of short-term aspirin use for prevention of recurrent colorectal adenoma have provided compelling evidence of a causal relationship between aspirin and colorectal neoplasia. However, data on long-term risk of colorectal cancer according to dose, timing, or duration of therapy with aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain limited. Objective To examine the influence of aspirin and NSAIDs in prevention of colorectal cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective cohort study of 82 911 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study providing data on medication use biennially since 1980 and followed up through June 1, 2000. Main Outcome Measure Incident colorectal cancer. Results Over a 20-year period, we documented 962 cases of colorectal cancer. Among women who regularly used aspirin (≥2 standard [325-mg] tablets per week), the multivariate relative risk (RR) for colorectal cancer was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67–0.88) compared with nonregular users. However, significant risk reduction was not observed until more than 10 years of use (P≤.001 for trend). The benefit appeared related to dose: compared with women who reported no use, the multivariate RRs for cancer were 1.10 (95% CI, 0.92–1.31) for women who used 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin tablets per week, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.73–1.10) for 2 to 5 aspirin per week, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.62–0.97) for 6 to 14 aspirin per week, and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.49–0.95) for more than 14 aspirin per week (P<.001 for trend). Notably, women who used more than 14 aspirin per week for longer than 10 years in the past had a multivariate RR for cancer of 0.47 (95% CI, 0.31–0.71). A similar dose-response relationship was found for nonaspirin NSAIDs (P=.007 for trend). The incidence of reported major gastrointestinal bleeding events per 1000 person-years also appeared to be dose-related: 0.77 among women who denied any aspirin use; 1.07 for 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin

  6. T-cell response to p53 tumor-associated antigen in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bueter, Marco; Gasser, Martin; Schramm, Nicolai; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Tocco, Georges; Gerstlauer, Christiane; Grimm, Martin; Nichiporuk, Ekaterina; Thalheimer, Andreas; Thiede, Arnulf; Meyer, Detlef; Benichou, Gilles; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2006-02-01

    Despite the radical surgical resection performed in patients with colorectal carcinoma, there is a high rate of tumor recurrence. Over an observation period of 3 years, 18% of the patients in our collective suffered a tumor relapse with local or distinct metastases after initial R0-resection. Some evidence suggests that this may be due to suppression of anti-tumor responses, a phenomenon that might be attributed to regulatory T cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the tumor-specific immune response depending on the UICC stage of patients with colorectal cancer. The cellular immune responses against defined antigens that are overexpressed in most of the patients with colorectal cancer were characterized. For this purpose, the tumor suppressor gene, p53, was chosen as the tumor-associated antigen that exhibits mutations and overexpression in up to 60% of colorectal carcinoma. We observed that p53 induced both IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion. The predominance of IL-10 production indicated that regulatory T cells directly participate in modulating the anti-tumor immune response. IL-10 levels in the blood as well as the expression of regulatory T-cell specific genes at the tumor site correlate with the UICC stage of the disease. These results may provide an explanation for the poor prognosis and increased recurrence rate in patients with advanced carcinoma.

  7. Biomarkers, Bundled Payments, and Colorectal Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Patrick; Raju, Gottumukkala; Rodriguez, Alma; Burke, Thomas; Hafemeister, Lisa; Hawk, Ernest; Wu, Xifeng; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the management of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are urgently needed, as such cancers continue to be one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers; CRC accounts for 21% of all cancers and is responsible for mortalities second only to lung cancer in the United States. A comprehensive science-driven approach towards markedly improved early detection/screening to efficacious targeted therapeutics with clear diagnostic and prognostic markers is essential. In addition, further changes addressing rising costs, stemming from recent health care reform measures, will be brought about in part by changes in how care is reimbursed. For oncology, the advances in genomics and biomarkers have the potential to define subsets of patients who have a prognosis or response to a particular type of therapy that differs from the mean. Better definition of a cancer’s behavior will facilitate developing care plans tailored to the patient. One method under study is episode-based payment or bundling, where one payment is made to a provider organization to cover all expenses associated with a discrete illness episode. Payments will be based on the average cost of care, with providers taking on a risk for overutilization and outliers. For providers to thrive in this environment, they will need to know what care a patient will require and the costs of that care. A science-driven “personalized approach” to cancer care has the potential to produce better outcomes with reductions in the use of ineffectual therapies and costs. This promising scenario is still in the future, but progress is being made, and the shape of things to come for cancer care in the age of genomics is becoming clearer. PMID:22893787

  8. Pathophysiological mechanisms of death resistance in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Ying; Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancers develop adaptive mechanisms to survive under extreme conditions and display hallmarks of unlimited proliferation and resistance to cell death. The deregulation of cell death is a key factor that contributes to chemoresistance in tumors. In a physiological context, balance between cell proliferation and death, and protection against cell damage are fundamental processes for maintaining gut epithelial homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying anti-death cytoprotection and tumor resistance often bear common pathways, and although distinguishing them would be a challenge, it would also provide an opportunity to develop advanced anti-cancer therapeutics. This review will outline cell death pathways (i.e., apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis), and discuss cytoprotective strategies in normal intestinal epithelium and death resistance mechanisms of colon tumor. In colorectal cancers, the intracellular mechanisms of death resistance include the direct alteration of apoptotic and necroptotic machinery and the upstream events modulating death effectors such as tumor suppressor gene inactivation and pro-survival signaling pathways. The autocrine, paracrine and exogenous factors within a tumor microenvironment can also instigate resistance against apoptotic and necroptotic cell death in colon cancers through changes in receptor signaling or transporter uptake. The roles of cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2, growth factors, glucose, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides in colorectal cancer will be highlighted. Targeting anti-death pathways in the colon cancer tissue might be a promising approach outside of anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenesis strategies for developing novel drugs to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26557002

  9. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome.

  10. Enhanced Reality and Intraoperative Imaging in Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ris, Frederic; Yeung, Trevor; Hompes, Roel; Mortensen, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal surgery is one of the most common procedures performed around the world with more than 600,000 operations each year in the United States, and more than a million worldwide. In the past two decades, there has been a clear trend toward minimal access and surgeons have embraced this evolution. Widespread adoption of advanced minimally invasive procedures is often limited by procedural complexity and the need for specific technical skills. Furthermore, the loss of 3D vision, limited overview of the surgical field, and diminished tactile sensation make major colorectal procedures more challenging and have an impact on the surgeons' learning curves. New technologies are emerging that can compensate for some of the sensory losses associated with laparoscopy. High-definition picture acquisition, 3D camera systems, and the use of biomarkers will allow improved identification of the target structures and help differentiate them from surrounding tissues. In this article, we describe some of the new technologies available and, in particular, focus on the possible implications of biomarkers and fluorescent laparoscopic imaging. PMID:26491408

  11. Genetics, diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE ROSA, MARINA; PACE, UGO; REGA, DANIELA; COSTABILE, VALERIA; DURATURO, FRANCESCA; IZZO, PAOLA; DELRIO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death. Surgery represents the mainstay of treatment in early cases but often patients are primarily diagnosed in an advanced stage of disease and sometimes also distant metastases are present. Neoadjuvant therapy is therefore needed but drug resistance may influence response and concur to recurrent disease. At molecular level, it is a very heterogeneous group of diseases with about 30% of hereditary or familial cases. During colorectal adenocarcinomas development, epithelial cells from gastrointestinal trait acquire sequential genetic and epigenetic mutations in specific oncogenes and/or tumour suppressor genes, causing CRC onset, progression and metastasis. Molecular characterization of cancer associated mutations gives valuable information about disease prognosis and response to the therapy. Very early diagnosis and personalized care, as well as a better knowledge of molecular basis of its onset and progression, are therefore crucial to obtain a cure of CRC. In this review, we describe updated genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC pointing out the extreme need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patient outcomes. PMID:26151224

  12. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-08-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome. PMID:27602235

  13. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome. PMID:27602235

  14. Biomarker-directed Targeted Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carethers, John M.

    2015-01-01

    With advances in the understanding of the biology and genetics of colorectal cancer (CRC), diagnostic biomarkers that may predict the existence or future presence of cancer or a hereditary condition, and prognostic and treatment biomarkers that may direct the approach to therapy have been developed. Biomarkers can be ascertained and assayed from any tissue that may demonstrate the diagnostic or prognostic value, including from blood cells, epithelial cells via buccal swab, fresh or archival cancer tissue, as well as from cells shed into fecal material. For CRC, current examples of biomarkers for screening and surveillance include germline testing for suspected hereditary CRC syndromes, and stool DNA tests for screening average at-risk patients. Molecular biomarkers for CRC that may alter patient care and treatment include the presence or absence of microsatellite instability, the presence or absence of mutant KRAS, BRAF or PIK3CA, and the level of expression of 15-PGDH in the colorectal mucosa. Molecularly targeted therapies and some general therapeutic approaches rely on biomarker information. Additional novel biomarkers are on the horizon that will undoubtedly further the approach to precision or individualized medicine. PMID:26609516

  15. Thymic carcinoids in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Teh, B T; Zedenius, J; Kytölä, S; Skogseid, B; Trotter, J; Choplin, H; Twigg, S; Farnebo, F; Giraud, S; Cameron, D; Robinson, B; Calender, A; Larsson, C; Salmela, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of thymic carcinoids in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and to study means for detection and prevention of this tumor in patients with MEN1. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Thymic carcinoid is a rare malignancy, with approximately 150 cases reported to date. It may be associated with MEN1 and carries a poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Its underlying etiology is unknown. METHODS: Ten patients with MEN1 from eight families with anterior mediastinal tumors were included in a case series study at tertiary referring hospitals. Clinicopathologic studies were done on these patients, with a review of the literature. Mutation analysis was performed on the MEN1 gene in families with clusterings of the tumor to look for genotype-phenotype correlation. Loss of heterozygosity was studied in seven cases to look for genetic abnormalities. RESULTS: Histologic studies of all tumors were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid. Clustering of this tumor was found in some of the families-three pairs of brothers and three families with first- or second-degree relatives who had thymic carcinoid. All patients described here were men, with a mean age at detection of 44 years (range 31 to 66). Most of the patients had chest pain or were asymptomatic; none had Cushing's or carcinoid syndrome. All tumors were detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. The results of octreoscans performed in three patients were all positive. Histopathologic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid and did not stain for ACTH. Mutation analysis of the families with clustering revealed mutations in different exons/introns of the MEN1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies of seven tumors did not show LOH in the MEN1 region, but two tumors showed LOH in the 1p region. CONCLUSIONS: MEN1-related thymic carcinoids constitute approximately 25

  16. Neoplasias mielodisplásicas o mieloproliferativas (PDQ®)—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del tratamiento de las neoplasias mielodisplásicas o mieloproliferativas, incluso las leucemias mielomonocíticas crónicas o juveniles, y la LMC atípica.

  17. Genetics of Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Neoplasias (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of endocrine and neuroendocrine neoplasias. This summary contains information about the MEN1 gene, the RET gene, genetic testing, and clinical interventions. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have a hereditary medullary thyroid cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  18. Proceedings From the First Asia-Oceania Research Organisation on Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Faro, Edited by Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    The First Asia-Oceania Research Organisation on Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) Meeting was held in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, in July 2005. The conference covered regional issues relating to infection with the human papillomavirus—epidemiology, virology, and immunology, testing, screening, and prevention strategies—as well as cervical cancer screening and its management.

  19. Local recurrence of pheochromocytoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Tramunt, Blandine; Buffet, Alexandre; Grunenwald, Solange; Vezzosi, Delphine; Bennet, Antoine; Huyghe, Eric; Zerdoud, Slimane; Caron, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), an inverted physiological ratio between urinary normetanephrines and metanephrines is an early marker of recurrence in epinephrine-secreting pheochromocytoma, and 131I MIBG treatment appears to be a useful therapeutic option in order to avoid multiple invasive surgical procedures in pheochromocytomatosis.

  20. THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALO METHANES (THMs) IN THE DRINKING WATER
    Christopher Sistrunk and Tony DeAngelo, North Carolina Central University and US Environmental Protection Agency
    The THMs are the most widely distributed and the most co...

  1. Brain metastasis from pheochromocytoma in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Rainero, I; Savi, L; Rivoiro, C; Pinessi, L

    2001-12-01

    Neurological involvement in multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome is uncommon. Notalgia paresthetica (pruritus localized in an area between D2 and D6 dermatomes) is the neurological symptom more frequently described in patients with MEN 2A. The authors report the unusual case of a MEN 2A patient with a brain metastasis from a pheochromocytoma. PMID:11677427

  2. Kimchi protects against azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah; Park, Kun-Young

    2014-08-01

    The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  3. Kimchi Protects Against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  4. Differences between endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis and Enterococcus spp. and their association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, J; García-País, M J; Coira, A; Rabuñal, R; García-Garrote, F; Pita, J; Rodríguez-Macías, A; Blanco, M; Lopez-Roses, L; López-Álvarez, M J; Alonso-García, M P

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus bovis group and Enterococcus spp. share phenotypic characteristics and intestinal habitat. Both have been associated with endocarditis and colorectal neoplasm (CRN). We studied all cases of endocarditis diagnosed between 1988 and 2014 in our centre and caused by S. bovis (109, 48.8 % of the bacteremia) and by Enterococcus spp. (36, 3.4 % of the bacteremia). Patients were seen until death or during a long-term follow-up, in order to rule out a concomitant CRN. The 109 cases of S. bovis endocarditis (SbIE) compared with the 36 caused by enterococci showed: a higher proportion of males (91 % vs. 72 %, p=0.005), more multivalvular involvement (28 % vs. 6 %, p=0.004), embolic complications (44 vs. 22 %, p=0.02) and colorectal neoplasm (64 % vs. 25 %, p=0.001). SbIE showed fewer co-morbidities (32 vs. 58 %, p=0.005), and less frequently urinary infection source (0 vs. 25 %, p=0.001) and healthcare-related infection (2 vs. 44 %, p=0.001). A total of 123 patients were followed up for an extended period (mean: 65.9 ± 57.5 months). During the follow-up, 6 of 28 (21 %) cases with enterococcal endocarditis and 43 of 95 (45.2 %, p=0.01) cases with SbIE developed a new CRN. These neoplasiae appeared a mean of 60.4 months later (range 12-181 months). Among the 43 cases with SbIE and CRN, 12 had had a previously normal colonoscopy and 31 had had a previous CRN and developed a second neoplasm. Cases of SbIE present important differences with those caused by Enterococcus spp. Colonoscopy must be mandatory both in the initial evaluation of SbIE, as during the follow-up period.

  5. Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm: Risk factors for recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Briedigkeit, Alexander; Sultanie, Omar; Sido, Bernd; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate risk factors for local recurrence after endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm. METHODS: Retrospective data analysis of 216 endoscopic mucosal resections for colorectal adenomas > 20 mm in 179 patients (40.3% female; median age 68 years; range 35-91 years). All patients had at least 1 follow-up endoscopy with a minimum control interval of 2 mo (mean follow-up 6 mo/2.0-43.4 mo). Possible factors associated with local recurrence were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Median size of the lesions was 30 mm (20-70 mm), 69.0% were localized in the right-sided (cecum, ascending and transverse) colon. Most of the lesions (85.6%) showed a non-pedunculated morphology and the majority of resections was in piecemeal technique (78.7%). Histology showed carcinoma or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 51/216 (23.6%) lesions including 4 low risk carcinomas (pT1a, L0, V0, R0 - G1/G2). Histologically proven recurrence was observed in 33/216 patients (15.3%). Patient age > 65 years, polyp size > 30 mm, non-pedunculated morphology, localization in the right-sided colon, piecemeal resection and tubular-villous histology were found as associated factors in univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only localization in the right-sided colon (HR = 6.842/95%CI: 1.540-30.394; P = 0.011), tubular-villous histology (HR = 3.713/95%CI: 1.617-8.528; P = 0.002) and polyp size > 30 mm (HR = 2.563/95%CI: 1.179-5.570; P = 0.017) were significantly associated risk factors for adenoma recurrence. CONCLUSION: Meticulous endoscopic follow-up is warranted after endoscopic mucosal resection of adenomas localized in the right-sided colon larger than > 30 mm, with tubular-villous histology. PMID:26981180

  6. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  7. Dietary walnut suppression of colorectal cancer in mice: Mediation by miRNA patterns and fatty acid incorporation.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Michael A; Ko, Byung-Joon; Witte, Theodore R; Dincer, Fadime; Hardman, W Elaine; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer, unlike many other malignancies, may be preventable. Recent studies have demonstrated an inverse association between nut consumption and incidence of colon cancer; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. An emerging concept suggests that microribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may help explain the relationship between walnut consumption and decreased colorectal neoplasia risk. Seven days after HT-29 colon cancer cell injection, mice were randomized to either control or walnut diets for 25 days of diet treatment. Thirty samples of tumor and of omental adipose were analyzed to determine changes in lipid composition in each dietary group. In the tumors of the walnut-containing diet, we found significant increases in α-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and total omega-3 acids, and a decrease in arachidonic acid, as compared to the control diet. Final tumor size measured at sacrifice was negatively associated with percentage of total omega-3 fatty acid composition (r=-0.641, P=.001). MicroRNA expression analysis of colorectal tumor tissue revealed decreased expression of miRNAs 1903, 467c and 3068 (P<.05) and increased expression of miRNA 297a* (P=.0059) in the walnut-treated group as compared to control diet. Our results indicate that changes in the miRNA expression profiles likely affect target gene transcripts involved in pathways of anti-inflammation, antivascularization, antiproliferation and apoptosis. We also demonstrate the incorporation of protective fatty acids into colonic epithelium of walnut-fed mice, which may independently alter miRNA expression profiles itself. Future studies of the mechanism of widespread miRNA regulation by walnut consumption are needed to offer potential prognostic and therapeutic targets.

  8. Pathogenesis of germ cell neoplasia in testicular dysgenesis and disorders of sex development.