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Sample records for advanced composite shear

  1. Development of a metal-clad advanced composite shear web design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced composite web concept was developed for potential application to the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust structure. The program consisted of design synthesis, analysis, detail design, element testing, and large scale component testing. A concept was sought that offered significant weight saving by the use of Boron/Epoxy (B/E) reinforced titanium plate structure. The desired concept was one that was practical and that utilized metal to efficiently improve structural reliability. The resulting development of a unique titanium-clad B/E shear web design concept is described. Three large scale components were fabricated and tested to demonstrate the performance of the concept: a titanium-clad plus or minus 45 deg B/E web laminate stiffened with vertical B/E reinforced aluminum stiffeners.

  2. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  3. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A final program summary is reported for test and evaluation activities that were conducted for space shuttle web selection. Large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of advanced composite shear web construction to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners and logitudinal aluminum stiffening. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs.

  4. Rewriting in Advanced Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, William B.

    A college English instructor made an informal comparison of rewriting habits of students in a freshman composition course and two advanced composition courses. Notes kept on student rewriting focused on this central question: given peer and instructor response to their papers and a choice as to what and how to rewrite, what will students decide to…

  5. Analysis of shear test method for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergner, H. W., Jr.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic plane stress finite element analysis of the stress distributions in four flat test specimens for in-plane shear response of composite materials subjected to mechanical or thermal loads is presented. The shear test specimens investigated include: slotted coupon, cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear. Results are presented in the form of normalized shear contour plots for all three in-plane stess components. It is shown that the cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear specimens have stress distributions which are more than adequate for determining linear shear behavior of composite materials. Laminate properties, core effects, and fixture configurations are among the factors which were found to influence the stress distributions.

  6. Advanced composites technology

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E; Sanchez, R J

    1998-10-01

    The development of fiber composite components in next-generation munitions, such as sabots for kinetic energy penetrators and lightweight cases for advanced artillery projectiles, relies on design trade-off studies using validated computer code simulations. We are developing capabilities to determine the failure of advanced fiber composites under multiaxial stresses to critically evaluate three-dimensional failure models and develop new ones if necessary. The effects of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on failure of composites are being investigated using a high-pressure testing system that incorporates several unique features. Several improvements were made to the system this year, and we report on the first tests of both isotropic and fiber composite materials. The preliminary results indicate that pressure has little effect on longitudinal compression strength of unidirectional composites, but issues with obtaining reliable failures in these materials still remain to be resolved. The transverse compression strength was found to be significantly enhanced by pressure, and the trends observed for this property and the longitudinal strength are in agreement with recent models for failure of fiber composites.

  7. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  8. Advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. Judd; Hillig, William G.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Pipes, R. Byron; Perepezko, John H.; Sheehan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high-performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic, and carbon matrices. Because of a strong carbon and fiber industry, Japan is the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation-resistant carbon/carbon composite program. With its outstanding technical base in carbon technology, Japan should be able to match present technology in the U.S. and introduce lower-cost manufacturing methods. However, the panel did not see any innovative approaches to oxidation protection. Ceramic and especially intermetallic matrix composites were not yet receiving much attention at the time of the panel's visit. There was a high level of monolithic ceramic research and development activity. High temperature monolithic intermetallic research was just starting, but notable products in titanium aluminides had already appeared. Matrixless ceramic composites was one novel approach noted. Technologies for high temperature composites fabrication existed, but large numbers of panels or parts had not been produced. The Japanese have selected aerospace as an important future industry. Because materials are an enabling technology for a strong aerospace industry, Japan initiated an ambitious long-term program to develop high temperature composites. Although just starting, its progress should be closely monitored in the U.S.

  9. Design of laminated composite plates for maximum shear buckling loads

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.R.; Chu, K.H.; Kam, T.Y.

    1993-12-01

    The optimal lamination arrangements of laminated composite plates with maximum shear buckling loads are studied via a multi-start global optimization technique. A previously proposed shear deformable finite element is used to evaluate the positive and negative shear buckling loads of laminated composite plates in the optimal design process. Optimal lay-ups of thin as well as moderately thick composite plates with global maximum positive or negative shear buckling loads are determined utilizing the multi-start global optimal design technique. A number of examples of the optimal shear buckling design of symmetrically and antisymmetrically laminated composite plates with various material properties, length-to-thickness ratios, aspect ratios and different numbers of layer groups are given to illustrate the trends of optimal layer orientations of the plates. Since the existence of in-plane axial force is possible, the effects of axial compressive load on the optimal layer orientations for maximum shear buckling load are also investigated.

  10. Advanced composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

    1993-01-01

    Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and

  11. Analysis of longitudinal thickness-shear stiffness of a monolayer filamentary composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Bert, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    The longitudinal thickness-shear behavior of a rectangular cross-section prism containing circular cross-section fibers embedded in a matrix is analyzed. The problem is formulated as a Saint-Venant flexure problem modeled by a tip-loaded cantilever composite beam and solution is obtained by the boundary-point least-squares method. It is shown that the longitudinal thickness-shear modulus is much greater than the in-plane shear modulus for a monofilament composite and therefore an independent analysis is necessary to predict the longitudinal thickness-shear behavior of the composite. Numerical results are presented in graphical form for various values of fiber volume fraction and material parameters typical of modern advanced composites.

  12. Shear induced electrical behaviour of conductive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk; Krückel, Johannes; Schubert, Dirk W.

    2013-04-01

    The time-dependent electrical resistance of polymethylmethacrylate containing carbon black was measured under oscillatory shear in the molten state. The electrical signal was oscillating exactly at the doubled frequency of the oscillatory shear deformation. Moreover, the experimental results gave a hint to the development of conductive structures in polymer melts under shear deformation. It was shown that the flow induced destruction of conductive paths dominates over the flow induced build-up in the beginning of the shear deformations. However, for longer times both competitive effects reach a dynamic equilibrium and only the thermally induced build-up of pathways influences the changes in the composite resistance during the shear. Furthermore, the oscillating electrical response depends clearly on the deformation amplitude applied. A simple physical model describing the behaviour of conductive pathways under shear deformation was derived and utilized for the description of the experimental data.

  13. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  14. Characterization of interlaminar shear strength of ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, N.J.J.; Tsuwei Chou . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    The interlaminar shear strengths of three ceramic matrix composites have been characterized using a double-notch shear (DNS) test. The material systems investigated are plain woven C/SiC, plain woven SiC/SiC, and cross-plied SiC/calcium aluminosilicate-II. The use of the double-notch shear test for measuring the interlaminar shear strength of ceramic matrix composites is evaluated first. Numerical stress analyses are performed to investigate the effect of DNS specimen length, notch distance, and specimen supporting jig on the stress distribution in the expected fracture plane and the interlaminar shear strength. The numerical findings are then compared with an analytical model proposed elsewhere and correlated with the experimental results. The validity of this test technique has been established.

  15. Shear deformable finite beam elements for composite box beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Choi, Dong-Ho

    2014-04-01

    The shear deformable thin-walled composite beams with closed cross-sections have been developed for coupled flexural, torsional, and buckling analyses. A theoretical model applicable to the thin-walled laminated composite box beams is presented by taking into account all the structural couplings coming from the material anisotropy and the shear deformation effects. The current composite beam includes the transverse shear and the restrained warping induced shear deformation by using the first-order shear deformation beam theory. Seven governing equations are derived for the coupled axial-flexural-torsional-shearing buckling based on the principle of minimum total potential energy. Based on the present analytical model, three different types of finite composite beam elements, namely, linear, quadratic and cubic elements are developed to analyze the flexural, torsional, and buckling problems. In order to demonstrate the accuracy and superiority of the beam theory and the finite beam elements developed by this study, numerical solutions are presented and compared with the results obtained by other researchers and the detailed three-dimensional analysis results using the shell elements of ABAQUS. Especially, the influences of the modulus ratio and the simplified assumptions in stress-strain relations on the deflection, twisting angle, and critical buckling loads of composite box beams are investigated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. The Advanced Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Burlaga, L. F.; Cummings, A. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Frain, W. E.; Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Hovestadt, D.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) was recently selected as one of two new Explorer-class missions to be developed for launch during the mid-1990's. ACE will observe particles of solar, interplanetary, interstellar, and galactic origins, spanning the energy range from that of the solar wind (approx. 1 keV/nucleon) to galactic cosmic ray energies (several hundred MeV/nucleon). Definitive studies will be made of the abundance of nearly all isotopes from H to Zn (1 less than or = Z less than or = 30), with exploratory isotope studies extending to Zr (Z = 40). To accomplish this, the ACE payload includes six high-resolution spectrometers, each designed to provide the optimum charge, mass, or charge-state resolution in its particular energy range, and each having a geometry factor optimized for the expected flux levels, so as to provide a collecting power a factor of 10 to 1000 times greater than previous or planned experiments. The payload also includes several instruments of standard design that will monitor solar wind and magnetic field conditions and energetic H, He, and electron fluxes. The scientific objectives, instrumentation, spacecraft, and mission approach that were defined for ACE during the Phase-A study period are summarized.

  17. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 3 Summary report: Shear web component testing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Three large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of the design concept to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs. An approximate analysis of prebuckling deflections is presented and computer-aided design results, which consider prebuckling deformations, indicate that the design concept offers a theoretical weight saving of 31 percent relative to all metal construction. Recommendations are made for design concept options and analytical methods that are appropriate for production hardware.

  18. Tensile/Shear Behaviour of Multi-stitched/Nano Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilisik, Kadir; Kaya, Gaye

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to investigate tensile/shear behavior of multi-stitched/nano composites. For this purpose, non-stitched, non-stitched/nano, multi-stitched and multi-stitched/nano composites were made. It was shown that the warp/filling tensile strength and modulus of composites were slightly reduced in both multi-stitched and multi-stitched/nano composites due to fiber breakage that resulted from the multi-stitching process. In addition, there were not significant differences between non-stitched and multi-stitched structures. The non-stitched/nano composite showed slightly higher in-plane shear strength compared with the non-stitched composite. The in-plane shear strength of the non-stitched composite, on the other hand, increased steadily compared to the multi-stitched composite because of the stitching process and the interface between the stitching yarn and polymer matrix. Stitching significantly improved the delamination resistance in the multi-stitched and multi-stitched/nano composites experienced a small amount of damaged areas. The incorporation of nano silica improved the damage resistance of multi-stitched composites. Therefore, the damaged tolerance composite was developed with stitching and the addition of the nano silica for various industrial applications, such as electronic boards.

  19. Influence of Through-Thickness Pinning on Composite Shear Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, Romain; Baley, Christophe; Cartié, Denis D. R.; Davies, Peter

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes results from tests to examine the influence of through-thickness pinning on in-plane shear behaviour, measured by tensile loading of ±45° specimens. Samples were produced by both aeronautical and marine manufacturing processes. As few previous studies have investigated pinning of marine composites these were also subjected to out-of-plane shear delamination tests. For both carbon/epoxy laminates the pins reduce the apparent in-plane shear modulus and strength. Pins modify the strain field measured by full-field image analysis, and slow damage development. A new damage mechanism, transverse pin cracking, was observed.

  20. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  1. Advances in Composites Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Dexter, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    A significant level of research is currently focused on the development of tough resins and high strain fibers in an effort to gain improved damage tolerance. Moderate success has been achieved with the development of new resins such as PEEK and additional improvements look promising with new thermoplastic resins. Development of innovative material forms such as 2-D and 3-D woven fabrics and braided structural subelements is also expected to improve damage tolerance and durability of composite hardware. The new thrust in composites is to develop low cost manufacturing and design concepts to lower the cost of composite hardware. Processes being examined include automated material placement, filament winding, pultrusion, and thermoforming. The factory of the future will likely incorporate extensive automation in all aspects of manufacturing composite components.

  2. Composite Interlaminar Shear Fracture Toughness, G(sub 2c): Shear Measurement of Sheer Myth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The concept of G2c as a measure of the interlaminar shear fracture toughness of a composite material is critically examined. In particular, it is argued that the apparent G2c as typically measured is inconsistent with the original definition of shear fracture. It is shown that interlaminar shear failure actually consists of tension failures in the resin rich layers between plies followed by the coalescence of ligaments created by these failures and not the sliding of two planes relative to one another that is assumed in fracture mechanics theory. Several strain energy release rate solutions are reviewed for delamination in composite laminates and structural components where failures have been experimentally documented. Failures typically occur at a location where the mode 1 component accounts for at least one half of the total G at failure. Hence, it is the mode I and mixed-mode interlaminar fracture toughness data that will be most useful in predicting delamination failure in composite components in service. Although apparent G2c measurements may prove useful for completeness of generating mixed-mode criteria, the accuracy of these measurements may have very little influence on the prediction of mixed-mode failures in most structural components.

  3. ISAAC Advanced Composites Research Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stewart, Brian K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is acquiring a state-of-art composites fabrication capability to support the Center's advanced research and technology mission. The system introduced in this paper is named ISAAC (Integrated Structural Assembly of Advanced Composites). The initial operational capability of ISAAC is automated fiber placement, built around a commercial system from Electroimpact, Inc. that consists of a multi-degree of freedom robot platform, a tool changer mechanism, and a purpose-built fiber placement end effector. Examples are presented of the advanced materials, structures, structural concepts, fabrication processes and technology development that may be enabled using the ISAAC system. The fiber placement end effector may be used directly or with appropriate modifications for these studies, or other end effectors with different capabilities may either be bought or developed with NASA's partners in industry and academia.

  4. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  5. Rapid adhesive bonding of advanced composites and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryart, J. R.; Hodgest, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) concepts utilize a toroid induction technique to heat the adhesive bond line directly. This technique was used to bond titanium overlap shear specimens with 3 advanced thermoplastic adhesives and APC-2 (graphite/PEEK) composites with PEEK film. Bond strengths equivalent to standard heated-platen press bonds were produced with large reductions in process time. RAB produced very strong bonds in APC-2 adherend specimens; the APC-2 adherends were highly resistant to delamination. Thermal cycling did not significantly affect the shear strengths of RAB titanium bonds with polyimide adhesives. A simple ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation process was found promising for evaluating bond quality.

  6. Advanced strategic interceptor composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D.H.; Patty, C.E. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Launch mass reduction, stiffness increase, and primary bending mode frequency increase remain the prime focus of the US Army Strategic Defense Command (USASDC) advanced composite material development and testing program. The initial activity was directed toward fabrication of a demonstration structure consistent with the Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) ERIS flight design. The objectives of this phase of the work were three-fold: selection of the optimum composite materials; concurrent bonding and joining technology development; evaluation of the performance of each test structure relative to its metal counterpart and relative to alternative composites. The effort exceeded model predictions. The resin matrix composite structure mass was 52% lower than the metal design. Modal testing demonstrated a 200% increase in stiffness and a 41% gain in first mode bending frequency. Given the demonstrated level of success, an additional element was added to the task focus: cost-effective, mass quantity fabrication techniques. Single step technology has been successfully applied to a relatively simple thermoset based bridge structure. Two step molding and assembly have been demonstrated for a GBI-X class thermoplastic structure. Preliminary testing has been completed to isolate and resolve problems associated with single step fabrication of the more complex GBI-X class structure. Fabrication of an appropriate test article as preparation for modal survey evaluation of the latter is in progress. Results are presented. Future program directions are summarized.

  7. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  8. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  9. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia. PMID:27555895

  10. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  11. Compositional evolution of high-temperature sheared lherzolite PHN 1611

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. ); Griffin, W.L.; Ryan, C.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The evolution of fertile' mantle has been studied by proton microprobe (PIXE) analysis of minerals of a high-temperature sheared xenolith from the Thaba Putsoa kimerlite in Lesotho, southern Africa. Analyzed elements include Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Sr, Y, and Zr. Garnets are homogeneous in Ni and Zn but have rims enriched relative to cores in Zr and Y. Compositions of olivine neoblasts define intergranular gradients of Fe, Zn, and Ni; Fe-rich olivine is relatively Zn-rich but Ni-poore. Although individual clinopyroxene grains are nearly homogeneous, clinopyroxene associated with Fe-rich olivine is relatively Fe- and Zn-rich but Sr- and Cr-poor. The trace-element abundances and compositional gradients constrain the processes of periodotite enrichment and the thermal history. Enrichment of Zr, Y, and Fe in garnet rims documents infiltration of a silica-undersaturated melt. The Fe-rich olivine compositions and the Zn and Fe gradients establish that the xenolith was sampled from near a melt conduit. Mechanical mixing of inhomogeneous peridotite and melt infiltration may have been concurrent. Because garnets appear homogeneous in Ni, mantle temperature changes affecting PHN 1611 occurred before or over a longer period than the melt infiltration. Measured and calculated abundances of many incompatible trace elements in the rock are similar to those proposed for primitive mantle. Calculated chondrite-normalized abundances of Sr, Ti, Zr, and Y are like those of appropriate REE. Enrichment processes in PHN 1611 proceeded at unusually high recorded temperature and in the apparent absence of minor phases common in lower-temperature metasomatized rocks, but similar processes may be common. In particular, mechanical mixing near mantle dikes may frequently occur. These enrichment mechanisms may produce xenolith compositions that resemble some proposed for primitive mantle but that have different implications for mantle evolution. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and nanoleakage of conventional and self-adhering flowable composites to primary teeth dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Priyanka; Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Darrel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The latest advancement in adhesive dentistry is the development of self adhering flowable composite resin which incorporates the self-etch adhesion technology to eliminate the steps of etching, rinsing, priming and bonding. Few studies have addressed resin bonding to primary teeth. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength and nanoleakage of conventional and self adhering flowable composites to primary teeth dentin. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, I.T.S Dental College, Hospital and Research Centre, Greater Noida; in association with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.T.S Engineering College, Greater Noida; and the Advanced Instrumentation Research Facility (AIRF), Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Materials and Methods: Sixty of the ninety primary teeth were evaluated for shear bond strength and thirty for nanoleakage. The samples were divided into three groups; Group I – Dyad Flow (Kerr), Group II – Fusio Liquid Dentin (Pentron Clinical Technologies) and Group III – G-aenial Universal Flo (GC). Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine. Nanoleakage pattern was observed under scanning electron microscope. Results: The shear bond strength of conventional flowable composite was significantly greater than self adhering flowable composite (p<0.05). Nanoleakage scores of both conventional and self adhering flowable composites were comparable. Conclusions: Self adhering flowable composites combine properties of composites and self etch adhesives, eliminating the need for separate bond application that simplifies direct restorative procedure. The evolution of self adhering materials could open new horizons for pediatric dentistry. PMID:27630496

  13. A comparison of three popular test methods for determining the shear modulus of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Morton, John; Farley, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Three popular shear tests (the 10 degree off-axis, the plus or minus 45 degree tensile, and the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture) for shear modulus measurement are evaluated for a graphite-epoxy composite material system. A comparison of the shear stress-strain response for each test method is made using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry. The uniformity and purity of the strain fields in the test sections of the specimens are discussed, and the shear responses obtained from each test technique are presented and compared. For accurate measurement of shear modulus, the 90 degree Iosipescu specimen is recommended.

  14. An evaluation of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, S.; Morton, J.; Jackson, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of advanced composite laminates is studied. The assumptions used for the development of the shear strength formulas were examined, and factors such as the specimen geometry and stacking sequence were assessed experimentally. It was found that the strength of symmetric and balanced +/-45 deg laminates depends primarily upon the specimen thickness rather than the specimen width. These findings have important implications for the +/-45 deg tensile test which is recommended by several organizations for the determination of the in-plane shear stress/strain response and the shear strength of continuous fiber reinforced composites. Modifications to the recommended practices for specimen selection and shear strength determination are suggested.

  15. Shear Behavior of 3D Woven Hollow Integrated Sandwich Composites: Experimental, Theoretical and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Chang; Cai, Deng'an; Li, Wenlong; Wang, Xiaopei

    2016-11-01

    An experimental, theoretical and numerical investigation on the shear behavior of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites was presented in this paper. The microstructure of the composites was studied, then the shear modulus and load-deflection curves were obtained by double lap shear tests on the specimens in two principal directions of the sandwich panels, called warp and weft. The experimental results showed that the shear modulus of the warp was higher than that of the weft and the failure occurred in the roots of piles. A finite element model was established to predict the shear behavior of the composites. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental data. Simultaneously, a theoretical method was developed to predict the shear modulus. By comparing with the experimental data, the accuracy of the theoretical method was verified. The influence of structural parameters on shear modulus was also discussed. The higher yarn number, yarn density and dip angle of the piles could all improve the shear modulus of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites at different levels, while the increasing height would decrease the shear modulus.

  16. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Structural design, tooling, fabrication, and test activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composite vertical stabilizer (CVS) for the DC 10 Commercial Transport Aircraft. Structural design details are described and the status of structural and weight analyses are reported. A structural weight reduction of 21.7% is currently predicted. Test results are discussed for sine wave stiffened shear webs containing representative of the CVS spar webs and for lightning current transfer and tests on a panel representative of the CVS skins.

  17. Custom Machines Advance Composite Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Here is a brief list of materials that NASA will not be using to construct spacecraft: wood, adobe, fiberglass, bone. While it might be obvious why these materials would not make for safe space travel, they do share a common characteristic with materials that may well be the future foundation of spacecraft design: They all are composites. Formed of two or more unlike materials - such as cellulose and lignin in the case of wood, or glass fibers and plastic resin in the case of fiberglass-composites provide enhanced mechanical and physical properties through the combination of their constituent materials. For this reason, composites are used in everything from buildings, bathtubs, and countertops to boats, racecars, and sports equipment. NASA continually works to develop new materials to enable future space missions - lighter, less expensive materials that can still withstand the extreme demands of space travel. Composites such as carbon fiber materials offer promising solutions in this regard, providing strength and stiffness comparable to metals like aluminum but with less weight, allowing for benefits like better fuel efficiency and simpler propulsion system design. Composites can also be made fatigue tolerant and thermally stable - useful in space where temperatures can swing hundreds of degrees. NASA has recently explored the use of composites for aerospace applications through projects like the Composite Crew Module (CCM), a composite-constructed version of the aluminum-lithium Multipurpose Crew Capsule. The CCM was designed to give NASA engineers a chance to gain valuable experience developing and testing composite aerospace structures.

  18. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  19. Research priorities for advanced fibrous composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.; Swedlow, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Priorities for research in advanced laminated fibrous composite materials are presented. Supporting evidence is presented in two bodies, including a general literature survey and a survey of aerospace composite hardware and service experience. Both surveys were undertaken during 1977-1979. Specific results and conclusions indicate that a significant portion of contemporary published research diverges from recommended priorites.

  20. Rail Shear and Short Beam Shear Properties of Various 3-Dimensional (3-D) Woven Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    from stress-strain response. A 0.2% plastic strain offset method was used to calculate the yield of the material. Table 4 compares the maximum... plastic region where the progressive damages began to form in the samples. Based on the stress-strain curves, it was notable that the 12° configuration...outperformed the other architectures in terms of shear strength and moduli. Another observation made from the curvatures was that the plastic portion

  1. Three-dimensional imaging of shear bands in bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A H; Araullo-Peters, V; Gibbons, M; Restrepo, O D; Niezgoda, S R; Windl, W; Flores, K M; Hofmann, D C; Marquis, E A

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of the increase in ductility in bulk metallic glass matrix composites over monolithic bulk metallic glasses is to date little understood, primarily because the interplay between dislocations in the crystalline phase and shear bands in the glass could neither be imaged nor modelled in a validated way. To overcome this roadblock, we show that shear bands can be imaged in three dimensions by atom probe tomography from density variations in the reconstructed atomic density, which density-functional theory suggests being a local-work function effect. Imaging of near-interface shear bands in Ti48 Zr20 V12 Cu5 Be15 bulk metallic glass matrix composite permits measurement of their composition, thickness, branching and interactions with the dendrite interface. These results confirm that shear bands here nucleate from stress concentrations in the glass due to intense, localized plastic deformation in the dendrites rather than intrinsic structural inhomogeneities.

  2. Shear induced alignment of short nanofibers in 3D printed polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem Yunus, Doruk; Shi, Wentao; Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2016-12-01

    3D printing of composite materials offers an opportunity to combine the desired properties of composite materials with the flexibility of additive manufacturing in geometric shape and complexity. In this paper, the shear-induced alignment of aluminum oxide nanowires during stereolithography printing was utilized to fabricate a nanowire reinforced polymer composite. To align the fibers, a lateral oscillation mechanism was implemented and combined with wall pattern printing technique to generate shear flow in both vertical and horizontal directions. A series of specimens were fabricated for testing the composite material’s tensile strength. The results showed that mechanical properties of the composite were improved by reinforcement of nanofibers through shear induced alignment. The improvement of tensile strength was approximately ∼28% by aligning the nanowires at 5 wt% (∼1.5% volume fraction) loading of aluminum oxide nanowires.

  3. Shear induced alignment of short nanofibers in 3D printed polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Doruk Erdem; Shi, Wentao; Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2016-12-09

    3D printing of composite materials offers an opportunity to combine the desired properties of composite materials with the flexibility of additive manufacturing in geometric shape and complexity. In this paper, the shear-induced alignment of aluminum oxide nanowires during stereolithography printing was utilized to fabricate a nanowire reinforced polymer composite. To align the fibers, a lateral oscillation mechanism was implemented and combined with wall pattern printing technique to generate shear flow in both vertical and horizontal directions. A series of specimens were fabricated for testing the composite material's tensile strength. The results showed that mechanical properties of the composite were improved by reinforcement of nanofibers through shear induced alignment. The improvement of tensile strength was approximately ∼28% by aligning the nanowires at 5 wt% (∼1.5% volume fraction) loading of aluminum oxide nanowires.

  4. An Evaluation of the Iosipescu Specimen for Composite Materials Shear Property Measurement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen

    1991-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of the suitability of the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture is presented. An experimental investigation using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry is performed. A finite element analysis of the Iosipescu shear test for unidirectional and cross-ply composites is used to assess the uniformity of the shear stress field in the vicinity of the notch, and demonstrate the effect of the nonuniform stress field upon the strain gage measurements used for the determination of composite shear moduli. From the test results for graphite-epoxy laminates, it is shown that the proximity of the load introduction point to the test section greatly influences the individual gage readings for certain fiber orientations but the effect upon shear modulus measurement is relatively unimportant. A numerical study of the load contact effect shows the sensitivity of some fiber configurations to the specimen/fixture contact mechanism and may account for the variations in the measured shear moduli. A comparison of the strain gage readings from one surface of a specimen with corresponding data from moire interferometry on the opposite face documented an extreme sensitivity of some fiber orientations to eccentric loading which induced twisting and yielded spurious shear stress-strain curves. In the numerical analysis, it is shown that the Iosipescu specimens for different fiber orientations have to be modeled differently in order to closely approximate the true loading conditions. Correction factors are needed to allow for the nonuniformity of the strain field and the use of the average shear stress in the shear modulus evaluation. The correction factors, which are determined for the region occupied by the strain gage rosette, are found to be dependent upon the material orthotropic ratio and the finite element models. Based upon the experimental and numerical results, recommendations for improving the reliability and

  5. Advanced textile structural composites -- status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Arendts, F.J.; Drechsler, K.; Brandt, J.

    1993-12-31

    Composites with 3D woven, braided or knitted fiber reinforcement offer a high potential for the cost-effective manufacturing of structures featuring an interesting mechanical performance, for example with regard to damage tolerance or energy absorption capability. In this paper, the properties of various textile structural composites with regard to stiffness, strength, damage tolerance, energy absorption capability as well as the respective manufacturing processes (RTM or thermoplastic hybrid-yarn technique) are presented in comparison to conventional ud tape based composites. The influence of the fiber architecture on the mechanical performance (tensile stiffness and strength, compression strength, interlaminar shear strength, compression strength after impact, fracture mechanical properties, through-penetration resistance) of monolithic and composite sandwich structures has been evaluated in an experimental study. It has been shown that composites involving new 3D weavings with minimum fiber crimp can compete with tape-based laminates as far as stiffness and strength are concerned. Using knittings makes it possible to manufacture composites having superior through-penetration resistance. The specific feature of the 3D braiding process is the ability to produce complex shaped structures having a high degree of freedom with regard to fiber geometry. Finally, the application of various textile structural composites will be presented on the basis of three demonstrator components (automotive engine mount, aircraft leading edge and motor cycle helmet), and the potential for further developments will be discussed.

  6. A comparative evaluation of in-plane shear test methods for laminated graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, John; Ho, Henjen

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate popular shear test methods for various forms of graphite-epoxy composite materials and to determine the shear response of graphite-epoxy composites with various forms of fiber architecture. Numerical and full-field experimental stress analyses were performed on four shear test configurations for unidirectional and bidirectional graphite-epoxy laminates to assess the uniformity and purity of the shear stress (strain) fields produced in the specimen test section and to determine the material in-plane shear modulus and shear response. The test methods were the 10 deg off-axis, the +/- 45 deg tension, the Iosipescu V-notch, and a compact U-notch specimen. Specimens were prepared from AS4/3501-6 graphite-epoxy panels, instrumented with conventional strain gage rosettes and with a cross-line moire grating, and loaded in a convenient testing machine. The shear responses obtained for each test method and the two methods of specimen instrumentation were compared. In a second phase of the program the shear responses obtained from Iosipescu V-notch beam specimens were determined for woven fabric geometries of different weave and fiber architectures. Again the responses of specimens obtained from strain gage rosettes and moire interferometry were compared. Additional experiments were performed on a bidirectional cruciform specimen which was also instrumented with strain gages and a moire grating.

  7. Crack Growth Mechanisms under Anti-Plane Shear in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Allison Lynne

    The research conducted for this dissertation focuses on determining the mechanisms associated with crack growth in polymer matrix composite laminates subjected to anti-plane shear (mode III) loading. For mode III split-beam test methods were proposed, and initial evaluations were conducted. A single test method was selected for further evaluation. Using this test method, it was determined that the apparent mode III delamination toughness, GIIIc , depended on geometry, which indicated a true material property was not being measured. Transverse sectioning and optical microscopy revealed an array of transverse matrix cracks, or echelon cracks, oriented at approximately 45° and intersecting the plane of the delamination. Subsequent investigations found the echelon array formed prior to the onset of planar delamination advance and that growth of the planar delamination is always coupled to echelon array formation in these specimens. The evolution of the fracture surfaces formed by the echelon array and planar delamination were studied, and it was found that the development was similar to crack growth in homogenous materials subjected to mode III or mixed mode I-III loading, although the composite laminate architecture constrained the fracture surface development differently than homogenous materials. It was also found that, for split-beam specimens such as those used herein, applying an anti-plane shear load results in twisting of the specimen's uncracked region which gives rise to a mixed-mode I-III load condition. This twisting has been related to the apparent mode III toughness as well as the orientation of the transverse matrix cracks. A finite element model was then developed to study the mechanisms of initial echelon array formation. From this, it is shown that an echelon array will develop, but will become self-limiting prior to the onset of planar delamination growth.

  8. Advanced composite airframe program: Today's technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Danny E.; Mazza, L. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP) was undertaken to demonstrate the advantages of the application of advanced composite materials and structural design concepts to the airframe structure on helicopters designed to stringent military requirements. The primary goals of the program were the reduction of airframe production costs and airframe weight by 17 and 22 percent respectively. The ACAP effort consisted of a preliminary design phase, detail design, and design support testing, full-scale fabrication, laboratory testing, and a ground/flight test demonstration. Since the completion of the flight test demonstration programs follow-on efforts were initiated to more fully evaluate a variety of military characteristics of the composite airframe structures developed under the original ACAP advanced development contracts. An overview of the ACAP program is provided and some of the design features, design support testing, manufacturing approaches, and the results of the flight test evaluation, as well as, an overview of Militarization Test and Evaluation efforts are described.

  9. Enhancement of the in-plane shear properties of carbon fiber composites containing carbon nanotube mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hansang

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane shear property of carbon fiber laminates is one of the most important structural features of aerospace and marine structures. Fiber-matrix debonding caused by in-plane shear loading is the major failure mode of carbon fiber composites because of the stress concentration at the interfaces. In this study, carbon nanotube mats (CNT mat) were incorporated in two different types of carbon fiber composites. For the case of woven fabric composites, mechanical interlocking between the CNTs and the carbon fibers increased resistance to shear failure. However, not much improvement was observed for the prepreg composites as a result of incorporation of the CNT mats. The reinforcement mechanism of the CNT mat layer was investigated by a fractographic study using scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the CNT mat was functionalized by three different methods and the effectiveness of the functionalization methods was determined and the most appropriate functionalization method for the CNT mat was air oxidation.

  10. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  11. Evaluation of shear-compressive strength properties for laminated GFRP composites in electromagnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun Hee; Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Sam Yeon

    2014-07-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composites can be applied to an insulating structure of a nuclear fusion device. It is necessary to investigate the interlaminar fracture characteristics of the laminated composites for the assurance of design and structural integrity. The three methods used to prepare the glass fiber reinforced plastic composites tested in this study were vacuum pressure impregnation, high pressure laminate (HPL), and prepreg laminate. We discuss the design criteria for safe application of composites and the shear-compressive test methods for evaluating mechanical properties of the material. Shear-compressive tests could be performed successfully using series-type test jigs that were inclined 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° to the normal axis. Shear strength depends strongly on the applied compressive stress. The design range of allowable shear stress was extended by use of the appropriate composite fabrication method. HPL had the largest design range, and the allowable interlaminar shear stress was 0.254 times the compressive stress.

  12. English 341: Advanced Composition for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, William

    2013-01-01

    English 341: Advanced Composition for Teachers is a three-credit undergraduate course for pre-service educators at Francis Marion University, a mid-size public university located in northeast South Carolina. According to the university catalog, students enrolled in English 341 "explore connections among writing, teaching, and learning as they…

  13. Advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Activities related to development of an advanced composites stabilizer for the Boeing 737 commercial transport are reported. Activities include discussion of criteria and objectives, design loads, the fatigue spectrum definition to be used for all spectrum fatigue testing, fatigue analysis, manufacturing producibility studies, the ancillary test program, quality assurance, and manufacturing development.

  14. The design of repairable advanced composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the repair of advanced composite structures by mechanical fasteners or by adhesive bonding. It is shown that many of today's composite designs are unreasonably difficult to repair. Conversely, the knowledge to design repairable structures is already available, if only it is applied during the initial design stage. Bolted or riveted repairs require only the avoidance of extremely orthotropic composite fiber patterns; those near the quasi-isotropic layup are the most suitable. Mildly orthotropic fiber patterns are appropriate for structures in which there is a dominant load direction. Thick composite structures are shown to require bolted or riveted repairs while thin structures favor adhesively bonded permanent repairs, although provisions can be easily made for temporary mechanical repairs. The reasons why integrally stiffened cocured composite designs are usually impractical to repair are explained and alternative repairable design concepts are presented.

  15. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology provide considerable opportunity for application to future aircraft thermal protection system (TPS), providing materials with higher temperature capability, lower weight, and higher strength and stiffness than traditional materials. The Thermal Protection Material Branch at NASA Ames Research Center has been making significant progress in the development, characterization, and entry simulation (arc-jet) testing of new CMC's. This protection gives a general overview of the Ames Thermal Protection Materials Branch research activities, followed by more detailed descriptions of recent advances in very-high temperature Zr and Hf based ceramics, high temperature, high strength SiC matrix composites, and some activities in polymer precursors and ceramic coating processing. The presentation closes with a brief comparison of maximum heat flux capabilities of advanced TPS materials.

  16. ISAAC - A Testbed for Advanced Composites Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stewart, Brian K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is acquiring a state-of-art composites fabrication environment to support the Center's research and technology development mission. This overall system described in this paper is named ISAAC, or Integrated Structural Assembly of Advanced Composites. ISAAC's initial operational capability is a commercial robotic automated fiber placement system from Electroimpact, Inc. that consists of a multi-degree of freedom commercial robot platform, a tool changer mechanism, and a specialized automated fiber placement end effector. Examples are presented of how development of advanced composite materials, structures, fabrication processes and technology are enabled by utilizing the fiber placement end effector directly or with appropriate modifications. Alternatively, end effectors with different capabilities may either be bought or developed with NASA's partners in industry and academia.

  17. Large strain variable stiffness composites for shear deformations with applications to morphing aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, G. P.; Henry, C. P.

    2008-03-01

    Morphing or reconfigurable structures potentially allow for previously unattainable vehicle performance by permitting several optimized structures to be achieved using a single platform. The key to enabling this technology in applications such as aircraft wings, nozzles, and control surfaces, are new engineered materials which can achieve the necessary deformations but limit losses in parasitic actuation mass and structural efficiency (stiffness/weight). These materials should exhibit precise control of deformation properties and provide high stiffness when exercised through large deformations. In this work, we build upon previous efforts in segmented reinforcement variable stiffness composites employing shape memory polymers to create prototype hybrid composite materials that combine the benefits of cellular materials with those of discontinuous reinforcement composites. These composites help overcome two key challenges for shearing wing skins: the resistance to out of plane buckling from actuation induced shear deformation, and resistance to membrane deflections resulting from distributed aerodynamic pressure loading. We designed, fabricated, and tested composite materials intended for shear deformation and address out of plane deflections in variable area wing skins. Our designs are based on the kinematic engineering of reinforcement platelets such that desired microstructural kinematics is achieved through prescribed boundary conditions. We achieve this kinematic control by etching sheets of metallic reinforcement into regular patterns of platelets and connecting ligaments. This kinematic engineering allows optimization of materials properties for a known deformation pathway. We use mechanical analysis and full field photogrammetry to relate local scale kinematics and strains to global deformations for both axial tension loading and shear loading with a pinned-diamond type fixture. The Poisson ratio of the kinematically engineered composite is ~3x higher than

  18. The Effect of Cyclic Hygrothermal Environment on Interlaminar Shear Strength (ilss) of CCF300/BMI Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Yun-Feng; Duan, Yue-Xin; Du, Shan-Yi

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the effect of cyclic hygrothermal environment on the interfacial property of CCF300/BMI composites. The moisture weight and interlaminar shear strength of CCF300/BMI composites specimen of each stage during three absorption-desorption cyclical stages was investigated. The results showed the ILSS of composites after water absorption dramatically decreased, but it could make a comeback on the whole after removal of water.

  19. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 1 summary report: Shear web design development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept was developed for the Space Shuttle orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The boron-epoxy laminate contributes to the strength and stiffness efficiency of the basic web section. The titanium-cladding functions to protect the polymeric laminate parts from damaging environments and is chem-milled to provide reinforcement in selected areas. Detailed design drawings are presented for both boron/epoxy reinforced and all-metal shear webs. The weight saving offered is 24% relative to all-metal construction at an attractive cost per pound of weight saved, based on the detailed designs. Small scale element tests substantiate the boron/epoxy reinforced design details in critical areas. The results show that the titanium-cladding reliably reinforces the web laminate in critical edge load transfer and stiffener fastener hole areas.

  20. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  1. Automotive applications for advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of nonaerospace applications for advanced composite materials with special emphasis on the automotive applications. The automotive industry has to satisfy exacting requirements to reduce the average fuel consumption of cars. A feasible approach to accomplish this involves the development of composites cars with a total weight of 2400 pounds and a fuel consumption of 33 miles per gallon. In connection with this possibility, the automotive companies have started to look seriously at composite materials. The aerospace industry has over the past decade accumulated a considerable data base on composite materials and this is being made available to the nonaerospace sector. However, the automotive companies will place prime emphasis on low cost resins which lend themselves to rapid fabrication techniques.

  2. Second NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The conference papers are presented. The Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. These papers will also be included in the Ninth Conference Proceedings to be published by the Federal Aviation Administration as a separate document.

  3. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Biaxial Test for Determining Shear Properties of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Barnett, Terry R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical investigation of a biaxial tension/compression test for determining shear properties of composite materials are reported. Using finite element models of isotropic and orthotropic laminates, a specimen geometry was optimized. A kinematic fixture was designed to introduce an equal and opposite pair of forces into a specimen with a one inch square test section. Aluminum and several composite laminates with the optimized geometry and a configuration with large stress gradients were tested in the fixture. The specimens were instrumented with strain gages in the center of the test section for shear stiffness measurements. Pure shear strain was measured. The results from the experiments correlated well with finite element results. Failure of the specimens occurred through the center of the test section and appeared to have initiated at the high stress points. The results lead to the conclusion that the optimized specimen is suitable for determining shear modulus for composite materials. Further revisions to the specimen geometry are necessary if the method is to give shear strength data.

  4. Analysis and seismic tests of composite shear walls with CFST columns and steel plate deep beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Xu, Fangfang

    2013-12-01

    A composite shear wall concept based on concrete filled steel tube (CFST) columns and steel plate (SP) deep beams is proposed and examined in this study. The new wall is composed of three different energy dissipation elements: CFST columns; SP deep beams; and reinforced concrete (RC) strips. The RC strips are intended to allow the core structural elements — the CFST columns and SP deep beams — to work as a single structure to consume energy. Six specimens of different configurations were tested under cyclic loading. The resulting data are analyzed herein. In addition, numerical simulations of the stress and damage processes for each specimen were carried out, and simulations were completed for a range of location and span-height ratio variations for the SP beams. The simulations show good agreement with the test results. The core structure exhibits a ductile yielding mechanism characteristic of strong column-weak beam structures, hysteretic curves are plump and the composite shear wall exhibits several seismic defense lines. The deformation of the shear wall specimens with encased CFST column and SP deep beam design appears to be closer to that of entire shear walls. Establishing optimal design parameters for the configuration of SP deep beams is pivotal to the best seismic behavior of the wall. The new composite shear wall is therefore suitable for use in the seismic design of building structures.

  5. Advanced composite materials for optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweben, Carl

    2013-09-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have been well established in optomechanical systems for several decades. The other three classes of composites; metal matrix composites (MMCs), ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), and carbon matrix composites (CAMCs) are making significant inroads. The latter include carbon/carbon (C/C) composites (CCCs). The success of composites has resulted in increasing use in consumer, industrial, scientific, and aerospace/defense optomechanical applications. Composites offer significant advantages over traditional materials, including high stiffnesses and strengths, near-zero and tailorable coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs), tailorable thermal conductivities (from very low to over twice that of copper), and low densities. In addition, they lack beryllium's toxicity problems. Some manufacturing processes allow parts consolidation, reducing machining and joining operations. At present, PMCs are the most widely used composites. Optomechanical applications date from the 1970s. The second High Energy Astrophysical Observatory spacecraft, placed in orbit in 1978, had an ultrahigh-modulus carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy (carbon/epoxy) optical bench metering structure. Since then, fibers and matrix materials have advanced significantly, and use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) has increased steadily. Space system examples include the Hubble Space Telescope metering truss and instrument benches, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), James Webb Space Telescope and many others. Use has spread to airborne applications, such as SOFIA. Perhaps the most impressive CFRP applications are the fifty-four 12m and twelve 7m moveable ground-based ALMA antennas. The other three classes of composites have a number of significant advantages over PMCs, including no moisture absorption or outgassing of organic compounds. CCC and CMC components have flown on a variety of spacecraft. MMCs have been used in space, aircraft, military and industrial

  6. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Detail design activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composites elevator for the Boeing 727 commercial transport. Design activities include discussion of the full scale ground test and flight test activities, the ancillary test programs, sustaining efforts, weight status, and the production status. Prior to flight testing of the advanced composites elevator, ground, flight flutter, and stability and control test plans were reviewed and approved by the FAA. Both the ground test and the flight test were conducted according to the approved plan, and were witnessed by the FAA. Three and one half shipsets have now been fabricated without any significant difficulty being encountered. Two elevator system shipsets were weighed, and results validated the 26% predicted weight reduction. The program is on schedule.

  7. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  8. Cumulative Damage Model for Advanced Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    conditions of static loads; various theories have been advanced to predict the onset and progress of these individual damage events. • The approach taken in...composite laminates, one common approach is the well-known "first ply failure" theory (see e.g. Tsai and Hahn [l]). The basic assumption in the theory ...edge interlaminar stresses provides a physical x tai,-ntion of the edge delamination phenomenon; a suitable theory defining t he conditions for its

  9. Relationship between voids and interlaminar shear strength of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Frimpong, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The effect of voids on the interlaminar shear strength of a polyimide matrix composite system is described. The AS4 graphite/PMR-15 composite was chosen for study because this system can be readily processed by using the standard specified cure cycle to produce void-free composites and because preliminary work in this study had shown that the processing parameters of this resin matrix system can be altered to produce cured composites of varying void contents. Thirty-eight 12-ply unidirectional composite panels were fabricated for this study. A significant range of void contents (0 to 10 percent) was produced. The panels were mapped, ultrasonically inspected, and sectioned into interlaminar shear, flexure, and fiber content specimens. The density of each specimen was measured and interlaminar shear and flexure strength measurements were then made. The fiber content was measured last. The results of these tests were evaluated by using ultrasonic results, photomicrographs, statistical methods, theoretical relationships derived by other investigators, and comparison of the test data with the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) computer program developed at the Lewis Research Center for predicting composite ply properties. The testing is described in as much detail as possible in order to help others make realistic comparisons.

  10. Compressive and shear buckling analysis of metal matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1993-01-01

    Combined inplane compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels using the Raleigh-Ritz minimum energy method with a consideration of transverse shear effect of the sandwich core. The sandwich panels were fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that slightly slender (along unidirectional compressive loading axis) rectangular sandwich panels have the most desirable stiffness-to-weight ratios for aerospace structural applications; the degradation of buckling strength of sandwich panels with rising temperature is faster in shear than in compression; and the fiber orientation of the face sheets for optimum combined-load buckling strength of sandwich panels is a strong function of both loading condition and panel aspect ratio. Under the same specific weight and panel aspect ratio, a sandwich panel with metal matrix composite face sheets has much higher buckling strength than one having monolithic face sheets.

  11. Measurement of interfacial shear strength in SiC-fiber/Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughner, James W.; Bhatt, Rham T.

    1989-01-01

    An indentation method for measuring shear strength in brittle matrix composites was applied to SiC-fiber/Si3N4-matrix samples. Three methods were used to manufacture the composites: reaction bonding of a Si/SiC preform, hot-pressing, and nitrogen-overpressure sintering. An indentation technique developed by Marshall for thin specimens was used to measure the shear strength of the interface and the interfacial friction stresses. This was done by inverting the sample after the initial push through and retesting the pushed fibers. SEM observations showed that the shear strength was determined by the degree of reaction between the fiber and the matrix unless the fiber was pushed out of its (well-bonded) sheath.

  12. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-01

    The "shear fracture" which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of "shear fracture" phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a "shear fracture" in the component.

  13. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  14. A Novel Method for Dynamic Short-Beam Shear Testing of 3D Woven Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-11

    Yip MC, Lin JL (1998) Effects of low-energy impact on the fatigue behavior of carbon /epoxy composites. Composites Science and Technology 58(1):1–8 5...Compos- ite Materials 42(20):2111–2122 12. Davis DC, Whelan BD (2012) An experimental study of interlam- inar shear fracture toughness of a nanotube ...delamination toughness of stitched graphite/epoxy textile composites. Composites Science and Technology 57(7):729–737 15. Chen L, Ifju PG, Sankar BV (2001) A

  15. Inclusion of transverse shear deformation in exact buckling and vibration analysis of composite plate assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melvin S.; Kennedy, David

    1992-01-01

    The problem considered is the development of the necessary plate stiffnesses for use in a general purpose program for buckling and vibration of composite plate assemblies. The required stiffnesses are for the assumption of sinusoidal response along the plate length with transverse shear included. The method is based on the exact solution of the plate differential equations for a composite laminate having fully populated A, B, and D matrices which leads to a differential equation of tenth order.

  16. Advanced composite combustor structural concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the feasibility of and benefits derived from the use of high temperature composite materials in aircraft turbine engine combustor liners. The study included a survey and screening of the properties of three candidate composite materials including tungsten reinforced superalloys, carbon-carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers reinforcing a ceramic matrix of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS). The SiC-LAS material was selected as offering the greatest near term potential primarily on the basis of high temperature capability. A limited experimental investigation was conducted to quantify some of the more critical mechanical properties of the SiC-LAS composite having a multidirection 0/45/-45/90 deg fiber orientation favored for the combustor linear application. Rigorous cyclic thermal tests demonstrated that SiC-LAS was extremely resistant to the thermal fatigue mechanisms that usually limit the life of metallic combustor liners. A thermal design study led to the definition of a composite liner concept that incorporated film cooled SiC-LAS shingles mounted on a Hastelloy X shell. With coolant fluxes consistent with the most advanced metallic liner technology, the calculated hot surface temperatures of the shingles were within the apparent near term capability of the material. Structural analyses indicated that the stresses in the composite panels were low, primarily because of the low coefficient of expansion of the material and it was concluded that the dominant failure mode of the liner would be an as yet unidentified deterioration of the composite from prolonged exposure to high temperature. An economic study, based on a medium thrust size commercial aircraft engine, indicated that the SiC-LAS combustor liner would weigh 22.8N (11.27 lb) less and cost less to manufacture than advanced metallic liner concepts intended for use in the late 1980's.

  17. Transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Yong H.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1994-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the accurate determination of transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in flat multilayered composite panels subjected to mechanical and thermal loads. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the transverse shear stresses to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. The panel is discretized by using either a three-field mixed finite element model based on a two-dimensional first- order shear deformation plate theory or a two-field degenerate solid element with each of the displacement components having a linear variation throughout the thickness of the laminate. The evaluation of transverse shear stresses can be conveniently divided into two phases. The first phase consists of using a superconvergent recovery technique for evaluating the in-plane stresses in the different layers. In the second phase, the transverse shear stresses are evaluated by using piecewise integration, in the thickness direction, of the three-dimensional equilibrium equations. The same procedure is used for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the transverse shear stresses. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by means of numerical examples of multilayered cross-ply panels subjected to transverse loading, uniform temperature change, and uniform temperature gradient through the thickness of the panel. In each case the standard of the comparison is taken to be the exact solution of the three dimensional thermoelasticity equations of the panel.

  18. Influence of shear stress magnitude and direction on atherosclerotic plaque composition

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vikram V.; Bovens, Sandra M.; Mohri, Zahra; Poulsen, Christian Bo; Gsell, Willy; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Towhidi, Leila; de Silva, Ranil; Petretto, Enrico; Krams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    The precise flow characteristics that promote different atherosclerotic plaque types remain unclear. We previously developed a blood flow-modifying cuff for ApoE−/− mice that induces the development of advanced plaques with vulnerable and stable features upstream and downstream of the cuff, respectively. Herein, we sought to test the hypothesis that changes in flow magnitude promote formation of the upstream (vulnerable) plaque, whereas altered flow direction is important for development of the downstream (stable) plaque. We instrumented ApoE−/− mice (n = 7) with a cuff around the left carotid artery and imaged them with micro-CT (39.6 µm resolution) eight to nine weeks after cuff placement. Computational fluid dynamics was then performed to compute six metrics that describe different aspects of atherogenic flow in terms of wall shear stress magnitude and/or direction. In a subset of four imaged animals, we performed histology to confirm the presence of advanced plaques and measure plaque length in each segment. Relative to the control artery, the region upstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude only (p < 0.05), whereas the region downstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude and direction (p < 0.05). These data suggest that shear stress magnitude contributes to the formation of advanced plaques with a vulnerable phenotype, whereas variations in both magnitude and direction promote the formation of plaques with stable features. PMID:27853578

  19. Influence of shear stress magnitude and direction on atherosclerotic plaque composition.

    PubMed

    Pedrigi, Ryan M; Mehta, Vikram V; Bovens, Sandra M; Mohri, Zahra; Poulsen, Christian Bo; Gsell, Willy; Tremoleda, Jordi L; Towhidi, Leila; de Silva, Ranil; Petretto, Enrico; Krams, Rob

    2016-10-01

    The precise flow characteristics that promote different atherosclerotic plaque types remain unclear. We previously developed a blood flow-modifying cuff for ApoE(-/-) mice that induces the development of advanced plaques with vulnerable and stable features upstream and downstream of the cuff, respectively. Herein, we sought to test the hypothesis that changes in flow magnitude promote formation of the upstream (vulnerable) plaque, whereas altered flow direction is important for development of the downstream (stable) plaque. We instrumented ApoE(-/-) mice (n = 7) with a cuff around the left carotid artery and imaged them with micro-CT (39.6 µm resolution) eight to nine weeks after cuff placement. Computational fluid dynamics was then performed to compute six metrics that describe different aspects of atherogenic flow in terms of wall shear stress magnitude and/or direction. In a subset of four imaged animals, we performed histology to confirm the presence of advanced plaques and measure plaque length in each segment. Relative to the control artery, the region upstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude only (p < 0.05), whereas the region downstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude and direction (p < 0.05). These data suggest that shear stress magnitude contributes to the formation of advanced plaques with a vulnerable phenotype, whereas variations in both magnitude and direction promote the formation of plaques with stable features.

  20. Thermo-Oxidative Stability of Graphite/PMR-15 Composites: Effect of Fiber Surface Modification on Composite Shear Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopolous, Demetrios S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish a correlation between the weight loss of a polyimide (PMR- 15) matrix and graphite fibers and the in-plane shear properties of their unidirectional composites subjected to different isothermal aging times up to 1000 hr at 316 C. The role of fiber surface treatment on the composite degradation during the thermo-oxidative aging was investigated by using A4 graphite fibers with three surface modifications: untreated (AU-4), surface treated (AS-4), and surface treated and sized with an epoxy-compatible sizing (AS-4G). The weight loss of the matrix fibers, and composites was determined during the aging. The effect of thermal aging was seen in all the fiber samples in terms of weight loss and reduction in fiber diameter. Calculated values of weight loss fluxes for different surfaces of rectangular unidirectional composite plates showed that the largest weight loss occurred at those cut surfaces where fibers were perpendicular to the surface. Consequently, the largest amount of damage was also noted on these cut surfaces. Optical observation of the neat matrix and composite plates subjected to different aging times revealed that the degradation (such as matrix microcracking and void growth) occurred in a thin surface layer near the specimen edges. The in-plane shear modulus of the composites was unaffected by the fiber surface treatment and the thermal aging. The shear strength of the composites with the untreated fibers was the lowest and it decreased with aging. A fracture surface examination of the composites with untreated fibers suggested that the weak interface allowed the oxidation reaction to proceed along the interface and thus expose the inner material to further oxidation. The results indicated that the fiber-matrix interface affected the composite degradation process during its thermal aging and that the the weak interface accelerated the composite degradation.

  1. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  2. Advanced composites wing study program, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. T.; Michaelson, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures was conducted as a part of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program to establish, by the mid-1980s, the technology for the design of a subsonic commercial transport aircraft leading to a 40% fuel savings. The study objective was to develop a plan to define the effort needed to support a production commitment for the extensive use of composite materials in wings of new generation aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Identification and analysis of what was needed to meet the above plan requirements resulted in a program plan consisting of three key development areas: (1) technology development; (2) production capability development; and (3) integration and validation by designing, building, and testing major development hardware.

  3. Macroscopic Ordering of CNTs in a Liquid Crystalline Polymer Nano-Composite by Shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakonda, P.; Sarkar, S.; Iannacchione, G. S.; Gombos, E.; Hoonjan, G. S.; Georgiev, G.; Cebe, P.

    2012-02-01

    We present a series of complimentary experiments exploring the macroscopic alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a liquid crystalline polymer (isotactic polypropylene - iPP) nano-composites as a function of temperature, shear, and CNT concentration. The phase behavior of iPP+CNT, studied by Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry, revealed the evolution of the α-monoclinic transition and its dynamics, which are dependent on CNT content and thermal treatment. These results indicate that the CNT nucleates crystal formation from the melt. Spectroscopic ellipsometry reveals a change in the optical constants that are connected to the ordering of CNTs when the iPP+CNT is sheared. This anisotropy is also exhibited in measurements of the electrical and thermal conductivities parallel and perpendicular to the shear direction. The amount of order induced into the dispersed CNTs is relatively low for these low concentration samples (< 5 wt%).

  4. Impact of triacylglycerol composition on shear-induced textural changes in highly saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Sandra B; Andersen, Morten D; Hammershøj, Marianne; Wiking, Lars

    2017-01-15

    This study demonstrates a strong interaction between triacylglycerol (TAG) composition and effects of shear rate on the microstructure and texture of fats. Cocoa butter alternatives with similar saturated fat content, but different major TAGs (PPO-, PSO-, SSO-, POP- and SOS-rich blends) were evaluated. Results show how shear can create a harder texture in fat blends based on symmetric monounsaturated TAGs (up to ∼200%), primarily due to reduction in crystal size, whereas shear has little effect on hardness of asymmetric monounsaturated TAGs. Such differences could not be ascribed to differences in the degree of supercooling, but was found to be a consequence of differences in the crystallisation behaviour of different TAGs. The fractal dimension was evaluated by dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier transformation of microscopy images. However, the concept of fractal patterns was found to be insufficient to describe microstructural changes of fat blends with high solid fat content.

  5. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  6. Factors associated with shear bond strength of composite resin to human enamel.

    PubMed

    Gray, G B; MacMillan, S; Payne, A P; McGadey, J

    1996-12-01

    The preparation of enamel surfaces before etching by removing 0.5 mm of surface tooth structure is common-place in modern restorative dentistry. This study was designed to measure and compare the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to prepared and unprepared enamel using various proprietary bonding systems. The analysed results failed to show significant differences between the shear bond strengths of the prepared and unprepared enamel specimens. Conditioning enamel surfaces for 60 seconds using 2.5% nitric acid where the solution was allowed to desiccate, resulted in significantly lower bond strengths compared to the other regimes. A correlation of the etchant pH with the mean shear bond strength of the adhesive systems to enamel was observed. The surface topography of the etched enamel surfaces correlated moderately well with the bond strengths obtained.

  7. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent.

  8. Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications: Speedy Nonlinear Analysis of Postbuckled Panels in Shear (SNAPPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, Dave; Sobel, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A simple and rapid analysis method, consisting of a number of modular, 'strength-of-materials-type' models, is presented for predicting the nonlinear response and stiffener separation of postbuckled, flat, composite, shear panels. The analysis determines the maximum principal tensile stress in the skin surface layer under to toe. Failure is said to occur when this stress reaches the mean transverse tensile strength of the layer. The analysis methodology consists of a number of closed-form equations that can easily be used in a 'hand analysis. For expediency, they have been programmed into a preliminary design code called SNAPPS (Speedy Nonlinear Analysis of Postbuckled Panels in Shear), which rapidly predicts postbuckling response of the panel for each value of the applied shear load. SNAPPS response and failure predictions were found to agree well with test results for three panels with widely different geometries, laminates and stiffnesses. Design guidelines are given for increasing the load-carrying capacity of stiffened, composite shear panels.

  9. A New Method for Shear Stabilization of Advanced Tokamak Reactors via Mode Converted Ion Bernstein Waves*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, Richard; Scharer, John

    2002-11-01

    We examine a new method for generating sheared flows in advanced tokamak D-T reactors with the goal of creating and controlling internal transport barriers. Ion-Bernstein waves (IBWs) have the recognized capacity to create internal transport barriers through sheared plasma flows resulting from ion absorption. Under reactor conditions, the IBW can be generated by mode conversion of a fast magnetosonic wave incident from the high-field side (HFS) on the second harmonic resonance of a minority hydrogen component, with near 100200 MHz) minimizes parasitic absorption and permits the converted IBW to approach the fifth tritium harmonic. It also facilitates compact antennas and feeds, and efficient fast wave launch. Placement of the 5T absorption layer on the HFS is advantageous for shear production. The scheme is applicable to reactors with aspect ratio < 3 such that the conversion and absorption layers are both on the high field side of the magnetic axis. Various factors (adequate separation of the mode conversion layer from the magnetic axis, concentration of the fast wave near the midplane, large machine size, and plasma elongation) minimize poloidal field effects in the conversion zone and permit a slab analysis. We use a 1-D full-wave code to analyze the conversion and absorption. A 2-D ray-tracing code incorporating poloidal magnetic fields is used to follow the IBW for various equilibria. Within this analysis a weak bean shape appears most favorable. This is an attractive scheme for future advanced tokamak reactors. *Research supported by the Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

  10. Fatigue of Advanced In-Situ Composite Solders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) " ~~" Solder joints used in surface mount technology experience thermomechanical fatigue due to the mismatches in...solder joint to undergo shear strains. The purpose of this study was to examine and explain the thermomechanical fatigue damage mechanisms of various...types of solder compositions. Shear, creep, low cycle fatigue , and thermomechanical fatigue tests were conducted in this research. The development

  11. An experimental and analytical investigation of the rail shear-test method as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcwithey, R. R.; Weisshaar, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the results from an experimental and analytical investigation of the stress distributions occurring in a rail shear test. The effects of non-uniform stresses induced by differential thermal expansion, rail flexibility and specimen aspect ratio on measured shear modulus and ultimate strength of composite laminates are shown. A two-dimensional linearly elastic finite element model was used to analytically determine how various geometric parameters influenced the magnitude and distribution of inplane normal and shear stresses in a tensile rail shear specimen. Rail shear tests were conducted at room temperature and 589 K (600 F) on selected graphite-polyimide composite laminates using two titanium rail configurations. The analysis and test methods are discussed, and the results of the effects of the various parameters on shear modulus and ultimate strength are presented.

  12. In-plane and Interlaminar Shear Strength of a Unidirectional Hi-nicalon Fiber-reinforced Celsian Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uenal, O.; Bansal, N. P.

    2000-01-01

    In-plane and interlaminar shear strength of a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced (BaSr)Al2Si2O8 celsian composite were measured by the double-notch shear test method between room temperature and 1200 C. The interlaminar shear strength was lower than the in-plane shear strength at all temperatures. Stress analysis, using finite element modeling, indicated that shear stress concentration was not responsible for the observed difference in strength. Instead, the difference in layer architecture and thus, the favorable alignment of fiber-rich layers with the shear plane in the interlaminar specimens appears to be the reason for the low strength of this composite. A rapid decrease in strength was observed with temperature due to softening of the glassy phase in the material.

  13. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  14. Ten deg off-axis tensile test for intralaminar shear characterization of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen for the intralaminar shear characterization of unidirectional composites. Composite mechanics, a combined-stress failure criterion, and a finite element analysis were used to determine theoretically the stress-strain variation across the specimen width and the relative stress and strain magnitudes at the 10 deg plane. Strain gages were used to measure the strain variation across the specimen width at specimen midlength and near the end tabs. Specimens from Mod-I/epoxy, T-300/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy were used in the experimental program. It was found that the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen is suitable for intralaminar shear characterization and it is recommended that it should be considered as a possible standard test specimen for such a characterization.

  15. Development of Partially Encased Composite Columns for use in Steel Shear Walls for Seismic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Robert G.

    2008-07-01

    Partially encased composite columns consist of a welded thin-plate H-shaped steel section with concrete cast between the flanges. Transverse steel links are welded between the flanges, spaced at regular intervals, to enhance the resistance of the flanges to local buckling. Although they were developed originally to resist gravity loading in mid- and high-rise buildings, they are currently being investigated for applications as the vertical boundary elements in steel shear walls in both low and high seismic zones. The paper provides an overview of several developments from a major ongoing investigation leading up to a recent large-scale test of a steel shear wall that incorporates partially encased composite columns. Key results from the various components of the research program are presented.

  16. Optical measurement on dynamic buckling behavior of stiffened composite panels under in-plane shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Bai, Ruixiang; Tao, Wang; Wei, Xiao; Leng, Ruijiao

    2016-12-01

    The buckling behavior and failure mode of a composite panel stiffened by I-shaped stringers under in-plane shear is studied using digital fringe projection profilometry. The basic principles of the dynamic phase-shifting technique, multi-frequency phase-unwrapping technique and inverse-phase technique for nonlinear error compensation are introduced. Multi-frequency fringe projection profilometry was used to monitor and measure the change in the morphology of a discontinuous surface of the stiffened composite panel during in-plane shearing. Meanwhile, the strain history of multiple points on the skin was obtained using strain rosettes. The buckling mode and deflection of the panel at different moments were analyzed and compared with those obtained using the finite element method. The experimental results validated the FEM analysis.

  17. Effect of surface treatment on micro shear bond strength of two indirect composites

    PubMed Central

    Moezizadeh, Maryam; Ansari, Zahra Jaberi; Fard, Fatemeh Matin

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of surface treatment on micro shear bond strength of two indirect composites. Materials and Methods: Blocks of 2 × 7 × 20 mm dimensions were made from two kinds of resin composites, Gradia and Signum plus. Samples were subjected to secondary curing to complete polymerization. They were divided into five groups: control without any preparation, second group sandblasted with aluminum oxide, third, fourth and fifth groups were lased under a beam of 0.5, 1 and 2 W respectively. Panavia resin cement was placed on the composite blocks using tygon tubes and cured and micro shear bond strength was measured. One sample of each group was observed under electronic microscope. Data was analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests. Results: For Gradia composite, the sandblasted group showed highest strength (25.7±2.9 MPa) followed by the laser beam of 1 W group (with 23.6± 2.8 MPa). In Signum composite, the laser beam of 1 W (21.4±4.2 MPa) showed the highest strength followed by the sandblasted group (with 19.4±3.2 MPa). Conclusion: Surface treatments using sandblast and laser beam of 1W power along with silane are two effective methods to increase the bond strength of composites. PMID:22876007

  18. Shear strain mediated magneto-electric effects in composites of piezoelectric lanthanum gallium silicate or tantalate and ferromagnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasulu, G.; Piskulich, E.; Srinivasan, G.; Qu, P.; Qu, Hongwei; Petrov, V. M.; Fetisov, Y. K.; Nosov, A. P.

    2014-07-21

    Shear strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) coupling is studied in composites of piezoelectric Y-cut lanthanum gallium silicate (LGS) or tantalate (LGT) and ferromagnetic Fe-Co-V alloys. It is shown that extensional strain does not result in ME effects in these layered composites. Under shear strain generated by an ac and dc bias magnetic fields along the length and width of the sample, respectively, strong ME coupling is measured at low-frequencies and at mechanical resonance. A model is discussed for the ME effects. These composites of Y-cut piezoelectrics and ferromagnetic alloys are of importance for shear strain based magnetic field sensors.

  19. Investigation of interfacial shear strength in SiC/Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bhatt, R. T.; Kiser, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber push-out technique was used to determine fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength (ISS) for silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composites in the as-fabricated condition and after consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). In situ video microscopy and acoustic emission detection greatly aided the interpretation of push-out load/displacement curves.

  20. Shear bond strength of composite resin to titanium according to various surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yun; Yang, Hong-So; Park, Sang-Won; Park, Ha-Ok; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM When veneering composite resin-metal restoration is prepared, the fact that bond strength between Ti and composite resin is relatively weak should be considered. PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength between the veneering composite resin and commercial pure (CP) Ti / Ti-6Al-4V alloy according to the method of surface treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS The disks were cast by two types of metal. Their surfaces were treated by sandblasting, metal conditioner, TiN coating and silicoating respectively. After surface treatment, the disks were veneered by composite resin (Tescera™, Bisco, USA) which is 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness. The specimens were stored in water at 25℃ for 24 hours, and then evaluated for their shear bond strength by universal testing machine (STM-5®, United Calibration, USA). These values were statistically analyzed. RESULTS 1. All methods of surface treatment were used in this study satisfied the requirements of ISO 10477 which is the standard of polymer-based crown and bridge materials. 2. The metal conditioner treated group showed the highest value in shear bond strength of CP Ti, silicoated group, TiN coated group, sandblasted group, in following order. 3. The silicoated group showed the highest value in shear bond strength of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, metal conditioner treated group, sandblasted group, TiN coated group, in following order. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, all methods of surface treatment used in this study are clinically available. PMID:21165258

  1. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  2. How do Material Properties and Sediment Composition Control Shear Strength of Clayey Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, I.; Huhn, K.

    2005-12-01

    Mostly unknown during slope destabilisation are deformational processes occurring during the initial phase of failure along a basal shear plane. Major aim of our studies is to analyze mechanical behaviour of a sediment package under low stress conditions. We focus on identification and quantification of influences of sediment composition, material properties, e.g. coefficient of friction, and pore pressure distribution on material strength. We developed a 2D numerical shear box experiment using the Discrete Element Method which is based on a granular model approach. Materials are built up of spherical particles which can be combined to simulate complex grain geometries, e.g. elliptically shaped `clay` minerals. Force distribution is calculated at each particle contact according to simple physical laws. This enables detailed information about local and global stress fields. In addition, particle paths and rotations can be traced at each time step allowing determination of coefficient of friction and porosity as well as identification of spatial and temporal development of localized shear zones. The micro-scaled shear box consists of a fixed bottom wall and an adjustable upper wall to reproduce loads. The model extends over 0.002 x 0.0012m. Particle distribution ranges from `silt` to `clay` fraction. We are using two general model setups. In model (A), `silt` and `clay` particles create a single, heterogeneous layer varying the clay content from 0% - 100%. A three-layered `cake` model (B) consists of a single `clay` layer embedded in a `silt` matrix. Model (A): an increase of` `clay` concentration leads to localization of distinct shear planes. Simultaneously, fluctuations of the coefficient of friction decrease immediately after implementation of `clay`. Shear zones extend along the entire model and are stable over several time steps. Dip angles of shear planes vary between 0°, 25°, and 30°. `Clay` particles rotate into a preferred orientation of 0° to 45

  3. Life Limiting Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar shear strength of four different fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites was determined with doublenotch shear test specimens as a function of test rate at elevated temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1316 C in air. Life limiting behavior, represented as interlaminar shear strength degradation with decreasing test rate, was significant for 2-D crossplied SiC/MAS-5 and 2-D plain-woven C/SiC composites, but insignificant for 2-D plain-woven SiC/SiC and 2-D woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, Michigan) SiC/SiC composites. A phenomenological, power-law delayed failure model was proposed to account for and to quantify the rate dependency of interlaminar shear strength of the composites. Additional stress rupture testing in interlaminar shear was conducted at elevated temperatures to validate the proposed model. The model was in good agreement with SiC/MAS-5 and C/SiC composites, but in poor to reasonable agreement with Sylramic SiC/SiC. Constant shear stress-rate testing was proposed as a possible means of life prediction testing methodology for ceramic matrix composites subjected to interlaminar shear at elevated temperatures when short lifetimes are expected.

  4. Effect of warm air on the shear bond strength of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Allen, J D; Breeding, L C; Pashley, D H

    1992-04-01

    This investigation evaluated the operating characteristics of a recently introduced tooth dryer and its effect on the bond strength of three composite resins to etched enamel. The effect of varying air pressure, distance from the tip of the tooth dryer, and distance laterally from mid-air stream on temperature were measured using a rapid-response thermocouple. Specimens were subjected to shear forces either immediately after bonding or after 5 days of water storage. The air stream required from 32 to 41 seconds to reach maximal temperature; however, more than 90% of the maximal temperature was obtained in 20 seconds. There was an increase in temperature with increased air pressure and a decrease in temperature with increasing distance from the tip. The temperature dropped rapidly laterally from the center of the air stream. The shear bond strength measurements were significantly higher for the specimens prepared using the tooth dryer for one composite resin tested immediately after bonding; there was no statistically significant difference for the other resins. The effect of warm air on the shear bond strength of composite resins to etched enamel may be dependent on the resin used and the time between bonding and testing.

  5. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs.

    PubMed

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  6. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used. PMID:27092209

  7. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates with Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH). Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quasi-isotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  8. Effect of light-tip distance on the shear bond strengths of composite resin.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Scribante, Andrea; Boehme, Andreas; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of light-tip distance on the shear bond strength and failure site of brackets cured with three different light curing units: a high-intensity halogen (Astralis 10, 10-second curing), a light-emitting diode (LED, e-Light, six-second curing), and a plasma arc (PAC System, four-second curing). One hundred and thirty-five bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly allocated to nine groups of 15 specimens each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded with a composite resin to the teeth, and each curing light was tested at zero, three, and six mm from the bracket. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested for shear bond strength. When the three light curing units were compared at a light-tip distance of zero mm, the three lights showed no significantly different shear bond strengths. At light-tip distances of three and six mm, no significant differences were found between the halogen and plasma arc lights, but both lights showed significantly higher shear bond strengths than the LED light. When evaluating the effect of the light-tip distance on each light curing unit, the halogen light showed no significant differences between the three distances. However, the LED light produced significantly lower shear bond strengths at a greater light-tip distance, and the plasma arc lamp showed significantly higher shear bond strengths at a greater light-tip distance. In hard-to-reach areas, the use of PAC system is suggested, whereas the LED evaluated in this study is not recommended.

  9. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates with Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH) based on Cosserat couple stress theory. Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. Compression strengths of lamina without z-pins agreed well with a closed form expression derived by Budiansky and Fleck. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quaiisotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  10. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates With Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH) based on Cosserat couple stress theory. Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. Compression strengths of lamina without z-pins agreed well with a closed form expression derived by Budiansky and Fleck. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quasi-isotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  11. Shear Bond Strength of the Repair Composite Resin to Zirconia Ceramic by Different Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Arami, Sakineh; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Namdar, Fatemeh; Safavi, Nassimeh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is the evaluation of the amount of surface roughness (Ra) of Zirconia Ceramic following different surface treatments as well as the assessment of its shear bond strength to composite resin. Methods: 40 sintered zirconia ceramic block samples were randomly divided in 4 groups of 10 and underwent the following surface treatments: a) Control group without treatment b) Air abrasion with Al2O3 particles (50um) c) Er:YAG laser with 2W power for 10s d) Nd:YAG laser with 1.5W power for 2min Then the mean surface roughness (Ra) was evaluated by profilometer. In the next step, Alloy primer was used on a section of 9mm2 on the samples following the manufacturer’s instructions. After that Clearfil AP-X composite resin in cylinder shape with an internal diameter and height of 3mm were cured on the sections mentioned. At the end, all samples were tested to assess the shear bond strength by the Universal Testing Machine at a speed of 0.5mm/min until fracture occurred. The mean shear bond strengths were calculated and statistically analyzed by One Way ANOVA. Results: ANOVA analysis showed that roughness (Ra) was significantly different between the groups (P≤0.05). Ra was higher in the Nd:YAG group compared to the other groups (P≤0.05). The lower Ra was related to the control group. Air abrasion group showed highest amounts of shear bond strength and Nd:YAG laser group demonstrated lower amounts of shear bond strength (P≤0.05). Conclusion: Various surface treatments are differently effective on bond strength. Air abrasion is the most effective method to condition zirconia ceramic surfaces. PMID:25653817

  12. Inclusion of transverse shear deformation in the exact buckling and vibration analysis of composite plate assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melvin S.; Kennedy, David

    1993-01-01

    The problem considered is the development of the necessary plate stiffnesses for use in the general purpose program VICONOPT for buckling and vibration of composite plate assemblies. The required stiffnesses include the effects of transverse shear deformation and are for sinusoidal response along the plate length as required in VICONOPT. The method is based on the exact solution of the plate differential equations for a composite laminate having fully populated A, B, and D stiffness matrices which leads to an ordinary differential equation of tenth order.

  13. Design, Fabrication and Test of Graphite/Polyimide Composite Joints and Attachments for Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Standard and advanced bonded joint concepts were evaluated to develop a data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550F)). Design concepts for specific joint applications and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints were identified. Test results are presented for rail shear and sandwich beam compression tests and tension tests of moisture conditioned specimens and bonded on "T" sections. Coefficients of thermal expansion data are presented for A7F (LARC 13 Amide-imide modified) adhesion. Static discriminator test results for type 1 and type 2 bonded and bolted preliminary attachment concepts are presented and discussed.

  14. Development of Damped Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    DTIP FiLE COPY Applied Research Laboratory (Dto 00 CD Technical Report NO DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL...DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS by Clark A. Updike Ram B. Bhagat Technical Report No. TR 90-004 April 1990... Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C.A. Updike, R. Bhagat 1 3a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE

  15. Numerical analysis and parametric studies of the buckling of composite orthotropic compression and shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Stein, M.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is presented which was developed for the combined compression and shear of stiffened variable thickness orthotropic composite panels on discrete springs: boundary conditions are general and include elastic boundary restraints. Buckling solutions are obtained by using a newly developed trigonometric finite difference procedure which improves the solution convergence rate over conventional finite difference methods. The classical general shear buckling results which exist only for simply supported panels over a limited range of orthotropic properties, were extended to the complete range of these properties for simply supported panels and, in addition, to the complete range of orthotropic properties for clamped panels. The program was also applied to parametric studies which examine the effect of filament orientation upon the buckling of graphite-epoxy panels. These studies included an examination of the filament orientations which yield maximum shear or compressive buckling strength for panels having all four edges simply supported or clamped over a wide range of aspect ratios. Panels with such orientations had higher buckling loads than comparable, equal weight, thin skinned aluminum panels. Also included among the parameter studies were examinations of combined axial compression and shear buckling and examinations of panels with rotational elastic edge restraints.

  16. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  17. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage: Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Hanson, C. T.; Walker, T. H.; Metschan, S. L.; Mabson, G. E.; Wilden, K. S.; Flynn, B. W.; Scholz, D. B.; Polland, D. R.; Fredrikson, H. G.; Olson, J. T.; Backman, B. F.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program has studied transport fuselage structure with a large potential reduction in the total direct operating costs for wide-body commercial transports. The baseline fuselage section was divided into four 'quadrants', crown, keel, and sides, gaining the manufacturing cost advantage possible with larger panels. Key processes found to have savings potential include (1) skins laminated by automatic fiber placement, (2) braided frames using resin transfer molding, and (3) panel bond technology that minimized mechanical fastening. The cost and weight of the baseline fuselage barrel was updated to complete Phase B of the program. An assessment of the former, which included labor, material, and tooling costs, was performed with the help of design cost models. Crown, keel, and side quadrant cost distributions illustrate the importance of panel design configuration, area, and other structural details. Composite sandwich panel designs were found to have the greatest cost savings potential for most quadrants. Key technical findings are summarized as an introduction to the other contractor reports documenting Phase A and B work completed in functional areas. The current program status in resolving critical technical issues is also highlighted.

  18. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  19. Shear Pressed Aligned Carbon Nanotubes and their use as Composite and Adhesive Interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, James Joseph, III

    The following studies utilize shearing force to consolidate and re-orient multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a shear pressed sheet (SPS) preform. Carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth and shear pressing angle are studied to improve the quality of SPSs. Heat assisted vacuum infusion is used to form a nano-composite from the SPS preform, and mechanical properties are characterized and compared between non-functionalized and functionalized nano-composite tensile specimens. A novel functionalization technique is applied which rinses SPSs with an acidic wet chemical oxidation treatment of H2SO4 and KMnO4 in order to add sidewall carboxyl groups to the CNTs. This is shown to impart hydrophilicity to the SPS and improves composite modulus by 62%, strain-to-failure 42% and failure stress 113%. Composite laminates and joints are vulnerable to shearing forces which cause delamination in the former and failure in the latter. Damage is initiated and propagated at defects and free edges often due to high peel stress, which is much higher than the shear stress and functions as a tensile opening of the joint just as in Mode I delamination failure of laminate composites. In order to resist failure it is necessary to improve the strain-to-failure of the interphase where a crack propagates without sacrificing strength or modulus of the material, thus toughening the material without impacting the rigidity of the composite. Due to the similarity between peel stress/strain and Mode I delamination, the initiation fracture toughness of a double cantilever beam (DCB) test should provide a good indication of peel toughness at a joint free edge. Many studies have explored the possibility of improving Mode I fracture toughness (G IC) of a composite through locally incorporating a tough material into the interlaminar interphase; this material is termed an interleaf. Common interleaf categories are toughened adhesive, disperse particle, disperse fiber, short fiber nonwoven, and continuous

  20. Studies of noise transmission in advanced composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Mcgary, M. C.; Powell, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Noise characteristics of advanced composite material fuselages were discussed from the standpoints of applicable research programs and noise transmission theory. Experimental verification of the theory was also included.

  1. Response of Damaged and Undamaged Tailored Extension-Shear-Coupled Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2008-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the response of composite I-stiffener panels with extension-shear coupling are presented. This tailored concept, when used in the panel cover skins of a tiltrotor aircraft wing has the potential for increasing the aeroelastic stability margins and improving the aircraft productivity. The extension-shear coupling is achieved by using unbalanced plus or minus 45 deg. plies in the skin. Experimental and STAGS analysis results are compared for eight I-stiffener panel specimens. The results indicate that the tailored concept would be feasible to use in the wing skin of a tiltrotor aircraft. Evaluation of specimens impacted at an energy level of 500 in.-lbs indicate a minimal loss in stiffness and less than 30 percent loss in strength. Evaluation of specimens with severed center stiffener and adjacent skin indicated a strength loss in excess of 60 percent.

  2. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  3. A generalized self-consistent method for estimating effective shear properties of unidirectional composites comprising cylindrical orthotropic constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minhat, M.; Mahmud Zuhudi, N. Z.; Shamsudin, M. H.; Isa, M. D.; Harun, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    A micromechanics model based on generalized self-consistent method is proposed to estimate shear elastic properties of unidirectional fibre composites comprising cylindrical orthotropic layers. The features of the generalized self-consistent method are briefly presented and the homogenization schemes in determining the effective shear moduli of transversely isotropic medium are demonstrated. Numerical examples on the prediction of axial and transverse shear moduli of polymer composite reinforced with nanostructure hybrid fibres are illustrated. The close agreement between the prediction results and the results obtained from the available experimental data and finite element study validates the solutions produced by the proposed model.

  4. Dependency of Shear Strength on Test Rate in SiC/BSAS Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Both interlaminar and in-plane shear strengths of a unidirectional Hi-Nicalon(TM) fiber-reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate (SiC/BSAS) composite were determined at 1100 C in air as a function of test rate using double notch shear test specimens. The composite exhibited a significant effect of test rate on shear strength, regardless of orientation which was either in interlaminar or in in-plane direction, resulting in an appreciable shear-strength degradation of about 50 percent as test rate decreased from 3.3 10(exp -1) mm/s to 3.3 10(exp -5) mm/s. The rate dependency of composite's shear strength was very similar to that of ultimate tensile strength at 1100 C observed in a similar composite (2-D SiC/BSAS) in which tensile strength decreased by about 60 percent when test rate varied from the highest (5 MPa/s) to the lowest (0.005 MPa/s). A phenomenological, power-law slow crack growth formulation was proposed and formulated to account for the rate dependency of shear strength of the composite.

  5. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite veneering material and zirconia ceramics after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Komine, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Saito, Ayako; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated the shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconium dioxide (zirconia) ceramics after thermocycling. A total of 80 zirconia (Katana) discs were divided into five groups and primed with one of following agents: All Bond 2 Primer B (ABB), Alloy Primer (ALP), AZ Primer (AZP), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), and Porcelain Liner M Liquid A (PLA). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the primed zirconia. One-half of the specimens (n = 8) in each group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and the remaining eight specimens were thermocycled 5,000 times before shear bond strength testing. Mean bond strengths before thermocycling varied from 10.1 to 15.6 MPa; bond strengths after thermocycling ranged from 4.3 to 17.6 MPa. The ALP group had the highest strengths after thermocycling; there were no significant differences among the PLA, AZP, and EOP groups. The bond strength values for PLA, AZP, EOP, and ALP did not decrease with thermocycling. The application of an acidic functional monomer containing carboxylic anhydride (4-META), phosphonic acid (6-MHPA), or phosphate monomer (MDP) provided durable bond strength between Estenia C&B indirect composite and Katana zirconia.

  6. Thermomechanical characterization of graphite/polymide composites. [Stiffness; strength; shear properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The stiffness, strength and shear properties of three polyimide resins (NR-150B2, PMR-15 and CPI-2237) combined with three different moduli graphite fibers (C-6000, F-5A and GY-70) were determined at 20 to 371/sup 0/. Stiffness retention with increasing temperature is affected only by the thermal integrity of the polymide matrix. No loss in modulus occurs up to 316/sup 0/C for the PMR-15 and CPI-2237 based composites (T/sub g/ = 377/sup 0/C) or to 260/sup 0/C for the NR-150B2 based material (T/sub g/ approx. = 349/sup 0/C), with any of the three fibers. Both flexure and shear strengths show fiber dependent behavior with temperature. The higher modulus fiber composites (F-5A, GY-70) undergo little strength change up to 343/sup 0/C. Composite strengths of the lower modulus fibers (C-6000), however, degrade by as much as 50% over the same temperature range. Thermal-oxidative stability of the various graphite fibers, and its effect on interfacial strength degradation, are considered primary causes for the fiber-type dominated strength behavior. In general, strength retention appears directly related to degree of graphitization (modulus) of the fibers. The accumulated mechanical property data, some previously unknown, are correlated with microstructural features such as the fiber-matrix adhesion, porosity and processing defects. 11 figures.

  7. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, L.A.; Kunerth, D.C.; Walter, J.B.

    1991-09-01

    Nondestructive evaluation techniques were developed to characterize performance degrading conditions in continuous fiber-reinforced silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites. Porosity, fiber-matrix interface bond strength, and physical damage were among the conditions studied. The material studied is formed by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of the matrix material into a preform of woven reinforcing fibers. Acoustic, ultrasonic, and vibration response techniques were studied. Porosity was investigated because of its inherent presence in the CVI process and of the resultant degradation of material strength. Correlations between porosity and ultrasonic attenuation and velocity were clearly demonstrated. The ability of ultrasonic transmission scanning techniques to map variations in porosity in a single sample was also demonstrated. The fiber-matrix interface bond was studied because of its importance in determining the fracture toughness of the material. Correlations between interface bonding and acoustic and ultrasonic properties were observed. These results are presented along with those obtained form acoustic and vibration response measurements on material samples subjected to mechanical impact damage. This is the final report on research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Composite Tissue Transplantation: A Rapidly Advancing Field

    PubMed Central

    Ravindra, K.V.; Wu, S.; Bozulic, L.; Xu, H.; Breidenbach, W.C.; Ildstad, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) is emerging as a potential treatment for complex tissue defects. It is currently being performed with increasing frequency in the clinic. The feasibility of the procedure has been confirmed through 30 hand transplantation, 3 facial reconstructions, and vascularized knee, esophageal, and tracheal allografts. A major drawback for CTA is the requirement for lifelong immunosuppression. The toxicity of these agents has limited the widespread application of CTA. Methods to reduce or eliminate the requirement for immunosuppression and promote CTA acceptance would represent a significant step forward in the field. Multiple studies suggest that mixed chimerism established by bone marrow transplantation promotes tolerance resulting in allograft acceptance. This overview focuses on the history and the exponentially expanding applications of the new frontier in CTA transplantation: immunology associated with CTA; preclinical animal models of CTA; clinical experience with CTA; and advances in mixed chimerism–induced tolerance in CTA. Additionally, some important hurdles that must be overcome in using bone marrow chimerism to induce tolerance to CTA are also discussed. PMID:18589081

  9. Postbuckling analysis of shear deformable composite flat panels taking into account geometrical imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Stein, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of initial geometrical imperfections on the postbuckling response of flat laminated composite panels to uniaxial and biaxial compressive loading are investigated analytically. The derivation of the mathematical model on the basis of first-order transverse shear deformation theory is outlined, and numerical results for perfect and imperfect, single-layer and three-layer square plates with free-free, clamped-clamped, or free-clamped edges are presented in graphs and briefly characterized. The present approach is shown to be more accurate than analyses based on the classical Kirchhoff plate model.

  10. Shear characterization of unidirectional composites with the off-axis tension test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of end constraints on accurate determination of the intralaminar shear modulus G(12) from an off-axis tension test is examined both analytically and experimentally. The Pagano-Halpin (1968) model is employed to illustrate that, when the effect of end constraints is properly considered, the exact expression for G(12) is obtained. When the effect of end constraints is neglected, expressions for the apparent shear modulus G(12)-asterisk and apparent Young's modulus Exx-asterisk are obtained. Numerical comparison for various off-axis configurations and aspect ratios is carried out using typical material properties for graphite/polyimide unidirectional composites. It is demonstrated that the end-constraint effect influences accurate determination of G(12) more adversely than it affects the laminate Young's modulus E(xx) in the low off-axis range. Experimental results obtained from off-axis tests on unidirectional graphite/polyimide specimens confirm the above. Based on the presented analytical and experimental evidence, the 45-deg off-axis coupon is proposed for the determination of the intralaminar shear modulus G(12).

  11. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  12. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  13. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. Results: RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001) with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin. Conclusion: RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range. PMID:25628663

  14. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Trehan, Mridula; Sharma, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims and objectives: To measure and compare the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of light-cure composite. (Enlight, Ormco.) and dual-cure composite (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho). Materials and methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were divided into two groups: group I (blue): conventional light cure composite resin. (Enlight, Ormco.) and group II (green): dual cure composite resin. (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho.) with 30 teeth in each group. These samples were tested on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength. Results: Student t-test showed that the mean shear bond strength of the conventional light cure group (8.54 MPa - 10.42 MPa) was significantly lower than dual cure group (10.45 MPa -12.17 MPa). Conclusion: These findings indicate that the shear bond strength of dual-cure composite resin (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho) is comparatively higher than conventional light-cure composite resin (Enlight, Ormco). In the majority of the samples, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were 4 and 5 in both the groups whereas score 1 is attained by the least number of samples in both the groups. How to cite this article: Verma G, Trehan M, Sharma S. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):166-170. PMID:25206216

  15. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  16. Two interfacial shear strength calculations based on the single fiber composite test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhandarov, S. F.; Pisanova, E. V.

    1996-07-01

    The fragmentation of a single fiber embedded in a polymer matrix upon stretching (SFC test) provides valuable information on the fiber-matrix bond strength (τ), which determines stress transfer through the interface and, thus, significantly affects the mechanical properties of the composite material. However, the calculated bond strength appears to depend on data interpretation, i.e., on the applied theoretical model, since the direct result of the SFC test is the fiber fragment length distribution rather than the τ value. Two approaches are used in SFC testing for calculation of the bond strength: 1) the Kelly-Tyson model, in which the matrix is assumed to be totally elastic and 2) the Cox model using the elastic constants of the fiber and the matrix. In this paper, an attempt has been made to compare these two approaches employing theory as well as the experimental data of several authors. The dependence of the tensile stress in the fiber and the interfacial shear stress on various factors has been analyzed. For both models, the mean interfacial shear stress in the fragment of critical length (lc) was shown to satisfy the same formula (τ) = (σcD)/2lc, where D is the fiber diameter and σc is the tensile strength of a fiber at gauge length equal to lc. However, the critical lengths from the Kelly-Tyson approach and Cox model are differently related to the fragment length distribution parameters such as the mean fragment length. This discrepancy results in different (τ) values for the same experimental data set. While the main parameter in the Kelly-Tyson model assumed constant for a given fiber-matrix pair is the interfacial shear strength, the ultimate (local) bond strength τult may be seen as the corresponding parameter in the Cox model. Various τult values were obtained for carbon fiber-epoxy matrix systems by analyzing the data of continuously monitored single fiber composite tests. Whereas the mean value of the interfacial shear stress calculated in

  17. Evaluation of shear bond strengths of gingiva-colored composite resin to porcelain, metal and zirconia substrates

    PubMed Central

    An, Hong-Seok; Park, Ji-Man

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of the gingiva-colored composite resin and the tooth-colored composite resin to porcelain, metal and zirconia. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty cylindrical specimens were fabricated and divided into the following 6 groups (Group 1-W: tooth-colored composite bonded to porcelain, Group 1-P: gingiva-colored composite bonded to porcelain, Group 2-W: tooth-colored composite bonded to base metal, Group 2-P: gingiva-colored composite bonded to base metal, Group 3-W: toothcolored composite bonded to zirconia, Group 3-P: gingiva-colored composite bonded to zirconia). The shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine after thermocycling and the failure mode was noted. All data were analyzed using the two-way analysis of variance test and the Bonferroni post-hoc test at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The mean shear bond strength values in MPa were 12.39, 13.42, 8.78, 7.98, 4.64 and 3.74 for Group 1-W, 1-P, 2-W, 2-P, 3-W and 3-P, respectively. The difference between the two kinds of composite resin was not significant. The shear bond strength of Group 1 was the highest and that of Group 3 was the lowest. The differences among Group 1, 2 and 3 were all significant (P<.05). CONCLUSION The shear bond strength of the gingiva-colored composite was not less than that of the tooth-colored composite. Thus, repairing or fabricating ceramic restorations using the gingiva-colored composite resin can be regarded as a practical method. Especially, the prognosis would be fine when applied on porcelain surfaces. PMID:22053249

  18. Advanced composites characterization with x-ray technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1993-12-01

    Recognizing the critical need to advance new composites for the aeronautics and aerospace industries, we are focussing on advanced test methods that are vital to successful modeling and manufacturing of future generations of high temperature and durable composite materials. These newly developed composites are necessary to reduce propulsion cost and weight, to improve performance and reliability, and to address longer-term national strategic thrusts for sustaining global preeminence in high speed air transport and in high performance military aircraft.

  19. Advanced thermoset resins for fire-resistant composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal and flammability properties of some thermoset polymers and composites are described. The processing and evaluation of composites fabricated from currently used resins and advanced fire-resistant resins are also described. Laboratory test methodology used to qualify candidate composite materials includes thermochemical characterization of the polymeric compounds and evaluation of the glass reinforced composites for flammability and smoke evolution. The use of these test methods will be discussed in comparing advanced laminating resins and composites consisting of modified epoxies, phenolics and bismaleimide, with conventional baseline materials consisting of epoxy.

  20. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  1. Shear Strength of Single Lap Joint Aluminium-Thermoplastic Natural Rubber (Al-TPNR) Laminated Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzakkar, M. Z.; Ahmad, S.; Yarmo, M. A.; Jalar, A.; Bijarimi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of surface treatment on the aluminium surface and a coupling agent to improve adhesion between aluminium with organic polymer. Thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) matrix was prepared by melt blending of natural rubber (NR), liquid natural rubber (LNR) compatibilizer, linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MAH). The PEgMAH concentration used was varied from 0% - 25%. In addition, the aluminium surface was pre-treated with 3-glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane (3-GPS) to enhance the mechanical properties of laminated composite. It was found that the shear strength of single lap joint Al-TPNR laminated composite showing an increasing trend as a function of PE-g-MAH contents for the 3-GPS surface treated aluminium. Moreover, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the strength improvement was associated with the chemical state of the compound involved.

  2. Failure Analysis of Discrete Damaged Tailored Extension-Shear-Coupled Stiffened Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the failure of composite is tiffener panels with extension-shear coupling are presented. This tailored concept, when used in the cover skins of a tiltrotor aircraft wing has the potential for increasing the aeroelastic stability margins and improving the aircraft productivity. The extension-shear coupling is achieved by using unbalanced 45 plies in the skin. The failure analysis of two tailored panel configurations that have the center stringer and adjacent skin severed is presented. Finite element analysis of the damaged panels was conducted using STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) general purpose finite element program that includes a progressive failure capability for laminated composite structures that is based on point-stress analysis, traditional failure criteria, and ply discounting for material degradation. The progressive failure predicted the path of the failure and maximum load capability. There is less than 12 percent difference between the predicted failure load and experimental failure load. There is a good match of the panel stiffness and strength between the progressive failure analysis and the experimental results. The results indicate that the tailored concept would be feasible to use in the wing skin of a tiltrotor aircraft.

  3. Onset of failure in finitely strained layered composites subjected to combined normal and shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorović, M. D.; Triantafyllidis, N.

    2004-04-01

    A limiting factor in the design of fiber-reinforced composites is their failure under axial compression along the fiber direction. These critical axial stresses are significantly reduced in the presence of shear stresses. This investigation is motivated by the desire to study the onset of failure in fiber-reinforced composites under arbitrary multi-axial loading and in the absence of the experimentally inevitable imperfections and finite boundaries. By using a finite strain continuum mechanics formulation for the bifurcation (buckling) problem of a rate-independent, perfectly periodic (layered) solid of infinite extent, we are able to study the influence of load orientation, material properties and fiber volume fraction on the onset of instability in fiber-reinforced composites. Two applications of the general theory are presented in detail, one for a finitely strained elastic rubber composite and another for a graphite-epoxy composite, whose constitutive properties have been determined experimentally. For the latter case, extensive comparisons are made between the predictions of our general theory and the available experimental results as well as to the existing approximate structural theories. It is found that the load orientation, material properties and fiber volume fraction have substantial effects on the onset of failure stresses as well as on the type of the corresponding mode (local or global).

  4. A study of void effects on the interlaminar shear strength of unidirectional graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Frimpong, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of voids on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of a polyimide matrix composite system. The graphite/PRM-15 composite was chosen for study because of the extensive amount of experience that has been amassed in the processing of this material. Composite densities and fiber contents of more than thirty different laminates were measured along with ILSS. Void contents were calculated and the void geometry and distribution were noted using microscopic techniques such as those used in metallography. It was found that there was a good empirical correlation between ILSS and composite density. The most acceptable relationship between the ILSS and density was found to be a power equation which closely resembles theoretically derived expressions. An increase in scatter in the strength data was observed as the void content increased. In laminates with low void content, the void appears to be more segregated in one area of the laminate. It was found that void free composites could be processed in matched metal die molds at pressures greater than 1.4 and less than 6.9 MPa.

  5. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim D.; Schumacher, Lina; Lekic, Vedran; Thomas, Christine; Ito, Garrett

    2016-12-01

    The large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVP) are thermochemical anomalies in the deep Earth's mantle, thousands of km wide and ˜1800 km high. This study explores the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally subdivided into two domains: a primordial bottom domain near the core-mantle boundary and a basaltic shallow domain that extends from 1100 to 2300 km depth. This hypothesis reconciles published observations in that it predicts that the two domains have different physical properties (bulk-sound versus shear-wave speed versus density anomalies), the transition in seismic velocities separating them is abrupt, and both domains remain seismically distinct from the ambient mantle. We here report underside reflections from the top of the LLSVP shallow domain, supporting a compositional origin. By exploring a suite of two-dimensional geodynamic models, we constrain the conditions under which well-separated "double-layered" piles with realistic geometry can persist for billions of years. Results show that long-term separation requires density differences of ˜100 kg/m3 between LLSVP materials, providing a constraint for origin and composition. The models further predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from LLSVP roofs and to entrain basaltic material that has evolved in the lower mantle. Long-lived, vigorous "primary" plumes instead rise from LLSVP margins and entrain a mix of materials, including small fractions of primordial material. These predictions are consistent with the locations of hot spots relative to LLSVPs, and address the geochemical and geochronological record of (oceanic) hot spot volcanism. The study of large-scale heterogeneity within LLSVPs has important implications for our understanding of the evolution and composition of the mantle.

  6. In-Plane Shear Testing of Medium and High Modulus Woven Graphite Fiber Reinforced/Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.; Kumosa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Iosipescu shear tests were performed at room temperature and at 316 C (600 F) o woven composites with either M40J or M60J graphite fibers and PMR-II-50 polyimide resin matrix. The composites were tested as supplied and after thermo-cycling, with the thermo-cycled composites being tested under dry and wet conditions. Acoustic emission (AE) was monitored during the room and high temperature Iosipescu experiments. The shear stresses at the maximum loads and the shear stresses at the significant onset of AE were determined for the composites as function of temperature and conditioning. The combined effects of thermo-cycling and moisture on the strength and stiffness properties of the composites were evaluated. It was determined that the room and high temperature shear stresses at the maximum loads were unaffected by conditioning. However, at room temperature the significant onset of AE was affected by conditioning; the thermal conditioned wet specimens showed the highest shear stress at the onset of AE followed by thermal-conditioned and then as received specimens. Also, at igh temperature the significant onset of AE occurred in some specimens after the maximum load due to the viscoelastoplastic nature of the matrix material.

  7. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints is reported. The program consists of two concurrent tasks: (1) design and test of specific built up attachments; and (2) evaluation of standard advanced bonded joint concepts. A data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550 deg F)) to design concepts for specific joining applications, and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints are evaluated. Data for design and build GR/PI of lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Results for compression and interlaminar shear strengths of Celion 6000/PMR-15 laminates are given. Static discriminator test results for type 3 and type 4 bonded and bolted joints and final joint designs for TASK 1.4 scale up fabrication and testing are presented.

  8. A problem formulation for glideslope tracking in wind shear using advanced robust control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Chang, B.-C.; Fischl, Robert

    1992-01-01

    A formulation of the longitudinal glideslope tracking of a transport-class aircraft in severe wind shear and turbulence for application to robust control system design is presented. Mathematical wind shear models are incorporated into the vehicle mathematical model, and wind turbulence is modeled as an input disturbance signal. For this problem formulation, the horizontal and vertical wind shear gradients are treated as real uncertain parameters that vary over an entire wind shear profile. The primary objective is to examine the formulation of this problem into an appropriate design format for use in m-synthesis control system design.

  9. Shear Strength and Interfacial Toughness Characterization of Sapphire-Epoxy Interfaces for Nacre-Inspired Composites.

    PubMed

    Behr, Sebastian; Jungblut, Laura; Swain, Michael V; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-10-12

    The common tensile lap-shear test for adhesive joints is inappropriate for brittle substrates such as glasses or ceramics where stress intensifications due to clamping and additional bending moments invalidate results. Nevertheless, bonding of glasses and ceramics is still important in display applications for electronics, in safety glass and ballistic armor, for dental braces and restoratives, or in recently developed bioinspired composites. To mechanically characterize adhesive bondings in these fields nonetheless, a novel approach based on the so-called Schwickerath test for dental sintered joints is used. This new method not only matches data from conventional analysis but also uniquely combines the accurate determination of interfacial shear strength and toughness in one simple test. The approach is verified for sapphire-epoxy joints that are of interest for bioinspired composites. For these, the procedure not only provides quantitative interfacial properties for the first time, it also exemplarily suggests annealing of sapphire at 1000 °C for 10 h for mechanically and economically effective improvements of the interfacial bond strength and toughness. With increases of strength and toughness from approximately 8 to 29 MPa and from 2.6 to 35 J/m(2), respectively, this thermal modification drastically enhances the properties of unmodified sapphire-epoxy interfaces. At the same time, it is much more convenient than wet-chemical approaches such as silanization. Hence, besides the introduction of a new testing procedure for adhesive joints of brittle or expensive substrates, a new and facile annealing process for improvements of the adhesive properties of sapphire is suggested and quantitative data for the mechanical properties of sapphire-epoxy interfaces that are common in synthetic nacre-inspired composites are provided for the first time.

  10. Advanced composite applications for sub-micron biologically derived microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnur, J. M.; Price, R. R.; Schoen, P. E.; Bonanventura, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A major thrust of advanced material development is in the area of self-assembled ultra-fine particulate based composites (micro-composites). The application of biologically derived, self-assembled microstructures to form advanced composite materials is discussed. Hollow 0.5 micron diameter cylindrical shaped microcylinders self-assemble from diacetylenic lipids. These microstructures have a multiplicity of potential applications in the material sciences. Exploratory development is proceeding in application areas such as controlled release for drug delivery, wound repair, and biofouling as well as composites for electronic and magnetic applications, and high power microwave cathodes.

  11. Cumulative Damage Model for Advanced Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    ultimately used an exponential in the present example for added simplicity) and we norma - lize the function so that it becomes the modifier that determines...Testing and Design (Second Conference), ASTM STP 497, ASTM (1972) pp. 170-188. 5. Halpin, J. C., et al., "Characterization of Composites for the...Graphite Epoxy Composites," Proc. Symposium on Composite Materials: Testing and Design, ASTM , (Ma’rch 20, 1978) New Orleans, LA. 18. Hashin, Z. and Rotem

  12. Damage and failure mechanisms of a 3-directional carbon/carbon composite under uniaxial tensile and shear loads

    SciTech Connect

    Siron, O.; Lamon, J.

    1998-11-20

    The mechanical behavior of a three-directional carbon/carbon (C/C) composite under tensile and shear loads is investigated in relation with the failure mechanisms and, the fiber architecture. This three-directional C/C composite was produced by Chemical Vapor Infiltration of a needled fiber preform of multiple layers of satin woven tows. The C/C composite exhibited several interesting features including an essentially non-linear stress-strain behavior and permanent deformations. Three families of matrix cracks were identified under tensile and shear loads, including microcracks in the tows, intertow delamination and cracks across the longitudinal tows. It was found that the delamination cracks affect preponderantly the stress-strain behavior and the mechanical properties. Similar features in the mechanical behavior and the failure mechanisms were highlighted under tension and under shear loading.

  13. Quantification of Shear-Relative Asymmetries in Eyewall Slope Using Airborne Doppler Radar Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, A.; Rogers, R.; Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has become apparent that typical methods for analyzing tropical cyclones (TCs), such as track and intensity, are insufficient for evaluating TC structural evolution and numerical model forecasts of that evolution. Many studies have analyzed different metrics related to TC inner-core structure in an attempt to better understand the processes that drive changes in core structure. One important metric related to vertical TC structure is the slope of the eyewall. Hazelton and Hart (2013) discussed azimuthal mean eyewall slope based on radar reflectivity data, and its relationship with TC intensity and core structure. That study also noted significant azimuthal variation in slopes, but did not significantly explore reasons for this variation. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to quantify the role of vertical wind shear in causing azimuthal variance of slope, using research quality Doppler radar composites from the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD). We analyze the slope of the 20 dBZ surface as in Hazelton and Hart (2013), and also look at azimuthal variation in other measures of eyewall slope, such as the slope of the radius of maximum winds (RMW), which has been analyzed in an azimuthal mean sense by Stern and Nolan (2009), and an angular momentum surface. The shear-relative slopes are quantified by separating the radar data into four quadrants relative to the vertical shear vector: Downshear Left (DSL), Upshear Left (USL), Upshear Right (USR), and Downshear Right (DSR). This follows the method employed in shear-relative analyses of other aspects of TC core structure, such as Rogers et al. (2013) and Reasor et al. (2013). The data suitable for use in this study consist of 36 flights into 15 different TCs (14 Atlantic, 1 Eastern Pacific) between 1997 and 2010. Preliminary results show apparent shear-induced asymmetries in eyewall slope. The slope of the RMW shows an asymmetry due to the tilt of the vortex approximately along the shear vector, with

  14. Controlling exfoliation in order to minimize damage during dispersion of long SWCNTs for advanced composites

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Howon; Yamashita, Motoi; Ata, Seisuke; Futaba, Don N.; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We propose an approach to disperse long single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a manner that is most suitable for the fabrication of high-performance composites. We compare three general classes of dispersion mechanisms, which encompass 11 different dispersion methods, and we have dispersed long SWCNTs, short multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and short SWCNTs in order to understand the most appropriate dispersion methods for the different types of CNTs. From this study, we have found that the turbulent flow methods, as represented by the Nanomizer and high-pressure jet mill methods, produced unique and superior dispersibility of long SWCNTs, which was advantageous for the fabrication of highly conductive composites. The results were interpreted to imply that the biaxial shearing force caused an exfoliation effect to disperse the long SWCNTs homogeneously while suppressing damage. A conceptual model was developed to explain this dispersion mechanism, which is important for future work on advanced CNT composites. PMID:24469607

  15. Advanced composites wing study program. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. T.; Michaelson, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effort necessary to achieve a state of production readiness for the design and manufacturing of advanced composite wing structure is outlined. Technical assessment and program options are also reviewed for the wing study results.

  16. Experimental and analytical study on seismic behavior of steel-concrete multienergy dissipation composite shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Qiao, Qiyun; Yu, Chuanpeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a steel-concrete multi-energy dissipation composite shear wall, comprised of steel-reinforced concrete (SRC) columns, steel plate (SP) deep beams, a concrete wall and energy dissipation strips, is proposed. In order to study the multi-energy dissipation behavior and restorability after an earthquake, two stages of low cyclic loading tests were carried out on ten test specimens. In the first stage, test on five specimens with different number of SP deep beams was carried out, and the test lasted until the displacement drift reached 2%. In the second stage, thin SPs were welded to both sides of the five specimens tested in the first stage, and the same test was carried out on the repaired specimens (designated as new specimens). The load-bearing capacity, stiffness, ductility, hysteretic behavior and failure characteristics were analyzed for both stages and the results are discussed herein. Extrapolating from these results, strength calculation models and formulas are proposed herein and simulations using ABAQUS carried out; they show good agreement with the test results. The study demonstrates that SRC columns, SP deep beams, concrete wall and energy dissipation strips cooperate well and play an important role in energy dissipation. In addition, this study shows that the shear wall has good recoverability after an earthquake, and that the welding of thin SP's to repair a deformed wall is a practicable technique.

  17. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in carbon-epoxy composites are identified as a basis for more reliable prediction of the performance of these materials. The approach involves both the study of local fracture events in model specimens containing small groups of filaments and fractographic examination of high fiber content engineering composites. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of model specimen observations with gross fracture modes. The effects of fiber surface treatment, resin modification and fiber content are studied and acoustic emission methods are applied. Some effort is devoted to analysis of the failure process in composite/metal specimens.

  18. Shear-lag analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional composite with fiber damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.; Dharani, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Development of a method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of unidirectional hybrid (buffer strip) composite laminates was studied. Three particular solutions are discussed in detail: broken fibers in a unidirectional half-plane; adjoined half planes of different fiber and matrix properties; and the solution of two half planes bounding a third distinct region of finite width. This finite width region represents a buffer strip and primary attention is given to the potential of this strip to arrest a crack that originates in one of the half planes. A materials modeling approach using the classical shear lag assumption to describe the stress transfer between fibers was analyzed. Explicit fiber and matrix properties of the three regions are retained, and changes in the laminate behavior as a function of the relative material properties, buffer strip width, and initial crack length are discussed.

  19. Effect of prebonding procedures on shear bond strength of resin composite to pressable ceramic.

    PubMed

    Estafan, D; Dussetschleger, F; Estafan, A; Jia, W

    2000-01-01

    Low bond strength between tooth structure and restorative ceramic material is a major cause of ceramic fractures or failures. Prebonding measures performed on pressable ceramic material were evaluated and the different shear bond strengths obtained by each method were tabulated. The three individual groups were subjected to 9% hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel for 0, 1, and 5 minutes. The different acid-etched time groups were chemically treated with silane coupler alone, silane coupling agent with bonding agent, and bonding agent alone. The silane coupling agent produced the highest bond strength between the composite structure and the pressable ceramic restorative material. High bond values were achieved by etching the porcelain for one minute. The use of the silane coupling agent with a one minute 9% HF acid etch yielded the greatest bond strength.

  20. Film in the Advanced Composition Classroom: A Tapestry of Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Pearce

    2015-01-01

    This article advances film as worthy of rhetorical inquiry and deserving of more sustained attention in the advanced composition classroom. The first section identifies various approaches to the "language" of film, which can be adopted to navigate the technical, rhetorical, and cultural concerns needed to compose informed multimodal…

  1. Advanced composites: Design and application. Proceedings of the meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R.; Willard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of advanced composites is discussed with emphasis on aerospace, aircraft, automotive, marine, and industrial applications. Failure modes in advanced composites are also discussed.

  2. Shear test of composite bonded to dentin: Er:YAG laser versus dental handpiece preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Wigdor, Harvey A.

    1995-05-01

    The erbium:YAG laser coupled with a cooling stream of water appears to be an effective means of removing dental hard tissues. However, before the procedure is deemed clinically viable, there are several important issues of safety and efficacy that need to be explored. In this study we investigated the surface that remains following laser ablation of dentin and compared the results to the use of a dental handpiece. Specifically, we studied the effect the laser radiation had on the bonding of composite to dentin. The crowns of extracted human molars were removed revealing the underlying dentin. An additional thickness of material was removed with either a dental handpiece or an Er:YAG laser by raster scanning the samples under a fixed handpiece or laser. Comparable surface roughnesses were achieved. A cylinder of composite was bonded onto the prepared surfaces following the manufacturer's directions. The dentin-composite bond was then shear stressed to failure on a universal testing apparatus and the maximum load recorded. Preliminary results indicated that laser irradiated samples had improved bond strengths. SEM photographs of the surfaces were also taken to compare the two methods of tooth preparation.

  3. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Sanohkan, Sasiwimol; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Larpboonphol, Narongrit; Sae-Yib, Taewalit; Jampa, Thibet; Manoppan, Satawat

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental) specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10). Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE), AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical), and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE) and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa) were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = 0.05). Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD) value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa) and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa). The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different. PMID:24347881

  4. Graphite/Polyimide Composites. [conference on Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B. (Editor); Davis, J. G., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed under the Composites for Advanced Space Transportation System Project is reported. Specific topics covered include fabrication, adhesives, test methods, structural integrity, design and analysis, advanced technology developments, high temperature polymer research, and the state of the art of graphite/polyimide composites.

  5. Effects of Shear, Defocus, and Wavefront Error on the Theoretical Performance of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer for Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martino, Antonio J.; Hagopian, John G.

    1998-01-01

    The combined effects on performance of shear between the two arms, defocus of die detector, and difference in wavefront between the two arms of a Fourier transform spectrometer using cube corner retroreflectors were investigated. Performance was characterized by the amplitude of the fringe signals coming from a detector as the path-length difference was scanned. A closed-form expression was found for the combined effects of shear and defocus, and it was found that defocus had no effect in the absence of shear. The effect of wavefront error was modeled numerically and assumed to be independent of shear and defocus. Results were compared with measurements made on the breadboard and engineering model of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer for the Cassini mission to Saturn, and good agreement was found.

  6. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants – SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Rampal, Poonam; Kumar, Sukesh

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control) -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups) -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05). On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred. PMID:22090756

  7. Flat tensile specimen design for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, Dennis W.

    1990-01-01

    Finite element analyses of flat, reduced gage section tensile specimens with various transition region contours were performed. Within dimensional constraints, such as maximum length, tab region width, gage width, gage length, and minimum tab length, a transition contour radius of 41.9 cm produced the lowest stress values in the specimen transition region. The stresses in the transition region were not sensitive to specimen material properties. The stresses in the tab region were sensitive to specimen composite and/or tab material properties. An evaluation of stresses with different specimen composite and tab material combinations must account for material nonlinearity of both the tab and the specimen composite. Material nonlinearity can either relieve stresses in the composite under the tab or elevate them to cause failure under the tab.

  8. Advanced composite materials for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Bland A.; Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The objective in the NASA Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) project is to develop new composite material concepts for highly stable and durable reflectors with precision surfaces. The project focuses on alternate material concepts such as the development of new low coefficient of thermal expansion resins as matrices for graphite fiber reinforced composites, quartz fiber reinforced epoxies, and graphite reinforced glass. Low residual stress fabrication methods will be developed. When coupon specimens of these new material concepts have demonstrated the required surface accuracies and resistance to thermal distortion and microcracking, reflector panels will be fabricated and tested in simulated space environments. An important part of the program is the analytical modeling of environmental stability of these new composite materials concepts through constitutive equation development, modeling of microdamage in the composite matrix, and prediction of long term stability (including viscoelasticity). These analyses include both closed form and finite element solutions at the micro and macro levels.

  9. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fundamental failure mechanisms in carbon-epoxy composites were studied for more reliable prediction of the performance of these materials. Single and multiple fiber specimens were tested under tensile loads, and the sequence of failure events was observed. Parameters such as resin crack sensitivity, fiber surface treatment and variations in fibers from batch to batch are being evaluated. The analysis of bulk composite fracture processes using acoustic emission techniques is being studied in order to correlate microscopic observations with bulk composite behavior. Control of the fracture process through matrix and interface modification is being attempted, and study of failure processes in composite/metal specimens is being conducted. Most of the studies involved DEN 438 epoxy novolac as the matrix, but some experiments are now underway using the higher temperature resin ERLA 4617.

  10. Directed Biosynthesis of Oriented Crystalline Cellulose for Advanced Composite Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    Cellulose for Advanced Composite Fibers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hugh...properties will allow the synthesis of composites possessing improved strength and functionality will be investigated. The bacterial cellulose fibers will

  11. Shear wave elastography imaging for assessing the chronic pathologic changes in advanced diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kamal; Loberant, Norman; Abbas, Nur; Fadi, Hassan; Shadia, Hassan; Khazim, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective The assessment of the grade of renal fibrosis in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) requires renal biopsy, which may be associated with certain risks. To assess the severity of chronic pathologic changes in DKD, we performed a quantitative analysis of renal parenchymal stiffness in advanced DKD, using shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Patients and methods Twenty-nine diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) grades 3–4 due to DKD, and 23 healthy subjects were enrolled. Combined conventional ultrasound and SWE imaging were performed on all participants. The length, width, and cortical thickness and stiffness were recorded for each kidney. Results Cortical thickness was lower in patients with DKD than in healthy subjects (13.8±2.2 vs 14.8±1.6 mm; P=0.002) and in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (13.0±3.5 vs 14.7±2.1 mm; P<0.001). Cortical stiffness was greater in patients with DKD than in healthy subjects (23.72±14.33 vs 9.02±2.42 kPa; P<0.001), in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (30.4±16.2 vs 14.6±8.1 kPa; P<0.001), and in DKD patients with CKD grade 3b, than in those with CKD grade 3a (15.7±6.7 vs 11.0±4.2 kPa; P=0.03). Daily proteinuria was higher in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (5.52±0.96 vs 1.13±0.72; P=0.001), and in DKD patients with CKD grade 3b, than in those with CKD grade 3a (1.59±0.59 vs 0.77±0.48; P<0.001). Cortical stiffness was inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=−0.65, P<0.001) and with cortical thickness (r=−0.43, P<0.001) in patients with DKD. Conclusions In patients with advanced DKD, SWE imaging may be utilized as a simple and practical method for quantitative evaluation of the chronic morphological changes and for the differentiation between CKD grades. PMID:27853373

  12. Influence of large deflection and transverse shear on random response of rectangular symmetric composite laminates to acoustic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Prasad, C. B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear equations of motion of symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates are derived accounting for von Karman strains. The effect of transverse shear is included in the formulation and the rotatory inertia effect is ignored. Using a single-mode Galerkin procedure the nonlinear modal equation is obtained. Direct equivalent linearization is employed. The response of acoustic excitation on moderately thick composite panels is studied. Further, the effects of transverse shear on large deflection vibration of laminates under random excitation are studied. Mean-square deflection and mean-square inplane stresses are obtained for some symmetric graphite-epoxy laminates. Using equilibrium equations and the continuity requirements, the mean-square transverse shear stresses are calculated. The results obtained will be useful in the sonic fatigue design of composite aircraft panels. The analysis is presented in detail for simply supported plate. The analogous equations for a clamped case are given in the appendix.

  13. Trapped rubber processing for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Trapped rubber processing is a molding technique for composites in which precast silicone rubber is placed within a closed cavity where it thermally expands against the composite's surface supported by the vessel walls. The method has been applied by the Douglas Aircraft Company, under contract to NASA-Langley, to the design and fabrication of 10 DC-10 graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder assemblies. A three-bay development tool form mold die has been designed and manufactured, and tooling parameters have been established. Fabrication procedures include graphite layup, assembly of details in the tool, and a cure cycle. The technique has made it possible for the cocured fabrication of complex primary box structures otherwise impracticable via standard composite material processes.

  14. Failure behavior for composite single-bolted joints in double shear tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhanwen; Liu, Hanyang; Yang, Zhiyong; Shi, Hanqiao; Sun, Baogang

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the reliability and load carrying capacity of composite laminates structures which were lap jointed by bolt, in this paper, the failure strength and failure mode of laminated composite pinned-joints is investigated. To determine the effects of joint geometry and stacking sequence on the bearing strength and damage mode, the multi-scale numerical model combining with the Generalized Method of Cells (GMC) and considering the failure and the damage of constituent materials was created based on the ABAQUS and its user subroutine (USDFLD). A three-dimensional finite element technique was used for the stress analysis. Based on the three-dimensional state of stress of each element, different failure modes were detected by the failure theories of constituent materials, all of which are applied at the fiber, matrix and fiber-matrix interface constituent level. Numerical simulations have been carried out by which edge distance-to-hole diameter ratio, and plate width-to-hole diameter ratio are varied, The composite laminated plates are stacked with the following four different orientations: [+45/-45]2s, [90/+45/-45]s, and [0/90/0]s, the results show that failure mode and bearing strength are closely related to by stacking sequence of plates and geometrical parameters. Finally, the ultimate strength and failure modes of composite bolted joints in static tension double-shear loading conditions are predicted by using the progressive damage method established and the effects of layup and dimension of laminates on the properties of the connection structure were researched in this paper. An excellent agreement is found between data obtained from this study and the experiment.

  15. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  16. Technology Assessment of Advanced Composites. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    producing basic aluminum (and other metals) , and producing resins , fibers, composite tapes, cloth, etc. would therefore impact labor markets; (c...POLYESTER) -BMC (POLYESTERJ -PHENOLICS (VARIOUS) -DIALLYL PHTHALATE - MELAMINE -OTHER EPOXIES - POLYIMIDES -ACETAL -NYLON (AND OTHER AMIDES... Resin system THERMOSETS SMC (Polyester) BMC (Polyester) Phenolic Diallyl phthalate Melanine THERMOPLASTICS Acstal Nylon Polycarbonate

  17. Micromechanical Analysis of Inelastic Deformation of Unidirectional Fibrous Composites under Multiaxial and Shear Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoshkin, A. N.

    2003-09-01

    An algorithm is proposed for numerically solving nonlinear 3D problems of micromechanics of a unidirectionally reinforced composite with a regular structure. For the matrix, equations of the deformation theory of plasticity and relations of reduced rigidity in its failure zones are used, whereas the fibers are elastic and indestructible. According to the method of local approximation, fields of microstresses and microstrains are determined in a structural fragment containing nine periodic cells. Boundary conditions of the fragment correspond to an arbitrary combination of longitudinal, transverse, and shear microstresses occurring in the central part of the fragment. The solution to the nonlinear 3D problem is sought by the method of superposition with an iterational refinement based on the successive solution of an antiplane problem and a problem on a generalized plain strain state of the structural segment. Special features of the iteration procedure are considered. The calculated deformation diagrams and ultimate strengths of a unidirectional glass-epoxy composite are presented for several loading trajectories.

  18. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  19. Determination of the Shear Buckling Load of a Large Polymer Composite I-Section Using Strain and Displacement Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Y.; Lee, Jeong Wan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method and procedure of sensing and determining critical shear buckling load and corresponding deformations of a comparably large composite I-section using strain rosettes and displacement sensors. The tested specimen was a pultruded composite beam made of vinyl ester resin, E-glass and carbon fibers. Various coupon tests were performed before the shear buckling test to obtain fundamental material properties of the I-section. In order to sensitively detect shear buckling of the tested I-section, twenty strain rosettes and eight displacement sensors were applied and attached on the web and flange surfaces. An asymmetric four-point bending loading scheme was utilized for the test. The loading scheme resulted a high shear and almost zero moment condition at the center of the web panel. The web shear buckling load was determined after analyzing the obtained test data from strain rosettes and displacement sensors. Finite element analysis was also performed to verify the experimental results and to support the discussed experimental approach. PMID:23443364

  20. Mechanically fastened composite laminates subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1993-01-01

    Bolts and rivets provide a means of load transfer in the construction of aircraft. However, they give rise to stress concentrations and are often the source and location of static and fatigue failures. Furthermore, fastener holes are prone to cracks during take-off and landing. These cracks present the most common origin of structural failures in aircraft. Therefore, accurate determination of the contact stresses associated with such loaded holes in mechanically fastened joints is essential to reliable strength evaluation and failure prediction. As the laminate is subjected to loading, the contact region, whose extent is not known, develops between the fastener and the hole boundary through this contact region, which consists of slip and no-slip zones due to friction. The presence of the unknown contact stress distribution over the contact region between the pin and the composite laminate, material anisotropy, friction between the pin and the laminate, pin-hole clearance, combined bearing-bypass and shear loading, and finite geometry of the laminate result in a complex non-linear problem. In the case of bearing-bypass loading in compression, this non-linear problem is further complicated by the presence of dual contact regions. Previous research concerning the analysis of mechanical joints subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading is non-existent. In the case of bearing-bypass loading only, except for the study conducted by Naik and Crews (1991), others employed the concept of superposition which is not valid for this non-linear problem. Naik and Crews applied a linear finite element analysis with conditions along the pin-hole contact region specified as displacement constraint equations. The major shortcoming of this method is that the variation of the contract region as a function of the applied load should be known a priori. Also, their analysis is limited to symmetric geometry and material systems, and frictionless boundary conditions. Since the

  1. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined.

  2. Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems (CASTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the in-house and contract work accomplished under the CASTS Project. In July 1975 the CASTS Project was initiated to develop graphite fiber/polyimide matrix (GR/PI) composite structures with 589K (600 F) operational capability for application to aerospace vehicles. Major tasks include: (1) screening composites and adhesives, (2) developing fabrication procedures and specifications, (3) developing design allowables test methods and data, and (4) design and test of structural elements and construction of an aft body flap for the Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle which will be ground tested. Portions of the information are from ongoing research and must be considered preliminary. The CASTS Project is scheduled to be completed in September 1983.

  3. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  4. JTEC panel report on advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.; Grisaffe, S. J.; Hillig, W. B.; Perepezko, J. H.; Pipes, R. B.; Sheehan, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites visited Japan and surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic and carbon matrices. The panel's interests included not only what composite systems were chosen, but also how these systems were developed. A strong carbon and fiber industry makes Japan the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation resistant carbon/carbon composite program. The goals for this program are ambitious, and it is just starting, but its progress should be closely monitored in the United States.

  5. Effects of polymerization method on flexural and shear bond strengths of a fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Hiroaki; Tanoue, Naomi; Minesaki, Yoshito; Kamasaki, Yoko; Fujiwara, Taku; Minami, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-31

    This study investigated the effects of indirect composite polymerization on the postcuring mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced composite. An indirect composite seated on glass fibers preimpregnated with polymerized monomer was polymerized by 1) photoirradiation using a halogen-fluorescent polymerizing unit for 5 min, 2) method 1 plus secondary heating at 100°C for 15 min, 3) photoirradiation using a metal halide light unit for 60 s, or 4) preliminary polymerization using a halogen light unit for 20 s followed by method 3. After polymerization, the flexural and shear bond strengths of the fiber-reinforced composite were examined, as was the flexural strength of non-fiber-reinforced composite specimens polymerized using the same methods. Among non-fiber-reinforced composite specimens, flexural strength was lower for method 1 than for the other three methods; however, among fiberreinforced composite specimens, the four methods did not significantly differ in flexural strength or shear bond strength. Composite-fiber interface separation without breakage of the fiber after flexural strength testing was not observed in specimens polymerized by methods 2 or 4. In conclusion, use of a conventional unit for high-intensity light irradiation after preliminary irradiation, or light irradiation followed by secondary heating, is recommended for polymerization of composite material seated on polymerized glass fiber.

  6. Investigation of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins for utilization in vibration assisted liquid composite molding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Kirdar, C.; Rudolph, N.; Zaremba, S.; Drechsler, K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient production and consumption of energy are of greatest importance for contemporary industries and their products. This has led to an increasing application of lightweight materials in general and of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) in particular. However, broader application of CFRP is often limited by high costs and manual labor production processes. These constraints are addressed by Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. In LCM a dry fibrous preform is placed into a cavity and infiltrated mostly by thermoset resins; epoxy resins are wide spread in CFRP applications. One crucial parameter for a fast mold filling is the viscosity of the resin, which is affected by the applied shear rates as well as temperature and curing time. The work presented focuses on the characterization of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins. Furthermore, the correlation with the conditions in vibration assisted LCM processes, where additional shear rates are created during manufacture, is discussed. Higher shear rates result from high frequencies and/or high amplitudes of the vibration motions which are created by a vibration engine mounted on the mold. In rheological investigations the shear thinning behavior of a representative epoxy resin is studied by means of rotational and oscillatory experiments. Moreover, possible effects of shear rates on the chemical curing reaction are studied. Here, the time for gelation is measured for different levels of shear rates in a pre-shearing phase. Based on the rheological studies, the beneficial effect of vibration assistance in LCM processes with respect to mold filling can further be predicted and utilized.

  7. An evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin, using newer dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Mithra N; Bhandary, Shruti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the shear bond strength of Total etch Prime and Bond NT and self etch newer dentin bonding agents Clearfil S3, Xeno III Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond and G Bond used to bond composite resin to dentin, and to compare the difference in the shear bond strengths of the self etch newer dentin bonding agents. Hundred freshly extracted noncarious human maxillary premolar teeth were selected. The occlusal surfaces of each tooth were ground to prepare flat dentin surfaces at a depth of 1.5 mm and were randomly grouped, with twenty specimens in each: Group I - Prime and Bond NT, Group II - Clearfil Protect Bond, Group III - Xeno III Bond, Group IV - Clearfil S3 Bond, Group V - G Bond. Each group was treated with its respective bonding agents, as per the manufacturers' instructions Clearfill – Kuraray, Japan, G bond – GC Tokyo, Japan, Xeno- De Trey Densply, Germany. Blocks or Cylinders of composite resin were built up using Teflon mold and cured. Shear bond strengths were tested using Instron Universal testing machine and recorded in Mpa. The results were statistically analyzed using One-way anova and Tukeys HSD test. The total etch adhesive showed higher shear bond strength than self etching adhesives (P < 0.001). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that all the adhesive agents evaluated showed optimal shear bond strength 17-20 Mpa, except G bond. However, shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin is better with one bottle total etch adhesive than with the newer self etching bonding agents. PMID:20142888

  8. Effect of various intraoral repair systems on the shear bond strength of composite resin to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Han, In-Hae; Kang, Dong-Wan; Chung, Chae-Heon; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study compared the effect of three intraoral repair systems on the bond strength between composite resin and zirconia core. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty zirconia specimens were divided into three groups according to the repair method: Group I- CoJet™ Repair System (3M ESPE) [chairside silica coating with 30 µm SiO2 + silanization + adhesive]; Group II- Ceramic Repair System (Ivoclar Vivadent) [etching with 37% phosphoric acid + Zirconia primer + adhesive]; Group III- Signum Zirconia Bond (Heraus) [Signum Zirconia Bond I + Signum Zirconia Bond II]. Composite resin was polymerized on each conditioned specimen. The shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine, and fracture sites were examined with FE-SEM. Surface morphology and wettability after surface treatments were examined additionally. The data of bond strengths were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tamhane post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Increased surface roughness and the highest wettability value were observed in the CoJet sand treated specimens. The specimens treated with 37% phosphoric acid and Signum Zirconia Bond I did not show any improvement of surface irregularity, and the lowest wettability value were found in 37% phosphoric acid treated specimens. There was no significant difference in the bond strengths between Group I (7.80 ± 0.76 MPa) and III (8.98 ± 1.39 MPa). Group II (3.21 ± 0.78 MPa) showed a significant difference from other groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION The use of Intraoral silica coating system and the application of Signum Zirconia Bond are effective for increasing the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia. PMID:24049565

  9. Advanced composite vertical fin for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    The structural box of the L-1011 vertical fin was redesigned using advanced composite materials. The box was fabricated and ground tested to verify the structural integrity. This report summarizes the complete program starting with the design and analysis and proceeds through the process development ancillary test program production readiness verification testing, fabrication of the full-scale fin boxes and the full-scale ground testing. The program showed that advanced composites can economically and effectively be used in the design and fabrication of medium primary structures for commercial aircraft. Static-strength variability was demonstrated to be comparable to metal structures and the long term durability of advanced composite components was demonstrated.

  10. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Lekic, V.; Thomas, C.; Schumacher, L.; Ito, G.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography reveals two antipodal LLSVPs in the Earth's mantle, each extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) up to ~1000 km depth. The LLSVPs are thought to host primitive mantle materials that bear witness of early-Earth processes, and/or subducted basalt that has cumulated in the mantle over billions of years. A compositional distinction between the LLSVPs and the ambient mantle is supported by anti-correlation of bulk-sound and shear-wave velocity (Vs) anomalies as well as abrupt lateralgradients in Vs along LLSVP margins. Both of these observations, however, are mainly restricted to the LLSVP bottom domains (2300~2900 km depth). Comparison of seismic observations with mineral-physics data suggests that these bottom domains are more likely to be composed of primitive mantle than of basaltic material. On the other hand, the seismic signature of the LLSVP shallow domains (1000~2300 km depth) is consistent with a basaltic composition, though a purely thermal origin cannot be ruled out. Here, we explore the dynamical, seismological, and geochemical implications of the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally layered with a primitive bottom domain and a basaltic shallow domain (see Fig.). We test this hypothesis using 2D thermochemical mantle-convection models. Depending on the density difference between primitive and basaltic materials, the materials either mix or remain separate as they join to form thermochemical piles in the deep mantle. Separation of both materials within the piles provides an explanation for LLSVP seismic properties, including substantial internal vertical gradients in Vs observed at 400-700 km height above the CMB. Geodynamic models predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from the roofs of these compositionally layered piles while entraining basaltic material that has evolved in the lower mantle. Long-lived "primary" plumes rise from LLSVP margins and entrain a mix of materials, including small fractions of

  11. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim; Lekic, Vedran; Schumacher, Lina; Ito, Garrett; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography reveals two antipodal LLSVPs in the Earth's mantle, each extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) up to ~1000 km depth. The LLSVPs are thought to host primordial mantle materials that bear witness of early-Earth processes, and/or subducted basalt that has accumulated in the mantle over billions of years. A compositional distinction between the LLSVPs and the ambient mantle is supported by anti-correlation of bulk-sound and shear-wave velocity (Vs) anomalies as well as abrupt lateral gradients in Vs along LLSVP margins. Both of these observations, however, are mainly restricted to the LLSVP bottom domains (2300~2900 km depth), or hereinafter referred to as "deep distinct domains" (DDD). Seismic sensitivity calculations suggest that DDDs are more likely to be composed of primordial mantle material than of basaltic material. On the other hand, the seismic signature of LLSVP shallow domains (1000~2300 km depth) is consistent with a basaltic composition, though a purely thermal origin cannot be ruled out. Here, we explore the dynamical, seismological, and geochemical implications of the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally layered with a primordial bottom domain (or DDD) and a basaltic shallow domain. We test this hypothesis using 2D thermochemical mantle-convection models. Depending on the density difference between primordial and basaltic materials, the materials either mix or remain separate as they join to form thermochemical piles in the deep mantle. Separation of both materials within these piles provides an explanation for LLSVP seismic properties, including substantial internal vertical gradients in Vs observed at 400-700 km height above the CMB, as well as out-of-plane reflections on LLSVP sides over a range of depths. Predicted geometry of thermochemical piles is compared to LLSVP and DDD shapes as constrained by seismic cluster analysis. Geodynamic models predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from LLSVP roofs and

  12. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  13. Advances in very lightweight composite mirror technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Bowers, Charles W.; Content, David A.; Marzouk, Marzouk; Romeo, Robert C.

    2000-09-01

    We report progress in the development of very lightweight (< 5 kg/m2) mirrors made by replication using graphite fiber cyanate ester resin composites. The replication process is optimized to significantly improve the surface smoothness and figure quality. Achievements include near- diffraction-limited optical performance [< 1/20 wave root mean square (rms) at 632.8 nm] in replica flats, fractional wave rms performance in curved mirrors at 90% pupil, and almost exact reproduction of the surface microroughness of the mandrel. The curved mirrors typically show some edge roll off and several waves (rms optical) of astigmatism, coma, and third-order spherical aberration. These are indications of thermal contraction in an inhomogeneous medium. This inhomogeneity is due to a systematic radial variation in density and fiber/resin ratio induced in composite plies when draped around a small and highly curved mandrel. The figure accuracy is expected to improve with larger size optics and in mirrors with longer radii of curvature. Nevertheless, the present accuracy figure is sufficient for using postfiguring techniques such as ion milling to achieve diffraction-limited performances at optical and UV wavelengths. We demonstrate active figure control using a simple apparatus of low-mass, low-force actuators to correct astigmatism. The optimized replication technique is applied to the fabrication of a 0.6-m-diam mirror with an areal density of 3.2 kg/m2. Our result demonstrates that the very lightweight, large-aperture construction used in radio telescopes can now be applied to optical telescopes.

  14. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  15. Vibration and damping of laminated, composite-material plates including thickness-shear effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bert, C. W.; Siu, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical investigation of sinusoidally forced vibration of laminated, anisotropic plates including bending-stretching coupling, thickness-shear flexibility, all three types of inertia effects, and material damping is presented. In the analysis the effects of thickness-shear deformation are considered by the use of a shear correction factor K, analogous to that used by Mindlin for homogeneous plates. Two entirely different approaches for calculating the thickness-shear factor for a laminate are presented. Numerical examples indicate that the value of K depends on the layer properties and the stacking sequence of the laminate.

  16. Stiffening of short small-size circular composite steel–concrete columns with shear connectors

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Sherif M.; Ramadan, Hazem M.; Mourad, Sherif A.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the effect of shear connectors’ distribution and method of load application on load–displacement relationship and behavior of thin-walled short concrete-filled steel tube (CFT) columns when subjected to axial load. The study focused on the compressive strength of the CFT columns and the efficiency of the shear stud in distribution of the load between the concrete core and steel tube. The study showed that the use of shear connectors enhanced slightly the axial capacity of CFT columns. It is also shown that shear connectors have a great effect on load distribution between the concrete and steel tubes. PMID:27222757

  17. Pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in debris flows of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly; Dietrich, William

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are mixtures of sediment and water that can have a wide range of different grain size distributions and water contents. The composition of the material is expected to have a strong effect on the development of pore fluid pressures in excess to hydrostatic, which in turn might affect the internal deformation behavior. We present a set of large scale experiments with debris flow mixtures of different compositions in a 4-m diameter rotating drum. Longitudinal profiles of basal fluid pressure and normal stress were measured and a probe to determine fluid pressure at different depths within the flow was developed and tested. Additionally we determined vertical profiles of mean particle velocities in the flow interior by measuring small variations of conductivity of the passing material and calculating the time lag between signals from two independent measurements at a small, known distance apart. Mean values of basal pore fluid pressure range from hydrostatic pressure for gravel-water flows to nearly complete liquefaction for muddy mixtures having a wide grain size distribution. The data indicate that the presence of fines dampens fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress and concentrates shear at the base. The mobility of grain-fluid flows is strongly enhanced by a combination of fines in suspension as part of the interstitial fluid and a wide grain size distribution. Excess fluid pressure may arise from fluid displacement by converging grains at the front of the flow and the slow settling of grains through a highly viscous non-Newtonian fluid. Our findings support the need for pore pressure evolution and diffusion equations in debris flow models as they depend on particle size distributions. This study contributes to the understanding of the production of excess fluid pressure in grain fluid mixtures and may guide the development of constitutive models that describe natural events.

  18. A study on the compatibility between one-bottle dentin adhesives and composite resins using micro-shear bond strength

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to determine whether the combined use of one-bottle self-etch adhesives and composite resins from same manufacturers have better bond strengths than combinations of adhesive and resins from different manufacturers. Materials and Methods 25 experimental micro-shear bond test groups were made from combinations of five dentin adhesives and five composite resins with extracted human molars stored in saline for 24 hr. Testing was performed using the wire-loop method and a universal testing machine. Bond strength data was statistically analyzed using two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test. Results Two way ANOVA revealed significant differences for the factors of dentin adhesives and composite resins, and significant interaction effect (p < 0.001). All combinations with Xeno V (Dentsply De Trey) and Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray Dental) adhesives showed no significant differences in micro-shear bond strength, but other adhesives showed significant differences depending on the composite resin (p < 0.05). Contrary to the other adhesives, Xeno V and BondForce (Tokuyama Dental) had higher bond strengths with the same manufacturer's composite resin than other manufacturer's composite resin. Conclusions Not all combinations of adhesive and composite resin by same manufacturers failed to show significantly higher bond strengths than mixed manufacturer combinations. PMID:25671210

  19. Effect of mesh distortion on the accuracy of transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Yong H.

    1995-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of mesh distortion on the accuracy of transverse shear stresses and their first-order and second-order sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composite panels subjected to mechanical and thermal loads. The panels are discretized by using a two-field degenerate solid element, with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both displacement and strain components, and the displacement components having a linear variation throughout the thickness of the laminate. A two-step computational procedure is used for evaluating the transverse shear stresses. In the first step, the in-plane stresses in the different layers are calculated at the numerical quadrature points for each element. In the second step, the transverse shear stresses are evaluated by using piecewise integration, in the thickness direction, of the three-dimensional equilibrium equations. The same procedure is used for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of transverse shear stresses. Numerical results are presented showing no noticeable degradation in the accuracy of the in-plane stresses and their sensitivity coefficients with mesh distortion. However, such degradation is observed for the transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients. The standard of comparison is taken to be the exact solution of the three-dimensional thermoelasticity equations of the panel.

  20. Effect of oil type and fatty acid composition on dynamic and steady shear rheology of vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Hasan; Toker, Omer Said; Dogan, Mahmut

    2012-01-01

    In this study, effect of fatty acid composition on dynamic and steady shear rheology of oils was studied. For this aim, different types of vegetable oils (soybean, sunflower, olive, hazelnut, cottonseed and canola), were used. Rheological properties of oil samples were identified by rheometer (Thermo-Haake) at 25°C and fatty acid composition of oils was determined by GC (Agilent 6890). Steady shear rheological properties of oil samples were measured at shear rate range of 0.1-100 s⁻¹. Viscosity of olive, hazelnut, cottonseed, canola, soybean and sunflower was 61.2 mPa.s, 59.7 mPa.s, 57.3 mPa.s, 53.5 mPa.s, 48.7 mPa.s and 48.2 mPa.s, respectively. There was a significant difference between viscosity of oils except soybean and sunflower. As a result it was seen that there was a correlation between viscosity and monounsaturated (R=0.89), polyunsaturated (R=-0.97) fatty acid composition of oils, separately. Equation was found to predict viscosity of the oils based on mono and polyunsaturation composition of oils. In addition the dynamic rheological properties of oils were also examined. G', G'' and tan δ (G''/G') values were measured at 0.3 Pa (in viscoelastic region) and 0.1-1 Hz. As a result of multiple regression analysis another equations were found between tan δ, viscosity and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  1. Creep Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of a SiC/SiC Ceramic Composite with a Self-healing Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.; Pope, M. T.

    2014-02-01

    Creep behavior in interlaminar shear of a non-oxide ceramic composite with a multilayered matrix was investigated at 1,200 °C in laboratory air and in steam environment. The composite was produced via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The composite had an oxidation inhibited matrix, which consisted of alternating layers of silicon carbide and boron carbide and was reinforced with laminated Hi-Nicalon™ fibers woven in a five-harness-satin weave. Fiber preforms had pyrolytic carbon fiber coating with boron carbide overlay applied. The interlaminar shear properties were measured. The creep behavior was examined for interlaminar shear stresses in the 16-22 MPa range. Primary and secondary creep regimes were observed in all tests conducted in air and in steam. In air and in steam, creep run-out defined as 100 h at creep stress was achieved at 16 MPa. Larger creep strains were accumulated in steam. However, creep strain rates and creep lifetimes were only moderately affected by the presence of steam. The retained properties of all specimens that achieved run-out were characterized. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  2. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  3. Effect of three different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Subramonian, Rajalekshmy; Mathai, Vijay; Christaine Angelo, Jeya Balaji Mano; Ravi, Jotish

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effect of 10% sodium ascorbate, 10% grape seed extract, and 10% pine bark extract on the shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Ninety recently extracted human premolars were divided into six groups of 15 teeth each. Except Group I (negative control), the labial enamel surface of all specimens in the other groups were bleached with 37.5% hydrogen peroxide. After bleaching, Group II specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 3weeks before composite bonding. Immediately following bleaching; Groups III, IV, and V specimens were treated with antioxidants 10% sodium ascorbate, 10% grape seed extract, and 10% pine bark extract, respectively, for 10 min and bonded with composite resin. In Group VI (positive control), the composite bonding was done immediately after bleaching. All specimens were stored in deionized water for 24 h at 37΀C before shear bond strength testing. The data obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test. Results: The unbleached teeth showed the highest shear bond strength followed by the bleached teeth treated with the antioxidant 10% pine bark extract. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it was observed that the use of antioxidants effectively reversed the compromised bond strength of bleached enamel. Among the antioxidants, 10% pine bark extract application after bleaching showed better bond strength. PMID:25829695

  4. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  5. Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, volume 1, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference. The ACT Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. Papers sponsored by the Department of Defense on the Design and Manufacturing of Low Cost Composites (DMLCC) are also included in Volume 2 of this document.

  6. A Multi-scale Refined Zigzag Theory for Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Plates with Improved Transverse Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iurlaro, Luigi; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) enables accurate predictions of the in-plane displacements, strains, and stresses. The transverse shear stresses obtained from constitutive equations are layer-wise constant. Although these transverse shear stresses are generally accurate in the average, layer-wise sense, they are nevertheless discontinuous at layer interfaces, and thus they violate the requisite interlaminar continuity of transverse stresses. Recently, Tessler applied Reissner's mixed variational theorem and RZT kinematic assumptions to derive an accurate and efficient shear-deformation theory for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich beams, called RZT(m), where "m" stands for "mixed". Herein, the RZT(m) for beams is extended to plate analysis, where two alternative assumptions for the transverse shear stresses field are examined: the first follows Tessler's formulation, whereas the second is based on Murakami's polynomial approach. Results for elasto-static simply supported and cantilever plates demonstrate that Tessler's formulation results in a powerful and efficient structural theory that is well-suited for the analysis of multilayered composite and sandwich panels.

  7. Research priorities and history of advanced composite compression testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Priorities for standard compression testing research in advanced laminated fibrous composite materials are presented along with a state of the art survey (completed in 1979) including history and commentary on industrial test methods. Historically apparent research priorities and consequent (lack of) progress are supporting evidence for newly derived priorities.

  8. Deformation measurements of composite multi-span beam shear specimens by Moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Joh, D.; Wood, J.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental analyses were performed for determination of in plane deformations and shear strains in unidirectional and quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy beams. Forty-eight ply beams were subjected to 5 point and 3 point flexure. Whole field measurements were recorded at load levels from about 20% to more than 90% of failure loads. Contour maps of U and W displacement fields were obtained by moire interferometry, using reference gratings of 2400 lines/mm. Clearly defined fringes with fringe orders exceeding 1000 were obtained. Whole field contour maps of shear strains were obtained by a method developed for these tests. Various anomalous effects were detected in the displacement fields. Their analysis indicated excess shear strains in resin rich zones in regions of shear tractions; free edge shear strains in quasi-isotropic specimens in regions of normal stresses; and shear stresses associated with cyclic shear compliances of quasi-isotropic plies in regions of shear tractions. Their contributions could occur independently or in superposition. Qualitative analyses addressed questions of relaxation; influence of contact stress distribution; specimen failure; effect of specimen overhang; nonlinearity; and qualities of 5 and 3 point flexure tests.

  9. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA'S Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several aluminum and copper based Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The presentation's goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's planned and on-going activities in MMC for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike and X-34 Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's reusable launch vehicle systems and space access vehicles. Advanced MMC processing techniques such as plasma spray, centrifugal casting, pressure infiltration casting will be discussed. Development of a novel 3D printing method for low cost production of composite preform, and functional gradient MMC to enhanced rocket engine's dimensional stability will be presented.

  10. Development of advanced ceramic matrix composite insulators for electromagnetic railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, R.D.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Washburn, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Stiff, erosion resistant insulator materials are currently needed as bore insulators for electromagnetic railguns. In this paper a status review is given of an ongoing program to develop stiff erosion resistant ceramic composite materials capable of withstanding the severe mechanical, electrical and thermal environment that exists in the bore of such devices. Analytical predictions were made in order to establish property goals. A wide variety of advanced ceramic composite insulator panels have been fabricated and tested. A railgun was modified to serve as a test device for evaluating the new insulator materials. Work has been initiated to scale up the fabrication of selected advanced ceramic composite insulator parts to be tested in full-size railguns.

  11. Mishap risk control for advanced aerospace/composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Although advanced aerospace materials and advanced composites provide outstanding performance, they also present several unique post-mishap environmental, safety, and health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on some of the unique hazards and concerns associated with these materials when damaged by fire, explosion, or high-energy impact. Additionally, recommended procedures and precautions are addressed as they pertain to all phases of a composite aircraft mishap response, including fire-fighting, investigation, recovery, clean-up, and guidelines are general in nature and not application-specific. The goal of this project is to provide factual and realistic information which can be used to develop consistent and effective procedures and policies to minimize the potential environmental, safety, and health impacts of a composite aircraft mishap response effort.

  12. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  13. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (< 1 mm) structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  14. Effect of low-velocity or ballistic impact damage on the strength of thin composite and aluminum shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Impact tests were conducted on shear panels fabricated from 6061-T6 aluminum and from woven fabric prepreg of Du Pont Kevlara fiber/epoxy resin and graphite fiber/epoxy resin. The shear panels consisted of three different composite laminates and one aluminum material configuration. Three panel aspect ratios were evaluated for each material configuration. Composite panels were impacted with a 1.27-cm (0.05-in) diameter aluminum sphere at low velocities of 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) and 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec). Ballistic impact conditions consisted of a tumbled 0.50-caliber projectile impacting loaded composite and aluminum shear panels. The results of these tests indicate that ballistic threshold load (the lowest load which will result in immediate failure upon penetration by the projectile) varied between 0.44 and 0.61 of the average failure load of undamaged panels. The residual strengths of the panels after ballistic impact varied between 0.55 and 0.75 of the average failure strength of the undamaged panels. The low velocity impacts at 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec) caused a 15 to 20 percent reduction in strength, whereas the impacts at 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) resulted in negligible strength loss. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental failure strengths and the predicted strength with the point stress failure criterion.

  15. Vibration Behavior of Composite Beams with Rectangular Sections Considering the Different Shear Correction Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Vebil

    As is well known, there are the first and higher order shear deformation theories that involve the shear correction factor (k- factor), which appears as a coefficient in the expression for the transverse shear stress resultant, to consider the shear deformation effects with a good approximation as a result of non-uniform distribution of the shear stresses over the cross-section of the beam. Timoshenko's beam theory (TBT) accounts both the shear and rotatory inertia effects based upon the first order shear deformation theory which offers the simple and acceptable solutions. The numerical value of the k-factor which was originally proposed by Timoshenko depends upon generally both the Poisson's ratio of the material and the shape of the cross-section. Recently, especially the numerical value of the k-factor for rectangular sections is examined by both theoretical and experimental manners. Although there are no large numerical differences among the most of the theories, a few of them says that the k-factor varies obviously with the aspect ratio of rectangular sections while Timoshenko's k-factor is applicable for small aspect ratios. In this study, the effect of the different k-factors developed by Timoshenko, Cowper and Hutchinson on the in-plane free vibration of the orthotropic beams with different boundary conditions and different aspect ratios are studied numerically based on the transfer matrix method. For the first six frequencies, the relative differences of among the theories are presented by charts.

  16. Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite and Resin-modified Glass Ionomer to Two Pulp Capping Materials

    PubMed Central

    Doozaneh, Maryam; Koohpeima, Fatemeh; Firouzmandi, Maryam; Abbassiyan, Forugh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable composite (SAFC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: A total of 72 acrylic blocks with a central hole (4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth) were prepared. The holes were filled with MTA (sub group A) and CEM cement. The specimens of both restorative materials were divided into 6 groups; overall there were 12 groups. In groups 1 and 4, SAFC was used without bonding while in groups 2 and 5 SAFC was used with bonding agent. In all these groups the material was placed into the plastic mold and light cured. In groups 3 and 6, after surface conditioning with poly acrylic acid and rinsing, RMGI was placed into the mold and photo polymerized. After 24 h, the shear bond strength values were measured and fracture patterns were examined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and student’s t-test. Results: The use of bonding agent significantly increased the shear bond strength of FC to MTA and CEM cement (P=0.008 and 0.00, respectively). In both materials, RMGI had the lowest shear bond strength values (2.25 Mpa in MTA and 1.32 Mpa in CEM). The mean shear bond strength were significantly higher in MTA specimen than CEM cement (P=0.003). There was a significant differences between fracture patterns among groups (P=0.001). Most failures were adhesive/mix in MTA specimen but in CEM cement groups the cohesive failures were observed in most of the samples. Conclusion: The bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite resin to MTA and CEM cement was higher than RMGI which was improved after the additional application of adhesive. PMID:28179935

  17. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms and Residual Stresses in Graphite/Polyimide Composites Subjected to Shear Dominated Biaxial Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Predecki, P. K.; Armentrout, D.; Benedikt, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Gentz, M.; Kumosa, L.; Sutter, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This research contributes to the understanding of macro- and micro-failure mechanisms in woven fabric polyimide matrix composites based on medium and high modulus graphite fibers tested under biaxial, shear dominated stress conditions over a temperature range of -50 C to 315 C. The goal of this research is also to provide a testing methodology for determining residual stress distributions in unidirectional, cross/ply and fabric graphite/polyimide composites using the concept of embedded metallic inclusions and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements.

  18. High Interlaminar Shear Strength Enhancement of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite through Fiber- and Matrix-Anchored Carbon Nanotube Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Raman Pillai, Suresh Kumar; Che, Jianfei; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2017-03-15

    To improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite, networks of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were grown on micron-sized carbon fibers and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed into the epoxy matrix so that these two types of carbon nanotubes entangle at the carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy matrix interface. The MWNTs on the CF fiber (CF-MWNTs) were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were finely dispersed in the epoxy matrix precursor with the aid of a dispersing agent polyimide-graft-bisphenol A diglyceryl acrylate (PI-BDA) copolymer. Using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, the SWNT-laden epoxy matrix precursor was forced into intimate contact with the "hairy" surface of the CF-MWNT fiber. The tube density and the average tube length of the MWNT layer on CF was controlled by the CVD growth time. The ILSS of the CF-MWNT/epoxy resin composite was examined using the short beam shear test. With addition of MWNTs onto the CF surface as well as SWNTs into the epoxy matrix, the ILSS of CF/epoxy resin composite was 47.59 ± 2.26 MPa, which represented a ∼103% increase compared with the composite made with pristine CF and pristine epoxy matrix (without any SWNT filler). FESEM established that the enhanced composite did not fail at the CF/epoxy matrix interface.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of the oxygen-inhibited layer on shear bond strength of two resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Ankur; Rao, Y Madhukar; Joshua, Martha; Narayanan, L. Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The rising demand for aesthetic adhesive restorations has led to the wide use of composites. Multilayer techniques are recommended for the success of these restorations. However, this technique of layering causes the problem of interlayer adhesion, thus supporting the influence of the oxygen-inhibited layer. This study sought to test the hypothesis that the oxygen-inhibited layer increases the shear bond strength of composite resin by allowing the resins on both sides to cross the interface and form an interdiffusion zone. Materials and Methods: A microhybrid composite resin, Charisma, and a nanofill composite resin, Solare, were used in this study. Cylindrical specimens of the composites of 5 mm diameter and 6 mm height were prepared and embedded in acrylic resin moulds after curing. Curing was done in an argon atmosphere to prevent the formation of the oxygen-inhibited layer. To clinically simulate an inert atmosphere, a cellophane matrix strip was used during the process of curing. Results: Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested using a universal testing machine and the results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. PMID:20351974

  20. The effect of bilayer composition on calcium ion transport facilitated by fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, T D; Yek, S H

    1995-10-04

    Passive calcium ion permeability across liposome bilayers is increased during exposure to fluid shear forces attainable in the mammalian vasculature. In this study, liposomes prepared from three different lipid mixtures (phosphatidylcholine alone; phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol; a mixture of anionic and cationic phospholipids plus cholesterol) are exposed to uniform shear stress in a rotational viscometer. Liposome permeability to calcium ion is estimated from continuous measurement of free intraliposome calcium ion concentration using a fluorescence technique. Calcium ion permeability in the absence of fluid force and susceptibility to shear-induced permeability modulation are positively correlated with estimated bilayer compressibility. Fluid shear forces are presumed to influence bilayer packing and modulate defect formation in proportion to bilayer compressibility. Bilayer defects produced by fluid forces may increase liposome permeability.

  1. The Effect of Shear Mixing Speed and Time on the Mechanical Properties of GNP/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullicino, Edward; Zou, Wentao; Gresil, Matthieu; Soutis, Costas

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of shear mixing speed and time on the mechanical properties of graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) composites. Shear mixing is cited in the literature as one method of making a good dispersion of nanofillers in a polymer that breaks down agglomerates into smaller particles and in the case of GNP can exfoliate layers of graphene. In this paper 0.1 to 5 wt% GNP was mixed with epoxy at different speeds and for different lengths of time. The composites were then cured and the tensile strength and Young's modulus was measured. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the dispersion of the GNP in the epoxy. The results show that the shear mixing speed and time affect the size of agglomerates, which has an impact on the mechanical properties of the composite. At 3000 rpm and 2 h of mixing the average size of agglomerate was 26.3 μm (30 % reduction compared to that of 1000 rpm and 1 h duration), the tensile strength of epoxy was not affected by the addition of GNP, while a 12 % increase was recorded for the Young's modulus. It is also found that functionalisation of the surface of the GNP improves the bond formed between the GNP and the resin that enhances its mechanical properties with no effect on the size of the agglomerates. Acetone was used to improve the GNP dispersion and found that shear mixing 5 wt% of GNP with acetone increases the Young's modulus up to 3.02 from 2.6 GPa for the neat epoxy, an almost 14 % rise.

  2. The Effect of Shear Mixing Speed and Time on the Mechanical Properties of GNP/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullicino, Edward; Zou, Wentao; Gresil, Matthieu; Soutis, Costas

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of shear mixing speed and time on the mechanical properties of graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) composites. Shear mixing is cited in the literature as one method of making a good dispersion of nanofillers in a polymer that breaks down agglomerates into smaller particles and in the case of GNP can exfoliate layers of graphene. In this paper 0.1 to 5 wt% GNP was mixed with epoxy at different speeds and for different lengths of time. The composites were then cured and the tensile strength and Young's modulus was measured. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the dispersion of the GNP in the epoxy. The results show that the shear mixing speed and time affect the size of agglomerates, which has an impact on the mechanical properties of the composite. At 3000 rpm and 2 h of mixing the average size of agglomerate was 26.3 μm (30 % reduction compared to that of 1000 rpm and 1 h duration), the tensile strength of epoxy was not affected by the addition of GNP, while a 12 % increase was recorded for the Young's modulus. It is also found that functionalisation of the surface of the GNP improves the bond formed between the GNP and the resin that enhances its mechanical properties with no effect on the size of the agglomerates. Acetone was used to improve the GNP dispersion and found that shear mixing 5 wt% of GNP with acetone increases the Young's modulus up to 3.02 from 2.6 GPa for the neat epoxy, an almost 14 % rise.

  3. Effect of Different Anti-Oxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resins to Bleached Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Saladi, Hari Krishna; Bollu, Indira Priyadarshini; Burla, Devipriya; Ballullaya, Srinidhi Vishnu; Devalla, Srihari; Maroli, Sohani; Jayaprakash, Thumu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The bond strength of the composite to the bleached enamel plays a very important role in the success and longevity of an aesthetic restoration. Aim The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the effect of Aloe Vera with 10% Sodium Ascorbate on the Shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached human enamel. Materials and Methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into 5 groups. Group I and V are unbleached and bleached controls groups respectively. Group II, III, IV served as experimental groups. The labial surfaces of groups II, III, IV, V were treated with 35% Carbamide Peroxide for 30mins. Group II specimens were subjected to delayed composite bonding. Group III and IV specimens were subjected to application of 10% Sodium Ascorbate and leaf extract of Aloe Vera following the Carbamide Peroxide bleaching respectively. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength using universal testing machine and the results were statistically analysed using ANOVA test. Tukey (HSD) Honest Significant Difference test was used to comparatively analyse statistical differences between the groups. A p-value <0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results The mean shear bond strength values of Group V showed significantly lower bond strengths than Groups I, II, III, IV (p-value <0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength values of groups I, II, III, IV. Conclusion Treatment of the bleached enamel surface with Aloe Vera and 10% Sodium Ascorbate provided consistently better bond strength. Aloe Vera may be used as an alternative to 10% Sodium Ascorbate. PMID:26674656

  4. Characterization and development of materials for advanced textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartness, J. Timothy; Greene, Timothy L.; Taske, Leo E.

    1993-01-01

    Work ongoing under the NASA Langley - Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program is discussed. The primary emphasis of the work centers around the development and characterization of graphite fiber that has been impregnated with an epoxy powder. Four epoxies have been characterized in towpreg form as to their weaveability and braidability. Initial mechanical properties have been generated on each resin system. These include unidirectional as well as 8-harness satin cloth. Initial 2D and 3D weaving and braiding trials will be reported on as well as initial efforts to develop towpreg suitable for advanced tow placement.

  5. In-Situ Investigation of Advanced Structural Coatings and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustundag, Ersan

    2003-01-01

    The premise of this project is a comprehensive study that involves the in-situ characterization of advanced coatings and composites by employing both neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques in a complementary manner. The diffraction data would then be interpreted and used in developing or validating advanced micromechanics models with life prediction capability. In the period covered by this report, basic work was conducted to establish the experimental conditions for various specimens and techniques. In addition, equipment was developed that will allow the in-situ studies under a range of conditions (stress, temperature, atmosphere, etc.).

  6. Methods and Compositions Based on Culturing Microorganisms in Low Sedimental Fluid Shear Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Wilson, James W.; Sarker, Shameema; Nauman, Eric A.; Schurr, Michael J.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of applying a low sedimental fluid shear environment to manipulate microorganisms were examined. Microorganisms obtained from a low sedimental fluid shear culture, which exhibit modified phenotypic and molecular genetic characteristics, are useful for the development of novel and improved diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines, and bio-industrial products. Furthermore, application of low sedimental fluid conditions to microorganisms permits identification of molecules uniquely expressed under these conditions, providing a basis for the design of new therapeutic targets.

  7. Micromechanical and in situ shear testing of Al–SiC nanolaminate composites in a transmission electron microscope (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Carl; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan Allan; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-11-07

    Nanolaminate composites show promise as high strength and toughness materials. Still, due to the limited volume of these materials, micron scale mechanical testing methods must be used to determine the properties of these films. To this end, a novel approach combining a double notch shear testing geometry and compression with a flat punch in a nanoindenter was developed to determine the mechanical properties of these films under shear loading. To further elucidate the failure mechanisms under shear loading, in situ TEM experiments were performed using a double notch geometry cut into the TEM foil. Aluminum layer thicknesses of 50nm and 100nm were used to show the effect of constraint on the deformation. Higher shear strength was observed in the 50 nm sample (690±54 MPa) compared to the 100 nm sample (423±28.7 MPa). Additionally, failure occurred along the Al-SiC interface in the 50 nm sample as opposed to failure within the Al layer in the 100 nm sample.

  8. Micromechanical and in situ shear testing of Al–SiC nanolaminate composites in a transmission electron microscope (TEM)

    DOE PAGES

    Mayer, Carl; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan Allan; ...

    2014-11-07

    Nanolaminate composites show promise as high strength and toughness materials. Still, due to the limited volume of these materials, micron scale mechanical testing methods must be used to determine the properties of these films. To this end, a novel approach combining a double notch shear testing geometry and compression with a flat punch in a nanoindenter was developed to determine the mechanical properties of these films under shear loading. To further elucidate the failure mechanisms under shear loading, in situ TEM experiments were performed using a double notch geometry cut into the TEM foil. Aluminum layer thicknesses of 50nm andmore » 100nm were used to show the effect of constraint on the deformation. Higher shear strength was observed in the 50 nm sample (690±54 MPa) compared to the 100 nm sample (423±28.7 MPa). Additionally, failure occurred along the Al-SiC interface in the 50 nm sample as opposed to failure within the Al layer in the 100 nm sample.« less

  9. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  10. CAD/CAM of braided preforms for advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gui; Pastore, Christopher; Tsai, Yung Jia; Soebroto, Heru; Ko, Frank

    A CAD/CAM system for braiding to produce preforms for advanced textile structural composites is presented in this paper. The CAD and CAM systems are illustrated in detail. The CAD system identifies the fiber placement and orientation needed to fabricate a braided structure over a mandrel, for subsequent composite formation. The CAM system uses the design parameters generated by the CAD system to control the braiding machine. Experimental evidence demonstrating the success of combining these two technologies to form a unified CAD/CAM system for the manufacture of braided fabric preforms with complex structural shapes is presented.

  11. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  12. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  13. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  14. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  15. Composite transport wing technology development: Design development tests and advanced structural concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; Harvill, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous design concepts, materials, and manufacturing methods were investigated for the covers and spars of a transport box wing. Cover panels and spar segments were fabricated and tested to verify the structural integrity of design concepts and fabrication techniques. Compression tests on stiffened panels demonstrated the ability of graphite/epoxy wing upper cover designs to achieve a 35 percent weight savings compared to the aluminum baseline. The impact damage tolerance of the designs and materials used for these panels limits the allowable compression strain and therefore the maximum achievable weight savings. Bending and shear tests on various spar designs verified an average weight savings of 37 percent compared to the aluminum baseline. Impact damage to spar webs did not significantly degrade structural performance. Predictions of spar web shear instability correlated well with measured performance. The structural integrity of spars manufactured by filament winding equalled or exceeded those fabricated by hand lay-up. The information obtained will be applied to the design, fabrication, and test of a full-scale section of a wing box. When completed, the tests on the technology integration box beam will demonstrate the structural integrity of an advanced composite wing design which is 25 percent lighter than the metal baseline.

  16. Ultrasonic shear velocities of MgSiO3-perovskite at high pressure and temperature and lower mantle composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sinelnikov,Y.; Chen, G.; Neuville, D.; Liebermann, R.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic interferometric measurements of the shear elastic properties of MgSiO{sub 3} perovskite were conducted on three polycrystalline specimens at conditions up to pressures of 8 gigapascals and temperatures of 800 kelvin. The acoustic measurements produced the pressure (P) and temperature (T) derivatives of the shear modulus (G), namely ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} = 1.8 {+-} 0.4 and ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} = 2.9 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup 2} gigapascals per kelvin. Combining these derivatives with the derivatives that were measured for the bulk modulus and thermal expansion of MgSiO{sub 3} perovskite provided data that suggest lower mantle compositions between pyrolite and C1 carbonaceous chondrite and a lower mantle potential temperature of 1500 {+-} 200 kelvin.

  17. Development of An Improved Technique For Identification of the Damping Properties of Orthogonally Reinforced Composites in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.; Gyunal, I.; Shishkin, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    A technique for identifying the amplitude dependences of the logarithmic decrement of vibrations of orthogonally reinforced composites in shear by using a refined model of deformation that takes into account the effect of the transverse strain in tension-compression of a layer package with a ± 45° lay-up relative to the longitudinal axis of the test specimen. The unknown dependences are represented by power functions with two unknown parameters, which are determined by minimizing the quadratic residual between the calculated and experimental internal damping parameters of test specimens. A comparison between the results of the shear damping properties of a CFRP, reinforced with a Porcher 3692 fabric, obtained with and without account of the transverse deformation of test specimens with the lay-up mentioned, is carried out.

  18. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  19. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  20. Boron/aluminum-graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fabrication feasibility and to assess the potential of adhesively-bonded metal and resin matrix fiber composite hybrids as an advanced material, for aerospace and other structural applications. The results of fabrication studies and of evaluation of physical and mechanical properties show that using this hybrid concept it is possible to design a composite which, when compared to nonhybrid composites, has improved transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for perdicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  1. Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference held at Long Beach, California, 8-11 June 1992. The ACT Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. Papers sponsored by the Department of Defense on the Design and Manufacturing of Low Cost Composites (DMLCC) are also included in Volume 2 of this document.

  2. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  3. Effect of Er:YAG Laser on Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel and Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Kabudan, Mona; Gholami, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bond strength of composite resin to enamel and dentin of primary teeth is lower than that to permanent teeth; therefore, it may compromise the adhesive bonding. New methods, such as laser application have been recently introduced for tooth preparation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth preparation with bur and Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of composite to enamel and dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five primary molar teeth were collected and 150 specimens were obtained by mesiodistal sectioning of each tooth. In each of the enamel and dentin groups, the teeth were randomly assigned to 3 subgroups with the following preparations: bur preparation + etching (37% H3PO4), laser preparation + etching, and laser preparation without etching. Single Bond adhesive and Z250 composite were applied to all samples. After thermocycling, the shear bond strength testing was preformed using the Instron Testing Machine. Data were analysed using SPSS-17 and two-way ANOVA. Results: The bond strength of enamel specimens was significantly higher than that of dentin specimens, except for the laser-non-etched groups. The enamel and dentin laser-non-etched groups had no significant difference in bond strength. In both enamel and dentin groups, bur preparation + etching yielded the highest bond strength, followed by laser preparation + etching, and the laser preparation without etching yielded the lowest bond strength (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In both enamel and dentin groups, laser preparation caused lower shear bond strength compared to bur preparation. PMID:26622267

  4. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Repair Micro-shear Bond Strength of Silica- and Zirconia-filled Composite Resins

    PubMed Central

    Joulaei, Mohammad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Ahmadi, Anahid; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Effect of surface treatments on repair bond strength of aged composite resins might be different due to their dissimilar fillers. The aim was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on repair micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of silica- (Spectrum TPH) and zirconia-filled (Filtek Z250) composite resins. Materials and methods Twenty-seven composite resin blocks were made from each type of composite resin: Z250 and Spectrum TPH. After aging, blocks of each type were randomly divided into three groups according to surface treatments: alloy primer, silane, and only surface roughening. Subsequently, each group was further subdivided into 3 subgroups based on the adhesive system used: Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond, and Margin Bond. Four composite resin columns were added on each block. After thermocycling, µSBStest were done at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analysed using multifactor ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). Results Analysis of data showed that the effect of composite resin type was not significant (p > 0.05), but the effects of the type of surface treatment (p = 0.01) and the type of adhesive system (p = 0.01) were significant on repair µSBS. In addition, the cumulative effect of the composite type-surface treatment and the composite type with the type of adhesive system were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the cumulative effects of the adhesive system-surface treatment (p = 0.03) and the composite type-the adhesive system-surface treatments (p = 0.002) were significant. Conclusion Although repair µSBS values of both silica- and zirconia-filled composite resins were similar, use of different combinations of surface treatments and adhesive systems affected their repair µSBS differently. PMID:23277859

  5. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  6. Probabilistic Evaluation of Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the deterministic and probabilistic structural evaluation results of two structures made with advanced ceramic composites (CMC): internally pressurized tube and uniformly loaded flange. The deterministic structural evaluation includes stress, displacement, and buckling analyses. It is carried out using the finite element code MHOST, developed for the 3-D inelastic analysis of structures that are made with advanced materials. The probabilistic evaluation is performed using the integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures computer code IPACS. The affects of uncertainties in primitive variables related to the material, fabrication process, and loadings on the material property and structural response behavior are quantified. The primitive variables considered are: thermo-mechanical properties of fiber and matrix, fiber and void volume ratios, use temperature, and pressure. The probabilistic structural analysis and probabilistic strength results are used by IPACS to perform reliability and risk evaluation of the two structures. The results will show that the sensitivity information obtained for the two composite structures from the computational simulation can be used to alter the design process to meet desired service requirements. In addition to detailed probabilistic analysis of the two structures, the following were performed specifically on the CMC tube: (1) predicted the failure load and the buckling load, (2) performed coupled non-deterministic multi-disciplinary structural analysis, and (3) demonstrated that probabilistic sensitivities can be used to select a reduced set of design variables for optimization.

  7. Direct Observation on the Evolution of Shear Banding and Buckling in Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, M. Q.; Chen, X. W.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. F.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of micro-damage and deformation of each phase in the composite plays a pivotal role in the clarification of deformation mechanism of composite. However, limited model and mechanical experiments were conducted to reveal the evolution of the deformation of the two phases in the tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite. In this study, quasi-static compressive tests were performed on this composite. For the first time, the evolution of micro-damage and deformation of the two phases in this composite, i.e., shear banding of the metallic glass matrix and buckling deformation of the tungsten fiber, were investigated systematically by controlling the loading process at different degrees of deformation. It is found that under uniaxial compression, buckling of the tungsten fiber occurs first, while the metallic glass matrix deforms homogeneously. Upon further loading, shear bands initiate from the fiber/matrix interface and propagate in the metallic glass matrix. Finally, the composite fractures in a mixed mode, with splitting in the tungsten fiber, along with shear fracture in the metallic glass matrix. Through the analysis on the stress state in the composite and resistance to shear banding of the two phases during compressive deformation, the possible deformation mechanism of the composite is unveiled. The deformation map of the composite, which covers from elastic deformation to final fracture, is obtained as well.

  8. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  9. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  10. In-Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Herbal Antioxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khamverdi, Zahra; Khadem, Parvin; Soltanian, Aliraza; Azizi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A reduction in bond strength of composite to bleached enamel has been reported immediately after bleaching treatment. Application of some antioxidant agents may decrease the adverse effects of whitening agents on bond strength and enhance composite bond to enamel. This study aimed to assess the effect of green tea, sodium ascorbate, sage and grape seed extract on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 90 human enamel surfaces were randomly divided into six groups as follows (n=15): G1, no bleaching; G2, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP); G3, HP+1000 μmol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) for 10 minutes; G4, HP+10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; G5, HP+10% sage for 10 minutes and G6, HP+5% grape seed extract for 10 minutes. The specimens were bonded to composite in all groups. The shear bond strength of specimens was measured in Megapascals (MPa). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α=0.05). Results: The highest and the lowest mean shear bond strength values were observed in group 1 (22.61±3.29MPa) and group 2 (5.87±1.80MPa), respectively. The reduction in bond strength in group 2 was greater than that in other groups (P<0.001). No significant difference was found among groups 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (P>0.05). Conclusions: All the herbal antioxidants used in this study equally compensated for the reduced bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. PMID:28127316

  11. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  12. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA's Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Elam, S.

    2001-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's on-going activities in MMC components for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike engine and X-34's Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight, low cost, and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each of NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicles and space access vehicles. In order to fabricate structures from MMC, effective joining methods must be developed to join MMC to the same or to different monolithic alloys. Therefore, a qualitative assessment of MMC's welding and joining techniques will be outlined.

  13. Producibility aspects of advanced composites for an L-1011 Aileron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hamersveld, J.; Fogg, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    The design of advanced composite aileron suitable for long-term service on transport aircraft includes Kevlar 49 fabric skins on honeycomb sandwich covers, hybrid graphite/Kevlar 49 ribs and spars, and graphite/epoxy fittings. Weight and cost savings of 28 and 20 percent, respectively, are predicted by comparison with the production metallic aileron. The structural integrity of the design has been substantiated by analysis and static tests of subcomponents. The producibility considerations played a key role in the selection of design concepts with potential for low-cost production. Simplicity in fabrication is a major factor in achieving low cost using advanced tooling and manufacturing methods such as net molding to size, draping, forming broadgoods, and cocuring components. A broadgoods dispensing machine capable of handling unidirectional and bidirectional prepreg materials in widths ranging from 12 to 42 inches is used for rapid layup of component kits and covers. Existing large autoclaves, platen presses, and shop facilities are fully exploited.

  14. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  15. First NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a compilation of papers presented at the first NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference held in Seattle, Washington, from 29 Oct. to 1 Nov. 1990. The ACT program is a major new multiyear research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Included are papers on materials development and processing, innovative design concepts, analysis development and validation, cost effective manufacturing methodology, and cost tracking and prediction procedures. Papers on major applications programs approved by the Department of Defense are also included.

  16. Advanced composites in sailplane structures: Application and mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muser, D.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced Composites in sailplanes mean the use of carbon and aramid fibers in an epoxy matrix. Weight savings were in the range of 8 to 18% in comparison with glass fiber structures. The laminates will be produced by hand-layup techniques and all material tests were done with these materials. These values may be used for calculation of strength and stiffness, as well as for comparison of the materials to get a weight-optimum construction. Proposals for material-optimum construction are mentioned.

  17. A photoelastic investigation of asymmetric four point bend shear test for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Sawyer, W.

    1986-01-01

    The shear stress fringe value of orthotropic birefringent model materials is presently used in an asymmetric four-point bend test that employs a notched specimen and is a modification of the Iosipescu test (1967). While in the case of a unidirectionally reinforced glass-polyester model material, shear stress fringe values obtained from 90- and 120-deg (sharp and radiused) notches are reasonably close to the values obtained for an off-axis tensile specimen, no conclusions can be drawn on the influence of the notch parameters, due to the peculiarities of the photoelastic response of the inhomogeneous orthotropic model material. The failure modes nevertheless indicate that a notch radius, and the 120-deg notch angle, reduce the stress concentration. Comparisons are made with finite element results.

  18. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  19. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  20. Composite Fan Blade Design for Advanced Engine Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Kuguoglu, Latife H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2004-01-01

    The aerodynamic and structural viability of composite fan blades of the revolutionary Exo-Skeletal engine are assessed for an advanced subsonic mission using the NASA EST/BEST computational simulation system. The Exo-Skeletal Engine (ESE) calls for the elimination of the shafts and disks completely from the engine center and the attachment of the rotor blades in spanwise compression to a rotating casing. The fan rotor overall adiabatic efficiency obtained from aerodynamic analysis is estimated at 91.6 percent. The flow is supersonic near the blade leading edge but quickly transitions into a subsonic flow without any turbulent boundary layer separation on the blade. The structural evaluation of the composite fan blade indicates that the blade would buckle at a rotor speed that is 3.5 times the design speed of 2000 rpm. The progressive damage analysis of the composite fan blade shows that ply damage is initiated at a speed of 4870 rpm while blade fracture takes place at 7640 rpm. This paper describes and discusses the results for the composite blade that are obtained from aerodynamic, displacement, stress, buckling, modal, and progressive damage analyses. It will be demonstrated that a computational simulation capability is readily available to evaluate new and revolutionary technology such as the ESE.

  1. V-378A: A modified bismaleimide for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    Addition polyimides cure with no evolution of gaseous by-products at relatively low temperatures and may be cured at low pressures to yield composites with excellent hot-wet strength retention. These properaties have made them excellent candidates as matrix resins for advanced composites. However, commercially available bismaleimides are solids and difficult to handle in preimpregnated form. V-378A is an addition polyimide composed of a mixture of bismaleimides and other reactive ingredients formulated to provide good prepreg properties and handling, facile cure and excellent composite mechanical properties. Several curing mechanisms are utilized to provide the characteristics exhibited by V-378A. Part of the mechanism is free radial and takes place at ambient temperature and above. Other mechanisms are principally Diels-Alder in nature. V-378A prepregs are tacky at ambient temperature, but do not have long tacky outlife similar to some epoxies. V-378A yields composites which exhibit hot-wet strength retention which is superior to that provided by epoxy resin systems.

  2. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  3. Design synthesis of a boron/epoxy reinforced metal shear web.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept has been developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad, boron/epoxy plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced stiffeners. Baseline composite and titanium shear resistant designs are compared; the composite concept is 28% lighter than the titanium web. Element test results show the metal cladding effectively reinforces critical composite load transfer and fastener hole areas making the composite web concept practical for other shear structure applications.-

  4. Experimental, numerical, and analytical studies on the seismic response of steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epackachi, Siamak

    The seismic performance of rectangular steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls is assessed for application to buildings and mission-critical infrastructure. The SC walls considered in this study were composed of two steel faceplates and infill concrete. The steel faceplates were connected together and to the infill concrete using tie rods and headed studs, respectively. The research focused on the in-plane behavior of flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. An experimental program was executed in the NEES laboratory at the University at Buffalo and was followed by numerical and analytical studies. In the experimental program, four large-size specimens were tested under displacement-controlled cyclic loading. The design variables considered in the testing program included wall thickness, reinforcement ratio, and slenderness ratio. The aspect ratio (height-to-length) of the four walls was 1.0. Each SC wall was installed on top of a re-usable foundation block. A bolted baseplate to RC foundation connection was used for all four walls. The walls were identified to be flexure- and flexure-shear critical. The progression of damage in the four walls was identical, namely, cracking and crushing of the infill concrete at the toes of the walls, outward buckling and yielding of the steel faceplates near the base of the wall, and tearing of the faceplates at their junctions with the baseplate. A robust finite element model was developed in LS-DYNA for nonlinear cyclic analysis of the flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. The DYNA model was validated using the results of the cyclic tests of the four SC walls. The validated and benchmarked models were then used to conduct a parametric study, which investigated the effects of wall aspect ratio, reinforcement ratio, wall thickness, and uniaxial concrete compressive strength on the in-plane response of SC walls. Simplified analytical models, suitable for preliminary analysis and design of SC walls, were

  5. An in vitro evaluation of shear bond strength of silorane and bis-GMA resin-based composite using different curing units

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Manak; Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate shear bond strength of silorane and bis-GMA based composite resins using self-etch and total-etch adhesive systems, and compare the effect of Quartz-tungten-halogen (QTH) and Light emitting diode (LED) on the shear bond strength of the experimental materials. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were exposed on intact extracted molars and composite resin was built 2 mm in diameter. Teeth were divided randomly into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 were restored with P90 system adhesive and Filtek P90 and cured with QTH and LED units respectively. Groups 3 and 4 were restored with total etch adhesive and Filtek Z100 and cured with QTH and LED units respectively. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing using Instrom Universal testing machine. Results: Data was subjected to one-way analysis of variance. Total-etch groups gave significantly higher shear bond strength values than the self-etch groups. No significant difference in shear bond strength was found between Groups 3 and 4, while Group 1 showed significantly higher values than Group 2. Conclusion: Type of light curing unit is not a significant factor affecting shear bond strength for bis-GMA RBCs using total-etch technique; while for curing silorane resin based composite (RBCs), conventional halogen curing units showed better results. PMID:22876019

  6. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 2: summary report: Shear web component fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Smith, D. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication of two shear web test elements and three large scale shear web test components are reported. In addition, the fabrication of test fixtures for the elements and components is described. The center-loaded beam test fixtures were configured to have a test side and a dummy or permanent side. The test fixtures were fabricated from standard extruded aluminum sections and plates and were designed to be reuseable.

  7. Geometrically nonlinear free vibration of shear deformable piezoelectric carbon nanotube/fiber/polymer multiscale laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, M.; Liu, X. F.; He, X. Q.; Kitipornchai, S.

    2014-07-01

    The nonlinear free vibration of carbon nanotubes/fiber/polymer composite (CNTFPC) multi-scale plates with surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is studied in this paper. The governing equations of the piezoelectric nanotubes/fiber/polymer multiscale laminated composite plates are derived based on first-order shear deformation plate theory (FSDT) and von Kármán geometrical nonlinearity. Halpin-Tsai equations and fiber micromechanics are used in hierarchy to predict the bulk material properties of the multiscale composite. The carbon nanotubes are assumed to be uniformly distributed and randomly oriented through the epoxy resin matrix. A perturbation scheme of multiple time scales is employed to determine the nonlinear vibration response and the nonlinear natural frequencies of the plates with immovable simply supported boundary conditions. The effects of the applied constant voltage, plate geometry, volume fraction of fibers and weight percentage of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the linear and nonlinear natural frequencies of the piezoelectric nanotubes/fiber/polymer multiscale composite plate are investigated through a detailed parametric study.

  8. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  9. Ultrasonics transduction in metallic and composite structures for structural health monitoring using extensional and shear horizontal piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, Ayman Kamal

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is crucial for monitoring structures performance, detecting the initiation of flaws and damages, and predicting structural life span. The dissertation emphasizes on developing analytical and numerical models for ultrasonics transduction between piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), and metallic and composite structures. The first objective of this research is studying the power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure for the aim of optimizing guided waves mode tuning and PWAS electromechanical (E/M) impedance for power-efficient SHM systems. Analytical models for power and energy were developed based on exact Lamb wave solution with application on multimodal Lamb wave situations that exist at high excitation frequencies and/or relatively thick structures. Experimental validation was conducted using Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer. The second objective of this work focuses on shear horizontal (SH) PWAS which are poled in thickness-shear direction (d35 mode). Analytical and finite element predictive models of the E/M impedance of free and bonded SH-PWAS were developed. Next, the wave propagation method has been considered for isotropic materials. Finally, the power and energy of SH waves were analytically modeled and a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for determining phase and group velocities, mode shapes, and energy of SH waves. The third objective focuses on guided wave propagation in composites. The transfer matrix method (TMM) has been used to calculate dispersion curves of guided waves in composites. TMM suffers numerical instability at high frequency-thickness values, especially in multilayered composites. A method of using stiffness matrix method was investigated to overcome instability. A procedure of using combined stiffness transfer matrix method (STMM) was presented and coded in MATLAB. This was followed by a comparative study between commonly used methods for the calculation of

  10. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (p<0.05) to test for significant differences between the lights. For surface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (p<0.05). Shear bond strength was determined using a push out method. Comparisons (ANOVA, p<0.05) were made between the different curing protocols. No significant difference in microleakage could be demonstrated between the different LCUs at the enamel side (p=0.60). At the dentin side only the Elipar Freelight (soft start), could significantly reduce microleakage (p<0.01). The hardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  11. The effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of composite resin to machined titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljadi, Mohammad

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between machined titanium and composite resin using different surface treatments. Materials and Methods: Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) specimens were ground with 600 grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=20/group). Group #1 (Control): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2 O3 for 10 sec. Group #2 (Rocatec): samples were treated with the Rocatec system following the manufacturer's directions but the silanization step was eliminated. Group #3 (Silano Pen): samples were treated with the Silano Pen system. Group #4 (H2SO4 etched): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2O3 for 10 sec and etched with 48% H2SO4 for 60 minutes at 60 oC. Group#5 (acid etching + Rocatec): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 2, respectively. Group #6 (acid etching + Silano Pen): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 3, respectively. Composite was bonded to the treated titanium surface, half of the specimens from each group (n=10/group) were subjected to thermocycling, and the samples were tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Representative samples from each group were evaluated with SEM. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05) in bond strength between the six groups of surface treatment and that thermocycling significantly decreased shear bond strength. There was no significant interaction (p = 0.07) between surface treatment and thermocycling status. With regard to the effect of surface treatment, a Tukey Post Hoc test showed that groups 3 (Silano Pen) and 6 (Silano Pen + H2SO4) showed significantly (p < 0.05) greater bond strengths compared to the rest of the groups. There was no significant difference in the bond strength between the four other groups. Conclusion: 1) Silano Pen is effective in improving the bond strength of titanium to composite resin. 2) The silanization step in

  12. Shear wave velocity structure of the lower crust in southern Africa: Evidence for compositional heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kgaswane, Eldridge M.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Juliã, Jordi; Dirks, Paul H. G. M.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the lower crust across the southern African shield has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations located in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. For large parts of both Archaean and Proterozoic terrains, the velocity models obtained from the inversions show shear wave velocities ≥4.0 km/s below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating a predominantly mafic lower crust. However, for much of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain in South Africa, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain in Zimbabwe, shear wave velocities of ≤3.9 km/s are found below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating an intermediate-to-felsic lower crust. The areas of intermediate-to-felsic lower crust in South Africa coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, suggesting that the more evolved composition of the lower crust may have resulted from crustal reworking and extension during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga.

  13. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft: Aileron manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, E. G.; Cobbs, W. L.; Legg, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication activities of the Advanced Composite Aileron (ACA) program are discussed. These activities included detail fabrication, manufacturing development, assembly, repair and quality assurance. Five ship sets of ailerons were manufactured. The detail fabrication effort of ribs, spar and covers was accomplished on male tools to a common cure cycle. Graphite epoxy tape and fabric and syntactic epoxy materials were utilized in the fabrication. The ribs and spar were net cured and required no post cure trim. Material inconsistencies resulted in manufacturing development of the front spar during the production effort. The assembly effort was accomplished in subassembly and assembly fixtures. The manual drilling system utilized a dagger type drill in a hydraulic feed control hand drill. Coupon testing for each detail was done.

  14. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  15. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design and evaluation of alternate concepts for the major subcomponents of the advanced composite aileron (ACA) was completed. From this array of subcomponents, aileron assemblies were formulated and evaluated. Based on these analyses a multirib assembly with graphite tape/syntactic core covers, a graphite tape front spar, and a graphite fabric rib was selected for development. A weight savings of 29.1 percent (40.8 pounds per aileron) is predicted. Engineering cost analyses indicate that the production cost of the ACA will be 7.3 percent less than the current aluminum aileron. Fabrication, machining, and testing of the material evaluation specimens for the resin screening program was completed. The test results lead to the selection of Narmco 5208 resin for the ACA. Other activities completed include: the detailed design of the ACA, construction of a three dimensional finite element model for structural analysis, and formulation of detail plans for material verification and process development.

  16. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  17. Liposomal drug deposits in poly(dopamine) coatings: effect of their composition, cell type, uptake pathway considerations, and shear stress.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Martin E; Fernandez-Medina, Marina; Postma, Almar; Städler, Brigitte

    2014-12-01

    Implantable devices equipped with coatings which have the ability to carry and deliver active compounds are of great interest. We report the assembly of liposome-containing poly(dopamine) films, and their interaction with adhering cells. The liposome composition is varied by adding lipophilic dopamine-conjugates and charged lipids. The cell mean fluorescence (CMF) of adhering cells due to the internalization of fluorescent cargo is found to be similar for coatings with the lipophilic-dopamine conjugates, while the charge affects the amount and location of the internalized cargo. The uptake mechanism for cargo by myoblasts using chemical inhibitors is found to be dependent on the used type of liposome. The CMF is significantly reduced for endothelial cells adhering to coatings with applied shear stress.

  18. Short-wavelength buckling and shear failures for compression-loaded composite laminates. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The short-wavelength buckling (or the microbuckling) and the interlaminar and inplane shear failures of multi-directional composite laminates loaded in uniaxial compression are investigated. A laminate model is presented that idealizes each lamina. The fibers in the lamina are modeled as a plate, and the matrix in the lamina is modeled as an elastic foundation. The out-of-plane w displacement for each plate is expressed as a trigonometric series in the half-wavelength of the mode shape for laminate short-wavelength buckling. Nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used. The model is applied to symmetric laminates having linear material behavior. The laminates are loaded in uniform end shortening and are simply supported. A linear analysis is used to determine the laminate stress, strain, and mode shape when short-wavelength buckling occurs. The equations for the laminate compressive stress at short-wavelength buckling are dominated by matrix contributions.

  19. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, K. E.; Marsh, A. H.; Sargisson, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual studies were conducted to assess the impact of incorporating advanced technologies in the nacelles of a current wide-bodied transport and an advanced technology transport. The improvement possible in the areas of fuel consumption, flyover noise levels, airplane weight, manufacturing costs, and airplane operating cost were evaluated for short and long-duct nacelles. Use of composite structures for acoustic duct linings in the fan inlet and exhaust ducts was considered as well as for other nacelle components. For the wide-bodied transport, the use of a long-duct nacelle with an internal mixer nozzle in the primary exhaust showed significant improvement in installed specific fuel consumption and airplane direct operating costs compared to the current short-duct nacelle. The long-duct mixed-flow nacelle is expected to achieve significant reductions in jet noise during takeoff and in turbo-machinery noise during landing approach. Recommendations were made of the technology development needed to achieve the potential fuel conservation and noise reduction benefits.

  20. Shear-bond-strength of orthodontic brackets to aged nano-hybrid composite-resin surfaces using different surface preparation.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Hatice Kubra; Akin, Mehmet; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface preparation methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets to aged nano-hybrid resin composite surfaces in vitro. A total of 100 restorative composite resin discs, 6 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were obtained and treated with an ageing procedure. After ageing, the samples were randomly divided as follows according to surface preparation methods: (1)Control, (2)37% phosphoric acid gel, (3)Sandblasting, (4)Diamond bur, (5)Air-flow and 20 central incisor teeth were used for the control etched group. SBS test were applied on bonded metal brackets to all samples. SBS values and residual adhesives were evaluated. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference (p<0.001) between the groups. Sandblasted group had the highest SBS value (12.85 MPa) in experimental groups. The sandblasting surface treatment is recommended as an effective method of bonding orthodontic metal brackets to nano-hybrid composite resin surfaces.

  1. Atmosphere composition monitor for space station and advanced missions application

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Powell, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    Long-term human occupation of extraterrestrial locations may soon become a reality. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently completed the definition and preliminary design of the low earth orbit (LEO) space station. They are now currently moving into the detailed design and fabrication phase of this space station and are also beginning to analyze the requirements of several future missions that have been identified. These missions include, for example, Lunar and Mars sorties, outposts, bases, and settlements. A requirement of both the LEO space station and future missions are environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), which provide a comfortable environment for humans to live and work. The ECLSS consists of several major systems, including atmosphere revitalization system (ARS), atmosphere pressure and composition control system, temperature and humidity control system, water reclamation system, and waste management system. Each of these major systems is broken down into subsystems, assemblies, units, and instruments. Many requirements and design drivers are different for the ECLSS of the LEO space station and the identified advanced missions (e.g., longer mission duration). This paper discusses one of the ARS assemblies, the atmosphere composition monitor assembly (ACMA), being developed for the LEO space station and addresses differences that will exist for the ACMA of future missions.

  2. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Stainless Steel Crowns Using Two Mechanical Surface Treatments and Two Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Sara; Heidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to stainless steel crowns (SSC) using two mechanical surface treatments (MSTs) and two bonding systems. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SSCs were divided into six groups of 14; Group1: No MST+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (N+U), Group 2: Surface roughening by a diamond bur+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (R+U), Group 3: Sandblasting+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (S+U), Group 4: No MST+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (N+A), Group 5: Surface roughening by a diamond bur+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (R+A), Group 6: Sandblasting+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (S+A). After MST and bonding procedure, composite cylinders were bonded to the lingual surface of SSCs, then the SBS of composite to SSCs was measured using a universal testing machine following thermocycling. Results: The SBS of groups R+U and S+U was significantly higher than that of group N+U. No significant difference was noted in SBS of groups R+U and S+U. The SBS of group S+A was significantly higher than that of groups N+A and R+A. No significant difference was noted in the SBS of groups N+A and R+A (P>0.05). Conclusions: In Scotchbond Universal adhesive groups, sandblasting and surface roughening by diamond bur significantly increased the SBS of composite to SSCs compared to no MST. In Alloy Primer groups, sandblasting significantly increased the SBS of composite to SSC compared to surface roughening with diamond bur and no MST. PMID:27536330

  3. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental program to develop several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints for lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Tasks accomplished include: a literature survey; design of static discriminator specimens; design allowables testing; fabrication of test panels and specimens; small specimen testing; and standard joint testing. Detail designs of static discriminator specimens for each of the four major attachment types are presented. Test results are given for the following: (1) transverse tension of Celion 3000/PMR-15 laminate; (2) net tension of a laminate for both a loaded and unloaded bolt hole; (3) comparative testing of bonded and co-cured doublers along with pull-off tests of single and double bonded angles; (4) single lap shear tests, transverse tension and coefficient of thermal expansion tests of A7F (LARC-13 amide-imide modified) adhesive; and (5) tension tests of standard single lap, double lap, and symmetric step lap bonded joints. Also, included are results of a finite element analysis of a single lap bonded composite joint.

  4. Effect of Addition of Curcumin Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Property and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Composite to Bovine Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Bahador, Abbas; Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Ahmadi, Badreddin; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of curcumin nanoparticles (curcNPs) on antimicrobial property and shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic composite to bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro, experimental study, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs were added to Transbond XT composite. Stainless steel brackets were bonded to 48 sound bovine incisors in four groups (n=12) using composite containing 0% (control), 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs. The bracket-tooth SBS was measured by a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) score was calculated after debonding using a stereomicroscope. Also, 180 discs were fabricated of the four composites; 108 were subjected to eluted component test, 36 were used for disc diffusion test and 36 were used for biofilm test to assess their antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Results: The highest and lowest SBS belonged to control and 10% curcNP groups, respectively. The difference in SBS was significant among the four groups (P=0.008). The SBS of control group was significantly higher than that of 10% curcNPs (P=0.006). The four groups were not significantly different in terms of ARI score (P>0.05). Growth inhibition zones were not seen in any group. In biofilm test, the colony counts of all bacteria significantly decreased by an increase in percentage of curcNPs. Colony count significantly decreased only at 30 days. Conclusions: At 1% concentration, curcNPs have significant antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria with no adverse effect on SBS. However, insolubility of curcNPs remains a major drawback. PMID:28127332

  5. Development of Stitched Composite Structure for Advanced Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn; Przekop, Adam; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew; Velicki, Alex; Linton, Kim; Wu, Hsi-Yung; Baraja, Jaime; Thrash, Patrick; Hoffman, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop technologies which will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composites. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. With the PRSEUS concept, through-the-thickness stitches are applied through dry fabric prior to resin infusion, and replace fasteners throughout each integral panel. Through-the-thickness reinforcement at discontinuities, such as along flange edges, has been shown to suppress delamination and turn cracks, which expands the design space and leads to lighter designs. The pultruded rod provides stiffening away from the more vulnerable skin surface and improves bending stiffness. A series of building blocks were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. These building blocks addressed tension, compression, and pressure loading conditions. The emphasis of the development work has been to assess the loading capability, damage arrestment features, repairability, post-buckling behavior, and response of PRSEUS flat panels to out-of plane pressure loading. The results of this building-block program from coupons through an 80%-scale pressure box have demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. This development program shows that the PRSEUS benefits are also applicable to traditional tube-andwing aircraft, those of advanced configurations, and other

  6. Effect of Porcelain Surface Pretreatments on Composite Resin-Porcelain Shear Bond Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    composite resin and dental porcelain has drawn much attention in recent years. This bond’is important in dentistry because without it, porcelain...of this research were to determine the effects that six dental porcelain surface pretreatments, two types of silane , and thermocycling had on...used in the principal study. The principal study compared six porcelain surface pretreatments, two silanes , and two specimen aging protocols. The six

  7. Role of multiwalled carbon nanotube in interlaminar shear strength of epoxy/glass fiber/multi walled carbon nanotube hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan Chandrasekaran, Vasan Churchill

    2011-12-01

    The motivation of this thesis is to investigate the role of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in enhancing the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of hybrid composites. The objective of this thesis is to understand the relationships between processing history, material variability, matrix properties, glass fiber/matrix interface properties and their correlations with interlaminar shear strength of hybrid composites. The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of hybrid composites made from glass fiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified epoxy is compared with that for unmodified epoxy/glass fiber composites (control). By combining the techniques of high speed mechanical stirring and ultrasonic agitation, 0.5% MWCNT by weight were dispersed in epoxy to prepare a suspension. Composites were manufactured by both injection double vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (IDVARTM) and the flow flooding chamber (FFC) methods. Compression shear tests (CST) were conducted on the manufactured samples to determine the ILSS. The effect of processing history and batch-to-batch variability of materials---glass fiber preform, resin and carbon nanotubes---on the ILSS of samples made by both techniques was investigated. Statistical comparison of the measured ILSS values for hybrid composites with the control specimens clearly show that hybrid composites made by the FFC process resulted in significant ILSS enhancement relative to the control and the IDVARTM specimens. After it was established that the FFC process improved the ILSS, the effect of functionalizing the nanotubes was explored. Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were oxidized by acid treatment and heated with triethylene tetra amine (TETA) to obtain amino functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNT). Hybrid composites with f-MWCNTs were manufactured using FFC technique and control samples were fabricated using the same E-Glass fiber mat and unmodified epoxy resin subjected to the same processing history. CST results show

  8. Development of Engineering Data on Advanced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    mp. "tls. [Vol. 6, p. 252 & Vol. 7, p. 124-1 INTERLAMINAR SHEAR; 00 Fisu (ksi) 14.49 12.69 8.76 7.18 Stnd. Dev. (ksi) 0.51 0.48 0.30 0.19 Range...J.Comp.Mtls. (Vol.6, p. 252 & Vol.7, p. 1241 INTER LAMINAR SHEAR -67 0 F 72 0 F 350"F 450OF Fisu (ksi) 14.73 13.62 9.79 6.21 Stnd. Dev. (ksi) 3.41

  9. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  10. Experimental Classical Flutter Reesults of a Composite Advanced Turboprop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehmed, O.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented that show the effects of blade pitch angle and number of blades on classical flutter of a composite advanced turboprop (propfan) model. An increase in the number of blades on the rotor or the blade pitch angle is destablizing which shows an aerodynamic coupling or cascade effect between blades. The flutter came in suddenly and all blades vibrated at the same frequency but at different amplitudes and with a common predominant phase angle between consecutive blades. This further indicates aerodynamic coupling between blades. The flutter frequency was between the first two blade normal modes, signifying an aerodynamic coupling between the normal modes. Flutter was observed at all blade pitch angles from small to large angles-of-attack of the blades. A strong blade response occurred, for four blades at the two-per-revolution (2P) frequency, when the rotor speed was near the crossing of the flutter mode frequency and the 2P order line. This is because the damping is low near the flutter condition and the interblade phase angle of the flutter mode and the 2P response are the same.

  11. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are enabling materials for a number of demanding applications in aerospace, energy, and nuclear industries. In the aerospace systems, these materials are being considered for applications in hot sections of jet engines such as the combustor liner, vanes, nozzle components, nose cones, leading edges of reentry vehicles, and space propulsion components. Applications in the energy and environmental industries include radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, heat recuperators, gas and diesel particulate filters, and components for land based turbines for power generation. These materials are also being considered for use in the first wall and blanket components of fusion reactors. In the last few years, a number of CMC components have been developed and successfully tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. They include robust fabrication and manufacturing, assembly and integration, coatings, property modeling and life prediction, design codes and databases, repair and refurbishment, and cost. Fabrication of net and complex shape components with high density and tailorable matrix properties is quite expensive, and even then various desirable properties are not achievable. In this presentation, a number of examples of successful CMC component development and testing will be provided. In addition, critical need for robust manufacturing, joining and assembly technologies in successful implementation of these systems will be discussed.

  12. Imperfection Insensitivity Analyses of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that serve as failure initiators. For the tow-steered shells, their circumferential variation in axial stiffness may have suppressed this sensitivity to imperfections, leading to the agreement noted between tests and analyses. To investigate this further, a numerical investigation was performed in this study using geometric imperfections measured from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with measured imperfections that were then, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load were observed for the range of imperfections studied here, which suggests that the tow steering, and resulting circumferentially varying axial stiffness, may result in the test-analysis correlation observed for these shells.

  13. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Composites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is a broad-band scanner with four to six bands, depending on the model. The AVHRR senses in the visible, near-, middle-, and thermal- infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This sensor is carried on a series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), beginning with the Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS-N) in 1978. Since 1989, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has been mapping the vegetation condition of the United States and Alaska using satellite information from the AVHRR sensor. The vegetation condition composites, more commonly called greenness maps, are produced every week using the latest information on the growth and condition of the vegetation. One of the most important aspects of USGS greenness mapping is the historical archive of information dating back to 1989. This historical stretch of information has allowed the USGS to determine a 'normal' vegetation condition. As a result, it is possible to compare the current week's vegetation condition with normal vegetation conditions. An above normal condition could indicate wetter or warmer than normal conditions, while a below normal condition could indicate colder or dryer than normal conditions. The interpretation of departure from normal will depend on the season and geography of a region.

  14. Interlaminar shear strength and thermo-mechanical properties of nano-enhanced composite materials under thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, G.; Douka, D.-D.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2013-04-01

    The introduction of nanoscaled reinforcement in otherwise conventional fiber reinforced composite materials has opened an exciting new area in composites research. The unique properties of these materials combined with the design versatility of fibrous composites may offer both enhanced mechanical properties and multiple functionalities which has been a focus area of the aerospace technology on the last decades. Due to unique properties of carbon nanofillers such as huge aspect ratio, extremely large specific surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity, Carbon Nanotubes have benn investigated as multifunvtional materials for electrical, thermal and mechanical applications. In this study, MWCNTs were incorporated in a typical epoxy system using a sonicator. The volume of the nanoreinforcement was 0.5 % by weight. Two different levels of sonication amplitude were used, 50% and 100% respectively. After the sonication, the hardener was introduced in the epoxy, and the system was cured according to the recommended cycle. For comparison purposes, specimens from neat epoxy system were prepared. The thermomechanical properties of the materials manufactured were investigated using a Dynamic Mechanical Analyser. The exposed specimens were subjected to thermal shock. Thermal cycles from +30 °C to -30 °C were carried out and each cycle lasted 24 hours. The thermomechanical properties were studied after 30 cycles . Furthermore, the epoxy systems prepared during the first stage of the study were used for the manufacturing of 16 plies quasi isotropic laminates CFRPs. The modified CFRPs were subjected to thermal shock. For comparison reasons unmodified CFRPs were manufactured and subjected to the same conditions. In addition, the interlaminar shear strength of the specimens was studied using 3-point bending tests before and after the thermal shock. The effect of the nanoreinforcement on the environmental degradation is critically assessed.

  15. Role of Mechanics of Textile Preform Composites in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.E.; Poe, C.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology Program was initiated by NASA as a partnership with the United States aeronautical industry in fiscal year 1989. The broad objective of the Program was to develop the technology to design and manufacture cost-effective and structurally optimized light-weight composite airframe primary structure. Phase A of the Program, 1989-1991, focused on the identification and evaluation of innovative manufacturing technologies and structural concepts. At the end of Phase A, the leading wing and fuselage design concepts were down-selected for further development in Phase B of the Program, 1992-1995. Three major fabrication technologies emerged from Phase A. These three approaches were the stitched dry preform, textile preform, and automated tow placement manufacturing methods. Each method emphasized rapid fiber placement, near net-shape preform fabrication, part count minimization, and matching the technologies to the specific structural configurations and requirements. The objective of Phase B was to continue the evolution of design concepts using the concurrent engineering process, down-select to the leading structural concept, and design, build, and test subscale components. Phase C of the ACT Program, 1995-2002, is a critical element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program and has been approved for implementation beginning in 1995. The objective of Phase C is to design, build, and test major components of the airframe to demonstrate the technology readiness for applications in the next generation subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Part of the technology readiness demonstration will include a realistic comparison of manufacturing costs and an increased confidence in the ability to accurately estimate the costs of composite structure. The Program Plan calls for the structural components to be a complete fuselage barrel with a window-belt and a wing box at the wing/fuselage intersection.

  16. A shear deformable theory of laminated composite shallow shell-type panels and their response analysis. I - Free vibration and buckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Khdeir, A. A.; Frederick, D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with the substantiation of a shear deformable theory of cross-ply laminated composite shallow shells. While the developed theory preserves all the advantages of the first order transverse shear deformation theory it succeeds in eliminating some of its basic shortcomings. The theory is further employed in the analysis of the eigenvibration and static buckling problems of doubly curved shallow panels. In this context, the state space concept is used in conjunction with the Levy method, allowing one to analyze these problems in a unified manner, for a variety of boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented and some pertinent conclusions are formulated.

  17. Comparative Study of the Shear Bond Strength of Flowable Composite in Permanent Teeth Treated with Conventional Bur and Contact or Non-Contact Er:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Parhami, Parisa; Pourhashemi, Seyed Jalal; Ghandehari, Mehdi; Mighani, Ghasem; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the in vitro effect of the Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser with different radiation distances and high-speed rotary treatment on the shear bond strength of flowable composite to enamel of human permanent posterior teeth. Methods: freshly extracted human molar teeth with no caries or other surface defects were used in this study (n=45). The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1: treated with non-contact Er:YAG Laser and etched with Er:YAG laser, Group 2: treated with contact Er:YAG Laser and etched with Er:YAG laser, Group 3 (control): treated with diamond fissure bur and etched with acid phosphoric 37%. Then the adhesive was applied on the surafces of the teeth and polymerized using a curing light appliance. Resin cylinders were fabricated from flowable composite. Shear bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The amount of Shear Bond Strength (SBS) in the 3 treatment groups was not the same (P<0.05).The group in which enamel surfaces were treated with diamond fissure bur and etched with acid (conrtol group) had the highest mean shear bond strength (19.92±4.76) and the group in which the enamel surfaces were treated with contact Er:YAG laser and etched with Er:YAG laser had the lowest mean shear bond strength (10.89±2.89). Mann-whitney test with adjusted P-value detected significant difference in shear bond strength between the control group and the other 2 groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that both contact and non-contact Er:YAG laser treatment reduced shear bond strength of flowable resin composite to enamel in comparison with conventional treatment with high speed rotary. Different Er:YAG laser distance irradiations did not influence the shear bond strength of flowable composite to enamel. PMID:25653813

  18. Effect of Surface Treatment with Er;Cr:YSSG, Nd:YAG, and CO2 Lasers on Repair Shear Bond Strength of a Silorane-based Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Shojaeei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect ofsurface treatment with Er; Cr:YSSG, Nd:YAG, and CO2 lasers on repair shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite resin. Materials and methods. Sixty eight cylindrical samples of a silorane-based composite resin (Filtek Silorane) were pre-pared and randomly divided into 4 groups as follows: group 1: without surface treatment; groups 2, 3 and 4 with surface treatments using Er; Cr:YSSG, Nd:YAG, and CO2 lasers, respectively. A positive control group (group 5) was assigned in order to measure cohesive strength. Repair shear bond strength values were measured and data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at a significance level of α=0.05. Results. There were statistically significant differences in repair shear bond strength values between group 2 and other groups (P < 0.05); and between group 1and groups 3and 4 (P < 0.001); however, there were no significant differences be-tween groups 3 and 4 (P = 0.91). Conclusion. The repair shear bond strength of silorane-based composite resin was acceptable by surface treatment with lasers PMID:23875082

  19. Microstructure and Shear Strength in Brazing Joint of Mo-Cu Composite with 304 Stainless Steel by Ni-Cr-P Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Jiteng; Li, Yajiang; Zheng, Deshuang

    2015-07-01

    The brazing of Mo-Cu composite and 304 stainless steel was carried out in vacuum with Ni-Cr-P filler metal at 980 °C for 20 min. Microstructure in Mo-Cu/304 stainless steel joint was investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and shear strength was measured by shearing test. The results indicate that shear strength of the Mo-Cu/304 stainless steel joint is about 155 MPa. There forms eutectic structure of γ-Ni solid solution with Ni3P in the braze seam. Ni-Cu(Mo) and Ni-Fe solid solution are at the interface beside Mo-Cu composite and 304 stainless steel, respectively. Shear fracture exhibits mixed ductile-brittle fracture feature with trans-granular fracture, ductile dimples and tearing edges. Fracture originates from the interface between brazing seam and Mo-Cu composite and it propagates to the braze seam due to the formation of brittle Ni5P2 and Cr3P precipitation.

  20. Effect of endodontic irrigation and dressing procedures on the shear bond strength of composite to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Hamar, Sahar E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of three sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)-endodontic irrigation procedures used alone or in combinations with two intermediate dressing materials on bond strengths of two adhesive composite systems to coronal dentin. Surfaces were treated with NaOCl or NaOCl–Glyde-File-Prep (H2O2 and EDTA) with or without chlorhexidine (CHX) as a final rinse. Intermediate dressing materials of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and sodium perborate (SP) were combined with surface treatments. Surface treatment groups (n = 10/group) included (1) distilled water (control), (2) 5.25% NaOCl (30 min), (3) NaOCl/Glyde (30 min), (4) NaOCl/Glyde (30 min) + CHX (2 min), (5) NaOCl/Glyde (30 min) + Ca(OH)2 (5 days) + CHX (2 min), and (6) NaOCl/Glyde (30 min) + SP (9 days) + CHX (2 min). For each surface treatment group, dentin shear bond strengths of two different composite systems (Excite/Tetric Flow Chroma, [EX/TFC], and Clearfil Protect Bond/Protect Liner F [PB/PLF]) were evaluated. Median shear bond strengths (EX/TFC, PB/PLF) for each surface treatment group in MPa were (1) 21, 18; (2) 26, 18; (3) 21, 17; (4) 22, 16; (5) 17, 11; and (6) 14, 11, respectively. NaOCl significantly increased the bond strength of EX/TFC (p < 0.05), but did not significantly affect that of PB/PLF. The use of NaOCl/Glyde with CHX did not significantly affect EX/TFC (p > 0.05), whereas it significantly decreased PB/PLF (p < 0.05). Ca(OH)2 and SP significantly decreased the bond strengths of both adhesive systems (p < 0.05). Adhesion to coronal dentin is dependent upon the irrigation regimen and the type of adhesive. PMID:25685402

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  2. Shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Sancakli, Erkan; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda; Yucel, Taner; Yildiz, Esra

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface pretreatment techniques on the surface roughness and shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for use with lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of one hundred thirty lithium disilicate CAD/CAM ceramic plates with dimensions of 6 mm × 4 mm and 3 mm thick were prepared. Specimens were then assigned into five groups (n=26) as follows: untreated control, coating with 30 µm silica oxide particles (Cojet™ Sand), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid etching, Er:YAG laser irradiation, and grinding with a high-speed fine diamond bur. A self-adhering flowable composite resin (Vertise Flow) was applied onto the pre-treated ceramic plates using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. Surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. Shear bond strength test were performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface roughness data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD tests. Shear bond strength test values were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at α=.05. RESULTS Hydrofluoric acid etching and grinding with high-speed fine diamond bur produced significantly higher surface roughness than the other pretreatment groups (P<.05). Hydrofluoric acid etching and silica coating yielded the highest shear bond strength values (P<.001). CONCLUSION Self-adhering flowable composite resin used as repair composite resin exhibited very low bond strength irrespective of the surface pretreatments used. PMID:25551002

  3. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Q. Q. Zhong, F. C. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Jia, M. N.; Xu, G. S. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B.

    2015-06-15

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E×B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E×B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  5. Instrumented Bolts Would Measure Shear Forces In Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, James Wayne; Mcwithey, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    Bolts instrumented with strain gauges used to measure shear forces. Bolts installed in multiple-bolt lap joints to obtain data on distribution of stresses and deformations in and around joints. Strain gauges indicate share of applied load borne by each individual bolt. In original application, bolted panels made of advanced refractory composite materials designed to withstand use at temperatures up to 4,000 degrees F. Also applicable to other joint materials and measurement of shear loads in other connections such as, shear loads on shafts in pulleys or gears.

  6. Advanced fiber-composite hybrids--A new structural material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    Introduction of metal foil as part of matrix and fiber composite, or ""sandwich'', improves strength and stiffness for multidirectional loading, improves resistance to cyclic loading, and improves impact and erosion resistance of resultant fiber-composite hybrid structure.

  7. Potential for Advanced Thermoplastic Composites in Space Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    in gages down to 125 fxm. (34). 43 Damping The intrinsic damping of polymer matrix composite is one of three decades greater than aluminum or...PROPERTIES BETWEEN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE , ALUMINUM, AND BERYLLIUM Polymer Matrix Composite Aluminum Beryllium Density, mg/m3 1.7 2.7 1.7...0*, 0*. 0*, 0"], laminate that is directionally stiffened for beam and tube applications. bMinimum polymer matrix composite gage is for six plies

  8. Development of Engineering Data on Advanced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Desig Gnxid- is essentially lidetical to the Asm fisue test (D790) except for the testing speed and the locatims of the load application points in...10.03] (0.23) [0.02) (0.14) No. of Speciaens 5 -j .5 5 Test Method ASTM D3518 Reference SINf•lLA•dNAR SHEAR Fisu (ksi](mPa) 118.17] (125.2) [15.27] (105.2

  9. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  10. Aromatic/aliphatic diamine derivatives for advanced compositions and polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, Donovan M. (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel compositions of matter comprise certain derivatives of 9,9-dialkyl fluorene diamine (AFDA). The resultant compositions, whether compositions of matter or monomers that are subsequently incorporated into a polymer, are unique and useful in a variety of applications. Useful applications of AFDA-based material include heavy ion radiation shielding components and components of optical and electronic devices.

  11. Use of micro-tomography for validation of method to identify interfacial shear strength from tensile tests of short regenerated cellulose fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajlane, A.; Miettinen, A.; Madsen, B.; Beauson, J.; Joffe, R.

    2016-07-01

    The interfacial shear strength of short regenerated cellulose fibre/polylactide composites was characterized by means of an industry-friendly adhesion test method. The interfacial shear strength was back-calculated from the experimental tensile stress-strain curves of composites by using a micro-mechanical model. The parameters characterizing the microstructure of the composites, e.g. fibre length and orientation distributions, used as input in the model were obtained by micro-tomography. The investigation was carried out on composites with untreated and surface treated fibres with various fibre weight contents (5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt% for untreated fibres, and 15wt% for treated fibres). The properties of fibres were measured by an automated single fibre tensile test method. Based on these results, the efficiency of the fibre treatment to improve fibre/matrix adhesion is evaluated, and the applicability of the method to measure the interfacial shear strength is discussed. The results are compared with data from previous work, and with other results from the literature.

  12. Can Suspended Iron-Alloy Droplets Explain the Origin, Composition and Properties of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Dorfman, S. M.; Labidi, J.; Zhang, S.; Manga, M.; Stixrude, L. P.; McDonough, W. F.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The enigmatic large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) identified by seismic tomography at the base of the Earth's mantle have been proposed to be reservoirs of primordial mantle composition tapped by hot spot volcanism. The LLSVPs are characterized by anomalously low shear wave speed, VS, slightly elevated bulk sound speed, VB, and high density, ρ, in piles as thick as 1000 km above the core-mantle boundary. This combination of properties could be explained by a few percent dense melt, but the solidus of the lower mantle silicate and oxide assemblage may be too high to produce melt over the large extent of these regions. Iron-rich sulfur-bearing alloy may be molten at the conditions of the LLSVPs and ~1-2% of this component could satisfy both constraints on VS and ρ. An Fe alloy phase in the LLSVPs also has the potential to explain geochemical anomalies associated with hot spot volcanism, and its existence can be constrained by geochemical mass balance. Primordial noble gases such as 3He would be preferentially dissolved in Fe-rich melt rather than crystalline silicates. The reconstructed abundances of the moderately siderophile/chalcophile elements S, Cu and Pb in iron-alloy-bearing LLSVPs do not exceed predicted losses from volatilization, though this depends on the S-content of the alloy. The alloy phase would also be expected to incorporate W, and W isotope anomalies associated with hot spots are thus expected to have important implications for the timing of LLSVP formation. We have developed a model, via CIDER-2014, for the origin and properties of LLSVPs incorporating geochemistry, mineral physics, and fluid dynamic constraints on the generation, capture, and thermoelastic properties of Fe-rich melt droplets. The solidification of a basal magma ocean would produce both solid silicates and metallic melt. The bulk of the alloy generated by this process would sink to merge with the core. However, once the density of the remnant liquid exceeds that of the

  13. Research on the exploitation of advanced composite materials to lightly loaded structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The objective was to create a sailplane which could fly in weaker thermals than present day sailplanes (by being lighter) and to fly in stronger thermals than present sailplanes (by carrying more water ballast). The research was to tackle the interaction of advanced composites and the aerodynamic performance, the interaction of fabrication procedures and the advanced composites, and the interaction of advanced composites and the design process. Many pieces of the overall system were investigated but none were carried to the resolution required for engineering application. Nonetheless, interesting and useful results were obtained and are here reported.

  14. Advanced composites - An assessment of the future. [for use in aerospace technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    An assessment concerning the possibilities of a use of advanced composites in aerospace and space technology identified a lack of confidence and high cost as the major factors inhibiting composite applications. Attention is given to the present employment of composites and plans for its future use in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Various programs conducted by NASA are concerned with the development of a technological base for the extended use of advanced composites in aerospace and space applications. A future commercial transport is considered in which virtually the entire airframe could be of advanced composites. The attitude of aircraft manufacturers, engine manufacturers, airlines, spacecraft users, and material suppliers with regard to an employment of composites is also examined.

  15. Overview of bacterial cellulose composites: a multipurpose advanced material.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Park, Joong Kon

    2013-11-06

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has received substantial interest owing to its unique structural features and impressive physico-mechanical properties. BC has a variety of applications in biomedical fields, including use as biomaterial for artificial skin, artificial blood vessels, vascular grafts, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and wound dressing. However, pristine BC lacks certain properties, which limits its applications in various fields; therefore, synthesis of BC composites has been conducted to address these limitations. A variety of BC composite synthetic strategies have been developed based on the nature and relevant applications of the combined materials. BC composites are primarily synthesized through in situ addition of reinforcement materials to BC synthetic media or the ex situ penetration of such materials into BC microfibrils. Polymer blending and solution mixing are less frequently used synthetic approaches. BC composites have been synthesized using numerous materials ranging from organic polymers to inorganic nanoparticles. In medical fields, these composites are used for tissue regeneration, healing of deep wounds, enzyme immobilization, and synthesis of medical devices that could replace cardiovascular and other connective tissues. Various electrical products, including biosensors, biocatalysts, E-papers, display devices, electrical instruments, and optoelectronic devices, are prepared from BC composites with conductive materials. In this review, we compiled various synthetic approaches for BC composite synthesis, classes of BC composites, and applications of BC composites. This study will increase interest in BC composites and the development of new ideas in this field.

  16. Influence of helium atoms on the shear behavior of the fiber/matrix interphase of SiC/SiC composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Enze; Du, Shiyu; Li, Mian; Liu, Chen; He, Shihong; He, Jian; He, Heming

    2016-10-01

    Silicon carbide has many attractive properties and the SiC/SiC composite has been considered as a promising candidate for nuclear structural materials. Up to now, a computational investigation on the properties of SiC/SiC composite varying in the presence of nuclear fission products is still missing. In this work, the influence of He atoms on the shear behavior of the SiC/SiC interphase is investigated via Molecular Dynamics simulation following our recent paper. Calculations are carried out on three dimensional models of graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase and amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with He atoms in different regions (the SiC region, the interface region and the PyC region). In the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms in the SiC region have little influence on the shear strength of the material, while both the shear strength and friction strength may be enhanced when they are in the PyC region. Low concentration of He atoms in the interface region of the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase increases the shear strength, while there is a reduction of shear strength when the He concentration is high due to the switch of sliding plane. In the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms can cause the reduction of the shear strength regardless of the regions that He atoms are located. The presence of He atoms may significantly alter the structure of SiC/SiC in the interface region. The influence of He atoms in the interface region is the most significant, leading to evident shear strength reduction of the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with increasing He concentration. The behaviors of the interphases at different temperatures are studied as well. The dependence of the shear strengths of the two types of interphases on temperatures is studied as well. For the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, it is found strongly related to the regions He atoms are located. Combining these results with our previous study on pure SiC/SiC system, we expect this work may provide new insight

  17. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites.

  18. Viscoelastic Properties of Advanced Polymer Composites for Ballistic Protective Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    of stainless steel-toughened NiAl composite plate. Author: Nardone , Vincent C. Corporate Source: United Technologies Research Cent, Hartford, CT, USA...toughened composites. Author: Nardone , Vincent C; Strife, James R, Corporate Source: United Technologies Research Cent, E. Hartford, CT, USA Source...matrix composites. Author: Nardone , Vincent C; Strife, James R.; Pre wo, K. M. Corporate Source: United Technologies Research Cent, E. Hartford, CT

  19. Human body composition: advances in models and methods.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; Wang, Z; Baumgartner, R N; Ross, R

    1997-01-01

    The field of human body composition research is reaching a mature stage in its development: The three interconnected areas that define body composition research--models and their rules, methodology, and biological effects--are well-defined and are actively investigated by scientists in diverse disciplines from many different nations; and methods are available for measuring all major atomic, molecular, cellular, and tissue-system level body composition components in research, clinical, and epidemiological settings. This review summarizes main body composition research concepts, examines new component-measurement methodologies, and identifies potential areas of future research.

  20. Advanced Composite Wind Turbine Blade Design Based on Durability and Damage Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Abumeri, Galib; Abdi, Frank

    2012-02-16

    The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite

  1. An Investigation of Some Advanced Skills of Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Bikram K.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate: (1) what linguistic and mental abilities are involved in composition; (2) to what extent undergraduate students in India possess these abilities, in English and in their native language; and (3) to what extent these abilities are being taught. The major portion of the paper discusses the nature of composition,…

  2. Tailoring Advanced Nanoscale Materials Through Synthesis of Composite Aerogel Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Introducing a desired solid guest to an about-to- gel silica sol prevents complete encapsulation of the guest particles by the silica, such that the...engineered at multiple points during sol gel processing by modifying the host solid, the guest solid, the composite gel , or the composite aerogel.

  3. Advanced SiC composites for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Schwarz, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    This is a short review of the motivation for and progress in the development of ceramic matrix composites for fusion. Chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide (SiC) composites have been fabricated from continuous fibers of either SiC or graphite and tested for strength and thermal conductivity. Of significance is the the Hi-Nicalon{trademark} SiC based fiber composite has superior unirradiated properties as compared to the standard Nicalon grade. Based on previous results on the stability of the Hi-Nicalon fiber, this system should prove more resistant to neutron irradiation. A graphite fiber composite has been fabricated with very good mechnical properties and thermal conductivity an order of magnitude higher than typical SiC/SiC composites.

  4. Advanced human carotid plaque progression correlates positively with flow shear stress using follow-up scan data: an in vivo MRI multi-patient 3D FSI study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Canton, Gador; Yuan, Chun; Ferguson, Marina; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Tang, Dalin

    2010-09-17

    Although it has been well-accepted that atherosclerosis initiation and early progression correlate negatively with flow wall shear stresses (FSS), increasing evidence suggests mechanisms governing advanced plaque progression are not well understood. Fourteen patients were scanned 2-4 times at 18 month intervals using a histologically validated multi-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol to acquire carotid plaque progression data. Thirty-two scan pairs (baseline and follow-up scans) were formed with slices matched for model construction and analysis. 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models were constructed and plaque wall stress (PWS) and flow shear stress (FSS) were obtained from all matching lumen data points (400-1000 per plaque; 100 points per matched slice) to quantify correlations with plaque progression measured by vessel wall thickness increase (WTI). Using FSS and PWS data from follow-up scan, 21 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant positive correlation between WTI and FSS (positive/negative/no significance ratio=21/8/3), and 26 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant negative correlation between WTI and PWS (positive/negative/no significance ratio=2/26/4). The mean FSS value of lipid core nodes (n=5294) from all 47 plaque models was 63.5dyn/cm(2), which was 45% higher than that from all normal vessel nodes (n=27553, p<0.00001). The results from this intensive FSI study indicate that flow shear stress from follow-up scan correlates positively with advanced plaque progression which is different from what has been observed in plaque initiation and early-stage progression. It should be noted that the correlation results do not automatically lead to any causality conclusions.

  5. Advanced Nanocrystalline Ceramic Matrix Composites with Improved Toughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-09

    nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes were fabricated by advanced powder processing techniques and consolidated by spark plasma...tests were conducted on niobium and/or carbon nanotube-reinforced alumina U 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 09-01-2009 13...Toughness Report Title ABSTRACT Alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes were fabricated by advanced powder processing

  6. Steady-shear rheological properties of graphene-reinforced epoxy resin for manufacturing of aerospace composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausi, Marialaura; Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Laurenzi, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the steady-shear rheological behavior and the absolute viscosity of epoxy matrix reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (xGnP) before cure. Three different grades of xGnP (grades C, M and H) were dispersed homogenously at different weight percentages (wt%) into the epoxy matrix, ranging from 0.5 to 5 wt%. It is found that nanocomposite fluids with xGnP-C exhibit a Newtonian behavior at shear rate in the range 0.1-100 s-1, conversely, nanocomposite fluids with xGnP of grade M and H exhibit a shear-thinning behavior with the increase of nanoplatelet loading. Results from this analysis indicate how the steady shear rheological properties of the nano-reinforced polymer fluids depend on the geometrical characteristics of the graphene nanoplatelets.

  7. Sonic fatigue testing of an advanced composite aileron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1982-01-01

    The sonic fatigue test program to verify the design of the composite inboard aileron for the L-1011 airplane is described. The composite aileron is fabricated from graphite/epoxy minisandwich covers which are attached to graphite/epoxy front spar and ribs, and to an aluminum rear spar with fasteners. The program covers the development of random fatigue data by means of coupon testing and modal studies on a representative section of the composite aileron, culminating in the accelerated sonic fatigue proof test. The composite aileron sustained nonlinear panel vibration during the proof test without failure. Viscous damping coefficients as low as 0.4% were measured on the panels. The effects of moisture conditioning and elevated temperature on the random fatigue life of both undamaged and impact damaged coupons were investigated. The combination of impact damage, moisture, and a 180 F temperature could reduce the random fatigue life by 50%.

  8. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)

    PubMed Central

    CANTEKİN, Kenan; AVCİ, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

  10. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    Several advantages, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness, superior corrosion resistance, and high fatigue and impact resistance, among others, make FRPs an attractive alternative to conventional construction materials for use in developing new structures as well as rehabilitating in-service infrastructure. As the number of infrastructure applications using FRPs grows, the need for the development of a uniform Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) approach, including design procedures and examples, has become paramount. Step-by-step design procedures and easy-to-use design formulas are necessary to assure the quality and safety of FRP structural systems by reducing the possibility of design and construction errors. Since 2008, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in coordination with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), has overseen the development of the Pre-Standard for Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) of Pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Structures using probability-based limit states design. The fifth chapter of the pre-standard focuses on the design of members in flexure and shear under different failure modes, where the current failure load prediction models proposed within have been shown to be highly inaccurate based on experimental data and evaluation performed by researchers at the West Virginia University Constructed Facilities Center. A new prediction model for determining the critical flexural load capacity of pultruded GFRP square and rectangular box beams is presented within. This model shows that the type of failure can be related to threshold values of the beam span-to-depth ratio (L/h) and total flange width-to-thickness ratio (bf /t), resulting in three governing modes of failure: local buckling failure in the compression flange (4 ≤ L/h < 6), combined strain failure at the web-flange junction (6 ≤ L/h ≤ 10), and bending failure in the tension flange (10 < L/h ≤ 42

  11. Advanced aerospace composite material structural design using artificial intelligent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.H.; Chen, J.L.; Hwang, W.C.

    1993-12-31

    Due to the complexity in the prediction of property and behavior, composite material has not substituted for metal widely yet, though it has high specific-strength and high specific-modulus that are more important in the aerospace industry. In this paper two artificial intelligent techniques, the expert systems and neural network technology, were introduced to the structural design of composite material. Expert System which has good ability in symbolic processing can helps us to solve problem by saving experience and knowledge. It is, therefore, a reasonable way to combine expert system technology to tile composite structural design. The development of a prototype expert system to help designer during the process of composite structural design is presented. Neural network is a network similar to people`s brain that can simulate the thinking way of people and has the ability of learning from the training data by adapting the weights of network. Because of the bottleneck in knowledge acquisition processes, the application of neural network and its learning ability to strength design of composite structures are presented. Some examples are in this paper to demonstrate the idea.

  12. In-situ cure monitoring of advanced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Tony; Saliba, Susan; Lanzafame, John; Gudeman, Linda

    Automatic process control and optimization depends on the ability to effectively determine the state of the process. In-situ sensors capable of monitoring the physical and chemical changes are therefore essential. The use of an in-situ acoustic ultrasonic sensor to monitor the cure characteristics of Bismaleimides (BMI) based composite materials was investigated. The acoustic attenuation reflects changes in the viscosity of the resin. The effects on the acoustic response curve of laminate thickness, ply orientation as well as the type of BMI were studied. A general correlation relating the acoustic attenuation of a curing BMI composite to the actual viscosity was developed. The results obtained for BMI were compared to those obtained from epoxy based composite materials.

  13. Multiply fully recyclable carbon fibre reinforced heat-resistant covalent thermosetting advanced composites

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanchao; Sun, Yanxiao; Yan, Shijing; Zhao, Jianqing; Liu, Shumei; Zhang, Mingqiu; Zheng, Xiaoxing; Jia, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Nondestructive retrieval of expensive carbon fibres (CFs) from CF-reinforced thermosetting advanced composites widely applied in high-tech fields has remained inaccessible as the harsh conditions required to recycle high-performance resin matrices unavoidably damage the structure and properties of CFs. Degradable thermosetting resins with stable covalent structures offer a potential solution to this conflict. Here we design a new synthesis scheme and prepare a recyclable CF-reinforced poly(hexahydrotriazine) resin matrix advanced composite. The multiple recycling experiments and characterization data establish that this composite demonstrates performance comparable to those of its commercial counterparts, and more importantly, it realizes multiple intact recoveries of CFs and near-total recycling of the principal raw materials through gentle depolymerization in certain dilute acid solution. To our best knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time a feasible and environment-friendly preparation-recycle-regeneration strategy for multiple CF-recycling from CF-reinforced advanced composites. PMID:28251985

  14. Multiply fully recyclable carbon fibre reinforced heat-resistant covalent thermosetting advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanchao; Sun, Yanxiao; Yan, Shijing; Zhao, Jianqing; Liu, Shumei; Zhang, Mingqiu; Zheng, Xiaoxing; Jia, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Nondestructive retrieval of expensive carbon fibres (CFs) from CF-reinforced thermosetting advanced composites widely applied in high-tech fields has remained inaccessible as the harsh conditions required to recycle high-performance resin matrices unavoidably damage the structure and properties of CFs. Degradable thermosetting resins with stable covalent structures offer a potential solution to this conflict. Here we design a new synthesis scheme and prepare a recyclable CF-reinforced poly(hexahydrotriazine) resin matrix advanced composite. The multiple recycling experiments and characterization data establish that this composite demonstrates performance comparable to those of its commercial counterparts, and more importantly, it realizes multiple intact recoveries of CFs and near-total recycling of the principal raw materials through gentle depolymerization in certain dilute acid solution. To our best knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time a feasible and environment-friendly preparation-recycle-regeneration strategy for multiple CF-recycling from CF-reinforced advanced composites.

  15. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  16. Investigation of fatigue strength of multilayer advanced fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, H. R.; Kozik, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical characterization of a multilayer fiber composite plate (without hole) was accomplished for both static and dynamic loading conditions using the finite difference technique. Thornel 300/5208 composites with and without holes were subjected to static and tensile fatigue testing. Five (5) fiber orientations were submitted to test. Tensile fatigue testing also included three (3) loading conditions and two (2) frequencies. The low-cycle test specimens demonstrated a shorter tensile fatigue life than the high-cycle test specimens. Failure surfaces demonstrated effect of testing conditions. Secondary failure mechanisms, such as: delamination, fiber breakage, and edge fiber delamination were present. Longitudinal delamination between plies also occurred in these specimens.

  17. An In-vitro Comparative Study of Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel using three Herbal Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Komineni, Nanda Kumar; Pola, Sambashivarao; Soujanya, E; Karne, Anand Ramtheerth; Nenavath, Bhasker; Shiva, Sandeep; Vuppunuthula, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction If adhesive restorations are carried out imme-diately, the Shear Bond Strength (SBS) to bleached enamel is reduced. The use of antioxidants can be highlighted since it seems to be a more effective alternative to reduce or remove the residual oxygen and immediate improvement in SBS. Aim The purpose of this in-vitro study was an attempt to regain the lost bond strength, for which, the comparison of SBS of composite resin to bleached enamel was carried out using various antioxidants i.e., 5% grape seed extract, 5% pine bark extract, 5% pomegranate peel extract. Materials and Methods Labial enamel surfaces of 50 extracted human maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 5 groups based on the antioxidant used as follows: Group I (n=10): Bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide gel for 10 minutes, without the use of an antioxidant; Group II (n=10): Bleaching followed by the use of 5% grape seed extract solution; Group III (n=10): Bleaching followed by the use of 5% pine bark extract solution Group IV (n=10): bleaching followed by the use of 5% pomegranate extract solution; and Group V (n=10): Control group in which no Bleaching was done. SBS of the specimens was tested using universal testing machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using computer software Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Mann Tukey Post hoc test. Results Mean SBS values were compared in all the groups and there was a statistically significant difference present among the groups (p<0.05). The SBS values were observed to be significantly higher in unbleached teeth (control group) followed by 5% pine bark extract, 5% grape seed extract, 5% pomegranate extract and the group in which teeth bleached with no antioxidant used. Conclusion The use of antioxidant immediately after bleaching the enamel surface, completely neutralizes the deleterious effects of bleaching and increases the SBS

  18. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  19. Advanced Nano-Composites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to increase energy efficiency and operating lifetime of wear-intensive industrial components and systems by developing and commercializing a family of ceramic-based monolithic composites that have shown remarkable resistance to wear in laboratory tests.

  20. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  1. Advanced Modeling Strategies for the Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    1999-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the deformation mechanisms in tile-reinforced armored components was conducted to develop the most efficient modeling strategies for the structural analysis of large components of the Composite Armored Vehicle. The limitations of conventional finite elements with respect to the analysis of tile-reinforced structures were examined, and two complementary optimal modeling strategies were developed. These strategies are element layering and the use of a tile-adhesive superelement. Element layering is a technique that uses stacks of shear deformable shell elements to obtain the proper transverse shear distributions through the thickness of the laminate. The tile-adhesive superelement consists of a statically condensed substructure model designed to take advantage of periodicity in tile placement patterns to eliminate numerical redundancies in the analysis. Both approaches can be used simultaneously to create unusually efficient models that accurately predict the global response by incorporating the correct local deformation mechanisms.

  2. Design and fabrication of Rene 41 advanced structural panels. [their performance under axial compression, shear, and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, B. E.; Northrup, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency was investigated of curved elements in the design of lightweight structural panels under combined loads of axial compression, inplane shear, and bending. The application is described of technology generated in the initial aluminum program to the design and fabrication of Rene 41 panels for subsequent performance tests at elevated temperature. Optimum designs for two panel configurations are presented. The designs are applicable to hypersonic airplane wing structure, and are designed specifically for testing at elevated temperature in the hypersonic wing test structure located at the NASA Flight Research Center. Fabrication methods developed to produce the Rene panels are described, and test results of smaller structural element specimens are presented to verify the design and fabrication methods used. Predicted strengths of the panels under several proposed elevated temperature test load conditions are presented.

  3. Effects of conventional and high-intensity light-curing on enamel shear bond strength of composite resin and resin-modified glass-ionomer.

    PubMed

    Sfondrini, M F; Cacciafesta, V; Pistorio, A; Sfondrini, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths of a composite resin (Transbond XT; 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America Inc, Alsip, Ill) cured with 2 different light-curing units: a conventional visible light unit (Ortholux XT; 3M Dental Products, St Paul, Minn) and a xenon arc light unit (Plasma Arc Curing [PAC] System; American Dental Technologies, Corpus Christi, Texas). One hundred twenty freshly extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 1 of 8 groups; each group consisted of 15 specimens. Two groups (1 group for each type of adhesive) were exposed to the visible light for 20 seconds (Transbond XT) and 40 seconds (Fuji Ortho LC), respectively, and used as control groups. The remaining 6 groups (3 for each adhesive) were cured with the xenon arc light for 2, 5, and 10 seconds. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested in a shear mode on an Instron universal testing machine (Instron Corp, Canton, Mass). For the groups bonded with Transbond XT, no statistically significant differences (P =.868) were found between the shear bond strength of the control group cured with Ortholux XT and those of the groups cured with the PAC System for 2, 5, or 10 seconds. When the shear bond strengths of the groups bonded with Fuji Ortho LC were evaluated, no statistically significant differences (P =.087) were found between the control group that was cured with Ortholux XT and those cured with the PAC System. The bond strength of the composite resin was significantly higher than that of the resin-modified glass ionomer in all the groups tested (P <.0001). The present findings indicate that, compared with visible light-curing, the xenon arc light enables the clinician to significantly reduce the curing time of both bonding agents, without affecting their shear bond strengths. Therefore, xenon arc light

  4. Advanced composite fiber/metal pressure vessels for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolopoulos, Aleck

    1993-06-01

    Structural Composites Industries has developed, qualified, and delivered a number of high performance carbon epoxy overwrapped/seamless aluminum liner pressure vessels for use in military aircraft where low weight, low cost, high operating pressure and short lead time are the primary considerations. This paper describes product design, development, and qualification for a typical program. The vessel requirements included a munitions insensitivity criterion as evidenced by no fragmentation following impact by a .50 cal tumbling bullet. This was met by the development of a carbon-Spectra hybrid composite overwrap on a thin-walled seamless aluminum liner. The same manufacturing, inspection, and test processes that are used to produce lightweight, thin walled seamless aluminum lined carbon/epoxy overwrapped pressure vessels for satellite and other space applications were used to fabricate this vessel. This report focuses on the results of performance in the qualification testing.

  5. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  6. Advanced Polymer Composite Molding Through Intelligent Process Analysis and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) and Seemann Composite Resin Infusion Molding Process (SCRIMPT M). All variations of RTM are suitable for the...numerical simulations have been used to design the vent and gate locations for molds used for RTM , VARTM and SCRIMPTM [2,3,7-14]. Regardless of the research...200 Words) To prevent dry spot formation in RTM , a control interface and four different adaptive control algorithms were developed and tested with

  7. SRM nozzle design breakthroughs with advanced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdoyes, Michel

    1993-06-01

    The weight reduction-related performance and cost of the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) units' critical nozzle components are undergoing revolutionary improvements through the use of 3D-woven carbon/carbon and carbon/alumina composite materials. These can be used to fabricate the SRM's nozzle throat nondegradable insulators, thermostructural insulator, and exit cones. Additional developments are noted among nozzle-related structural components for additional rocket propulsion systems, including a three-piece extendible nozzle.

  8. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    The structural design configuration for the Composite Vertical Stabilizer is described and the structural design, analysis, and weight activities are presented. The status of fabrication and test activities for the development test portion of the program is described. Test results are presented for the skin panels, spar web, spar cap to cover, and laminate properties specimens. Engineering drawings of vertification test panels and root fittings, rudder support specimens, titanium fittings, and rear spar specimen analysis models are included.

  9. Advances in photo-thermo-refractive glass composition modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. A.; Ignatiev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The novel photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass developed in ITMO University is a very promising optical material for photonic and plasmonic applications. In this paper authors represent study of tin influence on photo thermo inducted crystallization process and make a comparison of the optical and holographic properties of the new and classic composition of glass. Also during this work was made overall optimization of chemical composition namely was optimized concentration of halides, fluorides, bromides which are responsible for crystalline phase properties. Ions of antimony, which playing key role in catching and transferring electrons emitted during the UV exposure and subsequent heating. Also was lowered the concentration of stray impurity ions which a capable to catch photo-electrons. Optical spectra show that new composition of PTR glass has no absorption band in visible range caused by metal nano particles of silver. That allows recording of pure phase holograms in wide spectral range. Furthermore new PTR glass allows receiving refractive index modulation up to 1500 ppm. And the UV exposures needed to achieve maximum changes in refraction index are 6-7 times lower than in classic glass.

  10. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  11. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    D, Krishnakanth Reddy; V, Kishore M S; Safeena, Safeena

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine shear bond strength and the effect on the bracket/ adhesive failure mode when an acidic primer and other etchants were used to condition the enamel surface before bonding. Materials & Methods: Group I: Brackets bonded with Ultimate cure-on-light Light-cure composite adhesive system. Group II: Brackets bonded with Ortho-one no-mix. Self-cure composite adhesive system. Group III: Brackets bonded with Light-cure glass ionomer adhesive system. Group IV: Brackets bonded with Transbond plus self etching primer. Results: The results of this study indicated that the shear bond strength when using Transbond plus self etching primer showed the highest bond strength Group- IV(8.69 2.54 MPa) followed by Ultimate cure-on-light Group-I (8.62 1.84 MPa), Ortho-one no-mix (Bisco Inc. USA)Group-II (8.07 1.72 MPa), and least bond strength was seen in G.C. Fuji Ortho L.C. Group-III (6.01 1.6) MPa Conclusion: Use of self etching primer saves chairside time and satisfactory high bond strength was obtained. Care should be taken during debonding of ceramic brackets How to cite this article: Reddy K D, Kishore M S V, Safeena S. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):73-78. PMID:24155606

  13. Design and Manufacturing of a Novel Shear Thickening Fluid Composite (STFC) with Enhanced out-of-Plane Properties and Damage Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, F.; Meo, M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to absorb a large amount of energy during an impact event without generating critical damages represents a key feature of new generation composite systems. Indeed, the intrinsic layered nature of composite materials allows the embodiment of specific hybrid plies within the stacking sequence that can be exploited to increase impact resistance and damping of the entire structure without dramatic weight increase. This work is based on the development of an impact-resistant hybrid composite obtained by including a thin layer of Non-Newtonian silica based fluid in a carbon fibres reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminate. This hybrid phase is able to respond to an external solicitation by activating an order-disorder transition that thickens the fluid increasing its viscosity, hence dissipating the energy impact without any critical failure. Several Shear Thickening Fluids (STFs) were manufactured by changing the dimensions of the particles that constitute the disperse phase and their concentrations into the continuous phase. The dynamic viscosity of the different STFs was evaluated via rheometric tests, observing both shear thinning and shear thickening effects depending on the concentration of silica particles. The solutions were then embedded as an active layer within the stacking sequence to manufacture the hybrid CFRP laminates with different embedded STFs. Free vibration tests were carried out in order to assess the damping properties of the different laminates, while low velocity impact tests were used to evaluate their impact properties. Results indicate that the presence of the non-Newtonian fluid is able to absorb up to 45 % of the energy during an impact event for impacts at 2.5 m/s depending on the different concentrations and particles dimensions. These results were confirmed via C-Scan analyses to assess the extent of the internal delamination.

  14. Development of Curved-Plate Elements for the Exact Buckling Analysis of Composite Plate Assemblies Including Transverse-Shear Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.

    1999-01-01

    The analytical formulation of curved-plate non-linear equilibrium equations including transverse-shear-deformation effects is presented. A unified set of non-linear strains that contains terms from both physical and tensorial strain measures is used. Linearized, perturbed equilibrium equations (stability equations) that describe the response of the plate just after buckling occurs are derived. These equations are then modified to allow the plate reference surface to be located a distance z(sub c) from the centroidal surface. The implementation of the new theory into the VICONOPT exact buckling and vibration analysis and optimum design computer program is described. The terms of the plate stiffness matrix using both classical plate theory (CPT) and first-order shear-deformation plate theory (SDPT) are presented. The effects of in-plane transverse and in-plane shear loads are included in the in-plane stability equations. Numerical results for several example problems with different loading states are presented. Comparisons of analyses using both physical and tensorial strain measures as well as CPT and SDPT are made. The computational effort required by the new analysis is compared to that of the analysis currently in the VICONOPT program. The effects of including terms related to in-plane transverse and in-plane shear loadings in the in-plane stability equations are also examined. Finally, results of a design-optimization study of two different cylindrical shells subject to uniform axial compression are presented.

  15. Advanced refractory metals and composites for extraterrestrial power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Grobstein, Toni L.

    1990-01-01

    Concepts for future space power systems include nuclear and focused solar heat sources coupled to static and dynamic power-conversion devices; such systems must be designed for service lives as long as 30 years, despite service temperatures of the order of 1600 K. Materials are a critical technology-development factor in such aspects of these systems as reactor fuel containment, environmental protection, power management, and thermal management. Attention is given to the prospective performance of such refractory metals as Nb, W, and Mo alloys, W fiber-reinforced Nb-matrix composites, and HfC precipitate-strengthened W-Re alloys.

  16. Preparation, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Advanced Polymeric and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis titles are given below: physical and mechanical behavior of amorphous poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole)s and poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole) modification epoxies; the requirements of patentability as applied to the chemical arts; fabrication of thermoplastic polymer composite ribbon; blend of reactive diluents with phenylethynyl-terminated arylene ether oligomers; the synthesis, characterization, and application of ether-containing polyimides; the synthesis of reflective and electrically conductive polyimide films via an in-situ self-metalization procedure using silver (I) complexes; the thermal cure of phenylethynyl terminated polyimides and selected model compounds; and the synthesis, characterization, and molecular modeling of cyclic arylene ether oligomers.

  17. Advanced ultrasonic testing of complex shaped composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, D.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Filippov, G.; Salchak, Y.; Sedanova, E.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the wide application of composite materials it is necessary to develop unconventional quality control techniques. One of the methods that can be used for this purpose is ultrasonic tomography. In this article an application of a robotic ultrasonic system is considered. Precise positioning of the robotic scanner and path generating are defined as ones of the most important aspects. This study proposes a non-contact calibration method of a robotic ultrasonic system. Path of the scanner requires a 3D model of controlled objects which are created in accordance with the proposed algorithm. The suggested techniques are based on implementation of structured light method.

  18. Innovative fabrication processing of advanced composite materials concepts for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassapoglou, Christos; Dinicola, Al J.; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    The autoclave based THERM-X(sub R) process was evaluated by cocuring complex curved panels with frames and stiffeners. The process was shown to result in composite parts of high quality with good compaction at sharp radius regions and corners of intersecting parts. The structural properties of the postbuckled panels fabricated were found to be equivalent to those of conventionally tooled hand laid-up parts. Significant savings in bagging time over conventional tooling were documented. Structural details such as cocured shear ties and embedded stiffener flanges in the skin were found to suppress failure modes such as failure at corners of intersecting members and skin stiffeners separation.

  19. Advances in Moire interferometry for thermal response of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, E. W., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.; Hyer, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique for the precise measurement of the thermal response of both sides of a laminated composite coupon specimen uses Moire interferometry with fringe multiplication which yields a sensitivity of 833 nm (32.8 micro in.) per fringe. The reference gratings used are virtual gratings and are formed by partially mirrorized glass prisms in close proximity to the specimen. Results are compared with both results obtained from tests which used Moire interferometry on one side of composite laminates, and with those predicted by classical lamination theory. The technique is shown to be capable of producing the sensitivity and accuracy necessary to measure a wide range of thermal responses and to detect small side to side variations in the measured response. Tests were conducted on four laminate configurations of T300/5208 graphite epoxy over a temperature range of 297 K (75 F) to 422 K (300 F). The technique presented allows for the generation of reference gratings for temperature regimes well outside that used in these tests.

  20. Multisensor monitoring of drilling in advanced fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, Anthony C.; El-Gizawy, A. Sherif; Enemuoh, E. U.

    1997-06-01

    This paper investigates the main effects of drilling parameters (cutting speed, feed rate, tool geometry, and tool material) on cutting force and hole quality during drilling of magnamite graphite fiber reinforced polyether ether ketone (AS4/PEEK) composites. The AS4/PEEK is a one hundred and ninety nine-ply [0 degree(s)/45 degree(s)/90 degree(s)/-45 degree(s)]s laminate composite. Taguchi orthogonal array L9 technique is used to plan a 34 robust experiment. The workpiece is supported on a fixture and mounted on a 3-component piezoelectric transducer Kistler type 9257A model. The response signals (cutting force and acoustic emission) are acquired simultaneously during the drilling experiments. The signals are instantaneously sampled and stored in a pentium computer for later processing. The digitized signals are processed in time domain. Surface profilometer is used to measure the surface roughness of the drilled holes. The optimum drilling condition is determined by meticulous examination of the drilling parameter's main effects. The responses are analyzed based on Taguchi's signal-to-noise ratio as opposed to the measurement data and analysis of variance. The results show that sensor signals, delamination and surface roughness measurements are well correlated with the drilling parameters. Optimum drill tool materials, drill point angle and cutting conditions have been determined.

  1. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  2. In-vitro comparison of the effect of different bonding strategies on the micro-shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite resin to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Pouran; Alizadeh, Vahid; Fathpour, Kamyar; Mazaheri, Hamid; Mortazavi, Vajihosadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study evaluated the micro-shear bond strengths of a new low-shrinkage composite resin to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 70 extracted premolars were assigned to one of seven groups (n = 10): Group 1: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt; Kerr); Group 2: SE Bond (SE; Kuraray); Group 3: Silorane System Adhesive (SSA; 3M ESPE); Group 4: OptiBond Solo Plus + LS Bond (Opt LS); Group 5: SE Bond + LS Bond (SE LS); Group 6: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt Po); and Group 7: SE Bond (SE Po). Occlusal dentin was exposed and restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE) in groups 1 to 5 and Point 4 (Kerr) in groups 6 and 7. After thermocycling (1000 cycles at 5/55΀C), micro-shear bond test was carried out to measure the bond strengths. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and post hoc Tukeytests (P < 0.05). Results: Two-way ANOVA showed no significant differences between the two types of composite resin (P = 0.187), between bonding agents (P = 0.06) and between composite resin and bonding agents (P = 0.894). Because P value of bonding agents was near the significance level, one-way ANOVA was used separately between the two composite groups. This analysis showed significant differences between silorane composite resin groups (P = 0.045) and Tukey test showed a significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The application of total-etch and self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives with and without use of a hydrophobic resin coating resulted in acceptable bond strengths. PMID:27076826

  3. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Merve Bankoğlu; Bal, Bilge Turhan; Ünver, Senem; Doğan, Aylin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to thermocycled and non-thermocycled CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 specimens (10×10×2 mm) from each material were divided into 12 groups according to different surface treatments in combination with thermal aging procedures. Surface treatment methods were airborne-particle abrasion (abraded with 50 micron alumina particles), dry grinding (grinded with 125 µm grain size bur), and hydrofluoric acid (9%) and silane application. According to the thermocycling procedure, the groups were assigned as non-thermocycled, thermocycled after packing composites, and thermocycled before packing composites. The average surface roughness of the non-thermocycled specimens were measured after surface treatments. After packing composites and thermocycling procedures, shear bond strength (SBS) of the specimens were tested. The results of surface roughness were statistically analyzed by 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and SBS results were statistically analyzed by 3-way ANOVA. RESULTS Surface roughness of GC were significantly lower than that of LU and VE (P<.05). The highest surface roughness was observed for dry grinding group, followed by airborne particle abraded group (P<.05). Comparing the materials within the same surface treatment method revealed that untreated surfaces generally showed lower SBS values. The values of untreated LU specimens showed significantly different SBS values compared to those of other surface treatment groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION SBS was affected by surface treatments. Thermocycling did not have any effect on the SBS of the materials except acid and silane applied GC specimens, which were subjected to thermocycling before packing of the composite resin. PMID:27555894

  4. Status of Advanced Stitched Unitized Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Velicki, Alex

    2013-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift-to-drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise levels. The primary structural concept being developed under the ERA project in the Airframe Technology element is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. This paper describes how researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop fundamental PRSEUS technologies that could someday be implemented on a transport size aircraft with high aspect ratio wings or unconventional shapes such as a hybrid wing body airplane design.

  5. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.

  6. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Bhatt, Ramakrishna; Kiser, Doug; Wiesner, Valerie L.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation reviews the NASA advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components for next generation turbine engines. The emphasis has been placed on the current design challenges of the 2700F environmental barrier coatings; coating processing and integration with SiCSiC CMCs and component systems; and performance evaluation and demonstration of EBC-CMC systems. This presentation also highlights the EBC-CMC system temperature capability and durability improvements through advanced compositions and architecture designs, as shown in recent simulated engine high heat flux, combustion environment, in conjunction with mechanical creep and fatigue loading testing conditions.

  7. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  8. Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Daniels, D.L.; Serafini, T.T.; Di Carlo, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis focuses on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  9. Damage Prediction Models for Advanced Materials and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Ming; Ahmad, Jalees; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the assessment and evaluation of various acoustic tile designs were conducted using three-dimensional finite element analysis, which included static analysis, thermal analysis and modal analysis of integral and non-integral tile design options. Various benchmark specimens for acoustic tile designs, including CMC integral T-joint and notched CMC plate, were tested in both room and elevated temperature environment. Various candidate ceramic matrix composite materials were used in the numerical modeling and experimental study. The research effort in this program evolved from numerical modeling and concept design to a combined numerical analysis and experimental study. Many subjects associated with the design and performance of the acoustic tile in jet engine exhaust nozzle have been investigated.

  10. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft, task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.; Fogg, L. D.; Stone, R. L.; Dunning, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    Structural design and maintainability criteria were established and used as a guideline for evaluating a variety of configurations and materials for each of the major subcomponents. From this array of subcomponent designs, several aileron assemblies were formulated and analyzed. The selected design is a multirib configuration with sheet skin covers mechanically fastened to channel section ribs and spars. Qualitative analysis of currently available composite material systems led to the selection of three candidate materials on which comparative structural tests were conducted to measure the effects of environment and impact damage on mechanical property retention. In addition, each system was evaluated for producibility characteristics. From these tests, Thornel 300/5208 unidirectional tape was selected for the front spar and covers, and Thornel 300 fabric/5208 was chosen for the ribs.

  11. In situ cure monitoring of advanced fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Graham R.; Crosby, Peter A.; Fernando, Gerard F.; France, Chris M.; Spooncer, Ronald C.; Waters, David N.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of in-situ cure monitoring and cure modelling by three methods: (a) evanescent wave spectroscopy, (b) refractive index change, (c) near- infrared spectroscopy. Optical fibers were embedded into aerospace epoxy resins during the manufacturing process of the composite. The cure characteristics were then tracked in real- time during the processing of the material via evanescent wave interaction. This technique is based upon monitoring of characteristic infrared absorption bands of the resin system to find the concentration of the epoxy and amine hardener as a function of cure time. Hence this technique is suitable for on-line process monitoring and optimization. Results obtained from the optical fiber sensors were used to model the curing behavior of the resin system. The results were compared with near-infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry experiments carried out under similar conditions. The feasibility of utilizing refractive index changes to monitor the extent of cure has also been demonstrated.

  12. Advances in the Use of Thermography to Inspect Composite Tanks for Liquid Fuel Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of advances in the use of thermography to inspect composite tanks for liquid fuel propulsion systems. Details are given on the thermographic inspection system, thermographic analysis method (includes scan and defect map, method of inspection, and inclusions, ply wrinkle, and delamination defects), graphite composite cryogenic feedline (including method, image map, and deep/shallow inclusions and resin rich area defects), and material degradation nondestructive evaluation.

  13. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  14. Advanced thermoplastic composites: An attractive new material for usage in highly loaded vehicle components

    SciTech Connect

    Mehn, R.; Seidl, F.; Peis, R.; Heinzmann, D.; Frei, P.

    1995-10-01

    Beside the lightweight potential and further well known advantages of advanced composite materials, continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastics employed in vehicle structural parts especially offer short manufacturing cycle times and an additional economically viable manufacturing process. Presenting a frame structure concept for two highly loaded vehicle parts, a safety seat and a side door, numerous features concerning the choice of suitable composite materials, design aspects, investigations to develop a thermoforming technique, mature for a series production of vehicle parts, are discussed.

  15. Determination of critical loads for cylindrical sandwich panels of composite materials under two-sided compression and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, A. L.; Krashakov, Yu. F.

    The problem of determining the critical buckling stress of symmetric and nonsymmetric sandwich panels loaded in two-sided compression and shear is investigated analytically. The governing equation is obtained by solving equations of balance of forces and moments for an element of a sandwich structure in the case of buckling. The solution is based on the general assumptions of the theory of thin shallow shells. The results of the study can be used to optimize the structure of sandwich panels.

  16. Development of Curved-Plate Elements for the Exact Buckling Analysis of Composite Plate Assemblies Including Transverse-Shear Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David Michael

    1997-01-01

    The analytical formulation of curved-plate non-linear equilibrium equations including transverse-shear-deformation effects is presented. The formulation uses the principle of virtual work. A unified set of non-linear strains that contains terms from both physical and tensorial strain measures is used. Linearized, perturbed equilibrium equations (stability equations) that describe the response of the plate just after buckling occurs are then derived after the application of several simplifying assumptions. These equations are then modified to allow the reference surface of the plate to be located at a distance z(sub c) from the centroidal surface. The implementation of the new theory into the VICONOPT exact buckling and vibration analysis and optimum design computer program is described as well. The terms of the plate stiffness matrix using both Classical Plate Theory (CPT) and first-order Shear-Deformation Plate Theory (SDPT) are presented. The necessary steps to include the effects of in-plane transverse and in-plane shear loads in the in-plane stability equations are also outlined. Numerical results are presented using the newly implemented capability. Comparisons of results for several example problems with different loading states are made. Comparisons of analyses using both physical and tensorial strain measures as well as CPT and SDPF are also made. Results comparing the computational effort required by the new analysis to that of the analysis currently in the VICONOPT program are presented. The effects of including terms related to in-plane transverse and in-plane shear loadings in the in-plane stability equations are also examined. Finally, results of a design-optimization study of two different cylindrical shells subject to uniform axial compression are presented.

  17. Robust Joining and Integration of Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Challenges, Opportunities, and Realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2006-01-01

    Advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in a wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite components require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition, these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of high temperature joints in advanced ceramics and ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology. In addition, some examples of metal-ceramic brazing will also be presented. Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and composites will be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites will be discussed.

  18. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed.

  19. Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

    2001-01-12

    The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.

  20. Fatigue characterization of advanced carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Das, Partha S.; Jeelani, Shaik; Baker, Dean M.; Johnson, Sigured A.

    1992-01-01

    Response of quasi-isotropic laminates of SiC coated Carbon-Carbon (C/C) composites under flexural fatigue are investigated at room temperature. Virgin as well as mission cycled specimens are tested to study the effects of thermal and pressure cycling on the fatigue performance of C/C. Tests were conducted in three point bending with a stress ratio of 0.2 and frequency of 1 Hz. Fatigue strength of C/C has been found to be considerably high - approximately above 85 percent of the ultimate flexural strength. The fatigue strength appears to be decreasing with the increase in the number of mission cycling of the specimens. This lower strength with the mission cycled specimens is attributed to the loss of interfacial bond strength due to thermal and pressure cycling of the material. C/C is also found to be highly sensitive to the applied stress level during cyclic loading, and this sensitivity is observed to increase with the mission cycling. Weibull characterization on the fatigue data has been performed, and the wide scatter in the Weibull distribution is discussed. Fractured as well as untested specimens were C-scanned, and the progressive damage growth during fatigue is presented.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Inclusions and Precipitation Hardening in Metal Matrix Composites: Application to Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Hesam; Zbib, Hussein M.; Sun, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the strengthening effect of inclusions and precipitates in metals is investigated within a multiscale approach that utilizes models at various length scales, namely, Molecular Mechanics (MM), discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DD), and an Eigenstrain Inclusion Method (EIM). Particularly, precipitates are modeled as hardsoft particles whose stress fields interact with dislocations. The stress field resulting from the elastic mismatch between the particles and the matrix is accounted for through the EIM. While the MM method is employed for the purpose of developing rules for DD for short range interaction between a single dislocation and an inclusion, the DD method is used to predict the strength of the composite resulting from the interaction between ensembles of dislocations and particles. As an application to this method, the mechanical behavior of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) is investigated and the results are then compared to the experimental data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery, as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results show that strengthening due to nano sized particles is a function of the density and size of the precipitates. This size effect is then explained using a mechanistic model developed based on dislocation-particle interaction.

  2. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall wing study objectives are to study and plan the effort by commercial transport aircraft manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current conventional materials and practices to extensive use of advanced composites in wings of aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Specific wing study objectives are to define the technology and data needed to support an aircraft manufacturer's commitment to utilize composites primary wing structure in future production aircraft and to develop plans for a composite wing technology program which will provide the needed technology and data.

  3. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composite materials in the wing structure of future production aircraft. The study accomplished the following: (1) definition of acceptance factors, (2) identification of technology issues, (3) evaluation of six candidate wing structures, (4) evaluation of five program options, (5) definition of a composite wing technology development plan, (6) identification of full-scale tests, (7) estimation of program costs for the total development plan, (8) forecast of future utilization of composites in commercial transport aircraft and (9) identification of critical technologies for timely program planning.

  4. Variation in Content Coverage by Classroom Composition: An Analysis of Advanced Math Course Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covay, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that there is racial inequality in achievement returns from advanced math; however, they do not know why black students and white students taking the same level of math courses are not leaving with the same or comparable skill levels. To find out, the author examines variation in course coverage by the racial composition of the…

  5. Case Studies of Re-Entering Students in Advanced Composition: Composing Using the Word Processor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunder, Eleanor Parks

    A qualitative study examined the revision of writing on the word processor of two re-entering students in advanced composition in comparison to three traditional-age students. Its purposes were to see whether there was any difference in adaptation to the word processor between the two groups and whether each writer had a consistent revision…

  6. Inspecting Composite Ceramic Armor Using Advanced Signal Processing Together with Phased Array Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-08

    processing techniques have been developed to help improve phased array ultrasonic inspection and analysis of multi-layered ceramic armor panels. The...INSPECTING COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR USING ADVANCED SIGNAL PROCESSING TOGETHER WITH PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND J. S. Steckenrider Illinois College...immersion phased array ultrasound system. Some of these specimens had intentional design defects inserted interior to the specimens. Because of the very

  7. Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2008-01-01

    AS&M performed a broad assessment survey and study to establish the potential composite materials and structures applications and benefits to the Constellation Program Elements. Trade studies were performed on selected elements to determine the potential weight or performance payoff from use of composites. Weight predictions were made for liquid hydrogen and oxygen tanks, interstage cylindrical shell, lunar surface access module, ascent module liquid methane tank, and lunar surface manipulator. A key part of this study was the evaluation of 88 different composite technologies to establish their criticality to applications for the Constellation Program. The overall outcome of this study shows that composites are viable structural materials which offer from 20% to 40% weight savings for many of the structural components that make up the Major Elements of the Constellation Program. NASA investment in advancing composite technologies for space structural applications is an investment in America's Space Exploration Program.

  8. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to alloy treated with sandblasting and electrolytic etching.

    PubMed

    Goswami, M M; Gupta, S H; Sandhu, H S

    2014-03-01

    Conservation of natural tooth structure precipitated the emergence of resin-retained fixed partial dentures. The weakest link in this modality is the bond between resin cement and alloy of the retainer. Various alloy surface treatment have been recommended to improve alloy-resin bond. This in vitro study was carried out to observe changes in the Nickel-Chromium alloy (Wiron 99, Bego) surface following sandblasting or electrolytic etching treatment by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to evaluate the shear bond strength of a resin luting cement bonded to the surface treated alloy. 80 alloy blocks were cast and divided into four groups of 20 each. In groups-A & B, the test surfaces were treated by sandblasting with 50 and 250 μm sized aluminium oxide particles respectively. In groups-C & D, the test surfaces were first treated by sandblasting with 50 and 250 μm sized aluminium oxide particles respectively followed by electrolytic etching. Test surfaces were observed under SEM at 1,000× magnification. Two alloy blocks of each group were luted together by a resin luting cement (Rely X, 3M) and their shear bond strength was tested. The mean shear bond strength in MPa of groups-A to D were 6.44 (±0.74), 8.18 (±0.51), 14.45 (±0.59) and 17.43 (±1.20) respectively. Group-D showed bond strength that is more than clinically acceptable bond strength. It is recommended that before luting resin-retained fixed partial dentures, the fitting surface of the retainer should be electrolytically etched to achieve adequate micromechanical retention.

  10. Advanced composite structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Advanced material concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kreisler S. Y.; Landis, Abraham L.; Chow, Andrea W.; Hamlin, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    To achieve acceptable performance and long-term durability at elevated temperatures (350 to 600 F) for high-speed transport systems, further improvements of the high-performance matrix materials will be necessary to achieve very long-term (60,000-120,000 service hours) retention of mechanical properties and damage tolerance. This report emphasizes isoimide modification as a complementary technique to semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN's) to achieve greater processibility, better curing dynamics, and possibly enhanced thermo-mechanical properties in composites. A key result is the demonstration of enhanced processibility of isoimide-modified linear and thermo-setting polyimide systems.

  11. Criteria for initiation of delamination in quasi-static punch-shear tests of a carbon-fiber composite material.

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Eric Brian; English, Shawn Allen; Briggs, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    V arious phenomenological delamination initiation criteria are analyzed in quasi - static punch - shear tests conducted on six different geometries. These six geometries are modeled and analyzed using elastic, large - deformation finite element analysis. Analysis output is post - processed to assess different delamination initiation criteria, and their applicability to each of the geometries. These criteria are compared to test results to assess whether or not they are appropriate based on what occurred in testing. Further, examinations of CT scans and ultrasonic images o f test specimens are conducted in the appendix to determine the sequence of failure in each test geometry.

  12. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Corbani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n = 12). In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min), and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ). Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. Morphological evaluation revealed tags or plugs in dentinal tubules, especially when 60 mJ and 80 mJ were used. All four groups tended to leave more residues on the dentin surface, than the control group. Conclusion. Er:YAG dentin irradiation may enhance SBS of the self-adhering flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density. PMID:27830151

  13. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Wet and Dry Enamel Using Dentin Bonding Agents Containing Various Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramarao, Sathyanarayanan; John, Bindu Meera; Rajesh, Praveen; Swatha, S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bonding of composite resin to dentin mandates a wet substrate whereas, enamel should be dry. This may not be easily achievable in intracoronal preparations where enamel and dentin are closely placed to each other. Therefore, Dentin Bonding Agents (DBA) are recommended for enamel and dentinal bonding, where enamel is also left moist. A research question was raised if the “enamel-only” preparations will also benefit from wet enamel bonding and contemporary DBA. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin, bonded to dry and wet enamel using fifth generation DBA (etch and rinse system) containing various solvents such as ethanol/water, acetone and ethanol. Materials and Methods The crowns of 120 maxillary premolars were split into buccal and lingual halves. They were randomly allocated into four groups of DBA: Group 1-water/ethanol based, Group 2-acetone based, Group 3-ethanol based, Group 4-universal bonding agent (control group). The buccal halves and lingual halves were bonded using the wet bonding and dry bonding technique respectively. After application of the DBAs and composite resin build up, shear bond strength testing was done. Results Group 1 (ethanol/water based ESPE 3M, Adper Single Bond) showed highest bond strength of (23.15 MPa) in dry enamel. Group 2 (acetone based Denstply, Prime and Bond NT, showed equal bond strength in wet and dry enamel condition (18.87 MPa and 18.02 MPa respectively). Conclusion Dry enamel bonding and ethanol/water based etch and rinse DBA can be recommended for “enamel-only” tooth preparations. PMID:28274042

  14. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Paul; Zeinoun, Toni; Majzoub, Zeina; Corbani, Karim; Nammour, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n = 12). In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min), and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ). Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. Morphological evaluation revealed tags or plugs in dentinal tubules, especially when 60 mJ and 80 mJ were used. All four groups tended to leave more residues on the dentin surface, than the control group. Conclusion. Er:YAG dentin irradiation may enhance SBS of the self-adhering flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density.

  15. Development of Curved-Plate Elements for the Exact Buckling Analysis of Composite Plate Assemblies Including Transverse Shear Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1998-01-01

    The analytical formulation of curved-plate non-linear equilibrium equations that include transverse-shear-deformation effects is presented. A unified set of non-linear strains that contains terms from both physical and tensorial strain measures is used. Using several simplifying assumptions, linearized, stability equations are derived that describe the response of the plate just after bifurcation buckling occurs. These equations are then modified to allow the plate reference surface to be located a distance z(c), from the centroid surface which is convenient for modeling stiffened-plate assemblies. The implementation of the new theory into the VICONOPT buckling and vibration analysis and optimum design program code is described. Either classical plate theory (CPT) or first-order shear-deformation plate theory (SDPT) may be selected in VICONOPT. Comparisons of numerical results for several example problems with different loading states are made. Results from the new curved-plate analysis compare well with closed-form solution results and with results from known example problems in the literature. Finally, a design-optimization study of two different cylindrical shells subject to uniform axial compression is presented.

  16. Joining and Assembly of Silicon Carbide-based Advanced Ceramics and Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite component require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing o high temperature joints in ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics (CVD and hot pressed), and C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites, in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology (ARCJoinT). Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and CVI and melt infiltrated SiC matrix composites will,be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites well be discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  18. Influence of Cr and W alloying on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength in cast and directionally solidified sapphire NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tiwari, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composites with chromium or tungsten as alloying additions were synthesized using casting and zone directional solidification (DS) techniques and characterized by a fiber pushout test as well as by microhardness measurements. The sapphire-NiAl(Cr) specimens exhibited an interlayer of Cr rich eutectic at the fiber-matrix interface and a higher interfacial shear strength compared to unalloyed sapphire-NiAl specimens processed under identical conditions. In contrast, the sapphire-NiAl(W) specimens did not show interfacial excess of tungsten rich phases, although the interfacial shear strength was high and comparable to that of sapphire-NiAl(Cr). The postdebond sliding stress was higher in sapphire-NiAl(Cr) than in sapphire-NiAl(W) due to interface enrichment with chromium particles. The matrix microhardness progressively decreased with increasing distance from the interface in both DS NiAl and NiAl(Cr) specimens. The study highlights the potential of casting and DS techniques to improve the toughness and strength of NiAl by designing dual-phase microstructures in NiAl alloys reinforced with sapphire fibers.

  19. Influence of transverse-shear and large-deformation effects on the low-speed impact response of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Prasad, Chunchu B.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented for determining the transient response of simply supported, rectangular laminated composite plates subjected to impact loads from airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors. A first-order shear-deformation theory is included in the analysis to represent properly any local short-wave-length transient bending response. The impact force is modeled as a locally distributed load with a cosine-cosine distribution. A double Fourier series expansion and the Timoshenko small-increment method are used to determine the contact force, out-of-plane deflections, and in-plane strains and stresses at any plate location due to an impact force at any plate location. The results of experimental and analytical studies are compared for quasi-isotropic laminates. The results indicate that using the appropriate local force distribution for the locally loaded area and including transverse-shear-deformation effects in the laminated plate response analysis are important. The applicability of the present analytical procedure based on small deformation theory is investigated by comparing analytical and experimental results for combinations of quasi-isotropic laminate thicknesses and impact energy levels. The results of this study indicate that large-deformation effects influence the response of both 24- and 32-ply laminated plates, and that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is required for predicting the response accurately.

  20. Study of mould design and forming process on advanced polymer-matrix composite complex structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. J.; Zhan, L. H.; Bai, H. M.; Chen, X. P.; Zhou, Y. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced carbon fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are widely applied to aviation manufacturing field due to their outstanding performance. In this paper, the mould design and forming process of the complex composite structure were discussed in detail using the hat stiffened structure as an example. The key issues of the moulddesign were analyzed, and the corresponding solutions were also presented. The crucial control points of the forming process such as the determination of materials and stacking sequence, the temperature and pressure route of the co-curing process were introduced. In order to guarantee the forming quality of the composite hat stiffened structure, a mathematical model about the aperture of rubber mandrel was introduced. The study presented in this paper may provide some actual references for the design and manufacture of the important complex composite structures.

  1. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  2. A comparative study of shear bond strength between metal and ceramic brackets and artificially aged composite restorations using different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Mousavi, Nasim; Ghasemi, Amir

    2012-10-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) between ceramic brackets (CBs) and resin composite restorations (RCRs) prepared using different surface treatments. The findings were also compared with a similar study that used stainless steel brackets (SSBs). Forty-five premolars were restored with a nano-hybrid composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram) and randomly assigned to three surface treatment groups: group 1, 5 per cent hydrofluoric acid (HF); group 2, air abrasion (50 μm alumina particles); and group 3, diamond bur. Specimens were bonded with CBs (Fascination) and exposed to thermo-cycling (500 cycles). The shear force at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute was transmitted to brackets. The adhesive remnant index (ARIs) scores were recorded after bracket failure. The analysis of SBS variance (P < 0.01) and chi-square test of ARIs scores (P < 0.01) revealed significant differences among three groups tested. The SBS in group 3 (mean: 26.34 ± 4.76 MPa) and group 2 (mean: 26.68 ± 5.93 MPa) was significantly higher than group 1 (mean: 16.25 ± 5.42 MPa). The SBS was significantly higher in CBs (mean: 23.09 ± 7.19 MPa) compared to SSBs (mean: 15.56 ± 5.13 MPa). High ARIs (100 per cent) occurred in SSBs treated with a diamond bur, whereas CBs primarily failed at the resin-adhesive interface (P < 0.01). In two-thirds of the specimens (SSBs or CBs), no adhesive was left on the restoration after HF conditioning. The ARIs profile of CBs and SSBs that received surface treatments with air abrasion were similar (P > 0.05) and bond failure occurred mainly in adhesive-bracket base and resin-adhesive interfaces. The diamond bur surface treatment is recommended as a safe and cost-effective method of bonding CBs to RCRs.

  3. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  4. Investigation of the relations between resin and advanced composite mechanical properties. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.; Walrath, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    One untoughened epoxy baseline resin and three toughened epoxy resin systems were evaluated. The Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914 resin systems were supplied in the uncured state by NASA-Langley and cast into thin flat specimens and round dogbone specimens. Tensile and torsional shear measurements were performed at three temperatures and two moisture conditions. Coefficients of thermal expansion and moisture expansion were also measured. Extensive scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental conditions under which the various specimens were tested. A micromechanics analysis was used to predict the unidirectional composite response under the various test conditions, incorporating the neat resin experimental results as the required input data. The mechanical and physical test results, the scanning electron microscope observations, and the analytical predictions were then correlated.

  5. Investigation of the relations between neat resin and advanced composite mechanical properties. Volume 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.; Walrath, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of one untoughened epoxy baseline resin and three toughened epoxy resin systems was performed. The Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914 resin systems were supplied in the uncured state by NASA-Langley and cast into thin flat specimens and round dogbone specimens. Tensile and torsional shear measurements were performed at three temperatures and two moisture conditions. Coefficients of thermal expansion and moisture expansion were also measured. Extensive scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed, to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental conditions under which the various specimens were tested. A micromechanics analysis was used to predict the unidirectional composite response under the various test conditions, using the neat resin experimental results as the required input data. Mechanical and physical test results, the scanning electron microscope observations, and the analytical predictions were then correlated.

  6. Compression strengths of advanced composites from a novel mini-sandwich beam

    SciTech Connect

    Crasto, A.S.; Kim, R.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    The intrinsic compression strength of advanced composites is difficult to measure, as the results often depend on the loading geometry and test conditions. Slight variations in specimen geometry can result in an eccentricity of the applied load with consequent specimen buckling. Complex test fixtures and specimen geometries have therefore been developed to avoid such premature failure under compressive loading. In spite of this, there is a large variation in reported strengths for some composites (notably those of intermediate-modulus carbon fibers), and failure strains are also significantly lower than those of the individual filaments. To better approximate the intrinsic composite compressive strength, a novel symmetric mini-sandwich beam was designed for testing. The beam has a composite skin (of variable thickness) on both sides of a neat resin core (of same material as the composite matrix). Unidirectional mini-sandwich specimens of AS4 and S-glass fibers in an epoxy matrix and AS4 in a PEEK matrix were tested in direct axial compression and four-point flexure. Failure occurred predominantly in the specimen gage section, at composite stresses and strains substantially higher than observed in corresponding tests on all composite-coupons. This paper discusses the fabrication and testing of these beams and analyzes the resulting compressive data and failure modes.

  7. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous task, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMIU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TclITk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  8. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  9. Effect of neutron irradiation on fracture resistance of advanced SiC/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Snead, Lance L.

    2011-10-01

    In order to identify the neutron irradiation effects on fracture resistance of advanced SiC/SiC composites, unloading-reloading single edge notched bend tests were conducted and an analytical model based on non-linear fracture mechanics was applied. As a result of the analysis, energy release rate contributed by macro-crack initiation of 3.1 kJ/m 2 for both unirradiated and irradiated advanced SiC/SiC composites (Hi-Nicalon Type-S (0°/90° plain woven)/multilayer/chemically vapor infiltration) is estimated. This result indicates no significant degradation in fracture resistance after neutron irradiation to 5.9 × 10 25 n/m 2 at 800 °C.

  10. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chovil, D. V.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Desper, O. E.; Jamison, E. S.; Syder, H.

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, analysis, and testing activities and results that were required to produce five and one-half shipsets of advanced composite elevators for Boeing 727 aircraft are summarized. During the preliminary design period, alternative concepts were developed. After selection of the best design, detail design and basic configuration improvements were evaluated. Five and one-half shipsets were manufactured. All program goals (except competitive cost demonstration) were accomplished when our design met or exceeded all requirements, criteria, and objectives.

  11. Spectrally Analyzed Embedded Infrared Fiber Optic Diagnostic of Advanced Composite Propellant Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    observations, XM39. This nitramine composite propellant is 76 per cent RDX with most of the balance made up by the binder cellulose acetate butyrate and the...13 Figure 7 Predicted Model Spectrum for Pure Decomposition Gas at 6 atm with a 0.3 cm Absorption Path Length...program of in situ diagnostics and laboratory experiments has led to more advanced models of the gas phase processes in the dark zone and secondary flame

  12. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  13. Plasma and neutrophil fatty acid composition in advanced cancer patients and response to fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pratt, V C; Watanabe, S; Bruera, E; Mackey, J; Clandinin, M T; Baracos, V E; Field, C J

    2002-12-02

    Metabolic demand and altered supply of essential nutrients is poorly characterised in patients with advanced cancer. A possible imbalance or deficiency of essential fatty acids is suggested by reported beneficial effects of fish oil supplementation. To assess fatty acid status (composition of plasma and neutrophil phospholipids) in advanced cancer patients before and after 14 days of supplementation (12+/-1 g day(-1)) with fish (eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) or placebo (olive) oil. Blood was drawn from cancer patients experiencing weight loss of >5% body weight (n=23). Fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids and the major phospholipid classes of isolated neutrophils were determined using gas liquid chromatography. At baseline, patients with advanced cancer exhibited low levels (<30% of normal values) of plasma phospholipids and constituent fatty acids and elevated 20 : 4 n-6 content in neutrophil phospholipids. High n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratios in neutrophil and plasma phospholipids were inversely related to body mass index. Fish oil supplementation raised eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in plasma but not neutrophil phospholipids. 20 : 4 n-6 content was reduced in neutrophil PI following supplementation with fish oil. Change in body weight during the supplementation period related directly to increases in eicosapentaenoic acid in plasma. Advanced cancer patients have alterations in lipid metabolism potentially due to nutritional status and/or chemotherapy. Potential obstacles in fatty acid utilisation must be addressed in future trials aiming to improve outcomes using nutritional intervention with fish oils.

  14. A shear deformable theory of laminated composite shallow shell-type panels and their response analysis. II - Static response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khdeir, A. A.; Librescu, L.; Frederick, D.

    1989-01-01

    In the second part of this paper, by using the static counterparts of the governing equations derived in Librescu (1989), the static response of shallow composite shell-type panels subjected to a sinusoidal transverse load is investigated. The numerical applications, encompassing a large number of boundary conditions and various lamination schemes, allow one to obtain some conclusions which are formulated in the paper.

  15. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin reinforced chemical cure glass ionomer, conventional chemical cure glass ionomer and chemical cure composite resin in direct bonding systems: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kolasani Srinivasa; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Yugandhar, Garlapati; Kumar, B Sunil; Reddy, S N Chandrasekhar; Babu, Devatha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    The acid pretreatment and use of composite resins as the bonding medium has disadvantages like scratching and loss of surface enamel, decalcification, etc. To overcome disadvantages of composite resins, glass ionomers and its modifications are being used for bonding. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of resin reinforced glass ionomer as a direct bonding system with conventional glass ionomer cement and composite resin. The study showed that shear bond strength of composite resin has the higher value than both resin reinforced glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration and it increased from 1 to 24 hours in all groups. The shear bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement was higher than the conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration. Conditioning with polyacrylic acid improved the bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement significantly but not statistically significant in the case of conventional glass ionomer cement.

  16. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  17. Study of the costs and benefits of composite materials in advanced turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Stotler, C. L.; Neitzel, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Composite component designs were developed for a number of applicable engine parts and functions. The cost and weight of each detail component was determined and its effect on the total engine cost to the aircraft manufacturer was ascertained. The economic benefits of engine or nacelle composite or eutectic turbine alloy substitutions was then calculated. Two time periods of engine certification were considered for this investigation, namely 1979 and 1985. Two methods of applying composites to these engines were employed. The first method just considered replacing an existing metal part with a composite part with no other change to the engine. The other method involved major engine redesign so that more efficient composite designs could be employed. Utilization of polymeric composites wherever payoffs were available indicated that a total improvement in Direct Operating Cost (DOC) of 2.82 to 4.64 percent, depending on the engine considered, could be attained. In addition, the percent fuel saving ranged from 1.91 to 3.53 percent. The advantages of using advanced materials in the turbine are more difficult to quantify but could go as high as an improvement in DOC of 2.33 percent and a fuel savings of 2.62 percent. Typically, based on a fleet of one hundred aircraft, a percent savings in DOC represents a savings of four million dollars per year and a percent of fuel savings equals 23,000 cu m (7,000,000 gallons) per year.

  18. Investigation of the Thermomechanical Behavior of a 2 × 2 TWILL Weave Fabric Advanced Textile Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, A.; Mali, H. S.; Misra, R. K.

    2015-05-01

    The thermomechanical performance of a 2 × 2 twill weave fabric advanced textile composite was evaluated. The tensile, compressive, and flexural properties of flat beam specimens of the composite were tested at room temperature, in water (24.9 to 96.7°C), and in liquid nitrogen (-96.9 to 99.4°C) by using a high-precision instrument called the dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The storage modulus and tanδ of the carbonfiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) specimens at various temperatures were evaluated. The scanning electron micrograph (SEMs) of deformed composite specimens revealed their failure mode (fiber pull-out, debonding, crack propagation, delamination, matrix cracking, and kinking of fibers).

  19. Advanced leading edge thermal-structure concept. Direct bond reusable surface insulation to a composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Figueroa, H.; Coe, C. F.; Kuo, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced leading-edge concept was analyzed using the space shuttle leading edge system as a reference model. The comparison indicates that a direct-bond system utilizing a high temperature (2700 F) fibrous refractory composite insulation tile bonded to a high temperature (PI/graphite) composite structure can result in a weight savings of up to 800 lb. The concern that tile damage or loss during ascent would result in adverse entry aerodynamics if a leading edge tile system were used is addressed. It was found from experiment that missing tiles (as many as 22) on the leading edge would not significantly affect the basic force-and-moment aerodynamic coefficients. Additionally, this concept affords a degree of redundancy to a thermal protection system in that the base structure (being a composite material) ablates and neither melts nor burns through when subjected to entry heating in the event tiles are actually lost or damaged during ascent.

  20. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. R.; Haskins, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Implementation of metal and resin matrix composites into supersonic vehicle usage is contingent upon accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive service data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method of documenting the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. A program in progress to determine the time temperature stress capabilities of several high temperature composite materials includes thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, and tensile tests as well as real time flight simulation exposure. The program has two parts. The first includes all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continues these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. Results are presented of the 10,000 hour phase, which has now been completed.

  1. Reduced toxicity polyester resins and microvascular pre-preg tapes for advanced composites manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poillucci, Richard

    Advanced composites manufacturing broadly encapsulates topics ranging from matrix chemistries to automated machines that lay-up fiber-reinforced materials. Environmental regulations are stimulating research to reduce matrix resin formulation toxicity. At present, composites fabricated with polyester resins expose workers to the risk of contact with and inhalation of styrene monomer, which is a potential carcinogen, neurotoxin, and respiratory irritant. The first primary goal of this thesis is to reduce the toxicity associated with polyester resins by: (1) identification of potential monomers to replace styrene, (2) determination of monomer solubility within the polyester, and (3) investigation of approaches to rapidly screen a large resin composition parameter space. Monomers are identified based on their ability to react with polyester and their toxicity as determined by the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) and a green screen method. Solubilities were determined by the Hoftyzer -- Van Krevelen method, Hansen solubility parameter database, and experimental mixing of monomers. A combinatorial microfluidic mixing device is designed and tested to obtain distinct resin compositions from two input chemistries. The push for safer materials is complemented by a thrust for multifunctional composites. The second primary goal of this thesis is to design and implement the manufacture of sacrificial fiber materials suitable for use in automated fiber placement of microvascaular multifunctional composites. Two key advancements are required to achieve this goal: (1) development of a roll-to-roll method to place sacrificial fibers onto carbon fiber pre-preg tape; and (2) demonstration of feasible manufacture of microvascular carbon fiber plates with automated fiber placement. An automated method for placing sacrificial fibers onto carbon fiber tapes is designed and a prototype implemented. Carbon fiber tows with manual placement of sacrificial fibers is implemented within an

  2. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  3. Investigation of interfacial shear stresses, shape fixity, and actuation strain in composites incorporating shape memory polymers and shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungkyu; Headings, Leon; Dapino, Marcelo; Baur, Jeffery; Tandon, Gyaneshwar

    2015-03-01

    Shape memory composites (SMCs) based on shape memory alloys (SMAs) and shape memory polymers (SMPs) allow many design possibilities due to their controllable temperature-dependent mechanical properties. The complementary characteristics of SMAs and SMPs can be utilized in systems with shape recovery created by the SMA and shape fixity provided by the SMP. In this research, three SMC operating regimes are identified and the behavior of SMC structures is analyzed by focusing on composite shape fixity and interfacial stresses. Analytical models show that SMPs can be used to adequately fix the shape of SMA actuators and springs. COMSOL finite element simulations are in agreement with analytical expressions for shape fixity and interfacial stresses. Analytical models are developed for an end-coupled linear SMP-SMA two-way actuator and the predicted strain is shown to be in good agreement with experimental test results.

  4. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). RESULTS Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (P<.05). Heat drying after silanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (P<.05). However, no effect was determined for hydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). CONCLUSION Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study. PMID:27141252

  5. Effect of 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel and delayed bonding on shear bond strength of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer to bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Danesh-Sani, Seyed Amir; Esmaili, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate the neutralizing effect of antioxidant treatment and delayed bonding after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide on the shear bond strength of a composite resin (CR) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI) to enamel. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six freshly extracted human 3rd molars with flat enamel surfaces were divided into six experimental groups (n=12/group) and two control groups (n=12/group). After initial preparation, specimens in Groups 1 and 5 (control groups) were not bleached and the buccal enamel surface of specimens were bonded immediately with CR and RmGI. The samples of the remaining groups were all bleached six hours a day for seven days consecutively. Immediately after bleaching, groups two and six specimens were bonded with CR and RmGI. Groups 3 and 7 specimens were immersed in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and the specimens in Groups 4 and 8 were treated with 10% sodium ascorbate as an antioxidant agent after bleaching. Specimens in Groups 3 and 4 were bonded with CR and Groups 7 and 8 specimens were bonded with RmGI immediately. After specimens were bonded, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The SBS data analyses were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test for comparison of specific mean values. Results: The mean SBS value in Group 2 (immediately bonded with CR after bleaching) was significantly lower than other CR groups (P=0.045). RmGI did not bond to buccal enamel surface of specimens in group 6. There was no significant difference between other groups bonded with RmGI (P>0.05). Conclusions: Applying 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel and one week delay before bonding resulted in reversal of reduced bond strength of CR and RmGI to bleached enamel. PMID:22025826

  6. Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composite Blade Damping Characteristics for Aerospace Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Harris, Donald L.; Ting, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    For advanced aerospace propulsion systems, development of ceramic matrix composite integrally-bladed turbine disk technology is attractive for a number of reasons. The high strength-to-weight ratio of ceramic composites helps to reduce engine weight and the one-piece construction of a blisk will result in fewer parts count, which should translate into reduced operational costs. One shortcoming with blisk construction, however, is that blisks may be prone to high cycle fatigue due to their structural response to high vibration environments. Use of ceramic composites is expected to provide some internal damping to reduce the vibratory stresses encountered due to unsteady flow loads through the bladed turbine regions. A goal of our research was to characterize the vibration viscous damping behavior of C/SiC composites. The vibration damping properties were measured and calculated. Damping appeared to decrease with an increase in the natural frequency. While the critical damping amount of approximately 2% is required for typical aerospace turbomachinery engines, the C/SiC damping at high frequencies was less than 0.2% from our study. The advanced high-performance aerospace propulsion systems almost certainly will require even more damping than what current vehicles require. A purpose of this paper is to review some work on C/SiC vibration damping by the authors for the NASA CMC turbine blisk development program and address an importance of the further investigation of the blade vibration damping characteristics on candidate CMC materials for the NASA s advanced aerospace turbomachinery engine systems.

  7. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  8. Full-scale testing, production and cost analysis data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parson, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The development, testing, production activities, and associated costs that were required to produce five-and-one-half advanced-composite stabilizer shipsets for Boeing 737 aircraft are defined and discussed.

  9. Joining and Integration of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites to Metallic Systems for Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research and development activities in joining and integration of carbon-carbon (C/C) composites to metals such as Ti and Cu-clad-Mo for thermal management applications are presented with focus on advanced brazing techniques. A wide variety of carbon-carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices were joined to Ti and Cu-clad Mo using a number of active braze alloys. The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of active elements (e.g., Ti) at the composite/braze interface. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The chemical and thermomechanical compatibility between C/C and metals at elevated temperatures is assessed. The role of residual stresses and thermal conduction in brazed C/C joints is discussed. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that composite-to-metal brazed joints may be promising for lightweight thermal management applications.

  10. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  11. Advanced surface chemical analysis of continuously manufactured drug loaded composite pellets.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Akter; Nandi, Uttom; Fule, Ritesh; Nokhodchi, Ali; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed

    2017-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to develop and characterise polymeric composite pellets by means of continuous melt extrusion techniques. Powder blends of a steroid hormone (SH) as a model drug and either ethyl cellulose (EC N10 and EC P7 grades) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC AS grade) as polymeric carrier were extruded using a Pharma 11mm twin screw extruder in a continuous mode of operation to manufacture extruded composite pellets of 1mm length. Molecular modelling study using commercial Gaussian 09 software outlined a possible drug-polymer interaction in the molecular level to develop solid dispersions of the drug in the pellets. Solid-state analysis conducted via a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), hot stage microscopy (HSM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses revealed the amorphous state of the drug in the polymer matrices. Surface analysis using SEM/energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) of the produced pellets arguably showed a homogenous distribution of the C and O atoms in the pellet matrices. Moreover, advanced chemical surface analysis conducted via atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed a homogenous phase system having the drug molecule dispersed onto the amorphous matrices while Raman mapping confirmed the homogenous single-phase drug distribution in the manufactured composite pellets. Such composite pellets are expected to deliver multidisciplinary applications in drug delivery and medical sciences by e.g. modifying drug solubility/dissolutions or stabilizing the unstable drug (e.g. hormone, protein) in the composite network.

  12. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aero-Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the development and application of ceramic matrix composites consisting of silicon carbide (SiC) based matrices reinforced by small-diameter continuous-length SiC-based fibers. For example, these SiC/SiC composites are now in the early stages of implementation into hot-section components of civil aero-propulsion gas turbine engines, where in comparison to current metallic components they offer multiple advantages due to their lighter weight and higher temperature structural capability. For current production-ready SiC/SiC, this temperature capability for long time structural applications is 1250 degC, which is better than 1100 degC for the best metallic superalloys. Foreseeing that even higher structural reliability and temperature capability would continue to increase the advantages of SiC/SiC composites, progress in recent years has also been made at NASA toward improving the properties of SiC/SiC composites by optimizing the various constituent materials and geometries within composite microstructures. The primary objective of this chapter is to detail this latter progress, both fundamentally and practically, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in the materials and processes for the fiber, fiber coating, fiber architecture, and matrix, and in the design methods for incorporating these constituents into SiC/SiC microstructures with improved thermo-structural performance.

  13. The Effect of Aloe Vera, Pomegranate Peel, Grape Seed Extract, Green Tea, and Sodium Ascorbate as Antioxidants on the Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Home-bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Farshad, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Immediate application of bonding agent to home- bleached enamel leads to significant reduction in the shear bond strength of composite resin due to the residual oxygen. Different antioxidant agents may overcome this problem. Purpose This study aimed to assess the effect of different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of composite resin to home-bleached. Materials and Method Sixty extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5×1.5 cm), with the coronal portion left out of the block. After bleaching the labial enamel surface with 15% carbamide peroxide, they were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). Before performing composite resin restoration by using a cylindrical Teflon mold (5×2 mm), each group was treated with one of the following antioxidants: 10% sodium ascorbate solution, 10% pomegranate peel solution, 10% grape seed extract, 5% green tea extract, and aloe vera leaf gel. One group was left untreated as the control. The shear bond strength of samples was tested under a universal testing machine (ZwickRoell Z020). The shear bond strength data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results No significant difference existed between the control and experimental groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference between the effects of different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of bleached enamel. Conclusion Different antioxidants used in this study had the same effect on the shear bond strength of home-bleached enamel, and none of them caused a statistically significant increase in its value. PMID:26636116

  14. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering on the ChemMatCARS Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source: A Study of Shear-Induced Crystallisation in Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, D.; Hanley, T.; Knott, R.; Cookson, D.

    2008-09-08

    The first ever time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data from the undulator 15-ID-D beamline (ChemMatCARS) are presented. A 1.3 {angstrom} (9.54 keV) X-ray beam was selected to study the structure development in a polypropylene sample during shear-induced crystallization. A Linkam CSS450 shear cell provided the temperature and shear control. The polypropylene was first melted and then quenched to the crystallization temperature, where a step shear was applied. The SAXS data were collected using a Bruker 6000 CCD detector, which provided images of excellent resolution. The SAXS images (with 180{sup o} rotational symmetry) indicated that the polypropylene crystallizes with a high degree of anisotropy, and the lamellae are oriented perpendicular to the flow direction.

  15. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  16. Recent advances and issues in development of silicon carbide composites for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, T.; Hinoki, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Akira; Kohyama, Akira; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Henager, Charles H.; Hegeman, Hans

    2009-04-30

    Radiation-resistant advanced silicon carbide composites (SiC/SiC) have been developed as a promising candidate of the high-temperature operating advanced fusion DEMO reactor. With the completion of the “proof-of-principle” phase in development of “nuclear-grade” SiC/SiC, the R&D on SiC/SiC is shifting toward the more pragmatic phase, i.e., industrialization of component manufactures and data-basing. In this paper, recent advances and issues in 1) development of component fabrication technology including joining and functional coating, e.g., a tungsten overcoat as a plasma facing barrier, 2) recent updates in characterization of non-irradiated properties, e.g., strength anisotropy and chemical compatibility with solid lithium-based ceramics and lead-lithium liquid metal breeders, and 3) irradiation effects were specifically reviewed. Importantly high-temperature neutron irradiation effects on microstructural evolution, thermal and electrical conductivities and mechanical properties including the fiber/matrix interfacial strength were specified under various irradiation conditions, indicating seemingly very minor influence on the composite performance in the design temperature range.

  17. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: NASA's Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation reviews NASA environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development programs and the coating materials evolutions for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites in order to meet the next generation engine performance requirements. The presentation focuses on several generations of NASA EBC systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. The current EBC development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA 2700F candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance are described. The research and development opportunities for advanced turbine airfoil environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling are discussed.

  18. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, James R.; Haskins, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites will play a key role in the development of the technology for the design and fabrication of future supersonic vehicles. However, incorporating the material into vehicle usage is contingent on accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method to document the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. Consequently, a laboratory program was conducted to determine the time-temperature-stress capabilities of several high temperature composites. Tests included were thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, tensile, and real-time flight simulation exposure. The program had two phases. The first included all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continued these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. This report presents the results of the Phase 1 baseline and 10,000-hr aging and flight simulation studies, the Phase 2 50,000-hr aging studies, and the Phase 2 flight simulation tests, some of which extended to almost 40,000 hours.

  19. Titanium and advanced composite structures for a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Hoy, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Structural design studies were made, based on current technology and on an estimate of technology to be available in the mid 1980's, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced arrow wing configuration cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, and define an efficient structural arrangement. Material and concept selection, detailed structural analysis, structural design and airplane mass analysis were completed based on current technology. Based on estimated future technology, structural sizing for strength and a preliminary assessment of the flutter of a strength designed composite structure were completed. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members.

  20. Techniques for measurement of the thermal expansion of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques available to measure small thermal displacements in flat laminates and structural tubular elements of advanced composite materials are described. Emphasis is placed on laser interferometry and the laser interferometric dilatometer system used at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. Thermal expansion data are presented for graphite-fiber reinforced 6061 and 2024 aluminum laminates and for graphite fiber reinforced AZ91 C and QH21 A magnesium laminates before and after processing to minimize or eliminate thermal strain hysteresis. Data are also presented on the effects of reinforcement volume content on thermal expansion of silicon-carbide whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum.

  1. APL workers install CRIS on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Workers from the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) install the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). From left, are Al Sadilek, Marcos Gonzalez and Cliff Willey. CRIS is one of nine instruments on ACE, which will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of the solar corona, solar flares and the acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was developed for NASA by the APL. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched Aug. 21 aboard a two-stage Delta II 7920-8 rocket from Space Launch Complex 17, Pad A.

  2. Fabrication technologies and sensing applications of graphene-based composite films: Advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wensi; Zhang, Panpan; Su, Zhiqiang

    2017-03-15

    Graphene (G)-based composite materials have been widely explored for the sensing applications ascribing to their atom-thick two-dimensional conjugated structures, high conductivity, large specific surface areas and controlled modification. With the enormous advantages of film structure, G-based composite films (GCFs), prepared by combining G with different functional nanomaterials (noble metals, metal compounds, carbon materials, polymer materials, etc.), show unique optical, mechanical, electrical, chemical, and catalytic properties. Therefore, great quantities of sensors with high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability have been created in recent years. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the fabrication technologies of GCFs and their specific sensing applications. In addition, the relationship between the properties of GCFs and sensing performance is concentrated on. Finally, the personal perspectives and key challenges of GCFs are mentioned in the hope to shed a light on their potential future research directions.

  3. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high-performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single-cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament-wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S-glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessel structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all-titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized including data from current NASA-Lewis Research Center contractual and in-house programs.

  4. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.; Cardinale, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    The effort required by commercial transport manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current construction materials and practices to extensive use of composites in aircraft wings was investigated. The engineering and manufacturing disciplines which normally participate in the design, development, and production of an aircraft were employed to ensure that all of the factors that would enter a decision to commit to production of a composite wing structure were addressed. A conceptual design of an advanced technology reduced energy aircraft provided the framework for identifying and investigating unique design aspects. A plan development effort defined the essential technology needs and formulated approaches for effecting the required wing development. The wing development program plans, resource needs, and recommendations are summarized.

  5. Review of status and potential of tungsten-wire: Superalloy composites for advanced gas turbine engine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The current status of development of refractory-wire-superalloy composites and the potential for their application to turbine blades in land-based power generation and advanced aircraft engines are reviewed. The data indicate that refractory-wire-superalloy composites have application as turbine blades at temperatures of 2200 F and above.

  6. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  7. Propagation of shear bands in Ti{sub 66.1}Cu{sub 8}Ni{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 7.2}Nb{sub 13.9} nanostructure-dendrite composite during deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.B.; Das, J.; Baier, F.; Eckert, J.

    2005-04-25

    During deformation of Ti{sub 66.1}Cu{sub 8}Ni{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 7.2}Nb{sub 13.9} nanostructure-dendrite composite, primary and secondary shear bands form under perpendicular orientation. Detailed investigation of the microstructure of deformed specimens reveals deformed body-centered-cubic (bcc) {beta}-Ti dendrites forming a stepped morphology at the interfaces between the bcc {beta}-Ti dendrites and the nanostructured matrix, consisting of hexagonal close packed (hcp) {alpha}-Ti and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) Ti{sub 2}Cu phases. In the nanostructured matrix, the primary shear bands pass through coherent grain boundaries between the hcp {alpha}-Ti and the bct Ti{sub 2}Cu phases. In contrast, the secondary shear bands in the nanostructured matrix are arrested by sandwiched nanoscale grains of the hcp {alpha}-Ti and bct Ti{sub 2}Cu phases.

  8. Advanced Woven SiC/SiC Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2007-01-01

    The temperature, stress, and environmental conditions of many gas turbine, hypersonic, and even nuclear applications make the use of woven SiC/SiC composites an attractive enabling material system. The development in SiC/SiC composites over the past few years has resulted in significant advances in high temperature performance so that now these materials are being pursued for several turbine airfoil and reusable hypersonic applications. The keys to maximizing stress capability and maximizing temperature capability will be outlined for SiC/SiC. These include the type of SiC fiber, the fiber-architecture, and the matrix processing approach which leads to a variety of matrix compositions and structure. It will also be shown that a range of mechanical, thermal, and permeability properties can be attained and tailored depending on the needs of an application. Finally, some of the remaining challenges will be discussed in order for the use of these composite systems to be fully realized.

  9. Robust Joining and Integration Technologies for Advanced Metallic, Ceramic, and Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Morscher, Gregory N.; Halbig, Michael H.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    Robust integration and assembly technologies are critical for the successful implementation of advanced metallic, ceramic, carbon-carbon, and ceramic matrix composite components in a wide variety of aerospace, space exploration, and ground based systems. Typically, the operating temperature of these components varies from few hundred to few thousand Kelvin with different working times (few minutes to years). The wide ranging system performance requirements necessitate the use of different integration technologies which includes adhesive bonding, low temperature soldering, active metal brazing, diffusion bonding, ARCJoinT, and ultra high temperature joining technologies. In this presentation, a number of joining examples and test results will be provided related to the adhesive bonding and active metal brazing of titanium to C/C composites, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide to silicon carbide using titanium interlayer, titanium and hastelloy brazing to silicon carbide matrix composites, and ARCJoinT joining of SiC ceramics and SiC matrix composites. Various issues in the joining of metal-ceramic systems including thermal expansion mismatch and resulting residual stresses generated during joining will be discussed. In addition, joint design and testing issues for a wide variety of joints will be presented.

  10. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  11. Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Metz, III, Curtis F.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

  12. Ceramic (Feldspathic & IPS Empress II) vs. laboratory composite (Gradia) veneers; a comparison between their shear bond strength to enamel; an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, S; Azari, Abbas; Dehgan, S

    2010-07-01

    Patient demand for aesthetic dentistry is steadily growing. Laminates and free metal restorations have evolved in an attempt to overcome the invasiveness nature of full veneer restorations. Although many different materials have been used for making these restorations, there is no single material that fits best for all purposes. Two groups of ceramic material (Feldspathic and IPS Empress II) and one group of laboratory composite (Gradia) discs (10 discs in each group; 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared according to the manufacturer's instruction. The surface of ceramic discs were etched and silanized. In Gradia group, liquid primer was applied on composite surfaces. Thirty freshly extracted sound human molars and premolars were randomly divided into three groups. The enamel surface of each tooth was slightly flattened (0.3 mm) on the buccal or lingual side and then primed and cemented to the prepared discs with the aid of a dental surveyor. The finishing specimens were thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 2500 cycles and then prepared for shear bond strength testing. The resulting data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey HSD test. The fractured surfaces of each specimen were inspected by means of stereomicroscope and SEM. There is significant difference between the bond strength of materials tested. The mean bond strengths obtained with Feldspathic ceramic, IPS Empress II and Gradia were 33.10 +/- 4.31 MPa, 26.04 +/- 7.61 MPa and 14.42 +/- 5.82 MPa, respectively. The fracture pattern was mainly mixed for ceramic groups. More scientific evidence needed for standardization of bonding protocols.

  13. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  14. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen.

  15. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, supported by a variety of materials development programs, NASA Glenn Research Center has significantly increased the thermostructural capability of SiC/SiC composite materials for high-temperature aerospace applications. These state-of-the-art advances have occurred in every key constituent of the composite: fiber, fiber coating, matrix, and environmental barrier coating, as well as processes for forming the fiber architectures needed for complex-shaped components such as turbine vanes for gas turbine engines. This presentation will briefly elaborate on the nature of these advances in terms of performance data and underlying mechanisms. Based on a list of first-order property goals for typical high-temperature applications, key data from a variety of laboratory tests are presented which demonstrate that the NASA-developed constituent materials and processes do indeed result in SiC/SiC systems with the desired thermal and structural capabilities. Remaining process and microstructural issues for further property enhancement are discussed, as well as on-going approaches at NASA to solve these issues. NASA efforts to develop physics-based property models that can be used not only for component design and life modeling, but also for constituent material and process improvement will also be discussed.

  16. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component is presented. The recommended concept for the covers is graphite-epoxy hats bonded to a graphite-epoxy skin. The hat flare-out has been eliminated, instead the hat is continuous into the joint. The recommended concept for the spars is graphite-epoxy caps and a hybrid of Kevlar-49 and graphite-epoxy in the spar web. The spar cap, spar web stiffeners for attaching the ribs, and intermediate stiffeners are planned to be fabricated as a unit. Access hole in the web will be reinforced with a donut type, zero degree graphite-epoxy wound reinforcement. The miniwich design concept in the upper three ribs originally proposed is changed to a graphite-epoxy stiffened solid laminate design concept. The recommended configuration for the lower seven ribs remains as graphite-epoxy caps with aluminum cruciform diagonals. The indicated weight saving for the current advanced composite vertical fin configuration is 20.2% including a 24 lb growth allowance. The project production cost saving is approximately 1% based on a cumulative average of 250 aircraft and including only material, production labor, and quality assurance costs.

  17. Shear correction factors for layered plates and shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruttmann, F.; Wagner, W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper layered composite shells subjected to static loading are considered. The theory is based on a multi-field functional, where the associated Euler-Lagrange equations include besides the global shell equations formulated in stress resultants, the local in-plane equilibrium in terms of stresses and a constraint which enforces the correct shape of warping through the thickness. Within representative volume elements warping displacements are interpolated with layerwise cubic functions in thickness direction and constant shape throughout the reference surface. Elimination of warping and Lagrange parameters by static condensation leads to a material matrix for the stress resultants and to shear correction factors for layered plates and shells. For linear elasticity the computation can be done once in advance. The condensed material matrix is used in displacement based elements along with the enhanced strain method or in mixed hybrid elements with the usual 5 or 6 nodal degrees of freedom. This allows standard geometrical boundary conditions and the elements are applicable also to shell intersection problems. The interlaminar shear stresses are evaluated via the constitutive law by back substitution of the eliminated parameters. The computed transverse shear stresses are automatically continuous at the layer boundaries and zero at the outer surfaces. Furthermore, the integrals of the shear stresses coincide exactly with the shear forces without introduction of further constraints.

  18. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  19. Advanced materials: The fabrication, characterization and study of novel ceramics and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Michael W.

    As advances in technology prompt demands for materials with specific and wide ranges of properties, traditional materials have often not been able to meet these more challenging needs. There is also an exigency to process these materials with minimal consumption of energy at low cost. To address these needs there has been a considerable impetus to develop new materials, new processing strategies and/or new synthetic strategies. This thesis focuses on the synthesis, characterization, and manipulation of a variety of new and advanced materials. The two main topics of this thesis are, firstly, a composite system where the growth of an inorganic phase takes place within a polymer film. Composite films of CdS in PEO were formed by an in situ reaction of CdCl2/PEO composite films with an octane solution of hexamethyldisilathiane [S(TMS) 2]. Organized crystallization of the product was found only to occur in thin films (<300nm) in the presence of surfactant. Crystals were found to be uniform in size, shape, phase and crystallographic orientation. The principles of this system have been further developed and used to produce novel phases of lead sulfides at room temperature and pressure, and the first known synthesis of single crystals of Lithium Niobate at room temperature and pressure. The second part of this thesis deals with the synthesis and characterization of poly(methyl)silyne (PMSy), a polymer precursor to silicon carbide (SiC). The synthesis of PMSy is both cheap and simple. The polymer is non-pyrophoric which is unique among current SiC preceramic polymers. The pyrolysis of PMSy results in a ceramic of unrivaled purity, it is the only perfectly stoichiometric SiC than has been obtained from any polymeric precursor. Ceramic films have also been produced from PMSy, and are the smoothest, the most continuous, the most perfect and defect free that have ever been reported.

  20. Extension-torsion coupling behavior of advanced composite tilt-rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    An analytic model was developed to study the extension-bend-twist coupling behavior of an advanced composite helicopter or tilt-rotor blade. The outer surface of the blade is defined by rotating an arbitrary cross section about an initial twist axis. The cross section can be nonhomogeneous and composed of generally anisotropic materials. The model is developed based upon a three dimensional elasticity approach that is recast as a coupled two-dimensional boundary value problem defined in a curvilinear coordinate system. Displacement solutions are written in terms of known functions that represent extension, bending, and twisting and unknown functions for local cross section deformations. The unknown local deformation functions are determined by applying the principle of minimum potential energy to the discretized two-dimensional cross section. This is an application of the Ritz method, where the trial function family is the displacement field associated with a finite element (8-node isoparametric quadrilaterals) representation of the section. A computer program was written where the cross section is discretized into 8-node quadrilateral subregions. Initially the program was verified using previously published results (both three-dimensional elasticity and technical beam theory) for pretwisted isotropic bars with an elliptical cross section. In addition, solid and thin-wall multi-cell NACA-0012 airfoil sections were analyzed to illustrate the pronounced effects that pretwist, initial twist axis location, and spar location has on coupled behavior. Currently, a series of advanced composite airfoils are being modeled in order to assess how the use of laminated composite materials interacts with pretwist to alter the coupling behavior of the blade. These studies will investigate the use of different ply angle orientations and the use of symmetric versus unsymmetric laminates.

  1. Structural Framework for Flight: NASA's Role in Development of Advanced Composite Materials for Aircraft and Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Johnston, Norman J.; Pipes, R. Byron; McGuire, Jack F.

    2011-01-01

    This serves as a source of collated information on Composite Research over the past four decades at NASA Langley Research Center, and is a key reference for readers wishing to grasp the underlying principles and challenges associated with developing and applying advanced composite materials to new aerospace vehicle concepts. Second, it identifies the major obstacles encountered in developing and applying composites on advanced flight vehicles, as well as lessons learned in overcoming these obstacles. Third, it points out current barriers and challenges to further application of composites on future vehicles. This is extremely valuable for steering research in the future, when new breakthroughs in materials or processing science may eliminate/minimize some of the barriers that have traditionally blocked the expanded application of composite to new structural or revolutionary vehicle concepts. Finally, a review of past work and identification of future challenges will hopefully inspire new research opportunities and development of revolutionary materials and structural concepts to revolutionize future flight vehicles.

  2. More than meets the eye in bacterial cellulose: biosynthesis, bioprocessing, and applications in advanced fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Buldum, Gizem; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers are one of the stiffest organic materials produced by nature. It consists of pure cellulose without the impurities that are commonly found in plant-based cellulose. This review discusses the metabolic pathways of cellulose-producing bacteria and the genetic pathways of Acetobacter xylinum. The fermentative production of BC and the bioprocess parameters for the cultivation of bacteria are also discussed. The influence of the composition of the culture medium, pH, temperature, and oxygen content on the morphology and yield of BC are reviewed. In addition, the progress made to date on the genetic modification of bacteria to increase the yield of BC and the large-scale production of BC using various bioreactors, namely static and agitated cultures, stirred tank, airlift, aerosol, rotary, and membrane reactors, is reviewed. The challenges in commercial scale production of BC are thoroughly discussed and the efficiency of various bioreactors is compared. In terms of the application of BC, particular emphasis is placed on the utilization of BC in advanced fiber composites to manufacture the next generation truly green, sustainable and renewable hierarchical composites.

  3. Plasma-modified graphene nanoplatelets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as fillers for advanced rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, M.; Gozdek, T.; Bielinski, D. M.; Szymanowski, H.; Kleczewska, J.; Piatkowska, A.

    2015-07-01

    In modern rubber industry, there still is a room for new fillers, which can improve the mechanical properties of the composites, or introduce a new function to the material. Modern fillers like carbon nanotubes or graphene nanoplatelets (GnP), are increasingly applied in advanced polymer composites technology. However, it might be hard to obtain a well dispersed system for such systems. The polymer matrix often exhibits higher surface free energy (SFE) level with the filler, which can cause problems with polymer-filler interphase adhesion. Filler particles are not wet properly by the polymer, and thus are easier to agglomerate. As a consequence, improvement in the mechanical properties is lower than expected. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and GnP surface were modified with low-temperature plasma. Attempts were made to graft some functionalizing species on plasma-activated filler surface. The analysis of virgin and modified fillers’ SFE was carried out. MWCNT and GnP rubber composites were produced, and ultimately, their morphology and mechanical properties were studied.

  4. Applications of Advanced, Waveform Based AE Techniques for Testing Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been previously used to evaluate damage progression in laboratory tests of composite coupons. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite structures, the effects of wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. In this research, measurements were made of the attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels. As these materials have applications in a cryogenic environment, the effects of cryogenic insulation on the attenuation of plate mode AE signals were also documented.

  5. Processing and failure studies of advanced composites using x-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.; Saroyan, R.A.; Celeste, J. ); Nichols, M.C. ); Stock, S.R.; Breunig, T.M.; Guviniler, A. )

    1991-02-01

    The traditional role of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) has been to identify critical flaws in components after they have been fabricated. Recently, efforts have been made to introduce NDT techniques earlier in the engineering cycle, and some progress has been made in applying NDT inspection during component processing. Improvements that have been made in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of x-ray computed tomography (CT), however, indicate that it is now possible to introduce NDT concepts and methods to the earliest stage of component manufacture, namely, in the development of new materials -- where the characterization and analysis of microscopic features are important. X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) is a high resolution, three-dimensional variant of CT with a spatial resolution better than 0.005 mm. These studies have demonstrated that XTM is a powerful NDT technique which is capable of imaging microstructural features in even the most complicated advanced composite materials. Work is in progress to use XTM for dynamic studies of chemical vapor infiltration in continuous fiber ceramic composites. Furthermore, an in-situ tensile load frame is now being used in conjunction with XTM to study fatigue crack growth and tensile failure in metal matrix composites. The application of NDT imaging methods to materials studies will greatly enhance our understanding of time-dependent behavior in complex engineering materials. 3 refs.

  6. Advanced 3D Ni(OH)2/CNT Gel Composite Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hanlin; Duong, Hai Minh

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the performance of supercapacitors, advanced 3D Porous CNT/Ni(OH)2 gel composite electrodes are developed in this work. Compared with previously reported graphene gel supercapacitors, our electrodes using 1D CNTs have smaller diffusion resistance due to a shorter ion transport path. The developed 3D xerogel composite electrodes demonstrate the success of a careful engineered guest/host materials interface. Initially, the CNT gels are coated on the nickel foam to form a 3D scaffold, which serves as a microscopic electrical conductive network. Then Ni(OH)2 are incorporated using a traditional electrodeposition method. In this work, two types of the 3D CNT-coated nickel foams are investigated. The gels can be used directly as hydrogels or dried in air to form xerogels. Both hydrogels and xerogels present 3D tangled CNT networks. It shows that the hydrogel composite electrodes with unbundled CNTs, though presenting high capacitances of 1400 F/g at low discharge rate, possess lower capacitances at higher discharge rate and a poor cycling performance of less than 23% retention. In contrast, the xerogel composite electrodes can overcome these limitations in terms of a satisfied discharge performance of 1200 F/g and a good cycling retention more than 85% due to a stronger Ni(OH)2/CNT interface. The CNT bundles in the xerogel electrodes formed during the drying process can give a flat surface with small curvature, which facilitate the Ni(OH)2 nucleation and growth. Thanks for the support from the A star R-265-000-424-305.

  7. The effect of various sandblasting conditions on surface changes of dental zirconia and shear bond strength between zirconia core and indirect composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Naichuan; Yue, Li; Liao, Yunmao; Liu, Wenjia; Zhang, Hai; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To measure the surface loss of dental restorative zirconia and the short-term bond strength between an indirect composite resin (ICR) and zirconia ceramic after various sandblasting processes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three hundred zirconia bars were randomly divided into 25 groups according to the type of sandblasting performed with pressures of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa, sandblasting times of 7, 14 and 21 seconds, and alumina powder sizes of 50 and 110 µm. The control group did not receive sandblasting. The volume loss and height loss on zirconia surface after sandblasting and the shear bond strength (SBS) between the sandblasted zirconia and ICR after 24-h immersion were measured for each group using multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Least Significance Difference (LSD) test (α=.05). After sandblasting, the failure modes of the ICR/zirconia surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS The volume loss and height loss were increased with higher sandblasting pressure and longer sandblasting treatment, but they decreased with larger powder size. SBS was significantly increased by increasing the sandblasting time from 7 seconds to 14 seconds and from 14 seconds to 21 seconds, as well as increasing the size of alumina powder from 50 µm to 110 µm. SBS was significantly increased from 0.1 MPa to 0.2 MPa according to the size of alumina powder. However, the SBSs were not significantly different with the sandblasting pressure of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa. The possibilities of the combination of both adhesive failure and cohesive failure within the ICR were higher with the increases in bonding strength. CONCLUSION Based on the findings of this study, sandblasting with alumina particles at 0.2 MPa, 21 seconds and the powder size of 110 µm is recommended for dental applications to improve the bonding between zirconia core and ICR. PMID:26140173

  8. Advanced SiC/SiC Ceramic Composites For Gas-Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Easler, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a variety of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composite (ASC) systems that allow these materials to operate for hundreds of hours under stress in air at temperatures approaching 2700 F. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (approximately 30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive gas-turbine engine environments. The key for the ASC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays higher thermal stability than any other SiC- based ceramic fibers and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for higher environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics (COIC). Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and/or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) to form a Sic-based matrix with high creep and rupture resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to optimize the constituents and processing parameters for a Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforced ceramic composite system in which the Sic-based matrix is formed at COIC almost entirely by PIP (full PIP approach), (2) to evaluate the properties of this system in comparison to other 2700 F Sylramic-iBN systems in which the matrix is formed by full CVI and CVI + PIP, and (3) to examine the pros and cons of the full PIP approach for fabricating hot-section engine components. A key goal is the development of a composite system with low porosity, thereby providing high modulus, high matrix cracking strength, high interlaminar strength, and high thermal conductivity, a major property requirement for engine components that will experience high thermal gradients during service. Other key composite property goals are demonstration at

  9. Experimental method for determination of bending and torsional rigidities of advanced composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Takenori

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental method for the determination of the bending and torsional rigidities of advanced fiber composite laminates with the aid of laser holographic interferometry. The proposed method consists of a four-point bending test and a resonance test. The bending rigidity ratio (D{sub 12}/D{sub 22}) can be determined from the fringe patterns of the four-point bending test. The bending rigidities (D{sub 11} and D{sub 22}) and the torsional rigidity (D{sub 66}) are calculated from the natural frequencies of cantilever plates of the resonance test. The test specimens are carbon/epoxy cross-ply laminates. The adequacy of the experimental method is confirmed by comparing the measured rigidities with the theoretical values obtained from classical lamination theory (CLT) by using the measured tensile properties. The results show that the present method can be used to evaluate the rigidities of orthotropic laminates with reasonably good accuracy.

  10. Production implementation of fully automated, closed loop cure control for advanced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sean A.; Roberts, Nancy K.

    Economic of advanced composite part production requires development and use of the most aggressive cure cycles possible without sacrificing quality. As cure cycles are shortened and heating rates increase, tolerance windows for process parameters become increasingly narrow. These factors are intensified by condensation curing systems which generate large amounts of volatiles. Management of the situation requires fully automated, closed loop process control and a fundamental understanding of the material system used for the application. No turnkey system for this application is currently available. General Dynamics Pomona Division (GD/PD) has developed an integrated closed loop control system which is now being proofed in production. Realization of this system will enable cure time reductions of nearly 50 percent, while increasing yield and maintaining quality.

  11. On the Use of Accelerated Test Methods for Characterization of Advanced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    2003-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing for material characterization of advanced polymer matrix composites is discussed. The experimental and analytical methods provided should be viewed as a set of tools useful in the screening of material systems for long-term engineering properties in aerospace applications. Consideration is given to long-term exposure in extreme environments that include elevated temperature, reduced temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. Analytical formulations useful for predictive models that are based on the principles of time-based superposition are presented. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for determining specific aging mechanisms.

  12. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Based on estimated graphite and boron fiber properties, allowable stresses and strains were established for advanced composite materials. Stiffened panel and conventional sandwich panel concepts were designed and analyzed, using graphite/polyimide and boron/polyimide materials. The conventional sandwich panel was elected as the structural concept for the modified wing structure. Upper and lower surface panels of the arrow wing structure were then redesigned, using high strength graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, retaining the titanium spars and ribs from the prior study. The ATLAS integrated analysis and design system was used for stress analysis and automated resizing of surface panels. Flutter analysis of the hybrid structure showed a significant decrease in flutter speed relative to the titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium design by selective increase in laminate thickness and by using graphite fibers with properties intermediate between high strength and high modulus values.

  13. Advances in the Lightweight Air-Liquid Composite Heat Exchanger Development for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Johnston, J. Chris; Haas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    An advanced, lightweight composite modular Air/Liquid (A/L) Heat Exchanger (HX) Prototype for potential space exploration thermal management applications was successfully designed, manufactured, and tested. This full-scale Prototype consisting of 19 modules, based on recommendations from its predecessor Engineering Development unit (EDU) but with improved thermal characteristics and manufacturability, was 11.2 % lighter than the EDU and achieves potentially a 42.7% weight reduction from the existing state-of-the-art metallic HX demonstrator. However, its higher pressure drop (0.58 psid vs. 0.16 psid of the metal HX) has to be mitigated by foam material optimizations and design modifications including a more systematic air channel design. Scalability of the Prototype design was validated experimentally by comparing manufacturability and performance between the 2-module coupon and the 19-module Prototype. The Prototype utilized the thermally conductive open-cell carbon foam material but with lower density and adopted a novel high-efficiency cooling system with significantly increased heat transfer contact surface areas, improved fabricability and manufacturability compared to the EDU. Even though the Prototype was required to meet both the thermal and the structural specifications, accomplishing the thermal requirement was a higher priority goal for this first version. Overall, the Prototype outperformed both the EDU and the corresponding metal HX, particularly in terms of specific heat transfer, but achieved 93.4% of the target. The next generation Prototype to achieve the specification target, 3,450W would need 24 core modules based on the simple scaling factor. The scale-up Prototype will weigh about 14.7 Kg vs. 21.6 Kg for the metal counterpart. The advancement of this lightweight composite HX development from the original feasibility test coupons to EDU to Prototype is discussed in this paper.

  14. Development, Implementation and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the final report to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the research project entitled Development, Implementation, and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High-Temperature Composites. The research supporting this initiative has been conducted by Dr. Brett A. Bednarcyk, a Senior Scientist at OM in Brookpark, Ohio from the period of August 1998 to March 2005. Most of the work summarized herein involved development, implementation, and application of enhancements and new capabilities for NASA GRC's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package. When the project began, this software was at a low TRL (3-4) and at release version 2.0. Due to this project, the TRL of MAC/GMC has been raised to 7 and two new versions (3.0 and 4.0) have been released. The most important accomplishments with respect to MAC/GMC are: (1) A multi-scale framework has been built around the software, enabling coupled design and analysis from the global structure scale down to the micro fiber-matrix scale; (2) The software has been expanded to analyze smart materials; (3) State-of-the-art micromechanics theories have been implemented and validated within the code; (4) The damage, failure, and lifing capabilities of the code have been expanded from a very limited state to a vast degree of functionality and utility; and (5) The user flexibility of the code has been significantly enhanced. MAC/GMC is now the premier code for design and analysis of advanced composite and smart materials. It is a candidate for the 2005 NASA Software of the Year Award. The work completed over the course of the project is summarized below on a year by year basis. All publications resulting from the project are listed at the end of this report.

  15. Radiological study on newly developed composite corn advance lines in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekunle Olatunji, Michael; Bemigho Uwatse, Onosohwo; Uddin Khandaker, Mayeen; Amin, Y. M.; Faruq, G.

    2014-12-01

    Owing to population growth, there has been high demand for food across the world, and hence, different agricultural activities such as use of phosphate fertilizers, recycling of organic matters, etc, have been deployed to increase crop yields. In Malaysia, a total of nine composite corn advance lines have been developed at the Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Malaya and are being grown under different conditions with a bid to meet the average daily human need for energy and fiber intake. To this end, the knowledge of radioactivity levels in these corn advance lines are of paramount importance for the estimation of possible radiological hazards due to its consumption. Hence, the radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K in the corn have been determined using HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations in the corn ranged from 0.05 to 19.18 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, from 0.10 to 3.22 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra and from 26.4 to 129 Bq kg-1 for 40K. In order to ascertain the radiological safety of the population regarding maize consumption, the daily intakes of these radionuclides as well as the annual effective dose were estimated. The total effective dose obtained due to the ingestion of radionuclides via maize consumption is 15.39 μSv y-1, which is less than the international recommendations.

  16. Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, David; Carella, John

    1999-01-01

    This document, submitted by AlliedSignal Engines (AE), a division of AlliedSignal Aerospace Company, presents the program final report for the Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion in compliance with data requirements in the statement of work, Contract No. NAS3-97003. This document includes: 1 -Technical Summary: a) Component Design, b) Manufacturing Process Selection, c) Vendor Selection, and d) Testing Validation: 2-Program Conclusion and Perspective. Also, see the Appendix at the back of this report. This report covers the program accomplishments from December 1, 1996, to August 24, 1998. The Advanced High Temperature PMC's for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion was a one year long, five task technical effort aimed at designing, fabricating and testing a turbine engine component using NASA's high temperature resin system AMB-21. The fiber material chosen was graphite T650-35, 3K, 8HS with UC-309 sizing. The first four tasks included component design and manufacturing, process selection, vendor selection, component fabrication and validation testing. The final task involved monthly financial and technical reports.

  17. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  18. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft. Phase 1: Engineering development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ary, A.; Axtell, C.; Fogg, L.; Jackson, A.; James, A. M.; Mosesian, B.; Vanderwier, J.; Vanhamersveld, J.

    1976-01-01

    The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes the front and rear spars. Various design options were evaluated to arrive at a configuration which would offer the highest potential for satisfying program objectives. The preferred configuration selected consists of a hat-stiffened cover with molded integrally stiffened spars, aluminum trussed composite ribs, and composite miniwich web ribs with integrally molded caps. Material screening tests were performed to select an advanced composite material system for the Advanced Composite Vertical Fin (ACFV) that would meet the program requirements from the standpoint of quality, reproducibility, and cost. Preliminary weight and cost analysis were made, targets established, and tracking plans developed. These include FAA certification, ancillary test program, quality control, and structural integrity control plans.

  19. Polypropylene/glass fiber hierarchical composites incorporating inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles for advanced technological applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-10-09

    Novel isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/glass fiber (GF) laminates reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS2) nanoparticles as environmentally friendly fillers have been successfully fabricated by simple melt-blending and fiber impregnation in a hot-press without the addition of any compatibilizer. The influence of IF-WS2 concentration on the morphology, viscosity. and thermal and mechanical behavior of the hierarchical composites has been investigated. Results revealed an unprecedented 62 °C increase in the degradation temperature of iPP/GF upon addition of only 4.0 wt % IF-WS2. The coexistence of both micro- and nanoscale fillers resulted in synergistic effects on enhancing the stiffness, strength, crystallinity, thermal stability, glass transition (Tg) and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of the matrix. The approach used in this work is an efficient, versatile, scalable and economic strategy to improve the mechanical and thermal behavior of GF-reinforced thermoplastics with a view to extend their use in advanced technological applications. This new type of composite materials shows great potential to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport.

  20. Preparing GMAT for Operational Maneuver Planning of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, Rizwan Hamid; Hughes, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source space mission design, analysis and trajectory optimization tool. GMAT is developed by a team of NASA, private industry, public and private contributors. GMAT is designed to model, optimize and estimate spacecraft trajectories in flight regimes ranging from low Earth orbit to lunar applications, interplanetary trajectories and other deep space missions. GMAT has also been flight qualified to support operational maneuver planning for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission. ACE was launched in August, 1997 and is orbiting the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. The primary science objective of ACE is to study the composition of both the solar wind and the galactic cosmic rays. Operational orbit determination, maneuver operations and product generation for ACE are conducted by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF). This paper discusses the entire engineering lifecycle and major operational certification milestones that GMAT successfully completed to obtain operational certification for the ACE mission. Operational certification milestones such as gathering of the requirements for ACE operational maneuver planning, gap analysis, test plans and procedures development, system design, pre-shadow operations, training to FDF ACE maneuver planners, shadow operations, Test Readiness Review (TRR) and finally Operational Readiness Review (ORR) are discussed. These efforts have demonstrated that GMAT is flight quality software ready to support ACE mission operations in the FDF.

  1. Biomimetic self-healing of advanced composite structures using hollow glass fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2006-06-01

    The use of functional repair components stored inside hollow reinforcing fibres is being considered as a self-repair system for future composite structures. The incorporation of a self-healing capability within a variety of materials, including fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs), has been investigated by a number of workers previously. This paper considers the placement of self-healing plies within an FRP to mitigate damage occurrence and restore mechanical strength. The flexural strength results indicate that the inclusion of hollow fibres results in an initial strength reduction of 16% from a baseline FRP laminate. However, the effect of impact damage on the performance of the baseline FRP laminate and the laminate containing the hollow fibre layers was comparable, with a flexural strength typically 72-74% of the undamaged state. Self-healing of the damage site saw the laminate recover 87% of the undamaged baseline FRP laminate's strength. This study provides clear evidence that an FRP laminate containing hollow fibre layers can successfully self-heal. This result suggests that biomimetic repair is now possible for advanced composite structures.

  2. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic composite nacelle. [for achieving reductions in community noise and operating expense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodall, R. G.; Painter, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual nacelle designs for wide-bodied and for advanced-technology transports were studied with the objective of achieving significant reductions in community noise with minimum penalties in airplane weight, cost, and in operating expense by the application of advanced composite materials to nacelle structure and sound suppression elements. Nacelle concepts using advanced liners, annular splitters, radial splitters, translating centerbody inlets, and mixed-flow nozzles were evaluated and a preferred concept selected. A preliminary design study of the selected concept, a mixed flow nacelle with extended inlet and no splitters, was conducted and the effects on noise, direct operating cost, and return on investment determined.

  3. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed spatial and temporal climatologies of lightning occurrence based on eight atmospheric flow regimes. The AMU created climatological, or composite, soundings of wind speed and direction, temperature, and dew point temperature at four rawinsonde observation stations at Jacksonville, Tampa, Miami, and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for each of the eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the National Weather Service (NWS) Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the National version of the Skew-T Hodograph analysis and Research Program (NSHARP) software program. The NWS MLB requested the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS), so they could be overlaid on current observed soundings. This will allow the forecasters to compare the current state of the atmosphere with climatology. This presentation describes how the AMU converted the composite soundings from NSHARP Archive format to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format, so that the soundings could be displayed in AWl PS. The NetCDF is a set of data formats, programming interfaces, and software libraries used to read and write scientific data files. In AWIPS, each meteorological data type, such as soundings or surface observations, has a unique NetCDF format. Each format is described by a NetCDF template file. Although NetCDF files are in binary format, they can be converted to a text format called network Common data form Description Language (CDL). A software utility called ncgen is used to create a NetCDF file from a CDL file, while the ncdump utility is used to create a CDL file from a NetCDF file. An AWIPS receives soundings in Binary Universal Form for the Representation of Meteorological data (BUFR) format (http://dss.ucar.edu/docs/formats/bufr/), and then decodes them into NetCDF format. Only two sounding files are generated in AWIPS per day. One

  4. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  5. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 4: Full scale ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Dorwald, F.

    1982-01-01

    The ground tests conducted on the advanced composite vertical fin (ACVF) program are described. The design and fabrication of the test fixture and the transition structure, static test of Ground Test Article (GTA) No. 1, rework of GTA No. 2, and static, damage tolerance, fail-safe and residual strength tests of GTA No. 2 are described.

  6. Yield shear stress and disaggregating shear stress of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinmu; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-05-01

    This review presents two distinct rheological parameters of blood that have the potential to indicate blood circulation adequacy: yield shear stress (YSS) and disaggregating shear stress (DSS). YSS and DSS reflect the strength of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in suspension under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. YSS, defined as the critical stress to disperse RBC aggregates under static conditions, was found to be dependent upon hematocrit, fibrinogen, and red cell deformability, but not temperature. DSS, defined as the minimum shear stress to disperse RBC aggregates under dynamic conditions, is dependent upon fibrinogen, red cell deformability, and temperature but not hematocrit. Owing to recent advances in measurement technology, these two parameters can be easily measured, and thus, their clinical significance in blood circulation can be verified.

  7. The development of advanced materials: Negative Poisson's ratio materials, high damping and high stiffness materials, and composites with negative stiffness inclusions and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che

    The manufacture of negative Poisson's ratio polymeric foams was based on a thermal transformation technique to convert the convex cell shape of conventional foams to a concave or re-entrant shape through triaxial compression and heating. Poisson's ratio measurements were performed with a laser-based setup for non-transparent materials with high accuracy. Contrary to the predictions of the theory of elasticity, we observed cell size influences on Poisson's ratio of conventional and transformed foams. The theoretical study of the contact problem involving materials with negative Poisson's ratios revealed a further reduction on contact pressure between the contacting two bodies in comparison with materials with positive Poisson's ratio. The classical Hertz contact theory and 3D elasticity solution in an asymptotic form for finite-thickness, layered media indented by an elastic spherical were used. As for advanced composite materials, theoretically, significant amplification was found in composites' mechanical, thermal, electrical or coupled field properties due to negative stiffness inclusions. Experimentally, we fabricated high damping and high stiffness composite materials, SiC-InSn, to obtain a realization of the prediction from composite theory. With the idea of using negative stiffness components, we manufactured Sn, Zn or Al composites with 1% VO2 particles by volume, where the transforming particles, VO 2, were used as a negative stiffness source, and observed anomalies both in overall stiffness and tan delta. Broadband viscoelastic spectroscopy (BVS) was used to measure mechanical properties. The transformation of the eutectoid ZnAl was studied with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), and about a 30% increase in shear modulus and tan delta, respectively, were observed. To investigate the stability of systems with negative stiffness elements, several discrete viscoelastic models were analyzed. With the Lyapunov indirect stability theorem, we found that

  8. MoS2 nanolayers grown on carbon nanotubes: an advanced reinforcement for epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Keqing; Liu, Jiajia; Shi, Yongqian; Jiang, Saihua; Wang, Dong; Hu, Yuan; Gui, Zhou

    2015-03-25

    In the present study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) wrapped with MoS2 nanolayers (MoS2-CNTs) were facilely synthesized to obtain advanced hybrids. The structure of the MoS2-CNT hybrids was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Subsequently, the MoS2-CNT hybrids were incorporated into EP for reducing fire hazards. Compared with pristine CNTs, MoS2-CNT hybrids showed good dispersion in EP matrix and no obvious aggregation of CNTs was observed. The obtained nanocomposites exhibited significant improvements in thermal properties, flame retardancy and mechanical properties, compared with those of neat EP and composites with a single CNT or MoS2. With the incorporation of 2.0 wt % of MoS2-CNT hybrids, the char residues and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the EP composite was significantly increased. Also, the addition of MoS2-CNT hybrids awarded excellent fire resistance to the EP matrix, which was evidenced by the significantly reduced peak heat release rate and total heat release. Moreover, the amount of organic volatiles from EP decomposition was obviously decreased, and the formation of toxic CO was effectively suppressed, implying the toxicity of the volatiles was reduced and smoke production was obviously suppressed. The dramatically reduced fire hazards were generally ascribed to the synergistic effect of MoS2 and CNTs, containing good dispersion of MoS2-CNT hybrids, catalytic char function of MoS2 nanolayers, and physical barrier effects of MoS2 nanolayers and CNT network structure.

  9. Firefighting and Emergency Response Study of Advanced Composites Aircraft; Objective 1: Composite Material Damage in Minor Aircraft Fires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-18

    absorbed by the reaction ,  is the fraction of decomposed material, and Q is heat flux. The process is exothermic for negative values of H and... endothermic for positive values (the decomposition/phase change model allowed for endothermic reactions only). The decomposition rate term is typically...these reactions are dependent only on the polymer composition with only second order effects due to composite layup and fiber composition. This is

  10. Effects of two erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet lasers and conventional treatments as composite surface abrasives on the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Dadgar, Sepideh; Sanikhaatam, Zahra; Nateghian, Nazanin; Saravi, Mahdi Gholamrezaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bonding brackets to dental surfaces restored with composites are increasing. No studies to date have assessed the efficacy of laser irradiation in roughening of composite and the resulted shear bond strength (SBS) of the bonded bracket. We assessed, for the 1st time, the efficacy of two laser beams compared with conventional methods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five discs of light-cured composite resin were stored in deionized distilled water for 7 days. They were divided into five groups of 12 plus a group of five for scanning electron microscopy (SEM): Bur-abrasion followed by phosphoric acid etching (bur-PA), hydrofluoric acid conditioning (HF), sandblasting, 3 W and 2 W erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation for 12 s. After bracket bonding, specimens were water-stored (24 h) and thermocycled (500 cycles), respectively. SBS was tested at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was scored under ×10 magnification. SEM was carried out as well. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis, Tukey, Dunn, one-sample t-test/Wilcoxon tests, and Weibull analysis (α =0.05). Results: The SBS values (megapascal) were bur-PA (11.07 ± 1.95), HF (19.70 ± 1.91), sandblasting (7.75 ± 1.10), laser 2 W (15.38 ± 1.38), and laser 3 W (20.74 ± 1.73) (compared to SBS = 6, all P = 0.000). These differed significantly (ANOVA P = 0.000) except HF versus 3 W laser (Tukey P > 0.05). ARI scores differed significantly (Kruskal–Wallis P = 0.000), with sandblasting and 2 W lasers having scores inclined to the higher end (safest debonding). Weibull analysis implied successful clinical outcome for all groups, except for sandblasting with borderline results. Conclusion: Considering its high efficacy and the lack of adverse effects bound with other methods, the 3 W laser irradiation is recommended for clinical usage. PMID:26998473

  11. Preliminary design study of advanced composite blade and hub and nonmechanical control system for the tilt-rotor aircraft. Volume 2: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Project planning data for a rotor and control system procurement and testing program for modifications to the XV-15 tilt-rotor research demonstrator aircraft is presented. The design, fabrication, and installation of advanced composite blades compatible with the existing hub, an advanced composite hub, and a nonmechanical control system are required.

  12. The Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft lifts off from Pad 17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle lifts off with NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observatory at 10:39 a.m. EDT, on Aug. 25, 1997, from Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. This is the second Delta launch under the Boeing name and the first from Cape Canaveral. Launch was scrubbed one day by Air Force range safety personnel because two commercial fishing vessels were within the Delta's launch danger area. The ACE spacecraft will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles on its one-million-mile journey. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA. Study of these energetic particles may contribute to our understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system. ACE has a two-year minimum mission lifetime and a goal of five years of service. ACE was built for NASA by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and is managed by the Explorer Project Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The lead scientific institution is the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif.

  13. The Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft lifts off from Pad 17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Photographers and other onlookers watch as a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle lifts off with NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observatory at 10:39 a.m. EDT, on Aug. 25, 1997, from Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. This is the second Delta launch under the Boeing name and the first from Cape Canaveral. Liftoff had been scheduled for Aug. 24, but was scrubbed one day by Air Force range safety personnel because two commercial fishing vessels were within the Delta's launch danger area. The ACE spacecraft will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles on its one-million-mile journey. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA. Study of these energetic particles may contribute to our understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system. ACE has a two-year minimum mission lifetime and a goal of five years of service. ACE was built for NASA by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and is managed by the Explorer Project Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The lead scientific institution is the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif.

  14. Structural Performance of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The shells' fiber orientation angles vary continuously around their circumference from +/-10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/-45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the system's tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. A single cutout, scaled to represent a passenger door on a commercial aircraft, is then machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of the shells with cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for initial comparisons with test data. When retested, large deflections were observed around the cutouts, but the shells carried an average of 92 percent of the axial stiffness, and 86 percent of the buckling loads, of the shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions in performance demonstrate the potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of typical design features on the overall structural performance.

  15. Structural Characterization of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells with Large Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with large cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles of the shells vary continuously around their circumference from +/- 10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/- 45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the tow drop/add capability of the system to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells, both without and with small cutouts, were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. In this study, a single unreinforced cutout, scaled to represent a cargo door on a commercial aircraft, is machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of these shells with large cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for preliminary comparisons with test data. During testing, large displacements are observed around the large cutouts, but the shells maintain an average of 91 percent of the axial stiffness, and also carry 85 percent of the buckling loads, when compared to the pristine shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions indicate that there is great potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of large cutouts on the overall structural performance.

  16. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alva, T.; Henkel, J.; Johnson, R.; Carll, B.; Jackson, A.; Mosesian, B.; Brozovic, R.; Obrien, R.; Eudaily, R.

    1982-01-01

    This is the final report of technical work conducted during the fourth phase of a multiphase program having the objective of the design, development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component manufactured in a production environment at a cost competitive with those of its metal counterpart, and at a weight savings of at least 20 percent. The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes front and rear spars. During Phase 4 of the program, production quality tooling was designed and manufactured to produce three sets of covers, ribs, spars, miscellaneous parts, and subassemblies to assemble three complete ACVF units. Recurring and nonrecurring cost data were compiled and documented in the updated producibility/design to cost plan. Nondestruct inspections, quality control tests, and quality acceptance tests were performed in accordance with the quality assurance plan and the structural integrity control plan. Records were maintained to provide traceability of material and parts throughout the manufacturing development phase. It was also determined that additional tooling would not be required to support the current and projected L-1011 production rate.

  17. LiNiFe-based layered structure oxide and composite for advanced single layer fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Fan, Liangdong; Deng, Hui; He, Yunjune; Afzal, Muhammad; Dong, Wenjing; Yaqub, Azra; Janjua, Naveed K.

    2016-06-01

    A layered structure metal oxide, LiNi0.1Fe0.90O2-δ (LNF), is explored for the advanced single layer fuel cells (SLFCs). The temperature dependent impedance profiles and concentration cells (hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and H2/air atmospheres) tests prove LNF to be an intrinsically electronic conductor in air while mixed electronic and proton conductor in H2/air environment. SLFCs constructed by pure LNF materials show significant short circuiting reflected by a low device OCV and power output (175 mW cm-2 at 500 °C) due to high intrinsic electronic conduction. The power output is improved up to 640 and 760 mW cm-2, respectively at 500 and 550 °C by compositing LNF with ion conducting material, e.g., samarium doped ceria (SDC), to balance the electronic and ionic conductivity; both reached at 0.1 S cm-1 level. Such an SLFC gives super-performance and simplicity over the conventional 3-layer (anode, electrolyte and cathode) FCs, suggesting strong scientific and commercial impacts.

  18. Optimal attitude maneuver execution for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark A.; Baker, David

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft will require frequent attitude reorientations in order to maintain the spacecraft high gain antenna (HGA) within 3 deg of earth-pointing. These attitude maneuvers will be accomplished by employing a series of ground-commanded thruster pulses, computed by ground operations personnel, to achieve the desired change in the spacecraft angular momentum vector. With each maneuver, attitude nutation will be excited. Large nutation angles are undesirable from a science standpoint. It is important that the thruster firings be phased properly in order to minimize the nutation angle at the end of the maneuver so that science collection time is maximized. The analysis presented derives a simple approximation for the nutation contribution resulting from a series of short thruster burns. Analytic equations are derived which give the induced nutation angle as a function of the number of small thruster burns used to execute the attitude maneuver and the phasing of the burns. The results show that by properly subdividing the attitude burns, the induced nutation can be kept low. The analytic equations are also verified through attitude dynamics simulation and simulation results are presented. Finally, techniques for quantifying the post-maneuver nutation are discussed.

  19. The entrance system laboratory prototype for an advanced mass and ionic charge composition experiment.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, F; Desai, M I; Livi, R; Livi, S; McComas, D J; Randol, B

    2009-10-01

    Electrostatic analyzers (ESA) have been used extensively for the characterization of plasmas in a variety of space environments. They vary in shape, geometry, and size and are adapted to the specific particle population to be measured and the configuration of the spacecraft. Their main function is to select the energy per charge of the particles within a passband. An energy-per-charge range larger than that of the passband can be sampled by varying the voltage difference between the ESA electrodes. The voltage sweep takes time and reduces the duty cycle for a particular energy-per-charge passband. Our design approach for an advanced mass and ionic charge composition experiment (AMICCE) has a novel electrostatic analyzer that essentially serves as a spectrograph and selects ions simultaneously over a broad range of energy-per-charge (E/q). Only three voltage settings are required to cover the entire range from approximately 10 to 270 keV/q, thus dramatically increasing the product of the geometric factor times the duty cycle when compared with other instruments. In this paper, we describe the AMICCE concept with particular emphasis on the prototype of the entrance system (ESA and collimator), which we designed, developed, and tested. We also present comparisons of the laboratory results with electrostatic simulations.

  20. Fuel Distribution Estimate via Spin Period to Precession Period Ratio for the Advanced Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHart, Russell; Smith, Eric; Lakin, John

    2015-01-01

    The spin period to precession period ratio of a non-axisymmetric spin-stabilized spacecraft, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), was used to estimate the remaining mass and distribution of fuel within its propulsion system. This analysis was undertaken once telemetry suggested that two of the four fuel tanks had no propellant remaining, contrary to pre-launch expectations of the propulsion system performance. Numerical integration of possible fuel distributions was used to calculate moments of inertia for the spinning spacecraft. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of output from a dynamics simulation was employed to relate calculated moments of inertia to spin and precession periods. The resulting modeled ratios were compared to the actual spin period to precession period ratio derived from the effect of post-maneuver nutation angle on sun sensor measurements. A Monte Carlo search was performed to tune free parameters using the observed spin period to precession period ratio over the life of the mission. This novel analysis of spin and precession periods indicates that at the time of launch, propellant was distributed unevenly between the two pairs of fuel tanks, with one pair having approximately 20% more propellant than the other pair. Furthermore, it indicates the pair of the tanks with less fuel expelled all of its propellant by 2014 and that approximately 46 kg of propellant remains in the other two tanks, an amount that closely matches the operational fuel accounting estimate. Keywords: Fuel Distribution, Moments of Inertia, Precession, Spin, Nutation