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Sample records for advanced composite structures

  1. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  2. Advanced fiber placement of composite fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hercules/NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program will demonstrate the low cost potential of the automated fiber placement process. The Hercules fiber placement machine was developed for cost effective production of composite aircraft structures. The process uses a low cost prepreg tow material form and achieves equivalent laminate properties to structures fabricated with prepreg tape layup. Fiber placement demonstrations planned for the Hercules/NASA program include fabrication of stiffened test panels which represent crown, keel, and window belt segments of a typical transport aircraft fuselage.

  3. Advanced composite combustor structural concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the feasibility of and benefits derived from the use of high temperature composite materials in aircraft turbine engine combustor liners. The study included a survey and screening of the properties of three candidate composite materials including tungsten reinforced superalloys, carbon-carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers reinforcing a ceramic matrix of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS). The SiC-LAS material was selected as offering the greatest near term potential primarily on the basis of high temperature capability. A limited experimental investigation was conducted to quantify some of the more critical mechanical properties of the SiC-LAS composite having a multidirection 0/45/-45/90 deg fiber orientation favored for the combustor linear application. Rigorous cyclic thermal tests demonstrated that SiC-LAS was extremely resistant to the thermal fatigue mechanisms that usually limit the life of metallic combustor liners. A thermal design study led to the definition of a composite liner concept that incorporated film cooled SiC-LAS shingles mounted on a Hastelloy X shell. With coolant fluxes consistent with the most advanced metallic liner technology, the calculated hot surface temperatures of the shingles were within the apparent near term capability of the material. Structural analyses indicated that the stresses in the composite panels were low, primarily because of the low coefficient of expansion of the material and it was concluded that the dominant failure mode of the liner would be an as yet unidentified deterioration of the composite from prolonged exposure to high temperature. An economic study, based on a medium thrust size commercial aircraft engine, indicated that the SiC-LAS combustor liner would weigh 22.8N (11.27 lb) less and cost less to manufacture than advanced metallic liner concepts intended for use in the late 1980's.

  4. Probabilistic design of advanced composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, P. M.; Riskalla, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite technology offers potentials for sizable improvements in many areas: weight savings, maintainability, durability, and reliability. However, there are a number of inhibitors to these improvements. One of the biggest inhibitors is the imposition of traditional metallic approaches to design of composite structure. This is especially detrimental in composites because new materials technology demands new design approaches. Of particular importance are the decisions made regarding structural criteria. Significant changes cannot be implemented without careful consideration and exploration. This new approach is to implement changes on a controlled, verifiable basis. Probabilistic design is the methodology and the process to accomplish this. Its foundation is to base design criteria and objectives on reliability targets instead of arbitrary factors carried over from metallic structural history. The background is discussed of probabilistic design and the results are presented of a side-by-side comparison to generic aircraft structure designed the 'old' way and the 'new'. Activities are also defined that need to be undertaken to evolve available approaches to probabilistic design followed by summary and recommendations.

  5. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  6. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  7. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  8. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  9. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  10. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  11. Probabilistic Evaluation of Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the deterministic and probabilistic structural evaluation results of two structures made with advanced ceramic composites (CMC): internally pressurized tube and uniformly loaded flange. The deterministic structural evaluation includes stress, displacement, and buckling analyses. It is carried out using the finite element code MHOST, developed for the 3-D inelastic analysis of structures that are made with advanced materials. The probabilistic evaluation is performed using the integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures computer code IPACS. The affects of uncertainties in primitive variables related to the material, fabrication process, and loadings on the material property and structural response behavior are quantified. The primitive variables considered are: thermo-mechanical properties of fiber and matrix, fiber and void volume ratios, use temperature, and pressure. The probabilistic structural analysis and probabilistic strength results are used by IPACS to perform reliability and risk evaluation of the two structures. The results will show that the sensitivity information obtained for the two composite structures from the computational simulation can be used to alter the design process to meet desired service requirements. In addition to detailed probabilistic analysis of the two structures, the following were performed specifically on the CMC tube: (1) predicted the failure load and the buckling load, (2) performed coupled non-deterministic multi-disciplinary structural analysis, and (3) demonstrated that probabilistic sensitivities can be used to select a reduced set of design variables for optimization.

  12. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  13. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  14. Applications for thermal NDT on advanced composites in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, Steve R.

    1998-03-01

    Following several years of investigating active thermal imaging techniques, Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems Company (LMASC) has introduced a portable, time-dependent thermography (TDT) system into the production inspection environment. Originally pursued as a rapid, non-contacting, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for inspecting large surface areas, the TDT system has proven most useful as a rapid verification tool on advanced composite assemblies. TDT is a relatively new NDE methodology as compared to conventional ultrasonic and radiography testing. SEveral technical issues are being addressed as confidence in the system's capabilities increase. These include inspector training and certification, system sensitivity assessments, and test results interpretation. Starting in 1991, LMASC began a beta-site evaluation of a prototype TDT system developed by the Institute of Manufacturing Research at Wayne State University. This prototype was the forerunner of the current production system, which is offered commercially as a fully integrated thermal NDE system. Applications investigated to data include quality assurance of advanced aerospace composite structures/assemblies for disbonds/voids between skin and core. TDT has a number of advantages over traditional NDT methods. The process of acquiring thermal images is fast, and can decrease inspection time required to locate suspect areas. The system also holds promise for depot level inspections due to its portability. This paper describes a systematic approach to implementing TDT into the production inspection arena.

  15. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  16. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  17. Advanced Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarantos, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    This is an excerpt from a course for advanced students, designed to teach proficiency in English composition by providing activities specifically geared to the elimination of native language interference. (LG)

  18. Development of Stitched Composite Structure for Advanced Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn; Przekop, Adam; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew; Velicki, Alex; Linton, Kim; Wu, Hsi-Yung; Baraja, Jaime; Thrash, Patrick; Hoffman, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop technologies which will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composites. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. With the PRSEUS concept, through-the-thickness stitches are applied through dry fabric prior to resin infusion, and replace fasteners throughout each integral panel. Through-the-thickness reinforcement at discontinuities, such as along flange edges, has been shown to suppress delamination and turn cracks, which expands the design space and leads to lighter designs. The pultruded rod provides stiffening away from the more vulnerable skin surface and improves bending stiffness. A series of building blocks were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. These building blocks addressed tension, compression, and pressure loading conditions. The emphasis of the development work has been to assess the loading capability, damage arrestment features, repairability, post-buckling behavior, and response of PRSEUS flat panels to out-of plane pressure loading. The results of this building-block program from coupons through an 80%-scale pressure box have demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. This development program shows that the PRSEUS benefits are also applicable to traditional tube-andwing aircraft, those of advanced configurations, and other

  19. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.

  20. In-Situ Investigation of Advanced Structural Coatings and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustundag, Ersan

    2003-01-01

    The premise of this project is a comprehensive study that involves the in-situ characterization of advanced coatings and composites by employing both neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques in a complementary manner. The diffraction data would then be interpreted and used in developing or validating advanced micromechanics models with life prediction capability. In the period covered by this report, basic work was conducted to establish the experimental conditions for various specimens and techniques. In addition, equipment was developed that will allow the in-situ studies under a range of conditions (stress, temperature, atmosphere, etc.).

  1. Advanced aerospace composite material structural design using artificial intelligent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.H.; Chen, J.L.; Hwang, W.C.

    1993-12-31

    Due to the complexity in the prediction of property and behavior, composite material has not substituted for metal widely yet, though it has high specific-strength and high specific-modulus that are more important in the aerospace industry. In this paper two artificial intelligent techniques, the expert systems and neural network technology, were introduced to the structural design of composite material. Expert System which has good ability in symbolic processing can helps us to solve problem by saving experience and knowledge. It is, therefore, a reasonable way to combine expert system technology to tile composite structural design. The development of a prototype expert system to help designer during the process of composite structural design is presented. Neural network is a network similar to people`s brain that can simulate the thinking way of people and has the ability of learning from the training data by adapting the weights of network. Because of the bottleneck in knowledge acquisition processes, the application of neural network and its learning ability to strength design of composite structures are presented. Some examples are in this paper to demonstrate the idea.

  2. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites.

  3. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  4. Advanced ultrasonic testing of complex shaped composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, D.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Filippov, G.; Salchak, Y.; Sedanova, E.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the wide application of composite materials it is necessary to develop unconventional quality control techniques. One of the methods that can be used for this purpose is ultrasonic tomography. In this article an application of a robotic ultrasonic system is considered. Precise positioning of the robotic scanner and path generating are defined as ones of the most important aspects. This study proposes a non-contact calibration method of a robotic ultrasonic system. Path of the scanner requires a 3D model of controlled objects which are created in accordance with the proposed algorithm. The suggested techniques are based on implementation of structured light method.

  5. Status of Advanced Stitched Unitized Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Velicki, Alex

    2013-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift-to-drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise levels. The primary structural concept being developed under the ERA project in the Airframe Technology element is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. This paper describes how researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop fundamental PRSEUS technologies that could someday be implemented on a transport size aircraft with high aspect ratio wings or unconventional shapes such as a hybrid wing body airplane design.

  6. Recent advances in active fiber composites for structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bent, Aaron A.; Pizzochero, Alessandro E.

    2000-06-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFCs) provide a novel method for large scale actuation and sensing in active structures. The composite comprises unidirectionally aligned piezoelectric fibers, a resin matrix system, and interdigital electrode. AFCs have demonstrated distinct advantages over current monolithic piezoceramic actuators, including: higher planar actuation strain, tailorable orthotropic actuation, robustness to damage, conformability to curved surfaces, and potential for large area distributed actuation/sensing system. This manuscript focuses on recent developments in three key areas. The first area describes the completion of a standard AFC baseline material. The baseline AFC consists of 5.5mil diameter PZT-5A fibers laminated with an epoxy film adhesive and silver screen-printed electrodes. A scalable fabrication process based on lamination industry equipment has been implemented. Baseline AFC performance has been characterized, including free strains and blocked force. The send area describes continued work in developing optimized geometry/materials for future AFCs. AFC performance and efficiency can be affected significantly by changes in electrode pitch and fiber diameter and/or cross- sectional geometry. Various improved design have been identified. Third is review of application demonstration that exploit the benefits of AFCs to solve structural control problems.

  7. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  8. Advanced composites for windmills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourquardez, G.

    A development status assessment is conducted for advanced composite construction techniques for windmill blade structures which, as in the case of composite helicopter rotors, promise greater reliability, longer service life, superior performance, and lower costs. Composites in wind turbine applications must bear aerodynamic, inertial and gravitational loads in complex interaction cycles. Attention is given to large Darrieus-type vertical axis windmills, to which composite construction methods may offer highly effective pitch-control mechanisms, especially in the 'umbrella' configuration.

  9. Advanced composite structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Advanced material concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kreisler S. Y.; Landis, Abraham L.; Chow, Andrea W.; Hamlin, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    To achieve acceptable performance and long-term durability at elevated temperatures (350 to 600 F) for high-speed transport systems, further improvements of the high-performance matrix materials will be necessary to achieve very long-term (60,000-120,000 service hours) retention of mechanical properties and damage tolerance. This report emphasizes isoimide modification as a complementary technique to semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN's) to achieve greater processibility, better curing dynamics, and possibly enhanced thermo-mechanical properties in composites. A key result is the demonstration of enhanced processibility of isoimide-modified linear and thermo-setting polyimide systems.

  10. Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2008-01-01

    AS&M performed a broad assessment survey and study to establish the potential composite materials and structures applications and benefits to the Constellation Program Elements. Trade studies were performed on selected elements to determine the potential weight or performance payoff from use of composites. Weight predictions were made for liquid hydrogen and oxygen tanks, interstage cylindrical shell, lunar surface access module, ascent module liquid methane tank, and lunar surface manipulator. A key part of this study was the evaluation of 88 different composite technologies to establish their criticality to applications for the Constellation Program. The overall outcome of this study shows that composites are viable structural materials which offer from 20% to 40% weight savings for many of the structural components that make up the Major Elements of the Constellation Program. NASA investment in advancing composite technologies for space structural applications is an investment in America's Space Exploration Program.

  11. Advanced composites technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. Critical technology issues that must be addressed and solved to develop composite primary structures for transport aircraft are delineated. The program schedule and milestones are included. Work completed in the first 3 years of the program indicates the potential for achieving composite structures that weigh less and are cost effective relative to conventional aluminum structure. Selected technical accomplishments are noted. Readers who are seeking more in-depth technical information should study the other papers included in these proceedings.

  12. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  13. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composite materials in the wing structure of future production aircraft. The study accomplished the following: (1) definition of acceptance factors, (2) identification of technology issues, (3) evaluation of six candidate wing structures, (4) evaluation of five program options, (5) definition of a composite wing technology development plan, (6) identification of full-scale tests, (7) estimation of program costs for the total development plan, (8) forecast of future utilization of composites in commercial transport aircraft and (9) identification of critical technologies for timely program planning.

  14. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  15. Titanium and advanced composite structures for a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Hoy, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Structural design studies were made, based on current technology and on an estimate of technology to be available in the mid 1980's, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced arrow wing configuration cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, and define an efficient structural arrangement. Material and concept selection, detailed structural analysis, structural design and airplane mass analysis were completed based on current technology. Based on estimated future technology, structural sizing for strength and a preliminary assessment of the flutter of a strength designed composite structure were completed. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members.

  16. Design development of an advanced composite aileron. [graphite-epoxy structure for L-1011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design development of an advanced composite inboard aileron for the L-1011 commercial transport aircraft. Design details of the composite aileron are reported. Results of tests which substantiate the structural integrity of the design are also presented. The composite aileron is a multi-rib assembly with graphite/epoxy tape-syntactic core sandwich covers, a graphite/epoxy tape front spar, and graphite/epoxy fabric ribs. This structure is a direct replacement for the current metal aileron with a weight savings of 28.7 percent (40.3 lb.). Engineering cost estimates indicate that the composite structure will be cost competitive with the metal structure it is replacing.

  17. Study of mould design and forming process on advanced polymer-matrix composite complex structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. J.; Zhan, L. H.; Bai, H. M.; Chen, X. P.; Zhou, Y. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced carbon fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are widely applied to aviation manufacturing field due to their outstanding performance. In this paper, the mould design and forming process of the complex composite structure were discussed in detail using the hat stiffened structure as an example. The key issues of the moulddesign were analyzed, and the corresponding solutions were also presented. The crucial control points of the forming process such as the determination of materials and stacking sequence, the temperature and pressure route of the co-curing process were introduced. In order to guarantee the forming quality of the composite hat stiffened structure, a mathematical model about the aperture of rubber mandrel was introduced. The study presented in this paper may provide some actual references for the design and manufacture of the important complex composite structures.

  18. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  19. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall wing study objectives are to study and plan the effort by commercial transport aircraft manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current conventional materials and practices to extensive use of advanced composites in wings of aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Specific wing study objectives are to define the technology and data needed to support an aircraft manufacturer's commitment to utilize composites primary wing structure in future production aircraft and to develop plans for a composite wing technology program which will provide the needed technology and data.

  20. Structural Framework for Flight: NASA's Role in Development of Advanced Composite Materials for Aircraft and Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Johnston, Norman J.; Pipes, R. Byron; McGuire, Jack F.

    2011-01-01

    This serves as a source of collated information on Composite Research over the past four decades at NASA Langley Research Center, and is a key reference for readers wishing to grasp the underlying principles and challenges associated with developing and applying advanced composite materials to new aerospace vehicle concepts. Second, it identifies the major obstacles encountered in developing and applying composites on advanced flight vehicles, as well as lessons learned in overcoming these obstacles. Third, it points out current barriers and challenges to further application of composites on future vehicles. This is extremely valuable for steering research in the future, when new breakthroughs in materials or processing science may eliminate/minimize some of the barriers that have traditionally blocked the expanded application of composite to new structural or revolutionary vehicle concepts. Finally, a review of past work and identification of future challenges will hopefully inspire new research opportunities and development of revolutionary materials and structural concepts to revolutionize future flight vehicles.

  1. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  2. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques. PMID:26263987

  3. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  4. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques. PMID:26263987

  5. Advances in Micromechanics Modeling of Composites Structures for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada, Albert

    Although high performance, light-weight composites are increasingly being used in applications ranging from aircraft, rotorcraft, weapon systems and ground vehicles, the assurance of structural reliability remains a critical issue. In composites, damage is absorbed through various fracture processes, including fiber failure, matrix cracking and delamination. An important element in achieving reliable composite systems is a strong capability of assessing and inspecting physical damage of critical structural components. Installation of a robust Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system would be very valuable in detecting the onset of composite failure. A number of major issues still require serious attention in connection with the research and development aspects of sensor-integrated reliable SHM systems for composite structures. In particular, the sensitivity of currently available sensor systems does not allow detection of micro level damage; this limits the capability of data driven SHM systems. As a fundamental layer in SHM, modeling can provide in-depth information on material and structural behavior for sensing and detection, as well as data for learning algorithms. This dissertation focuses on the development of a multiscale analysis framework, which is used to detect various forms of damage in complex composite structures. A generalized method of cells based micromechanics analysis, as implemented in NASA's MAC/GMC code, is used for the micro-level analysis. First, a baseline study of MAC/GMC is performed to determine the governing failure theories that best capture the damage progression. The deficiencies associated with various layups and loading conditions are addressed. In most micromechanics analysis, a representative unit cell (RUC) with a common fiber packing arrangement is used. The effect of variation in this arrangement within the RUC has been studied and results indicate this variation influences the macro-scale effective material properties and

  6. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  7. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  8. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  9. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  10. Advanced composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

    1993-01-01

    Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and

  11. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Based on estimated graphite and boron fiber properties, allowable stresses and strains were established for advanced composite materials. Stiffened panel and conventional sandwich panel concepts were designed and analyzed, using graphite/polyimide and boron/polyimide materials. The conventional sandwich panel was elected as the structural concept for the modified wing structure. Upper and lower surface panels of the arrow wing structure were then redesigned, using high strength graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, retaining the titanium spars and ribs from the prior study. The ATLAS integrated analysis and design system was used for stress analysis and automated resizing of surface panels. Flutter analysis of the hybrid structure showed a significant decrease in flutter speed relative to the titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium design by selective increase in laminate thickness and by using graphite fibers with properties intermediate between high strength and high modulus values.

  12. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.; Cardinale, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    The effort required by commercial transport manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current construction materials and practices to extensive use of composites in aircraft wings was investigated. The engineering and manufacturing disciplines which normally participate in the design, development, and production of an aircraft were employed to ensure that all of the factors that would enter a decision to commit to production of a composite wing structure were addressed. A conceptual design of an advanced technology reduced energy aircraft provided the framework for identifying and investigating unique design aspects. A plan development effort defined the essential technology needs and formulated approaches for effecting the required wing development. The wing development program plans, resource needs, and recommendations are summarized.

  13. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  14. Research on the exploitation of advanced composite materials to lightly loaded structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The objective was to create a sailplane which could fly in weaker thermals than present day sailplanes (by being lighter) and to fly in stronger thermals than present sailplanes (by carrying more water ballast). The research was to tackle the interaction of advanced composites and the aerodynamic performance, the interaction of fabrication procedures and the advanced composites, and the interaction of advanced composites and the design process. Many pieces of the overall system were investigated but none were carried to the resolution required for engineering application. Nonetheless, interesting and useful results were obtained and are here reported.

  15. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  16. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  17. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  18. Composite transport wing technology development: Design development tests and advanced structural concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; Harvill, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous design concepts, materials, and manufacturing methods were investigated for the covers and spars of a transport box wing. Cover panels and spar segments were fabricated and tested to verify the structural integrity of design concepts and fabrication techniques. Compression tests on stiffened panels demonstrated the ability of graphite/epoxy wing upper cover designs to achieve a 35 percent weight savings compared to the aluminum baseline. The impact damage tolerance of the designs and materials used for these panels limits the allowable compression strain and therefore the maximum achievable weight savings. Bending and shear tests on various spar designs verified an average weight savings of 37 percent compared to the aluminum baseline. Impact damage to spar webs did not significantly degrade structural performance. Predictions of spar web shear instability correlated well with measured performance. The structural integrity of spars manufactured by filament winding equalled or exceeded those fabricated by hand lay-up. The information obtained will be applied to the design, fabrication, and test of a full-scale section of a wing box. When completed, the tests on the technology integration box beam will demonstrate the structural integrity of an advanced composite wing design which is 25 percent lighter than the metal baseline.

  19. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  20. Structural Performance of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The shells' fiber orientation angles vary continuously around their circumference from +/-10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/-45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the system's tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. A single cutout, scaled to represent a passenger door on a commercial aircraft, is then machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of the shells with cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for initial comparisons with test data. When retested, large deflections were observed around the cutouts, but the shells carried an average of 92 percent of the axial stiffness, and 86 percent of the buckling loads, of the shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions in performance demonstrate the potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of typical design features on the overall structural performance.

  1. Structural Characterization of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells with Large Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with large cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles of the shells vary continuously around their circumference from +/- 10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/- 45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the tow drop/add capability of the system to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells, both without and with small cutouts, were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. In this study, a single unreinforced cutout, scaled to represent a cargo door on a commercial aircraft, is machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of these shells with large cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for preliminary comparisons with test data. During testing, large displacements are observed around the large cutouts, but the shells maintain an average of 91 percent of the axial stiffness, and also carry 85 percent of the buckling loads, when compared to the pristine shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions indicate that there is great potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of large cutouts on the overall structural performance.

  2. A guide to structural factors for advanced composites used on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwagenen, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The use of composite materials in spacecraft systems is constantly increasing. Although the areas of composite design and fabrication are maturing, they remain distinct from the same activities performed using conventional materials and processes. This has led to some confusion regarding the precise meaning of the term 'factor of safety' as it applies to these structures. In addition, composite engineering introduces terms such as 'knock-down factors' to further modify material properties for design purposes. This guide is intended to clarify these terms as well as their use in the design of composite structures for spacecraft. It is particularly intended to be used by the engineering community not involved in the day-to-day composites design process. An attempt is also made to explain the wide range of factors of safety encountered in composite designs as well as their relationship to the 1.4 factor of safety conventionally applied to metallic structures.

  3. Effect of Interface Structure on Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yong X.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is given for nanostructuring the interface in composite materials and structures by introducing nanoscale features such as nanopores and nanofibers. The effects of modifying matrices and nano-architecturing interfaces on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite materials are examined. A nonlinear damage model for characterizing the deformation behavior of polymeric nanocomposites is presented and the application of this model to carbon nanotube-reinforced and reactive graphite nanotube-reinforced epoxy composite materials is shown. PMID:20054466

  4. Effect of interface structure on mechanical properties of advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yong X

    2009-11-25

    This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is given for nanostructuring the interface in composite materials and structures by introducing nanoscale features such as nanopores and nanofibers. The effects of modifying matrices and nano-architecturing interfaces on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite materials are examined. A nonlinear damage model for characterizing the deformation behavior of polymeric nanocomposites is presented and the application of this model to carbon nanotube-reinforced and reactive graphite nanotube-reinforced epoxy composite materials is shown.

  5. ISAAC Advanced Composites Research Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stewart, Brian K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is acquiring a state-of-art composites fabrication capability to support the Center's advanced research and technology mission. The system introduced in this paper is named ISAAC (Integrated Structural Assembly of Advanced Composites). The initial operational capability of ISAAC is automated fiber placement, built around a commercial system from Electroimpact, Inc. that consists of a multi-degree of freedom robot platform, a tool changer mechanism, and a purpose-built fiber placement end effector. Examples are presented of the advanced materials, structures, structural concepts, fabrication processes and technology development that may be enabled using the ISAAC system. The fiber placement end effector may be used directly or with appropriate modifications for these studies, or other end effectors with different capabilities may either be bought or developed with NASA's partners in industry and academia.

  6. LiNiFe-based layered structure oxide and composite for advanced single layer fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Fan, Liangdong; Deng, Hui; He, Yunjune; Afzal, Muhammad; Dong, Wenjing; Yaqub, Azra; Janjua, Naveed K.

    2016-06-01

    A layered structure metal oxide, LiNi0.1Fe0.90O2-δ (LNF), is explored for the advanced single layer fuel cells (SLFCs). The temperature dependent impedance profiles and concentration cells (hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and H2/air atmospheres) tests prove LNF to be an intrinsically electronic conductor in air while mixed electronic and proton conductor in H2/air environment. SLFCs constructed by pure LNF materials show significant short circuiting reflected by a low device OCV and power output (175 mW cm-2 at 500 °C) due to high intrinsic electronic conduction. The power output is improved up to 640 and 760 mW cm-2, respectively at 500 and 550 °C by compositing LNF with ion conducting material, e.g., samarium doped ceria (SDC), to balance the electronic and ionic conductivity; both reached at 0.1 S cm-1 level. Such an SLFC gives super-performance and simplicity over the conventional 3-layer (anode, electrolyte and cathode) FCs, suggesting strong scientific and commercial impacts.

  7. Resin Flow of an Advanced Grid-Stiffened Composite Structure in the Co-Curing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qizhong; Ren, Mingfa; Chen, Haoran

    2013-06-01

    The soft-mold aided co-curing process which cures the skin part and ribs part simultaneously was introduced for reducing the cost of advanced grid-stiffened composite structure (AGS). The co-curing process for a typical AGS, preformed by the prepreg AS4/3501-6, was simulated by a finite element program incorporated with the user-subroutines `thermo-chemical' module and the `chemical-flow' module. The variations of temperature, cure degree, resin pressure and fiber volume fraction of the AGS were predicted. It shows that the uniform distributions of temperature, cure degree and viscosity in the AGS would be disturbed by the unique geometrical pattern of AGS. There is an alternation in distribution of resin pressure at the interface between ribs and skin, and the duration time of resin flow is sensitive to the thickness of the AGS. To obtain a desired AGS, the process parameters of the co-curing process should be determined by the geometry of an AGS and the kinds of resin.

  8. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plan is defined for a composite wing development effort which will assist commercial transport manufacturers in reaching a level of technology readiness where the utilization of composite wing structure is a cost competitive option for a new aircraft production plan. The recommended development effort consists of two programs: a joint government/industry material development program and a wing structure development program. Both programs are described in detail.

  9. Advanced composites technology

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E; Sanchez, R J

    1998-10-01

    The development of fiber composite components in next-generation munitions, such as sabots for kinetic energy penetrators and lightweight cases for advanced artillery projectiles, relies on design trade-off studies using validated computer code simulations. We are developing capabilities to determine the failure of advanced fiber composites under multiaxial stresses to critically evaluate three-dimensional failure models and develop new ones if necessary. The effects of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on failure of composites are being investigated using a high-pressure testing system that incorporates several unique features. Several improvements were made to the system this year, and we report on the first tests of both isotropic and fiber composite materials. The preliminary results indicate that pressure has little effect on longitudinal compression strength of unidirectional composites, but issues with obtaining reliable failures in these materials still remain to be resolved. The transverse compression strength was found to be significantly enhanced by pressure, and the trends observed for this property and the longitudinal strength are in agreement with recent models for failure of fiber composites.

  10. Advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. Judd; Hillig, William G.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Pipes, R. Byron; Perepezko, John H.; Sheehan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high-performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic, and carbon matrices. Because of a strong carbon and fiber industry, Japan is the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation-resistant carbon/carbon composite program. With its outstanding technical base in carbon technology, Japan should be able to match present technology in the U.S. and introduce lower-cost manufacturing methods. However, the panel did not see any innovative approaches to oxidation protection. Ceramic and especially intermetallic matrix composites were not yet receiving much attention at the time of the panel's visit. There was a high level of monolithic ceramic research and development activity. High temperature monolithic intermetallic research was just starting, but notable products in titanium aluminides had already appeared. Matrixless ceramic composites was one novel approach noted. Technologies for high temperature composites fabrication existed, but large numbers of panels or parts had not been produced. The Japanese have selected aerospace as an important future industry. Because materials are an enabling technology for a strong aerospace industry, Japan initiated an ambitious long-term program to develop high temperature composites. Although just starting, its progress should be closely monitored in the U.S.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  12. An Integrated Theory for Predicting the Hydrothermomechanical Response of Advanced Composite Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated theory is developed for predicting the hydrothermomechanical (HDTM) response of fiber composite components. The integrated theory is based on a combined theoretical and experimental investigation. In addition to predicting the HDTM response of components, the theory is structured to assess the combined hydrothermal effects on the mechanical properties of unidirectional composites loaded along the material axis and off-axis, and those of angleplied laminates. The theory developed predicts values which are in good agreement with measured data at the micromechanics, macromechanics, laminate analysis and structural analysis levels.

  13. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  15. Advances in Composites Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Dexter, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    A significant level of research is currently focused on the development of tough resins and high strain fibers in an effort to gain improved damage tolerance. Moderate success has been achieved with the development of new resins such as PEEK and additional improvements look promising with new thermoplastic resins. Development of innovative material forms such as 2-D and 3-D woven fabrics and braided structural subelements is also expected to improve damage tolerance and durability of composite hardware. The new thrust in composites is to develop low cost manufacturing and design concepts to lower the cost of composite hardware. Processes being examined include automated material placement, filament winding, pultrusion, and thermoforming. The factory of the future will likely incorporate extensive automation in all aspects of manufacturing composite components.

  16. Innovative fabrication processing of advanced composite materials concepts for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassapoglou, Christos; Dinicola, Al J.; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    The autoclave based THERM-X(sub R) process was evaluated by cocuring complex curved panels with frames and stiffeners. The process was shown to result in composite parts of high quality with good compaction at sharp radius regions and corners of intersecting parts. The structural properties of the postbuckled panels fabricated were found to be equivalent to those of conventionally tooled hand laid-up parts. Significant savings in bagging time over conventional tooling were documented. Structural details such as cocured shear ties and embedded stiffener flanges in the skin were found to suppress failure modes such as failure at corners of intersecting members and skin stiffeners separation.

  17. Recent advance on design and manufacturing of composite anisogrid structures for space launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, G.; De Nicola, F.

    2012-12-01

    Anisogrid composite shells have been developed and applied since the eighties by the Russian technology aiming at critical weight structures for space launchers, as interstages and cone adapters. The manufacturing process commonly applied is based on the wet filament winding. The paper concerns with some developments of design and manufacturing recently performed at the Italian Aerospace Research Center on a cylindrical structural model representative of this kind of structures. The framework of preliminary design is improved by introducing the concept of suboptimal configuration in order to match the stiffness requirement of the shell and minimise the mass, in conjunction with the typical strength constraints. The undertaken manufacturing process is based on dry robotic winding for the lattice structure and for the outer skin, with the aid of usual rubber tooling and new devices for the automated deposition strategy. Resin infusion under vacuum bag and co-cure of the system of ribs and skin is finally applied out-of-autoclave, with the aid of a heated mandrel. With such approach an interstage structural model (scale factor 1:1.5) has been designed, manufactured and tested. Design requirements and loads refer to a typical space launcher whose baseline configuration is made in aluminium. The global mechanical test of the manufactured structure has confirmed the expected high structural performance. The possibility to reach substantial weight savings in comparison with the aluminium benchmark has been fully demonstrated.

  18. Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messinger, Ross

    2008-01-01

    An assessment was performed to identify the applicability of composite material technologies to major structural elements of the NASA Constellation program. A qualitative technology assessment methodology was developed to document the relative benefit of 24 structural systems with respect to 33 major structural elements of Ares I, Orion, Ares V, and Altair. Technology maturity assessments and development plans were obtained from more than 30 Boeing subject matter experts for more than 100 technologies. These assessment results and technology plans were combined to generate a four-level hierarchy of recommendations. An overarching strategy is suggested, followed by a Constellation-wide development plan, three integrated technology demonstrations, and three focused projects for a task order follow-on.

  19. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts were evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy materials are now under development.

  20. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts have been evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy material is now under development.

  1. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  2. Advanced bioceramic composite for bone tissue engineering: design principles and structure-bioactivity relationship.

    PubMed

    El-Ghannam, Ahmed R

    2004-06-01

    SCPC in vivo correlates well with the higher rate of silica dissolution from SCPC than bioactive glass. The facilitated Si dissolution was associated with rapid bone regeneration in defects grafted with SCPC. The enhanced bioactivity properties of the SCPC are due to its chemical composition, modified crystalline structure, and high porosity. The new SCPC may be used for a wide variety of applications in the field of bone reconstruction including tissue-engineering scaffolds for cell and drug delivery.

  3. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  4. Microcracking, microcrack-induced delamination, and longitudinal splitting of advanced composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A combined analytical and experimental study was conducted to analyze microcracking, microcrack-induced delamination, and longitudinal splitting in polymer matrix composites. Strain energy release rates, calculated by a variational analysis, were used in a failure criterion to predict microcracking. Predictions and test results were compared for static, fatigue, and cyclic thermal loading. The longitudinal splitting analysis accounted for the effects of fiber bridging. Test data are analyzed and compared for longitudinal splitting and delamination under mixed-mode loading. This study emphasizes the importance of using fracture mechanics analyses to understand the complex failure processes that govern composite strength and life.

  5. Advanced composite airframe program: Today's technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Danny E.; Mazza, L. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP) was undertaken to demonstrate the advantages of the application of advanced composite materials and structural design concepts to the airframe structure on helicopters designed to stringent military requirements. The primary goals of the program were the reduction of airframe production costs and airframe weight by 17 and 22 percent respectively. The ACAP effort consisted of a preliminary design phase, detail design, and design support testing, full-scale fabrication, laboratory testing, and a ground/flight test demonstration. Since the completion of the flight test demonstration programs follow-on efforts were initiated to more fully evaluate a variety of military characteristics of the composite airframe structures developed under the original ACAP advanced development contracts. An overview of the ACAP program is provided and some of the design features, design support testing, manufacturing approaches, and the results of the flight test evaluation, as well as, an overview of Militarization Test and Evaluation efforts are described.

  6. Sound transmission modeling of advanced multilayered composite structures using enhanced T-matrices for two-phase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Roland L.; Bryant, Rebecca S.

    2005-09-01

    Advanced composite structures have been used for many years in the aerospace industry. When designing multilayered structures special attention must be paid to the bonding techniques since the interface conditions have a direct effect on the mechanical coupling between the individual layers. Previous studies have shown the overall acoustical performance such as transmission loss and surface absorption to be sensitive to this structural path mainly in the lower frequency range. The state of the art shows that a comprehensive model is still lacking in the framework of the transfer matrix Method. The present paper proposes a new analytical modeling approach to tackle systems with stiffeners in the low-frequency range. This technique is based on the so-called Series-Parallel network of the transmission line theory in the framework of the classical electro-acoustical analogies. The simulations show that in the typical case of a double plate with stiffeners, with regards to transmission loss the design change due to the mechanical path is captured and the increase of the overall stiffness of the system shifts the resonance to the higher frequencies. The other important acoustical properties of multilayered systems will be highlighted during the presentation with regards to optimizing the overall acoustical performance.

  7. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications.

  8. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications. PMID:26512734

  9. Advanced composite materials: a strong growth industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites represent a material form that will see significant growth in structural applications. The authors notes that Du Pont sees a broad opportunity for these materials and proceeds to review reasons for the company's optimism as well as their approach to this technology. Substitution of composites for metals is shown graphically since 1960 and projected to 2025. Price reductions vs. steel of five materials also shown graphically since 1970 and projected to 1990. Today, use of advanced composites is primarily when high performance, is required, e.g., aerospace and sporting goods. The author sees a shift into higher-volume applications in the next 15 years, primarily the automotive industry. Finally, as the next century approaches, the author sees a possible capture of 50% of the structure-materials market, mostly in lightweight bridging structures and the top portion of large high-rise structures.

  10. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlivan, John T.; Wilson, Robert D.; Smith, Peter J.; Johnson, Ronald W.

    1984-01-01

    Toppics addressed include: advanced composites on Boeing commercial aircraft; composite wing durability; damage tolerance technology development; heavily loaded wing panel design; and pressure containment and damage tolerance in fuselages.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  12. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  13. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  14. ISAAC - A Testbed for Advanced Composites Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stewart, Brian K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is acquiring a state-of-art composites fabrication environment to support the Center's research and technology development mission. This overall system described in this paper is named ISAAC, or Integrated Structural Assembly of Advanced Composites. ISAAC's initial operational capability is a commercial robotic automated fiber placement system from Electroimpact, Inc. that consists of a multi-degree of freedom commercial robot platform, a tool changer mechanism, and a specialized automated fiber placement end effector. Examples are presented of how development of advanced composite materials, structures, fabrication processes and technology are enabled by utilizing the fiber placement end effector directly or with appropriate modifications. Alternatively, end effectors with different capabilities may either be bought or developed with NASA's partners in industry and academia.

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  16. Composite armored vehicle advanced technology demonstator

    SciTech Connect

    Ostberg, D.T.; Dunfee, R.S.; Thomas, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Composite structures are a key technology needed to develop future lightweight combat vehicles that are both deployable and survivable. The Composite Armored Vehicle Advanced Technology Demonstrator Program that started in fiscal year 1994 will continue through 1998 to verily that composite structures are a viable solution for ground combat vehicles. Testing thus far includes material characterization, structural component tests and full scale quarter section tests. Material and manufacturing considerations, tests, results and changes, and the status of the program will be described. The structural component tests have been completed successfully, and quarter section testing is in progress. Upon completion of the critical design review, the vehicle demonstrator will be Fabricated and undergo government testing.

  17. Custom Machines Advance Composite Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Here is a brief list of materials that NASA will not be using to construct spacecraft: wood, adobe, fiberglass, bone. While it might be obvious why these materials would not make for safe space travel, they do share a common characteristic with materials that may well be the future foundation of spacecraft design: They all are composites. Formed of two or more unlike materials - such as cellulose and lignin in the case of wood, or glass fibers and plastic resin in the case of fiberglass-composites provide enhanced mechanical and physical properties through the combination of their constituent materials. For this reason, composites are used in everything from buildings, bathtubs, and countertops to boats, racecars, and sports equipment. NASA continually works to develop new materials to enable future space missions - lighter, less expensive materials that can still withstand the extreme demands of space travel. Composites such as carbon fiber materials offer promising solutions in this regard, providing strength and stiffness comparable to metals like aluminum but with less weight, allowing for benefits like better fuel efficiency and simpler propulsion system design. Composites can also be made fatigue tolerant and thermally stable - useful in space where temperatures can swing hundreds of degrees. NASA has recently explored the use of composites for aerospace applications through projects like the Composite Crew Module (CCM), a composite-constructed version of the aluminum-lithium Multipurpose Crew Capsule. The CCM was designed to give NASA engineers a chance to gain valuable experience developing and testing composite aerospace structures.

  18. Recent advances in aerospace composite NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgeson, Gary E.

    2002-06-01

    As the aerospace industry continues to advance the design and use of composite structure, the NDE community faces the difficulties of trying to keep up. The challenges lie in manufacturing evaluation of the newest aerospace structures and materials and the in-service inspection and monitoring of damaged or aging composites. This paper provides examples of several promising NDI applications in the world of aerospace composites. Airborne (or non-contact) Ultrasonic Testing (UT) has been available for decades, but recently has generated new interest due to significant improvements in transducer design and low noise electronics. Boeing is developing inspection techniques for composite joints and core blankets using this technology. In-service inspection techniques for thick, multi-layer structures are also being advanced. One effective technique integrates the S-9 Sondicator, a traditional bond testing device, with Boeing's Mobile Automated Scanner (MAUS) platform. Composite patches have seen limited use on-aircraft, due, in part, to the difficulty of determining the quality of a bonded joint. A unique approach using Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is showing promise as a bonded patch-inspection method. Other NDI techniques currently being developed for aerospace application are also briefly discussed.

  19. Second NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The conference papers are presented. The Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. These papers will also be included in the Ninth Conference Proceedings to be published by the Federal Aviation Administration as a separate document.

  20. Imaging Structure and Composition Homogeneity of 300 mm SiGe Virtual Substrates for Advanced CMOS Applications by Scanning X-ray Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, Marvin H; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Chahine, Gilbert A; Zaumseil, Peter; Reich, Christian; Capellini, Giovanni; Montalenti, Francesco; Marzegalli, Anna; Xie, Ya-Hong; Schülli, Tobias U; Häberlen, Maik; Storck, Peter; Schroeder, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Advanced semiconductor heterostructures are at the very heart of many modern technologies, including aggressively scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistors for high performance computing and laser diodes for low power solid state lighting applications. The control of structural and compositional homogeneity of these semiconductor heterostructures is the key to success to further develop these state-of-the-art technologies. In this article, we report on the lateral distribution of tilt, composition, and strain across step-graded SiGe strain relaxed buffer layers on 300 mm Si(001) wafers treated with and without chemical-mechanical polishing. By using the advanced synchrotron based scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy technique K-Map together with micro-Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy, we are able to establish a partial correlation between real space morphology and structural properties of the sample resolved at the micrometer scale. In particular, we demonstrate that the lattice plane bending of the commonly observed cross-hatch pattern is caused by dislocations. Our results show a strong local correlation between the strain field and composition distribution, indicating that the adatom surface diffusion during growth is driven by strain field fluctuations induced by the underlying dislocation network. Finally, it is revealed that a superficial chemical-mechanical polishing of cross-hatched surfaces does not lead to any significant change of tilt, composition, and strain variation compared to that of as-grown samples. PMID:25871429

  1. Advanced Durability and Damage Tolerance Design and Analysis Methods for Composite Structures: Lessons Learned from NASA Technology Development Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are designed to be durable and damage tolerant. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. However, both durability and damage tolerance design methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of microstructural damage that may occur during the service lifetime of the vehicle. Durability and damage tolerance design and certification requirements are addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA manned spacecraft systems. The state-of-the-art in advanced design and analysis methods is illustrated by discussing the results of several recently completed NASA technology development programs. These programs include the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program demonstrating technologies for large transport aircraft and the X-33 hypersonic test vehicle demonstrating technologies for a single-stage-to-orbit space launch vehicle.

  2. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  3. Optimization of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Structural optimization is introduced and examples which illustrate potential problems associated with optimized structures are presented. Optimized structures may have very low load carrying ability for an off design condition. They tend to have multiple modes of failure occurring simultaneously and can, therefore, be sensitive to imperfections. Because composite materials provide more design variables than do metals, they allow for more refined tailoring and more extensive optimization. As a result, optimized composite structures can be especially susceptible to these problems.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  6. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  7. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  8. Recent advances on the understanding of structural and composition evolution of LMR cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-rich, magnesium-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as one of the very promising cathodes for Li-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several challenges, especially by their limited electrochemical stability rate capability. In this work, we present recent progresses on the understanding of the structural and composition evolution of LMR cathode materials with emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li [Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of the pristine materials and their dependence on the materials processing history, cycling induced structural degradation/chemical partition and their correlation with degradation of electrochemical performance. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on ternary system of transitional metal oxide.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  10. Recent advances on the understanding of structural and composition evolution of LMR cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-rich, magnesium-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as one of the very promising cathodes for Li-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several challenges, especially by their limited electrochemical stability rate capability. In this work, we present recent progresses on the understanding of the structural and composition evolution of LMR cathode materials with emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li [Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of the pristine materials and their dependence on the materials processing history, cycling induced structuralmore » degradation/chemical partition and their correlation with degradation of electrochemical performance. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on ternary system of transitional metal oxide.« less

  11. Anatase TiO2@C composites with porous structure as an advanced anode material for Na ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhian; Du, Ke; Lai, Yanqing; Fang, Jing; Li, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a facile strategy to synthesize the porous structure TiO2@C composites through a two-step method, in which the precursor of MIL-125(Ti) was firstly prepared by solvent thermal method and then calcined under inert atmosphere. When employed as anodes for Na ion batteries, TiO2@C composites can exhibit a superior cyclability with a reversible sodium storage capacity of 148 mAh g-1 at the current density 0.5 A g-1 after 500 cycles and an excellent rate performance with a capacity of 88.9 mAh g-1 even the current reached to 2.5 A g-1 due to the dispersion of anatase TiO2 throughout amorphous carbon matrix and the synergistic effect between the anatase TiO2 nanocrystals and carbon matrix, which can availably enhance the electric conductivity and alleviate the volumetric variation of TiO2 during the insertion/extraction process of Na+.

  12. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  13. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  14. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Topics addressed include: strength and hygrothermal response of L-1011 fin components; wing fuel containment and damage tolerance development; impact dynamics; acoustic transmission; fuselage structure; composite transport wing technology development; spar/assembly concepts.

  15. Graphite/Polyimide Composites. [conference on Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B. (Editor); Davis, J. G., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed under the Composites for Advanced Space Transportation System Project is reported. Specific topics covered include fabrication, adhesives, test methods, structural integrity, design and analysis, advanced technology developments, high temperature polymer research, and the state of the art of graphite/polyimide composites.

  16. Advanced AE Techniques in Composite Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been successfully used to evaluate damage mechanisms in laboratory testing of composite coupons. An example is presented in which the initiation of transverse matrix cracking was monitored. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite specimens or structures, the effects of modal wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. To demonstrate these effects, measurements of the far field, peak amplitude attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels are discussed. These measurements demonstrated that the flexural mode attenuation is dominated by dispersion effects. Thus, it is significantly affected by the thickness of the composite plate. Furthermore, the flexural mode attenuation can be significantly larger than that of the extensional mode even though its peak amplitude consists of much lower frequency components.

  17. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  18. Advanced composites wing study program, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. T.; Michaelson, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures was conducted as a part of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program to establish, by the mid-1980s, the technology for the design of a subsonic commercial transport aircraft leading to a 40% fuel savings. The study objective was to develop a plan to define the effort needed to support a production commitment for the extensive use of composite materials in wings of new generation aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Identification and analysis of what was needed to meet the above plan requirements resulted in a program plan consisting of three key development areas: (1) technology development; (2) production capability development; and (3) integration and validation by designing, building, and testing major development hardware.

  19. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  20. Advanced Aircraft Structures program: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juergen; Schroeder, H. W.; Dittrich, Kay W.; Bauer, E. J.; Zippold, H.

    1999-07-01

    Requirements of future military aircraft structures are constantly increasing with advancing technological progress. While performance is still the main focus, costs have become a major issue in military aircraft procurement.In order to efficiently support its technological base oriented on the future demands of the market Daimler Chrysler Aerospace/Military Aircraft Division has inaugurated the Advanced Aircraft Structures Program, a collaborative research effort together with the German Aerospace Center and Daimler Chrysler Research and Technology, the corporate research division of Daimler Benz. The two key technologies to be pursued within the framework of this program are cost- effective composite structures and smart materials. This paper will give an overview of the Advanced Aircraft Structures Program with particular emphasis on smart structures technology as applied to active vibration damping, vibration isolation of equipment and composite health monitoring.

  1. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  2. Environmental effects on advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Houska, C. R.; Naidu, S. V. N.

    1979-01-01

    The development of titanium matrix composites for elevated temperature applications was investigated. General solutions for treating diffusion in multiphase multicomponent systems were studied. Graphite polyimide composites were characterized with respect to mechanical property degradation by moisture.

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  4. Advanced composites for large Navy spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William E.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of work conducted on contract for the Naval Sea Systems Command. The objective of this contract was to provide direction for the development of high modulus graphite reinforced metal matrix composites. These advanced materials can have a significant effect on the performance of a spacecraft before, during and after an evasive maneuver. The work conducted on this program was organized into seven technical tasks. Task 1 was development of a generic Navy spacecraft model. Finite element models of candidate structural designs were developed. In Task 2, the finite-element model(s) of the structure were used to conduct analytical assessments involving conventional materials, resin matrix composites and metal matrix composites (MMC). In Task 3 and 4, MMC material design, fabrication and evaluation was conducted. This consisted of generating material designs and developing a data base for a broad range of graphite reinforced MMC materials. All material was procured according to specifications which set material quality and material property standards. In Task 5, a set of evasive maneuvering requirements were derived and used in Task 6 to conduct analytical simulations. These analytical simulations used current SOA material properties and projected material properties to provide an indication of key payoffs for material development. In Task 7, a set of material development recommendations was generated.

  5. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  6. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage: Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Hanson, C. T.; Walker, T. H.; Metschan, S. L.; Mabson, G. E.; Wilden, K. S.; Flynn, B. W.; Scholz, D. B.; Polland, D. R.; Fredrikson, H. G.; Olson, J. T.; Backman, B. F.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program has studied transport fuselage structure with a large potential reduction in the total direct operating costs for wide-body commercial transports. The baseline fuselage section was divided into four 'quadrants', crown, keel, and sides, gaining the manufacturing cost advantage possible with larger panels. Key processes found to have savings potential include (1) skins laminated by automatic fiber placement, (2) braided frames using resin transfer molding, and (3) panel bond technology that minimized mechanical fastening. The cost and weight of the baseline fuselage barrel was updated to complete Phase B of the program. An assessment of the former, which included labor, material, and tooling costs, was performed with the help of design cost models. Crown, keel, and side quadrant cost distributions illustrate the importance of panel design configuration, area, and other structural details. Composite sandwich panel designs were found to have the greatest cost savings potential for most quadrants. Key technical findings are summarized as an introduction to the other contractor reports documenting Phase A and B work completed in functional areas. The current program status in resolving critical technical issues is also highlighted.

  7. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  8. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  9. Research priorities for advanced fibrous composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.; Swedlow, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Priorities for research in advanced laminated fibrous composite materials are presented. Supporting evidence is presented in two bodies, including a general literature survey and a survey of aerospace composite hardware and service experience. Both surveys were undertaken during 1977-1979. Specific results and conclusions indicate that a significant portion of contemporary published research diverges from recommended priorites.

  10. Epoxy/Glass Fiber Laminated Composites Integrated with Amino Functionalized ZrO2 for Advanced Structural Applications.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sudipta; Ahemad, Soyeb; Das, Subhankar; Wang, Jialai

    2016-01-27

    This work demonstrates the successful silanization of ZrO2 nanoparticles (ZN) and their incorporation in glass fiber/epoxy composites. Microscopic investigation under transmission electron microscope elucidates antiaggregation and size enhancement of silanized ZrO2 nanoparticles (SZNs). FTIR spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate the chemical nature of the SZNs prepared. EDX results reveal the presence of Si onto SZNs. Incorporation of SZNs shows a strong influence on tensile and flexural properties of hybrid multiscale glass fiber composite (SZGFRP) compared to that of the neat epoxy glass fiber composite (GFRP). A significant variation of tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness of ∼27%, 62%, and 110% is observed with respect to GFRP. Strength and modulus under bending are also enhanced to ∼22% and ∼38%, respectively. Failure mechanisms obtained from macroscopic and microscopic investigation demonstrate reduced interfacial delamination for SZGFRP. Additionally, increased roughness of the fiber surface in SZGFRP laminates produces better interfacial bonding arising from SZN incorporation in laminates. This symptomatic behavior exposes the espousal of organically modified ZrO2 to enhance the interfacial bonding for their use in next generation hybrid laminates. PMID:26714570

  11. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  12. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  13. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  14. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  15. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  16. Probabilistic Design of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    A formal procedure for the probabilistic design evaluation of a composite structure is described. The uncertainties in all aspects of a composite structure (constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structural geometry, and service environments, etc.), which result in the uncertain behavior in the composite structural responses, are included in the evaluation. The probabilistic evaluation consists of: (1) design criteria, (2) modeling of composite structures and uncertainties, (3) simulation methods, and (4) the decision-making process. A sample case is presented to illustrate the formal procedure and to demonstrate that composite structural designs can be probabilistically evaluated with accuracy and efficiency.

  17. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  18. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  19. Refractory composites structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzero, G. V.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents the latest available data for the NASP Refractory Composites Materials and Structures Augmentation Program. The program's main goal is to provide the necessary information for a positive phase II to phase III plan for the X-30 to be built. After a brief overview of the program, the state-of-the-art fabrication of carbon/carbon subelements is presented. Material data packages for screening data, characterization data, damage and durability tolerance and actively-cooled airframe and engine program development are also presented.

  20. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  1. Radiation processing of carbon fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit

    2001-12-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced advanced composites are being used for a variety of structural applications, because of their useful mechanical properties, including high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Thermal curing of composite products results in internal stresses, due to the mismatch of the coefficients of expansion of the tools and the composite products. Because radiation curing can be done at ambient temperatures, the possibility that the residual stresses might be absent, or much lower in the radiation-cured products, originally led to the start of work on radiation curing of advanced composites at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Canada, in 1985. Research work during the last two decades has shown that advanced composites can be radiation-cured with electron beams or γ radiation. Many of the advantages of radiation curing, as compared to thermal curing, which include curing at ambient temperature, reduced curing time, improved resin stability and reduced volatile emissions, have now been demonstrated. The initial work focussed on electron curing of acrylated epoxy matrices. Since then, procedures have been developed to radiation cure conventional aerospace epoxies, as well. Electron beam cured advanced composites are now being developed for use in the aircraft and aerospace industry. Repair of advanced composite structures is also possible using radiation curing technology. Radiation curing work is continuing at Pinawa and has also been done by Aerospatiale, who have facilities for electron curing composite rocket motor casings and by Chappas and co-workers who have electron cured part of a boat hull. In this paper, the work done on this emerging new technology by the various groups is briefly reviewed.

  2. Advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Activities related to development of an advanced composites stabilizer for the Boeing 737 commercial transport are reported. Activities include discussion of criteria and objectives, design loads, the fatigue spectrum definition to be used for all spectrum fatigue testing, fatigue analysis, manufacturing producibility studies, the ancillary test program, quality assurance, and manufacturing development.

  3. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Detail design activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composites elevator for the Boeing 727 commercial transport. Design activities include discussion and results of the ancillary test programs, sustaining efforts, weight status, manufacturing producibility studies, quality assurance development, and production status.

  4. English 341: Advanced Composition for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, William

    2013-01-01

    English 341: Advanced Composition for Teachers is a three-credit undergraduate course for pre-service educators at Francis Marion University, a mid-size public university located in northeast South Carolina. According to the university catalog, students enrolled in English 341 "explore connections among writing, teaching, and learning as they…

  5. Strategies for stable composite structural design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Richard A.

    1992-12-01

    Advanced composites have been effectively used in space applications such as telescopes, optical benches, and metering structures. As the sophistication of optics and instrumentation increases, the need for near-zero outgassing and extremely dimensionally stable composites becomes of paramount importance. Continuing improvements in resin and reinforcing fiber technology have resulted in a wider selection of materials for the composite designer of dimensionally stable structures. Additional improvements in metal sealing techniques promise unprecedented long-term environmental stability. These new options allow the designer to develop a dimensional stability strategy which conforms to design requirements and yields an optimum, cost-effective composite design approach. This paper addresses the major stability issues in composites and how stability can be predicted for long-term applications, along with design options to achieve program goals. Low-moisture-absorbing composites based on cyanate esters, metal sealing techniques, and long-range stability are also addressed.

  6. Structural studies on carbon materials for advanced space technology. Part 1: Structure and oxidation behavior of some carbon/carbon composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, D. B.; Uptegrove, D. R.; Srinivasagopalan, S.

    1974-01-01

    The microstructure and some microstructural effects of oxidation have been investigated for laminar carbon fiber cloth/cloth binder matrix composite materials. It was found that cloth wave is important in determining the macrostructure of the composites X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the composites were more graphitic than the constituent fiber phases, indicating a graphitic binder matrix phase. Various tests which were conducted to investigate specific properties of the material are described. It was learned that under the moderate temperature and oxidant flow conditions studied, C-700, 730 materials exhibit superior oxidation resistance primarily because of the inhibiting influence of the graphitized binder matrix.

  7. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  8. Automotive applications for advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of nonaerospace applications for advanced composite materials with special emphasis on the automotive applications. The automotive industry has to satisfy exacting requirements to reduce the average fuel consumption of cars. A feasible approach to accomplish this involves the development of composites cars with a total weight of 2400 pounds and a fuel consumption of 33 miles per gallon. In connection with this possibility, the automotive companies have started to look seriously at composite materials. The aerospace industry has over the past decade accumulated a considerable data base on composite materials and this is being made available to the nonaerospace sector. However, the automotive companies will place prime emphasis on low cost resins which lend themselves to rapid fabrication techniques.

  9. Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, volume 1, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference. The ACT Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. Papers sponsored by the Department of Defense on the Design and Manufacturing of Low Cost Composites (DMLCC) are also included in Volume 2 of this document.

  10. Advances in thermoplastic matrix composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Newaz, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Accounts are given of the development status of thermoplastic composite processing methods, as well as their current thermal and mechanical behavior and delamination properties. Attention is given to the thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers, pultrusion-process modeling, the high temperature behavior of graphite/PEEK, the thermal conductivity of composites for electronic packaging, a FEM analysis of mode I and II thermoplastic-matrix specimens, and reinforcements' resin-impregnation behavior during thermoplastic composite manufacture. Also discussed are the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/PEEK for structural applications, moisture-content mechanical property effects in PPS-matrix composites, the interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites, and thermoplastic composite delamination growth under elevated temperature cyclic loading.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  12. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  13. Program for establishing long-time flight service performance of composite materials in the center wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 1: Advanced development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvill, W. E.; Kays, A. O.; Young, E. C.; Mcgee, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Areas where selective reinforcement of conventional metallic structure can improve static strength/fatigue endurance at lower weight than would be possible if metal reinforcement were used are discussed. These advantages are now being demonstrated by design, fabrication, and tests of three boron-epoxy reinforced C-130E center wing boxes. This structural component was previously redesigned using an aluminum build-up to meet increased severity of fatigue loadings. Direct comparisons of relative structural weights, manufacturing costs, and producibility can therefore be obtained, and the long-time flight service performance of the composite reinforced structure can be evaluated against the wide background of metal reinforced structure.

  14. Investigation of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    This final report consists of a compilation of four separate written documents, three dealing with the response and failure of elliptical composite cylinders to an internal pressure load, and the fourth dealing with the influence of manufacturing imperfections in curved composite panels. The three focused on elliptical cylinders consist of the following: 1 - A paper entitled "Progressive Failure Analysis of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," 2 - A paper entitled "Influence of Geometric Nonlinearities on the Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," and 3 - A report entitled "Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cyclinders." The document which deals with the influence of manufacturing imperfections is a paper entitled "Manufacturing Distortions of Curved Composite Panels."

  15. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Structural design, tooling, fabrication, and test activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composite vertical stabilizer (CVS) for the DC 10 Commercial Transport Aircraft. Structural design details are described and the status of structural and weight analyses are reported. A structural weight reduction of 21.7% is currently predicted. Test results are discussed for sine wave stiffened shear webs containing representative of the CVS spar webs and for lightning current transfer and tests on a panel representative of the CVS skins.

  16. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  17. CODSTRAN: Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is an integrated computer program being developed for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures subjected to service loads and environments. CODSTRAN is briefly described with respect to organization, capabilities and present status. Application of CODSTRAN current capability to a flat composite laminate with a center slit which was subjected to axial tension loading predicted defect growth which is in good agreement with C-scan ultrasonic test records.

  18. Advanced Structures: 2000-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies for extremely lightweight, multi-function structures with modular interfaces - the building-block technology for advanced spacecraft. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  19. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  20. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  1. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  2. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  3. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  4. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  5. Probabilistic assessment of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael E.; Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A general computational simulation methodology for an integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures is discussed and demonstrated using aircraft fuselage (stiffened composite cylindrical shell) structures with rectangular cutouts. The computational simulation was performed for the probabilistic assessment of the structural behavior including buckling loads, vibration frequencies, global displacements, and local stresses. The scatter in the structural response is simulated based on the inherent uncertainties in the primitive (independent random) variables at the fiber matrix constituent, ply, laminate, and structural scales that describe the composite structures. The effect of uncertainties due to fabrication process variables such as fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply orientation, and ply thickness is also included. The methodology has been embedded in the computer code IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). In addition to the simulated scatter, the IPACS code also calculates the sensitivity of the composite structural behavior to all the primitive variables that influence the structural behavior. This information is useful for assessing reliability and providing guidance for improvement. The results from the probabilistic assessment for the composite structure with rectangular cutouts indicate that the uncertainty in the longitudinal ply stress is mainly caused by the uncertainty in the laminate thickness, and the large overlap of the scatter in the first four buckling loads implies that the buckling mode shape for a specific buckling load can be either of the four modes.

  6. Method of fabricating composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigur, W. A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of fabricating structures formed from composite materials by positioning the structure about a high coefficient of thermal expansion material, wrapping a graphite fiber overwrap about the structure, and thereafter heating the assembly to expand the high coefficient of thermal expansion material to forcibly compress the composite structure against the restraint provided by the graphite overwrap. The high coefficient of thermal expansion material is disposed about a mandrel with a release system therebetween, and with a release system between the material having the high coefficient of thermal expansion and the composite material, and between the graphite fibers and the composite structure. The heating may occur by inducing heat into the assembly by a magnetic field created by coils disposed about the assembly through which alternating current flows. The method permits structures to be formed without the use of an autoclave.

  7. Advances in Structures for Large Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The development of structural systems for scientific remote sensing and space exploration has been underway for four decades. The seminal work from 1960 to 1980 provided the basis for many of the design principles of modern space systems. From 1980- 2000 advances in active materials and structures and the maturing of composites technology led to high precision active systems such those used in the Space Interferometry Mission. Recently, thin-film membrane or gossamer structures are being investigated for use in large area space systems because of their low mass and high packaging efficiency. Various classes of Large Space Systems (LSS) are defined in order to describe the goals and system challenges in structures and materials technologies. With an appreciation of both past and current technology developments, future technology challenges are used to develop a list of technology investments that can have significant impacts on LSS development.

  8. Reflexive composites: self-healing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W., Jr.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Havens, Ernie; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.

    2008-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. has developed reflexive composites achieving increased vehicle survivability through integrated structural awareness and responsiveness to damage. Reflexive composites can sense damage through integrated piezoelectric sensing networks and respond to damage by heating discrete locations to activate the healable polymer matrix in areas of damage. The polymer matrix is a modified thermoset shape memory polymer that heals based on phenomena known as reptation. In theory, the reptation healing phenomena should occur in microseconds; however, during experimentation, it has been observed that to maximize healing and restore up to 85 % of mechanical properties a healing cycle of at least three minutes is required. This paper will focus on work conducted to determine the healing mechanisms at work in CRG's reflexive composites, the optimal healing cycles, and an explanation of the difference between the reptation model and actual healing times.

  9. Advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Activities related to development of an advanced composites stabilizer for the Boeing 737 commercial transport are reported. Activities include discussion of the design and weight status, stiffness requirements, the finite element model, test programs, quality assurance, and manufacturing producibility studies. Design details of the graphite/epoxy components are virtually complete. Emphasis is placed on the metal and fiberglass trailing edge components. The bending and torsional stiffness properties are satisfactory for both stability/control and for flutter requirements. The finite element model input geometry is revised to reflect the latest changes to production drawings.

  10. Dynamic based damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sauvik; Ricci, Fabrizio; Baid, Harsh; Mal, Ajit K.

    2009-03-01

    Advanced composites are being used increasingly in state-of-the-art aircraft and aerospace structures. In spite of their many advantages, composite materials are highly susceptible to hidden flaws that may occur at any time during the life cycle of a structure, and if undetected, may cause sudden and catastrophic failure of the entire structure. This paper is concerned with the detection and characterization of hidden defects in composite structures before they grow to a critical size. A methodology for automatic damage identification and localization is developed using a combination of vibration and wave propagation data. The structure is assumed to be instrumented with an array of actuators and sensors to excite and record its dynamic response, including vibration and wave propagation effects. A damage index, calculated from the measured dynamical response of the structure in a previous (reference) state and the current state, is introduced as a determinant of structural damage. The indices are used to identify low velocity impact damages in increasingly complex composite structural components. The potential application of the approach in developing health monitoring systems in defects-critical structures is indicated.

  11. Boron/aluminum-graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fabrication feasibility and to assess the potential of adhesively-bonded metal and resin matrix fiber composite hybrids as an advanced material, for aerospace and other structural applications. The results of fabrication studies and of evaluation of physical and mechanical properties show that using this hybrid concept it is possible to design a composite which, when compared to nonhybrid composites, has improved transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for perdicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  12. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  13. Designing for fiber composite structural durability in hygrothermomechanical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is described which can be used to design/analyze fiber composite structures subjected to complex hygrothermomechanical environments. This methodology includes composite mechanics and advanced structural analysis methods (finite element). Select examples are described to illustrate the application of the available methodology. The examples include: (1) composite progressive fracture; (2) composite design for high cycle fatigue combined with hot-wet conditions; and (3) general laminate design.

  14. Trapped rubber processing for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Trapped rubber processing is a molding technique for composites in which precast silicone rubber is placed within a closed cavity where it thermally expands against the composite's surface supported by the vessel walls. The method has been applied by the Douglas Aircraft Company, under contract to NASA-Langley, to the design and fabrication of 10 DC-10 graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder assemblies. A three-bay development tool form mold die has been designed and manufactured, and tooling parameters have been established. Fabrication procedures include graphite layup, assembly of details in the tool, and a cure cycle. The technique has made it possible for the cocured fabrication of complex primary box structures otherwise impracticable via standard composite material processes.

  15. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  16. 21st century market opportunities for advanced fibers and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, C.L.

    1996-07-01

    High-strength, high-modulus fibers based upon either carbon, organic polymers, or ceramics are relatively new materials. Full-scale commercial production of these fibers began within the last 25 years. Current sales of advanced fibers are measured in thousands of tons per year, not in hundreds of thousands of tons per year, as are sales of glass structural fibers. Selling prices are measured in tens of dollars per pound as compared to dollars per pound for glass fiber. Therefore, advanced fibers must still be considered as specialty materials that will be selected based only upon their high performance. While much thanks is due to the aerospace and sporting goods industries for keeping the interest in advanced fibers and composites alive, it is generally agreed that the market will not grow (and prices will not decline) until these fibers are accepted in the industrial market. This presentation identifies industrial market opportunities for advanced fibers and composites in the next century, which is actually tomorrow in the time-line from the beginning of commercialization of advanced fibers. Specific, potential applications are cited, and the estimated volumes and values of these application given. 3 tabs.

  17. Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems (CASTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the in-house and contract work accomplished under the CASTS Project. In July 1975 the CASTS Project was initiated to develop graphite fiber/polyimide matrix (GR/PI) composite structures with 589K (600 F) operational capability for application to aerospace vehicles. Major tasks include: (1) screening composites and adhesives, (2) developing fabrication procedures and specifications, (3) developing design allowables test methods and data, and (4) design and test of structural elements and construction of an aft body flap for the Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle which will be ground tested. Portions of the information are from ongoing research and must be considered preliminary. The CASTS Project is scheduled to be completed in September 1983.

  18. Cost-efficient manufacturing of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W. Tom; Davis, John G.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program is seeking research breakthroughs that will allow structures made of graphite epoxy materials to replace metals in the wings and fuselages of future aircrafts. NASA's goals are to reduce acquisition cost by 20 to 25 percent, structural weight for a resized aircraft by 40 to 50 percent, and the number of parts by half compared to current production aluminum aircraft. The innovative structural concepts, materials, and fabrication techniques emerging from the ACT program are described, and the relationship between aerospace developments and industrial, commercial, and sporting goods applications are discussed.

  19. Materials and light thermal structures research for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1991-01-01

    The Light Thermal Structures Center at the University of Virginia sponsors educational and research programs focused on the development of reliable, lightweight structures to function in hostile thermal environments. Technology advances in materials and design methodology for light thermal structures will contribute to improved space vehicle design concepts with attendant weight savings. This paper highlights current research activities in three areas relevant to space exploration: low density, high temperature aluminum alloys, composite materials, and structures with thermal gradients. Advances in the development of new aluminum-lithium alloys and mechanically alloyed aluminum alloys are described. Material properties and design features of advanced composites are highlighted. Research studies in thermal structures with temperature gradients include inelastic panel buckling and thermally induced unstable oscillations. Current and future research is focused on the integration of new materials with applications to structural components with thermal gradients.

  20. Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference held at Long Beach, California, 8-11 June 1992. The ACT Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. Papers sponsored by the Department of Defense on the Design and Manufacturing of Low Cost Composites (DMLCC) are also included in Volume 2 of this document.

  1. Composite intermediate case manufacturing scale-up for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, Rowena H.

    1992-01-01

    This Manufacturing Technology for Propulsion Program developed a process to produce a composite intermediate case for advanced gas turbine engines. The method selected to manufacture this large, complex part uses hard tooling for surfaces in the airflow path and trapped rubber to force the composite against the mold. Subelements were manufactured and tested to verify the selected design, tools, and processes. The most significant subelement produced was a half-scale version of a composite intermediate case. The half-scale subelement maintained the geometry and key dimensions of the full-scale case, allowing relevant process development and structural verification testing to be performed on the subelement before manufacturing the first full-scale case.

  2. Structural biological composites: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Marc A.; Lin, Albert Y. M.; Seki, Yasuaki; Chen, Po-Yu; Kad, Bimal K.; Bodde, Sara

    2006-07-01

    Biological materials are complex composites that are hierarchically structured and multifunctional. Their mechanical properties are often outstanding, considering the weak constituents from which they are assembled. They are for the most part composed of brittle (often, mineral) and ductile (organic) components. These complex structures, which have risen from millions of years of evolution, are inspiring materials scientists in the design of novel materials. This paper discusses the overall design principles in biological structural composites and illustrates them for five examples; sea spicules, the abalone shell, the conch shell, the toucan and hornbill beaks, and the sheep crab exoskeleton.

  3. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  4. Recent advances in magnetostrictive particulate composite technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Wade J.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2002-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in using magnetostrictive particles in a polymer matrix; finding uses in many applications, both as an active transducer and a passive damper. Termed magnetostrictive particulate composites (MPC), the material provides capabilities identical or superior to the monolithic material. Fortis Technologies has been pursuing improvements in the application and fabrication of this innovative material. The MPC technology provides a passive, broadband, large temperature range, high stiffness, dampling material to be used where current technologies fall short. Damping applications of this technology include sporting goods, power/hand tools, space launch and satellite design, noise abatement and vibration isolation. Energy absorption of the composites has been measured and is approaching that of the monolithic material. The material can also be actively controlled by a magnetic field, producing a transducer that can be used for sonar applications. The advantage of this technology over those currently in use is the large power density at relatively low frequencies and the ease of fabrication, allowing less expensive and more effective conformal arrays. Effective strain output and piezomagnetic coefficients have been measured, as have its dynamic properties. The results show significant improvement of the strain output and piezomagnetic coefficients, approaching the monolithic material.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  6. Structural Qualification of Composite Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedward, Keith T.; McCarty, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of fundamental approaches for predicting failure and elongation characteristics of fibrous composites are summarized in this document. The research described includes a statistical formulation for individual fiber breakage and fragmentation and clustered fiber breakage, termed macrodefects wherein the aligned composite may represent a structural component such as a reinforcing bar element, a rebar. Experimental work conducted in support of the future exploitation of aligned composite rebar elements is also described. This work discusses the experimental challenges associated with rebar tensile test evaluation and describes initial numerical analyses performed in support of the experimental program.

  7. COBSTRAN - COMPOSITE BLADE STRUCTURAL ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctural ANalyzer) program is a pre- and post-processor that facilitates the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades, as well as composite wind turbine blades. COBSTRAN combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with a data base of fiber and matrix properties. As a preprocessor for NASTRAN or another Finite Element Method (FEM) program, COBSTRAN generates an FEM model with anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from the FEM program is provided as input to the COBSTRAN postprocessor. The postprocessor then uses the composite mechanics and laminate theory routines to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. COBSTRAN is designed to carry out the many linear analyses required to efficiently model and analyze blade-like structural components made of multilayered angle-plied fiber composites. Components made from isotropic or anisotropic homogeneous materials can also be modeled as a special case of COBSTRAN. NASTRAN MAT1 or MAT2 material cards are generated according to user supplied properties. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77 and was implemented on a CRAY X-MP with a UNICOS 5.0.12 operating system. The program requires either COSMIC NASTRAN or MSC NASTRAN as a structural analysis package. COBSTRAN was developed in 1989, and has a memory requirement of 262,066 64 bit words.

  8. Structural Design of Ares V Interstage Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleigh, David W.; Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary and detailed design studies were performed to mature composite structural design concepts for the Ares V Interstage structure as a part of NASA s Advanced Composite Technologies Project. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich and hat-stiffened composite panel structural concepts were considered. The structural design and analysis studies were performed using HyperSizer design sizing software and MSC Nastran finite element analysis software. System-level design trade studies were carried out to predict weight and margins of safety for composite honeycomb-core sandwich and composite hat-stiffened skin design concepts. Details of both preliminary and detailed design studies are presented in the paper. For the range of loads and geometry considered in this work, the hat-stiffened designs were found to be approximately 11-16 percent lighter than the sandwich designs. A down-select process was used to choose the most favorable structural concept based on a set of figures of merit, and the honeycomb sandwich design was selected as the best concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost.

  9. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2001-01-01

    This report includes the results of a research in which the COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis (CODSTRAN) computational simulation capabilities were augmented and applied to various structures for demonstration of the new features and verification. The first chapter of this report provides an introduction to the computational simulation or virtual laboratory approach for the assessment of damage and fracture progression characteristics in composite structures. The second chapter outlines the details of the overall methodology used, including the failure criteria and the incremental/iterative loading procedure with the definitions of damage, fracture, and equilibrium states. The subsequent chapters each contain an augmented feature of the code and/or demonstration examples. All but one of the presented examples contains laminated composite structures with various fiber/matrix constituents. For each structure simulated, damage initiation and progression mechanisms are identified and the structural damage tolerance is quantified at various degradation stages. Many chapters contain the simulation of defective and defect free structures to evaluate the effects of existing defects on structural durability.

  10. Acoustic emission studies of large advanced composite rocket motor cases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) patterns were measured during pressure testing of advanced composite rocket motor cases made of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy. Both accelerometers and high frequency AE transducers were used, and both frequency spectrum and amplitude distribution were studied. The AE patterns suggest that precursor emission might be used in certain cases to anticipate failure. The technique of hold-cycle AE monitoring was also evaluated and could become a valuable decision gate for test continuation/termination. Data presented show similarity of accelerometers and AE transducer responses despite the different frequency response, and suggest that structural AE phenomena are broadband.

  11. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, L.A.; Kunerth, D.C.; Walter, J.B.

    1991-09-01

    Nondestructive evaluation techniques were developed to characterize performance degrading conditions in continuous fiber-reinforced silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites. Porosity, fiber-matrix interface bond strength, and physical damage were among the conditions studied. The material studied is formed by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of the matrix material into a preform of woven reinforcing fibers. Acoustic, ultrasonic, and vibration response techniques were studied. Porosity was investigated because of its inherent presence in the CVI process and of the resultant degradation of material strength. Correlations between porosity and ultrasonic attenuation and velocity were clearly demonstrated. The ability of ultrasonic transmission scanning techniques to map variations in porosity in a single sample was also demonstrated. The fiber-matrix interface bond was studied because of its importance in determining the fracture toughness of the material. Correlations between interface bonding and acoustic and ultrasonic properties were observed. These results are presented along with those obtained form acoustic and vibration response measurements on material samples subjected to mechanical impact damage. This is the final report on research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Carbon composites in space vehicle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of carbon or graphite filaments now provide the designer with greatly improved materials offering high specific strength and modulus. Besides these advantages are properties which are distinctly useful for space applications and which provide feasibility for missions not obtainable by other means. Current applications include major and secondary structures of communications satellites. A number of R & D projects are exploring carbon-fiber application to rocket engine motor cases, advanced antenna systems, and space shuttle components. Future system studies are being made, based on the successful application of carbon fibers for orbiting space telescope assemblies, orbital transfer vehicles, and very large deployable energy generation systems. Continued technology development is needed in analysis, material standards, and advanced structural concepts to exploit the full potential of carbon filaments in composite materials.

  14. Composite Fan Blade Design for Advanced Engine Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Kuguoglu, Latife H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2004-01-01

    The aerodynamic and structural viability of composite fan blades of the revolutionary Exo-Skeletal engine are assessed for an advanced subsonic mission using the NASA EST/BEST computational simulation system. The Exo-Skeletal Engine (ESE) calls for the elimination of the shafts and disks completely from the engine center and the attachment of the rotor blades in spanwise compression to a rotating casing. The fan rotor overall adiabatic efficiency obtained from aerodynamic analysis is estimated at 91.6 percent. The flow is supersonic near the blade leading edge but quickly transitions into a subsonic flow without any turbulent boundary layer separation on the blade. The structural evaluation of the composite fan blade indicates that the blade would buckle at a rotor speed that is 3.5 times the design speed of 2000 rpm. The progressive damage analysis of the composite fan blade shows that ply damage is initiated at a speed of 4870 rpm while blade fracture takes place at 7640 rpm. This paper describes and discusses the results for the composite blade that are obtained from aerodynamic, displacement, stress, buckling, modal, and progressive damage analyses. It will be demonstrated that a computational simulation capability is readily available to evaluate new and revolutionary technology such as the ESE.

  15. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  16. Durability of commercial aircraft and helicopter composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of advanced composite technology during the past decade is discussed. Both secondary and primary components fabricated with boron, graphite, and Kevlar composites are evaluated. Included are spoilers, rudders, and fairings on commercial transports, boron/epoxy reinforced wing structure on C-130 military transports, and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on commercial helicopters. The development of composite structures resulted in advances in design and manufacturing technology for secondary and primary composite structures for commercial transports. Design concepts and inspection and maintenance results for the components in service are reported. The flight, outdoor ground, and controlled laboratory environmental effects on composites were also determined. Effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, aircraft fuels and fluids, and sustained tensile stress are included. Critical parameters affecting the long term durability of composite materials are identified.

  17. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA's Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Elam, S.

    2001-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's on-going activities in MMC components for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike engine and X-34's Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight, low cost, and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each of NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicles and space access vehicles. In order to fabricate structures from MMC, effective joining methods must be developed to join MMC to the same or to different monolithic alloys. Therefore, a qualitative assessment of MMC's welding and joining techniques will be outlined.

  18. Micromechanical characterization of nonlinear behavior of advanced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Chen, J. L.; Sun, C. T.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the presence of curing stresses and oriented crystalline structures in the matrix of polymer matrix fiber composites, the in situ nonlinear properties of the matrix are expected to be rather different from those of the bulk resin. A plane stress micromechanical model was developed to retrieve the in situ elastic-plastic properties of Narmco 5260 and Amoco 8320 matrices from measured elastic-plastic properties of IM7/5260 and IM7/8320 advance composites. In the micromechanical model, the fiber was assumed to be orthotropically elastic and the matrix to be orthotropic in elastic and plastic properties. The results indicate that both in situ elastic and plastic properties of the matrices are orthotropic.

  19. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1976-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum-weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to combine effectively finite-element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation-concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects, and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these features are given.

  20. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to effectively combine finite element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these new features are given.

  1. NASTRAN as an analytical research tool for composite mechanics and composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Selected examples are described in which NASTRAN is used as an analysis research tool for composite mechanics and for composite structural components. The examples were selected to illustrate the importance of using NASTRAN as an analysis tool in this rapidly advancing field.

  2. Role of Mechanics of Textile Preform Composites in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.E.; Poe, C.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology Program was initiated by NASA as a partnership with the United States aeronautical industry in fiscal year 1989. The broad objective of the Program was to develop the technology to design and manufacture cost-effective and structurally optimized light-weight composite airframe primary structure. Phase A of the Program, 1989-1991, focused on the identification and evaluation of innovative manufacturing technologies and structural concepts. At the end of Phase A, the leading wing and fuselage design concepts were down-selected for further development in Phase B of the Program, 1992-1995. Three major fabrication technologies emerged from Phase A. These three approaches were the stitched dry preform, textile preform, and automated tow placement manufacturing methods. Each method emphasized rapid fiber placement, near net-shape preform fabrication, part count minimization, and matching the technologies to the specific structural configurations and requirements. The objective of Phase B was to continue the evolution of design concepts using the concurrent engineering process, down-select to the leading structural concept, and design, build, and test subscale components. Phase C of the ACT Program, 1995-2002, is a critical element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program and has been approved for implementation beginning in 1995. The objective of Phase C is to design, build, and test major components of the airframe to demonstrate the technology readiness for applications in the next generation subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Part of the technology readiness demonstration will include a realistic comparison of manufacturing costs and an increased confidence in the ability to accurately estimate the costs of composite structure. The Program Plan calls for the structural components to be a complete fuselage barrel with a window-belt and a wing box at the wing/fuselage intersection.

  3. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  4. Advanced composite applications for sub-micron biologically derived microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnur, J. M.; Price, R. R.; Schoen, P. E.; Bonanventura, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A major thrust of advanced material development is in the area of self-assembled ultra-fine particulate based composites (micro-composites). The application of biologically derived, self-assembled microstructures to form advanced composite materials is discussed. Hollow 0.5 micron diameter cylindrical shaped microcylinders self-assemble from diacetylenic lipids. These microstructures have a multiplicity of potential applications in the material sciences. Exploratory development is proceeding in application areas such as controlled release for drug delivery, wound repair, and biofouling as well as composites for electronic and magnetic applications, and high power microwave cathodes.

  5. Application of Composite Mechanics to Composites Enhanced Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    2006-01-01

    A new and effective method is described to design composites to repair damage or enhance the overload strength of concrete infrastructures. The method is based on composite mechanics which is available in computer codes. It is used to simulate structural sections made from reinforced concrete which are typical in infrastructure as well as select reinforced concrete structures. The structural sections are represented by a number of layers through the thickness where different layers are used in concrete, and for the composite. The reinforced concrete structures are represented with finite elements where the element stiffness parameters are from the structural sections which are represented by composite mechanics. The load carrying capability of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show up to 40 percent improvements for damage and for overload enhancement with relatively small laminate thickness for the structural sections and up to three times for the composite enhanced select structures (arches and domes).

  6. Bioinspired twisted composites based on Bouligand structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, F.; Iervolino, O.; Scarselli, G.; Ginzburg, D.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between structural support and protection makes biological systems an important source of inspiration for the development of advanced smart composite structures. In particular, some particular material configurations can be implemented into traditional composites in order to improve their impact resistance and the out-of-plane properties, which represents one of the major weakness of commercial carbon fibres reinforced polymers (CFRP) structures. Based on this premise, a three-dimensional twisted arrangement shown in a vast multitude of biological systems (such as the armoured cuticles of Scarabei, the scales of Arapaima Gigas and the smashing club of Odontodactylus Scyllarus) has been replicated to develop an improved structural material characterised by a high level of in-plane isotropy and a higher interfacial strength generated by the smooth stiffness transition between each layer of fibrils. Indeed, due to their intrinsic layered nature, interlaminar stresses are one of the major causes of failure of traditional CFRP and are generated by the mismatch of the elastic properties between plies in a traditional laminate. Since the energy required to open a crack or a delamination between two adjacent plies is due to the difference between their orientations, the gradual angle variation obtained by mimicking the Bouligand Structures could improve energy absorption and the residual properties of carbon laminates when they are subjected to low velocity impact event. Two different bioinspired laminates were manufactured following a double helicoidal approach and a rotational one and were subjected to a complete test campaign including low velocity impact loading and compared to a traditional quasi-isotropic panel. Fractography analysis via X-Ray tomography was used to understand the mechanical behaviour of the different laminates and the residual properties were evaluated via Compression After Impact (CAI) tests. Results confirmed that the biological

  7. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in carbon-epoxy composites are identified as a basis for more reliable prediction of the performance of these materials. The approach involves both the study of local fracture events in model specimens containing small groups of filaments and fractographic examination of high fiber content engineering composites. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of model specimen observations with gross fracture modes. The effects of fiber surface treatment, resin modification and fiber content are studied and acoustic emission methods are applied. Some effort is devoted to analysis of the failure process in composite/metal specimens.

  8. The Advanced Composition Explorer power subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Panneton, P.E.; Tarr, J.E.; Goliaszewski, L.T.

    1998-07-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contract with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has designed and launched the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. ACE is a scientific observatory housing ten instruments, and is located in a halo orbit about the L1 Sun-Earth libration point. ACE is providing real-time solar wind monitoring and data on elemental and isotopic matter of solar and galactic origin. The ACE Electrical Power Subsystem (EPS) is a fault tolerant, solar powered, shunt regulated, direct energy transfer architecture based on the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) EPS. The differences are that MSX used oriented solar arrays with a nickel hydrogen-battery defined bus, while ACE uses fixed solar panels with a regulated bus decoupled from its nickel cadmium (NiCd) battery. Also, magnetometer booms are mounted on two of the four ACE solar panels. The required accuracy of the magnetometers impose severe requirements on the magnetic fields induced by the solar array. Other noteworthy features include a solar cell degradation experiment, in-flight battery reconditioning, a battery requalified to a high vibrational environment, and an adjustable bus voltage setpoint. The four solar panels consist of aluminum honeycomb substrates covered with 15.1% efficient silicon cells. The cells are strung using silver interconnects and are back-wired to reduce magnetic emissions below 0.1nT. Pyrotechnic actuated, spring loaded hinges deploy the panels after spacecraft separation from the Delta II launch vehicle. Solar cell experiments on two of the panels track cell performance degradation at L1, and also distinguish any hydrazine impingement degradation which may be caused by the thrusters. Each solar panel uses a digital shunt box, containing blocking diodes and MOSFETs, for short-circuit control of its 5 solar strings. A power box contains redundant analog MOSFET shunts, the 90% efficient boost regulator, and redundant battery chargers

  9. Micromechanics Based Design/Analysis Codes for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced high temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aero and space related applications specifically for propulsion system components. Consequently, this has led to a multitude of research activities pertaining to fabrication, testing and modeling of these materials. The efforts directed at the development of ceramic matrix composites have focused primarily on improving the properties of the constituents as individual phases. It has, however, become increasingly clear that for CMC to be successfully employed in high temperature applications, research and development efforts should also focus on optimizing the synergistic performance of the constituent phases within the as-produced microstructure of the complex shaped CMC part. Despite their attractive features, the introduction of these materials in a wide spectrum of applications has been excruciatingly slow. The reasons are the high costs associated with the manufacturing and a complete experimental testing and characterization of these materials. Often designers/analysts do not have a consistent set of necessary properties and design allowables to be able to confidently design and analyze structural components made from these composites. Furthermore, the anisotropy of these materials accentuates the burden both on the test engineers and the designers by requiring a vastly increased amount of data/characterization compared to conventional materials.

  10. Open-Lattice Composite Design Strengthens Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Advanced composite materials and designs could eventually be applied as the framework for spacecraft or extraterrestrial constructions for long-term space habitation. One such structure in which NASA has made an investment is the IsoTruss grid structure, an extension of a two-dimensional "isogrid" concept originally developed at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, under contract to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in the early 1970s. IsoTruss is a lightweight and efficient alternative to monocoque composite structures, and can be produced in a manner that involves fairly simple techniques. The technology was developed with support from NASA to explore space applications, and is garnering global attention because it is extremely lightweight; as much as 12 times stronger than steel; inexpensive to manufacture, transport, and install; low-maintenance; and is fully recyclable. IsoTruss is expected to see application as utility poles and meteorological towers, for the aforementioned reasons and because its design offers superior wind resistance and is less susceptible to breaking and woodpeckers. Other applications, such as reinforcement for concrete structures, stand-alone towers, sign supports, prostheses, irrigation equipment, and sporting goods are being explored

  11. Film in the Advanced Composition Classroom: A Tapestry of Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Pearce

    2015-01-01

    This article advances film as worthy of rhetorical inquiry and deserving of more sustained attention in the advanced composition classroom. The first section identifies various approaches to the "language" of film, which can be adopted to navigate the technical, rhetorical, and cultural concerns needed to compose informed multimodal…

  12. Advanced composites: Design and application. Proceedings of the meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R.; Willard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of advanced composites is discussed with emphasis on aerospace, aircraft, automotive, marine, and industrial applications. Failure modes in advanced composites are also discussed.

  13. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design and evaluation of alternate concepts for the major subcomponents of the advanced composite aileron (ACA) was completed. From this array of subcomponents, aileron assemblies were formulated and evaluated. Based on these analyses a multirib assembly with graphite tape/syntactic core covers, a graphite tape front spar, and a graphite fabric rib was selected for development. A weight savings of 29.1 percent (40.8 pounds per aileron) is predicted. Engineering cost analyses indicate that the production cost of the ACA will be 7.3 percent less than the current aluminum aileron. Fabrication, machining, and testing of the material evaluation specimens for the resin screening program was completed. The test results lead to the selection of Narmco 5208 resin for the ACA. Other activities completed include: the detailed design of the ACA, construction of a three dimensional finite element model for structural analysis, and formulation of detail plans for material verification and process development.

  14. Composite Bus Structure for the SMEX/WIRE Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosanova, Giulio G.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the weight and optimize the structural design of the Small Explorer (SMEX) Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) spacecraft, it has become desirable to change the material and construction from mechanically fastened aluminum structure to a fully bonded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) structure. GSFC has developed the WIRE spacecraft structural bus design concept, including the instrument and launch vehicle requirements. The WIRE Satellite is the fifth of a series of SMEX satellites to be launched once per year. GSFC has chosen Composite Optics Inc. (COI) as the prime contractor for the development and procurement of the WIRE composite structure. The detailed design of the fully bonded FRC structure is based on COI's Short Notice Accelerated Production SATellite ("SNAPSAT") approach. SNAPSAT is a state of the art design and manufacturing technology for advanced composite materials which utilizes flat-stock detail parts bonded together to produce a final structural assembly. The structural design approach adopted for the WIRE structure provides a very viable alternative to both traditional aluminum construction as well as high tech. molded type composite structures. This approach to composite structure design is much less costly than molded or honeycomb sandwich type composite construction, but may cost slightly more than conventional aluminum construction on the subsystem level. However on the overall program level the weight saving achieved is very cost effective, since the primary objective is to allocate more mass for science payloads.

  15. Uncertainty Analysis of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-phase approach and a computational procedure are presented for predicting the variability in the nonlinear response of composite structures associated with variations in the geometric and material parameters of the structure. In the first phase, hierarchical sensitivity analysis is used to identify the major parameters, which have the most effect on the response quantities of interest. In the second phase, the major parameters are taken to be fuzzy parameters, and a fuzzy set analysis is used to determine the range of variation of the response, associated with preselected variations in the major parameters. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example of a cylindrical panel with four T-shaped stiffeners and a circular cutout.

  16. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  17. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  18. Preliminary weight and cost estimates for transport aircraft composite structural design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary weight and cost estimates have been prepared for design concepts utilized for a transonic long range transport airframe with extensive applications of advanced composite materials. The design concepts, manufacturing approach, and anticipated details of manufacturing cost reflected in the composite airframe are substantially different from those found in conventional metal structure and offer further evidence of the advantages of advanced composite materials.

  19. Advanced Composition and the Computerized Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hult, Christine

    1989-01-01

    Discusses four kinds of computerized access tools: online catalogs; computerized reference; online database searching; and compact disks and read only memory (CD-ROM). Examines how these technologies are changing research. Suggests how research instruction in advanced writing courses can be refocused to include the new technologies. (RS)

  20. Advances in the history of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Nieves; Ellacuria, Joseba; Soler, José Ignacio; Triana, Rodrigo; Ibaseta, Guillermo

    2003-11-01

    The use of composite resins as direct restoration material in posterior teeth has demonstrated a great increase, due to esthetic requirements and the controversy regarding the mercury content in silver amalgams. In this article, we have reviewed the composition modifications which have occurred in materials based on resins since their introduction over a half a century ago which have enabled great improvements in their physical and mechanical properties. Likewise, we have highlighted current lines of research, centered on finding the ideal material for replacing silver amalgam as a direct filling material.

  1. Electron processing of fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit; Saunders, Chris B.; Barnard, John W.; Lopata, Vince J.; Kremers, Walter; McDougall, Tom E.; Chung, Minda; Tateishi, Miyoko

    1996-08-01

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxies, are used in the aircraft, aerospace, sporting goods, and transportation industries. Though thermal curing is the dominant industrial process for advanced composites, electron curing of similar composites containing acrylated epoxy matrices has been demonstrated by our work. The main attraction of electron processing technology over thermal technology is the advantages it offers which include ambient temperature curing, reduced curing times, reduced volatile emissions, better material handling, and reduced costs. Electron curing technology allows for the curing of many types of products, such as complex shaped, those containing different types of fibres, and up to 15 cm thick. Our work has been done principally with the AECL's 10 MeV, 1 kW electron accelerator; we have also done some comparative work with an AECL Gammacell 220. In this paper we briefly review our work on the various aspects of electron curing of advanced composites and their properties.

  2. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  3. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  4. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  5. Flight-service evaluation of composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    A review of programs aimed at flight-service evaluation of composite materials in various applications is presented. These flight-service programs are expected to continue for up to 5 years and include selective reinforcement of an airplane center wing box a helicopter tail cone, and composite replacements for commercial aircraft spoilers and fairings. These longtime flight-service programs will help provide the necessary information required by commercial airlines to commit advanced composites to aircraft structures with confidence. Results of these programs will provide information concerning the stability of composite materials when subjected to various flight environments.

  6. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  7. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined.

  8. Recent Advances in Composite Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifsnider, Ken; Case, Scott; Iyengar, Nirmal

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art and recent developments in the field of composite material damage mechanics are reviewed, with emphasis on damage accumulation. The kinetics of damage accumulation are considered with emphasis on the general accumulation of discrete local damage events such as single or multiple fiber fractures or microcrack formation. The issues addressed include: how to define strength in the presence of widely distributed damage, and how to combine mechanical representations in order to predict the damage tolerance and life of engineering components. It is shown that a damage mechanics approach can be related to the thermodynamics of the damage accumulation processes in composite laminates subjected to mechanical loading and environmental conditions over long periods of time.

  9. Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

    1981-09-15

    This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

  10. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, K. E.; Marsh, A. H.; Sargisson, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual studies were conducted to assess the impact of incorporating advanced technologies in the nacelles of a current wide-bodied transport and an advanced technology transport. The improvement possible in the areas of fuel consumption, flyover noise levels, airplane weight, manufacturing costs, and airplane operating cost were evaluated for short and long-duct nacelles. Use of composite structures for acoustic duct linings in the fan inlet and exhaust ducts was considered as well as for other nacelle components. For the wide-bodied transport, the use of a long-duct nacelle with an internal mixer nozzle in the primary exhaust showed significant improvement in installed specific fuel consumption and airplane direct operating costs compared to the current short-duct nacelle. The long-duct mixed-flow nacelle is expected to achieve significant reductions in jet noise during takeoff and in turbo-machinery noise during landing approach. Recommendations were made of the technology development needed to achieve the potential fuel conservation and noise reduction benefits.

  11. Advances and trends in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in computational structural mechanics are reviewed with reference to computational needs for future structures technology, advances in computational models for material behavior, discrete element technology, assessment and control of numerical simulations of structural response, hybrid analysis, and techniques for large-scale optimization. Research areas in computational structural mechanics which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified. These include prediction and analysis of the failure of structural components made of new materials, development of computational strategies and solution methodologies for large-scale structural calculations, and assessment of reliability and adaptive improvement of response predictions.

  12. JTEC panel report on advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.; Grisaffe, S. J.; Hillig, W. B.; Perepezko, J. H.; Pipes, R. B.; Sheehan, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites visited Japan and surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic and carbon matrices. The panel's interests included not only what composite systems were chosen, but also how these systems were developed. A strong carbon and fiber industry makes Japan the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation resistant carbon/carbon composite program. The goals for this program are ambitious, and it is just starting, but its progress should be closely monitored in the United States.

  13. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  14. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  15. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  16. Advances and trends in computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

  17. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  18. Advances in very lightweight composite mirror technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Bowers, Charles W.; Content, David A.; Marzouk, Marzouk; Romeo, Robert C.

    2000-09-01

    We report progress in the development of very lightweight (< 5 kg/m2) mirrors made by replication using graphite fiber cyanate ester resin composites. The replication process is optimized to significantly improve the surface smoothness and figure quality. Achievements include near- diffraction-limited optical performance [< 1/20 wave root mean square (rms) at 632.8 nm] in replica flats, fractional wave rms performance in curved mirrors at 90% pupil, and almost exact reproduction of the surface microroughness of the mandrel. The curved mirrors typically show some edge roll off and several waves (rms optical) of astigmatism, coma, and third-order spherical aberration. These are indications of thermal contraction in an inhomogeneous medium. This inhomogeneity is due to a systematic radial variation in density and fiber/resin ratio induced in composite plies when draped around a small and highly curved mandrel. The figure accuracy is expected to improve with larger size optics and in mirrors with longer radii of curvature. Nevertheless, the present accuracy figure is sufficient for using postfiguring techniques such as ion milling to achieve diffraction-limited performances at optical and UV wavelengths. We demonstrate active figure control using a simple apparatus of low-mass, low-force actuators to correct astigmatism. The optimized replication technique is applied to the fabrication of a 0.6-m-diam mirror with an areal density of 3.2 kg/m2. Our result demonstrates that the very lightweight, large-aperture construction used in radio telescopes can now be applied to optical telescopes.

  19. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to September 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12in. by 12in. by 6in. Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the

  20. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This progress report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12" by 12" by 6". Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the progress

  1. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  2. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  3. Effect of processing on Polymer/Composite structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the vitality and economic health of the field of polymer forecasting are discussed. A consistent and rational point of view which considers processing as a participant in the underlying triad of relationships which comprise materials science and engineering is outlined. This triad includes processing as it influences material structure, and ultimately properties. Methods in processing structure properties, polymer science and engineering, polymer chemistry and synthesis, structure and modification and optimization through processing, and methods of melt flow modeling in processing structure property relations of polymer were developed. Mechanical properties of composites are considered, and biomedical materials research to include polymer processing effects are studied. An analysis of the design technology of advances graphite/epoxy composites is also reported.

  4. Composite structures for magnetosphere imager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin

    1994-01-01

    Results of a trade study addressing the issues and benefits in using carbon fiber reinforced composites for the Magnetosphere Imager (MI) spacecraft are presented. The MI mission is now part of the Sun/Earth Connection Program. To qualify for this category, new technology and innovative methods to reduce the cost and size have to be considered. Topics addressed cover: (1) what is a composite, including advantages and disadvantages of composites and carbon/graphite fibers; and (2) structural design for MI, including composite design configuration, material selection, and analysis of composite structures.

  5. Research priorities and history of advanced composite compression testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Priorities for standard compression testing research in advanced laminated fibrous composite materials are presented along with a state of the art survey (completed in 1979) including history and commentary on industrial test methods. Historically apparent research priorities and consequent (lack of) progress are supporting evidence for newly derived priorities.

  6. Impact dynamics research on composite transport structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts being undertaken to investigate the response of composite and aluminum structures under crash loading conditions were reviewed. A Boeing 720 airplane was used in the controlled-impact demonstration test. Energy absorption of composite materials, the tearing of fuselage skin panels, the friction and abrasion behavior of composite skins, and the crushing behavior and dynamic response of composite beams were among the topics addressed.

  7. Impact dynamics research on composite transport structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts being undertaken to investigate the response of composite and aluminum structures under crash loading conditions were reviewed. A Boeing 720 airplane was used in the controlled-impact demonstration test. Energy absorption of composite materials, the tearing of fuselage skin panels, the friction and abrasion behavior of composite skins, and the crushing behavior and dynamic response of composite beams were among the topics addressed.

  8. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial frabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating: (1) complex composite structural behavior in general, and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  9. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA'S Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several aluminum and copper based Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The presentation's goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's planned and on-going activities in MMC for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike and X-34 Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's reusable launch vehicle systems and space access vehicles. Advanced MMC processing techniques such as plasma spray, centrifugal casting, pressure infiltration casting will be discussed. Development of a novel 3D printing method for low cost production of composite preform, and functional gradient MMC to enhanced rocket engine's dimensional stability will be presented.

  10. Damage progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    A computational simulation tool is used to evaluate the various stages of damage progression in composite materials during Iosipescu sheat testing. Unidirectional composite specimens with either the major or minor material axis in the load direction are considered. Damage progression characteristics are described for each specimen using two types of boundary conditions. A procedure is outlined regarding the use of computational simulation in composites testing. Iosipescu shear testing using the V-notched beam specimen is a convenient method to measure both shear strength and shear stiffness simultaneously. The evaluation of composite test response can be made more productive and informative via computational simulation of progressive damage and fracture. Computational simulation performs a complete evaluation of laminated composite fracture via assessment of ply and subply level damage/fracture processes.

  11. Mishap risk control for advanced aerospace/composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Although advanced aerospace materials and advanced composites provide outstanding performance, they also present several unique post-mishap environmental, safety, and health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on some of the unique hazards and concerns associated with these materials when damaged by fire, explosion, or high-energy impact. Additionally, recommended procedures and precautions are addressed as they pertain to all phases of a composite aircraft mishap response, including fire-fighting, investigation, recovery, clean-up, and guidelines are general in nature and not application-specific. The goal of this project is to provide factual and realistic information which can be used to develop consistent and effective procedures and policies to minimize the potential environmental, safety, and health impacts of a composite aircraft mishap response effort.

  12. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  13. Development of a composite (K1100/CE) satellite bus structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, C.N.; Snyder, B.A.; Dean, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the use of high-performance composite materials (K1100 graphite fiber/cyanate ester matrix [Gr/CE]) for the structural design of a full-capability small satellite built for the Navy Geosat Follow-On (GFO) Program. A challenging combination of mission requirements and program budget constraints led to the production of an advanced technology, multifunctional composite satellite bus. The process started with top-level requirements to derive structural performance, then proceeded through material selection, detail design, and procurement. It culminated in a successful test program.

  14. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  15. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  16. Development of stitched/RTM composite primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program is to provide the technology required to gain the full benefit of weight savings and performance offered by composite primary structures. Achieving the goal is dependent on developing composite materials and structures which are damage tolerant and economical to manufacture. Researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company are investigating stitching reinforcement combined with resin transfer molding (RTM) to create structures meeting the ACT program goals. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). The research is aimed at materials, processes and structural concepts for application in both transport wings and fuselages. Empirical guidelines are being established for stitching reinforcement in primary structures. New data are presented in this paper for evaluation tests of thick (90-ply) and thin (16-ply) stitched laminates, and from selection tests of RTM composite resins. Tension strength, compression strength and post-impact compression strength data are reported. Elements of a NASA LaRC program to expand the science base for stitched/RTM composites are discussed.

  17. Polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Serafini, T. T.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis is being focused on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  18. Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Daniels, D.L.; Serafini, T.T.; Di Carlo, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis focuses on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  19. Single crystal piezoelectric composites for advanced NDT ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Snook, Kevin; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Geng, Xuecang

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the design, fabrication and characterization of PMN-PT single crystal/epoxy composites are reported for NDT ultrasound transducers. Specifically, 1-3 PMN-PT/epoxy composites with center frequencies of 5 MHz - 40 MHz were designed and fabricated using either the dice-and-fill method or a photolithography based micromachining process. The measured electromechanical coefficients for composites with frequency of 5 MHz - 15 MHz were about 0.78-0.83, and the coupling coefficients for composites with frequencies of 25 MHz- 40 MHz were about 0.71-0.72. The dielectric loss remains low (< 0.05). These properties hold promise for advanced NDT ultrasound applications.

  20. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  1. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  2. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  3. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  4. Advanced composites: Fabrication processes for selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note is based on present state of the art for epoxy and polyimide matrix composite fabrication technology. Boron/epoxy and polyimide and graphite/epoxy and polyimide structural parts can be successfully fabricated. Fabrication cycles for polyimide matrix composites have been shortened to near epoxy cycle times. Nondestructive testing has proven useful in detecting defects and anomalies in composite structure elements. Fabrication methods and tooling materials are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of different tooling materials. Types of honeycomb core, material costs and fabrication methods are shown in table form for comparison. Fabrication limits based on tooling size, pressure capabilities and various machining operations are also discussed.

  5. Characterization and development of materials for advanced textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartness, J. Timothy; Greene, Timothy L.; Taske, Leo E.

    1993-01-01

    Work ongoing under the NASA Langley - Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program is discussed. The primary emphasis of the work centers around the development and characterization of graphite fiber that has been impregnated with an epoxy powder. Four epoxies have been characterized in towpreg form as to their weaveability and braidability. Initial mechanical properties have been generated on each resin system. These include unidirectional as well as 8-harness satin cloth. Initial 2D and 3D weaving and braiding trials will be reported on as well as initial efforts to develop towpreg suitable for advanced tow placement.

  6. Overview of bacterial cellulose composites: a multipurpose advanced material.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Park, Joong Kon

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has received substantial interest owing to its unique structural features and impressive physico-mechanical properties. BC has a variety of applications in biomedical fields, including use as biomaterial for artificial skin, artificial blood vessels, vascular grafts, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and wound dressing. However, pristine BC lacks certain properties, which limits its applications in various fields; therefore, synthesis of BC composites has been conducted to address these limitations. A variety of BC composite synthetic strategies have been developed based on the nature and relevant applications of the combined materials. BC composites are primarily synthesized through in situ addition of reinforcement materials to BC synthetic media or the ex situ penetration of such materials into BC microfibrils. Polymer blending and solution mixing are less frequently used synthetic approaches. BC composites have been synthesized using numerous materials ranging from organic polymers to inorganic nanoparticles. In medical fields, these composites are used for tissue regeneration, healing of deep wounds, enzyme immobilization, and synthesis of medical devices that could replace cardiovascular and other connective tissues. Various electrical products, including biosensors, biocatalysts, E-papers, display devices, electrical instruments, and optoelectronic devices, are prepared from BC composites with conductive materials. In this review, we compiled various synthetic approaches for BC composite synthesis, classes of BC composites, and applications of BC composites. This study will increase interest in BC composites and the development of new ideas in this field.

  7. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  8. Advances in Homology Protein Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhexin

    2007-01-01

    Homology modeling plays a central role in determining protein structure in the structural genomics project. The importance of homology modeling has been steadily increasing because of the large gap that exists between the overwhelming number of available protein sequences and experimentally solved protein structures, and also, more importantly, because of the increasing reliability and accuracy of the method. In fact, a protein sequence with over 30% identity to a known structure can often be predicted with an accuracy equivalent to a low-resolution X-ray structure. The recent advances in homology modeling, especially in detecting distant homologues, aligning sequences with template structures, modeling of loops and side chains, as well as detecting errors in a model, have contributed to reliable prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. The ongoing efforts in solving protein structures, which can be time-consuming and often difficult, will continue to spur the development of a host of new computational methods that can fill in the gap and further contribute to understanding the relationship between protein structure and function. PMID:16787261

  9. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  10. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  11. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  12. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  13. Modelling of failure of structural textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, N.; Gilchrist, M. D.

    This paper summarizes extensive experimental work regarding the manufacture, mechanical characterization and modelling of textile thermoplastic composites produced by means of commingled yarns. These composites are believed to have a high potential for applications in structural automotive components. However, methods need to be developed for faster manufacturing and reliable prediction of the component mechanical performance and failure. A practical approach of finite element modelling of the stiffness and strength behaviour of these composites is briefly discussed.

  14. Computerized structural mechanics for 1990's: Advanced aircraft needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Backman, B. F.

    1989-01-01

    The needs for computerized structural mechanics (CSM) as seen from the standpoint of the aircraft industry are discussed. These needs are projected into the 1990's with special focus on the new advanced materials. Preliminary design/analysis, research, and detail design/analysis are identified as major areas. The role of local/global analyses in these different areas is discussed. The lessons learned in the past are used as a basis for the design of a CSM framework that could modify and consolidate existing technology and include future developments in a rational and useful way. A philosophy is stated, and a set of analyses needs driven by the emerging advanced composites is enumerated. The roles of NASA, the universities, and the industry are identified. Finally, a set of rational research targets is recommended based on both the new types of computers and the increased complexity the industry faces. Computerized structural mechanics should be more than new methods in structural mechanics and numerical analyses. It should be a set of engineering applications software products that combines innovations in structural mechanics, numerical analysis, data processing, search and display features, and recent hardware advances and is organized in a framework that directly supports the design process.

  15. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 11th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Jan. 18-23, 1987, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The present conference on advanced ceramic materials discusses topics in the fields of NDE, coating/joining/tribology techniques, fracture and interface phenomena, whisker- and particulate-reinforced composites, fiber and whisker properties, SiC and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, glass/glass-ceramic matrix composites, alumina-matrix composites, ceramic materials for space structures, and SiC- and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/-matrix composites. Attention is given to ceramic characterization by thermal wave imaging, an advanced ceramic-to-metal joining process, the fracture modes of brittle-matrix unidirectional composites, the oxidation of SiC-containing composites, particulate matter in SiC whiskers, corrosion reactions in SiC ceramics, melt-infiltrated ceramic-matrix composites, environmental effects in toughened ceramics, and a ceramic composite heat exchanger.

  16. Probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A composite wing with spars and bulkheads is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures to control uncertainties in distortions and stresses. Results show that a smart composite wing can be controlled to minimize distortions and to have specified stress levels in the presence of defects. Structural responses such as changes in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stress in the control and controlled plies are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective uncertainties. Sensitivity factors are evaluated to identify those parameters that have the greatest influence on a specific structural response. Results show that smart composite structures can be configured to control both distortions and ply stresses to satisfy specified design requirements.

  17. Effects of defects in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendeckyj, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of defects in composite structures is addressed. Defects in laminates such as wrinkles, foreign particles, scratches and breaks are discussed. Effects of plygap plywaviness and machining defects are also studied.

  18. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Builtup Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    The damage progression and fracture of builtup composite structures was evaluated by using computational simulation to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel subjected to a bending load. The damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression, and propagation to structural collapse were simulated. An integrated computer code (CODSTRAN) was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of builtup composite structures under mechanical loading. Results showed that damage initiation and progression have a significant effect on the structural response. Also investigated was the influence of different types of bending load on the damage initiation, propagation, and final fracture of the builtup composite panel.

  19. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  20. Flutter study of an advanced composite wing with external stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Nagaraja, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A flutter test using a scaled model of an advanced composite wing for a Navy attack aircraft has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The model was a wall-mounted half-span wing with a semi-span of 6.63 ft. The wing had an aspect ratio of 5.31, taper ratio of 0.312, and quarter-chord sweep of 25 degrees. The model was supported in a manner that simulated the load path in the carry-through structure of the aircraft and the symmetric boundary condition at the fuselage centerline. The model was capable of carrying external stores from three pylon locations on the wing. Flutter tests were conducted for the wing with and without external stores. No flutter was encountered for the clean wing at test conditions which simulated the scaled airplane operating envelope. Flutter boundaries were obtained for several external store configurations. The flutter boundaries for the fuel tanks were nearly Mach number independent (occurring at constant dynamic pressure). To study the aerodynamic effect of the fuel tank stores, pencil stores (slender cylindrical rods) which had the same mass and pitch and yaw inertia as the fuel tanks were tested on the model. These pencil store configurations exhibited a transonic dip in the flutter dynamic pressure, indicating that the aerodynamic effect of the actual fuel tanks on flutter was significant. Several flutter analyses methods were used in an attempt to predict the flutter phenomenon exhibited during the wind-tunnel test. The analysis gave satisfactory predictions of flutter for the pencil store configurations, but unsatisfactory correlation for the actual fuel tank configurations.

  1. Composite curved frames for helicopter fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analysis and testing of composite curved frames. A major frame was selected from the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and designed as a composite structure. The curved beam effects were expected to increase flange axial stresses and induce transverse bending. A NASTRAN finite element analysis was conducted and the results were used in the design of composite curved frame specimens. Three specimens were fabricated and five static tests were conducted. The NASTRAN analysis and test results are compared for axial, transverse, and Web strains. Results show the curved beam effects are closely predicted by a NASTRAN analysis and the effects increase with loading on the composite frames.

  2. Service evaluation of aircraft composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Dow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The advantages of the use of composite materials in structural applications have been identified in numerous engineering studies. Technology development programs are underway to correct known deficiencies and to provide needed improvements. However, in the final analysis, flight service programs are necessary to develop broader acceptance of, and confidence in, any new class of materials such as composites. Such flight programs, initiated by NASA Langley Research Center, are reviewed. These programs which include the selectively reinforced metal and the all-composite concepts applied to both secondary and primary aircraft structural components, are described and current status is indicated.

  3. Global Failure Modes in High Temperature Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    Composite materials have been considered for many years as the major advance in the construction of energy efficient aerospace structures. Notable advances have been made in understanding the special design considerations that set composites apart from the usual "isotropic" engineering materials such as the metals. As a result, a number of significant engineering designs have been accomplished. However, one shortcoming of the currently favored composites is their relatively unforgiving behavior with respect to failure (brittleness) under seemingly mild impact conditions and large efforts are underway to rectify that situation, much along the lines of introducing thermoplastic matrix materials. Because of their relatively more pronounced (thermo) viscoelastic behavior these materials respond with "toughness" in fracture situations. From the point of view of applications requiring material strength, this property is highly desirable. This feature impacts several important and distinct engineering problems which have been' considered under this grant and cover the 1) effect of impact damage on structural (buckling) stability of composite panels, the 2) effect of time dependence on the progression of buckling instabilities, and the 3) evolution of damage and fracture at generic thickness discontinuities in structures. The latter topic has serious implications for structural stability problems (buckling failure in reinforced shell structures) as well as failure progression in stringer-reinforced shell structures. This grant has dealt with these issues. Polymer "toughness" is usually associated with uncrosslinked or thermo-plastic polymers. But, by comparison with their thermoset counterparts they tend to exhibit more pronounced time dependent material behavior; also, that time dependence can occur at lower temperatures which places restriction in the high temperature use of these "newer and tougher" materials that are not quite so serious with the thermoset matrix

  4. Composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The installation and use of a computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctrual ANalyzer), developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades was described. This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics, macromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites. COBSTRAN generates a NASTRAN model with equivalent anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from NASTRAN is used to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. Curved panel structures may be modeled providing the curvature of a cross-section is defined by a single value function. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  5. Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress achieved in the structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT) program which was developed to perform numerical optimizations on highly swept propfan blades. The optimization procedure seeks to minimize an objective function, defined as either direct operating cost or aeroelastic differences between a blade and its scaled model, by tuning internal and external geometry variables that must satisfy realistic blade design constraints. This report provides a detailed description of the input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses and refined analyses, as well as validation test cases for the STAT program. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  6. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  7. Advances in Hot-Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has actively participated in the development of hot structures technology for application to hypersonic flight systems. Hot structures have been developed for vehicles including the X-43A, X-37, and the Space Shuttle. These trans-atmospheric and atmospheric entry flight systems that incorporate hot-structures technology are lighter weight and require less maintenance than those that incorporate parasitic, thermal-protection materials that attach to warm or cool substructure. The development of hot structures requires a thorough understanding of material performance in an extreme environment, boundary conditions and load interactions, structural joint performance, and thermal and mechanical performance of integrated structural systems that operate at temperatures ranging from 1500 C to 3000 C, depending on the application. This paper will present recent advances in the development of hot structures, including development of environmentally durable, high temperature leading edges and control surfaces, integrated thermal protection systems, and repair technologies. The X-43A Mach-10 vehicle utilized carbon/carbon (C/C) leading edges on the nose, horizontal control surface, and vertical tail. The nose and vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased, high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three-layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the C/C, followed by a CVD layer of SiC, followed by a thin CVD layer of HfC. Work has also been performed on the development of an integrated structure and was focused on both hot and warm (insulated) structures and integrated fuselage/tank/TPS systems. The objective was to develop integrated multifunctional airframe structures that eliminate fragile external thermal-protection systems and incorporate the insulating function within the structure. The approach taken to achieve this goal was to develop candidate hypersonic

  8. Durability of composites in automotive structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; McCoy, H.E.; Ruggles, M.B.; Simpson, W.A.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1996-10-01

    The overall goal of the project is to develop experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines for automotive composite structures and to demonstrate their applicability to lightweight, manufacturable structures under representative field loading histories and environments. Key technical issues are the potentially degrading effects that (1) both cyclic and long-term sustained loadings, (2) various automotive environments, and (3) low-energy impacts can have on the dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness of automotive composite structures. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings and observations developed to date and to outline future directions.

  9. Self-assembled hierarchically structured organic-inorganic composite systems.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Designing bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composite materials is one of the most popular current research objectives. Due to the high complexity of biocomposite structures found in nacre and bone, for example, a one-pot scalable and versatile synthesis approach addressing structural key features of biominerals and affording bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composites with advanced physical properties is highly challenging. This article reviews recent progress in synthesizing organic-inorganic composite materials via various self-assembly techniques and in this context highlights a recently developed bio-inspired synthesis concept for the fabrication of hierarchically structured, organic-inorganic composite materials. This one-step self-organization concept based on simultaneous liquid crystal formation of anisotropic inorganic nanoparticles and a functional liquid crystalline polymer turned out to be simple, fast, scalable and versatile, leading to various (multi-)functional composite materials, which exhibit hierarchical structuring over several length scales. Consequently, this synthesis approach is relevant for further progress and scientific breakthrough in the research field of bio-inspired and biomimetic materials. PMID:27175790

  10. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    The structural design configuration for the Composite Vertical Stabilizer is described and the structural design, analysis, and weight activities are presented. The status of fabrication and test activities for the development test portion of the program is described. Test results are presented for the skin panels, spar web, spar cap to cover, and laminate properties specimens. Engineering drawings of vertification test panels and root fittings, rudder support specimens, titanium fittings, and rear spar specimen analysis models are included.

  11. Thermostructural tailoring of fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant area of interest in design of complex structures involves the study of multidisciplined problems. The coordination of several different intricate areas of study to obtain a particular design of a structure is a new and pressing area of research. In the past, each discipline would perform its task consecutively using the appropriate inputs from the other disciplines. This process usually required several time-consuming iterations to obtain a satisfactory design. The alternative pursued here is combining various participating disciplines and specified design requirements into a formal structural computer code. The main focus of this research is to develop a multidiscipline structural tailoring method for select composite structures and to demonstrate its application to specific areas. The development of an integrated computer program involves the coupling of three independent computer programs using an excutive module. This module will be the foundation for integrating a structural optimizer, a composites analyzer and a thermal analyzer. With the completion of the executive module, the first step was taken toward the evolution of multidiscipline software in the field of composite mechanics. Through the use of an array of cases involving a variety of objective functions/constraints and thermal-mechanical load conditions, it became evident that simple composite structures can be designed to a combined loads environment.

  12. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  13. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  14. Integrated Design for Manufacturing of Braided Preforms for Advanced Composites Part I: 2D Braiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan Tao; Ko, Frank K.; Hu, Hong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a 2D braiding design system for advanced textile structural composites was based on dynamic models. A software package to assist in the design of braided preform manufacturing has been developed. The package allows design parameters (machine speeds, fiber volume fraction, tightness factor, etc.) to be easily obtained and the relationships between said parameters to be demonstrated graphically. The fabirc geometry model (FGM) method was adopted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the composites. Experimental evidence demonstrates the success of the use of dynamic models in the design software for the manufacture of braided fabric preforms.

  15. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  16. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  17. First NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a compilation of papers presented at the first NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference held in Seattle, Washington, from 29 Oct. to 1 Nov. 1990. The ACT program is a major new multiyear research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Included are papers on materials development and processing, innovative design concepts, analysis development and validation, cost effective manufacturing methodology, and cost tracking and prediction procedures. Papers on major applications programs approved by the Department of Defense are also included.

  18. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  19. Advanced composites sizing guide for preliminary weight estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. W.

    During the preliminary design and proposal phases, it is necessary for the mass properties engineer to make weight estimates that require preliminary rough estimates to improve or verify Level I and Level II estimates and to support trade studies for various types of construction, materials substitution, wing t/c, and design criteria changes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple and easy to understand, preliminary sizing guide and present some numeric examples that will aid the mass properties engineer that is inexperienced with advanced composites analysis.

  20. Lunar crust: structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Toksöz, M N; Press, F; Anderson, K; Dainty, A; Latham, G; Ewing, M; Dorman, J; Lammlein, D; Sutton, G; Duennebier, F; Nakamura, Y

    1972-06-01

    Lunar seismic data from artificial impacts recorded at three Apollo seismometers are interpreted to determine the structure of the moon's interior to a depth of about 100 kilomneters. In the Fra Mauro region of Oceanus Procellarum, the moon has a layered crust 65 kilometers thick. The seismic velocities in the upper 25 kilometers are consistent with those in lunar basalts. Between 25 and 65 kilometers, the nearly constant velocity (6.8 kilometers per second) corresponds to velocities in gabbroic and anorthositic rocks. The apparent velocity is high (about 9 kilometers per second) in the lunar mantle immediately below the crust.

  1. The Compositional Structure of the Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, F. E.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Walsh, K. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Binzel, R. P.

    The past decade has brought major improvements in large-scale asteroid discovery and characterization, with over half a million known asteroids, more than 100,000 of which have some measurement of physical characterization. This explosion of data has allowed us to create a new global picture of the main asteroid belt. Put in context with meteorite measurements and dynamical models, a new and more complete picture of solar system evolution has emerged. The question has changed from "What was the original compositional gradient of the asteroid belt?" to "What was the original compositional gradient of small bodies across the entire solar system?" No longer is the leading theory that two belts of planetesimals are primordial, but instead those belts were formed and sculpted through evolutionary processes after solar system formation. This chapter reviews the advancements on the fronts of asteroid compositional characterization, meteorite measurements, and dynamical theories in the context of the heliocentric distribution of asteroid compositions seen in the main belt today. This chapter also reviews the major outstanding questions relating to asteroid compositions and distributions and summarizes the progress and current state of understanding of these questions to form the big picture of the formation and evolution of asteroids in the main belt. Finally, we briefly review the relevance of asteroids and their compositions in their greater context within our solar system and beyond.

  2. Structural durability of stiffened composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Rivers, James M.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The durability of a stiffened composite cylindrical shell panel is investigated under several loading conditions. An integrated computer code is utilized for the simulation of load induced structural degradation. Damage initiation, growth, and accumulation up to the stage of propagation to fracture are included in the computational simulation. Results indicate significant differences in the degradation paths for different loading cases. The effects of combined loading on structural durability and ultimate structural strength of a stiffened shell are assessed.

  3. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity. PMID:17326671

  4. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  5. Compression failure mechanisms of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M.; Moon, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was conducted to delineate the compression failure mechanisms of composite structures. The present report summarizes further results on kink band formation in unidirectional composites. In order to assess the compressive strengths and failure modes of fibers them selves, a fiber bundle was embedded in epoxy casting and tested in compression. A total of six different fibers were used together with two resins of different stiffnesses. The failure of highly anisotropic fibers such as Kevlar 49 and P-75 graphite was due to kinking of fibrils. However, the remaining fibers--T300 and T700 graphite, E-glass, and alumina--failed by localized microbuckling. Compressive strengths of the latter group of fibers were not fully utilized in their respective composite. In addition, acoustic emission monitoring revealed that fiber-matrix debonding did not occur gradually but suddenly at final failure. The kink band formation in unidirectional composites under compression was studied analytically and through microscopy. The material combinations selected include seven graphite/epoxy composites, two graphite/thermoplastic resin composites, one Kevlar 49/epoxy composite and one S-glass/epoxy composite.

  6. Structural behavior of composites with progressive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    Structural characteristics such as natural frequencies and buckling loads with corresponding mode shapes were investigated during progressive fracture of multilayer, angle-plied polymer matrix composites. A computer program was used to generate the numerical results for overall mechanical response of damaged composites. Variations in structural characteristics as a function of the previously applied loading were studied. Results indicate that most of the overall structural properties were preserved throughout a significant proportion of the ultimate fracture load. For the cases studied, changes in structural behavior began to occur after 70 percent of the ultimate fracture load was applied. However, the individual nature of the structural change was rather varied depending on the laminate configuration, fiber orientation, and the boundary conditions.

  7. MRS International Meeting on Advanced Materials, 1st, Tokyo, Japan, June 2, 3, 1988, Proceedings. Volume 4 - Composites corrosion/Coating of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shiushichi; Kobayashi, Akira; Nii, Kazuyoshi; Saito, Yasutoshi; Umekawa, Sokichi.

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on metal-matrix composites (MMCs) and ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) discusses electrodeposited C/Cu MMCs, the quasi-liquid hot press method for SiC/Al composites, die-cast MMCs for tribological applications, the solidification-processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites, the fracture of SiC whisker-reinforced Al-alloy MMCs, the elastic constants of a graphite/magnesium composite, and an elastoplastic analysis of metal/plastic/metal sandwich plates in three-point bending. Also discussed are the fabrication of diamond particle-dispersed glass composites in space, heat-resistant graphite fiber-reinforced phosphate ceramic CMCs, the high-temperature creep of SiC-reinforced alumina CMCs, flexible carbon fiber-reinforced exfoliated graphite composites, and the application of advanced CMCs to advanced railway systems, the corrosion and oxidation of SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and other structural ceramics, corrosion properties of advanced alloys, and novel coating systems for advanced materials.

  8. Geometrical Nonlinear Analysis of Composite Structures by Zigzag Theory—A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirbhate, N. J.; Tungikar, V. B.

    2010-10-01

    Advances in manufacturing technologies of composites leads to its uses as main load carrying structures which essentially need to be thick structures. Thus it is becoming increasingly important to predict accurately interlaminar variations of stresses and displacements along thickness of the composites. A review of the recent development of finite element methods for geometrical nonlinear analysis of composite structures specifically using zigzag theory is presented in this paper. The literature review is devoted to the recently developed finite elements, theories based on zigzag function for carrying out geometrical nonlinear analysis of composite structures. The future research is summarized finally.

  9. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aero-Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the development and application of ceramic matrix composites consisting of silicon carbide (SiC) based matrices reinforced by small-diameter continuous-length SiC-based fibers. For example, these SiC/SiC composites are now in the early stages of implementation into hot-section components of civil aero-propulsion gas turbine engines, where in comparison to current metallic components they offer multiple advantages due to their lighter weight and higher temperature structural capability. For current production-ready SiC/SiC, this temperature capability for long time structural applications is 1250 degC, which is better than 1100 degC for the best metallic superalloys. Foreseeing that even higher structural reliability and temperature capability would continue to increase the advantages of SiC/SiC composites, progress in recent years has also been made at NASA toward improving the properties of SiC/SiC composites by optimizing the various constituent materials and geometries within composite microstructures. The primary objective of this chapter is to detail this latter progress, both fundamentally and practically, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in the materials and processes for the fiber, fiber coating, fiber architecture, and matrix, and in the design methods for incorporating these constituents into SiC/SiC microstructures with improved thermo-structural performance.

  10. Multifunctional composites and structures with integrated mechanical and electromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhizi, Alireza Vakil

    Composite materials are used for their excellent structural performance. Load-bearing properties are traditionally the only aspects for which a composite structure is designed. Recent technological advances have made it possible to reach beyond this limited view. Inspired by biological systems, we seek to develop engineering materials that exhibit multiple functionalities in addition to providing structural integrity. Composites are a natural host for embedding elements that can enhance their nonstructural response. The present work is focused on embedding periodic arrays of scattering elements within composites to modify and tune their overall electromagnetic properties. A number of techniques for numerical and analytical modeling of the periodic media are discussed. Based on these methods we have designed and fabricated composites with tuned electromagnetic properties. Examples include fiber-reinforced polymer composites with embedded arrays of straight wires or coils. In both cases, the overall dielectric constant of the medium is reduced and can even be rendered negative within microwave frequencies. The coil medium can exhibit chiral response. Solutions for eliminating this behavior as well as a method for calculation of the bianisotropic material parameters are presented. One can achieve similar response at higher frequencies by reducing the length scale. For example, we show that a polymer film with embedded nano-strips of gold can demonstrate negative dielectric constant in infrared regime. An example of a structural composite is presented for which the magnetic permeability is altered and is turned negative within a microwave band. Finally, a general method for homogenization of the electromagnetic properties of periodic media based on the microstructure is developed. Two independent chapters complete this dissertation. In Chapter 8 the response of a soft hypo-elastic material in a pressure---shear experiment is studied. A nonlinear pressure- and

  11. High-strain composites and dual-matrix composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda Jimenez, Ignacio

    Most space applications require deployable structures due to the limiting size of current launch vehicles. Specifically, payloads in nanosatellites such as CubeSats require very high compaction ratios due to the very limited space available in this typo of platform. Strain-energy-storing deployable structures can be suitable for these applications, but the curvature to which these structures can be folded is limited to the elastic range. Thanks to fiber microbuckling, high-strain composite materials can be folded into much higher curvatures without showing significant damage, which makes them suitable for very high compaction deployable structure applications. However, in applications that require carrying loads in compression, fiber microbuckling also dominates the strength of the material. A good understanding of the strength in compression of high-strain composites is then needed to determine how suitable they are for this type of application. The goal of this thesis is to investigate, experimentally and numerically, the microbuckling in compression of high-strain composites. Particularly, the behavior in compression of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced silicone rods (CFRS) is studied. Experimental testing of the compression failure of CFRS rods showed a higher strength in compression than the strength estimated by analytical models, which is unusual in standard polymer composites. This effect, first discovered in the present research, was attributed to the variation in random carbon fiber angles respect to the nominal direction. This is an important effect, as it implies that microbuckling strength might be increased by controlling the fiber angles. With a higher microbuckling strength, high-strain materials could carry loads in compression without reaching microbuckling and therefore be suitable for several space applications. A finite element model was developed to predict the homogenized stiffness of the CFRS, and the homogenization results were used in

  12. Design of a robust SHM system for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Shawn; Liu, Ching-Chao; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Composites are becoming increasingly popular materials used in a wide range of applications on large-scale structures such as windmill blades, rocket motor cases, and aircraft fuselage and wings. For these large structures, using composites greatly enhances the operation and performance of the application, but also introduces extraordinary inspection challenges that push the limits of traditional NDE in terms of time and cost. Recent advances in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies offer a promising solution to these inspection challenges. But efficient design methodologies and implementation procedures are needed to ensure the reliability and robustness of SHM technologies for use in real-world applications. This paper introduces the essential elements of the design and implementation process by way of example. State-of-the-art techniques to optimize sensor placement, perform self-diagnostics, compensate for environmental conditions, and generate probability of detection (POD) curves for any application are discussed. The techniques are presented in relation to Acellent's recently developed SmartComposite System that is used to monitor the integrity of large composite structures. The system builds on the active sensor network technology of Acellent that is analogous to a built-in acousto-ultrasonic NDE system. Key features of the system include new miniaturized lightweight hardware, self-diagnostics and adaptive algorithm to automatically compensate for damaged sensors, reliable damage detection under different environmental conditions, and generation of POD curves. This paper will provide an overview of the system and demonstrate its key features.

  13. Multidisciplinary Design Of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Singhal, Surendra N.

    1996-01-01

    Unified computer code developed to implement multidisciplinary approach to design and analysis of composite-material structures that must withstand high temperatures. Code modular: includes executive module communicating with and coordinating other modules performing calculations pertaining to traditionally separate disciplines like those of acoustics, structural vibrations, structural loads, and thermal effects. Essential feature, finite-element numerical simulation of relevant physical phenomena according to applicable disciplines. Same finite-element mesh used in thermal, vibrational, and structural analyses; minimizing data-preparation time and eliminating errors incurred in transforming temperatures from one finite-element mesh to another.

  14. Composite structural armor for combat vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, William E., III; Alesi, A. L.; Parsons, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Several projects that have demonstrated the advantages of using thick composite armor technology for structural applications in armored combat vehicles are discussed. The first involved composite cargo doors for the Marine Corps LVTP-7 amphibious landing vehicle. Another was a demonstration composite turret that offered a weight reduction of 15.5 percent. The advantages of this composite armor compared to metallic armors used for combat vehicle hull and turret applications are reduced weight at equal ballistic protection; reduced back armor spall; excellent corrosion resistance; reduced production costs by parts consolidation; and inherent thermal and acoustic insulative properties. Based on the encouraging results of these past programs, the Demonstration Composite Hull Program was started in September 1986. To demonstrate this composite armor technology, the Army's newest infantry fighting vehicle, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), was selected as a model. A composite infantry fighting vehicle, designated the CIFV for this program, has been designed and fabricated and is currently undergoing a 6000 mile field endurance test. The CIFV demonstration vehicle uses the BFV engine, transmission, suspension, track and other equipment.

  15. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  16. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  17. A Structured Approach to English Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeier, Jerome L.

    A possible application of generative-transformational (phrase-structure) grammar to the teaching of English composition at the college freshman level is described in this dissertation, which presents a potential textbook for a course on language and its relationship to culture. Topics discussed include traditional grammar, the bases of…

  18. Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composite materials as distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, and artificial muscles (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composites (IPCC) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC) as biomimetic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial muscles are briefly discussed in this paper. These advances include brief reproduction of some of these advances that appeared in a new book and a recent set of 4 review articles published in the International Journal of Smart Materials and Structures, advances in manufacturing, force optimization, modeling and simulation and new products developed by Environmental Robots Incorporated, as well as numerous potential applications using Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMC's) as distributed nanosensors, nanotransducers, nanoactuators and artificial muscles. It is certainly clear that the extent of applications of IPCC's and IPMC's go beyond the scope of this paper or the space allocated to this paper. However, this paper will present the breadth and the depth of all such applications of IPCC's and IPMC's as biomimetic robotic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial/synthetic muscles.

  19. Bonded repair of composite aircraft structures: A review of scientific challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katnam, K. B.; Da Silva, L. F. M.; Young, T. M.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced composite materials have gained popularity in high-performance structural designs such as aerospace applications that require lightweight components with superior mechanical properties in order to perform in demanding service conditions as well as provide energy efficiency. However, one of the major challenges that the aerospace industry faces with advanced composites - because of their inherent complex damage behaviour - is structural repair. Composite materials are primarily damaged by mechanical loads and/or environmental conditions. If material damage is not extensive, structural repair is the only feasible solution as replacing the entire component is not cost-effective in many cases. Bonded composite repairs (e.g. scarf patches) are generally preferred as they provide enhanced stress transfer mechanisms, joint efficiencies and aerodynamic performance. With an increased usage of advanced composites in primary and secondary aerospace structural components, it is thus essential to have robust, reliable and repeatable structural bonded repair procedures to restore damaged composite components. But structural bonded repairs, especially with primary structures, pose several scientific challenges with the current existing repair technologies. In this regard, the area of structural bonded repair of composites is broadly reviewed - starting from damage assessment to automation - to identify current scientific challenges and future opportunities.

  20. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of layered multi-material hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loads. The effect of aggressive environments is also simulated. The simulation is based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermo-mechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loads lead to different tailored designs, even those competing with each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  1. Controlled Structure-Dependent Synthesis of Polymer/Nanosilver Composites for Highly Efficient Antibacterial Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, A.; Matyushov, V.; Klimchuk, D.

    Silver containing polymer composites were successfully synthesized via in-situ reduction approach. Different functional polymers with hydroxyl, amide and amine functionalities have been used as matrices. An influence of polymer structure and functionality on a size and shape of silver nanoparticles was established via FTIR/TEM complex analysis. The materials based on these composites could be effectively applied as advanced antibacterials.

  2. Custom Analog VLSI for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, W. R.; Cummings, A.; Keeman, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Aalami, D.; Kleinfelder, S. A.; Marshall, J. H.

    1993-11-01

    Two custom analog VLSI chips are currently in development for scientific payloads of NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer. One chip will be fabricated in the radiation hard 1.2 um CMOS process of the United Technologies Microelectronics Center (UlMC), and will contain 16 complete discriminator/12 bit pulse-height-analysis chains for the readout of heavy ion Si strip detectors. The second chip will be fabricated by Harris Semiconductor in their dielectrically isolated bipolar VHF process. This chip will contain the active elements of a single precision pulse-height-analysis chain and several precision discriminator chains. The chips designed in this effort and the techniques employed are expected to be applicable in science payloads of future missions, especially those which place extraordinary premiums on weight, power, and/or performance.

  3. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft: Aileron manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, E. G.; Cobbs, W. L.; Legg, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication activities of the Advanced Composite Aileron (ACA) program are discussed. These activities included detail fabrication, manufacturing development, assembly, repair and quality assurance. Five ship sets of ailerons were manufactured. The detail fabrication effort of ribs, spar and covers was accomplished on male tools to a common cure cycle. Graphite epoxy tape and fabric and syntactic epoxy materials were utilized in the fabrication. The ribs and spar were net cured and required no post cure trim. Material inconsistencies resulted in manufacturing development of the front spar during the production effort. The assembly effort was accomplished in subassembly and assembly fixtures. The manual drilling system utilized a dagger type drill in a hydraulic feed control hand drill. Coupon testing for each detail was done.

  4. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  5. A Nonlinear Theory for Smart Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: (1) Development of a completely coupled thermo-piezoelectric-mechanical theory for the analysis of composite shells with segmented and distributed piezoelectric sensor/actuators and shape memory alloys. The higher order displacement theory will be used to capture the transverse shear effects in anisotropic composites. The original theory will be modified to satisfy the stress continuity at ply interfaces. (2) Development of a finite element technique to implement the mathematical model. (3) Investigation of the coupled structures/controls interaction problem to study the complex trade-offs associated with the coupled problem.

  6. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  7. Elastic waves in structurally chiral composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shiuhkuang.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic wave propagation through structurally chiral (handed) media was studied. The primary objectives are to construct structurally chiral composites and to characterize their properties. Structurally chiral composites are constructed by stacking identical uniaxial plates, whose consecutive symmetric axes describe either a right- or a left-handed spiral. A matrix representation method is used to solve the elastic wave propagation in such layered composites. Numerical computation of the plane wave reflection and transmission characteristics for chiral arrangements are compared with those for the non-chiral one. It is concluded that the co-polarized characteristics are unaffected by the structural chirality, while the cross-polarized reflected and transmitted fields are greatly influenced by it. Numerical modeling is also applied for the real samples. The polarization ellipse of the transmitted field of each sample is calculated. To verify the form chirality, four glass-reinforced chiral and non-chiral composite samples are made from helix tape, molded, debulked, and cured individually under identical temperature and pressure histories. The spiral composites are characterized using shear and longitudinal wave transducers in ultrasonic experiments. Both the material properties and the polarization ellipse of the transmitted field of each sample are measured. It is proved conclusively that left and right handedness in the microstructures of a material rotates the plane of polarization of a propagating shear wave in the opposite directions. Thus it is now possible to say that by reducing the length scale of the handed microstructures tone more appropriate to its propagating wavelength, a medium is obtained that gives rise to effects similar to optical radar and optical dichroism.

  8. Structural CNT Composites Part II: Assessment of CNT Yarns as Reinforcement for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one-dimensional nanomaterials with outstanding electrical and thermal conductivities and mechanical properties. This combination of properties offers routes to enable lightweight structural aerospace components. Recent advances in the manufacturing of CNTs have made bulk forms such as yarns, tapes and sheets available in commercial quantities to permit the evaluation of these materials for aerospace use, where the superior tensile properties of CNT composites can be exploited in tension dominated applications such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To investigate their utility in this application, aluminum rings were overwrapped with thermoset/CNT yarn composite and their mechanical properties measured. CNT composite overwrap characteristics such as processing method, CNT/resin ratio, and applied tension during CNT yarn winding were varied to determine their effects on the mechanical performance of the CNT composite overwrapped Al rings (CCOARs). Mechanical properties of the CCOARs were measured under static and cyclic loads at room, elevated, and cryogenic temperatures to evaluate their mechanical performance relative to bare Al rings. At room temperature, the breaking load of CCOARs with a 10.8% additional weight due to the CNT yarn/thermoset overwrap increased by over 200% compared to the bare Al ring. The quality of the wound CNT composites was also investigated using x-ray computed tomography.

  9. A Community of Composition Theorists and Researchers: Collaborative Research and Theory Building in an Advanced Composition Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Kevin

    An advanced composition curriculum was designed for a class of 20 juniors and seniors, and because of the constraints of a university grant with which it was associated, the majority of assignments had to be collaborative. The subject of investigation was composition. That is, the students were challenged to do what composition researchers and…

  10. Advanced composite fiber/metal pressure vessels for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolopoulos, Aleck

    1993-06-01

    Structural Composites Industries has developed, qualified, and delivered a number of high performance carbon epoxy overwrapped/seamless aluminum liner pressure vessels for use in military aircraft where low weight, low cost, high operating pressure and short lead time are the primary considerations. This paper describes product design, development, and qualification for a typical program. The vessel requirements included a munitions insensitivity criterion as evidenced by no fragmentation following impact by a .50 cal tumbling bullet. This was met by the development of a carbon-Spectra hybrid composite overwrap on a thin-walled seamless aluminum liner. The same manufacturing, inspection, and test processes that are used to produce lightweight, thin walled seamless aluminum lined carbon/epoxy overwrapped pressure vessels for satellite and other space applications were used to fabricate this vessel. This report focuses on the results of performance in the qualification testing.

  11. Atmosphere composition monitor for space station and advanced missions application

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Powell, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    Long-term human occupation of extraterrestrial locations may soon become a reality. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently completed the definition and preliminary design of the low earth orbit (LEO) space station. They are now currently moving into the detailed design and fabrication phase of this space station and are also beginning to analyze the requirements of several future missions that have been identified. These missions include, for example, Lunar and Mars sorties, outposts, bases, and settlements. A requirement of both the LEO space station and future missions are environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), which provide a comfortable environment for humans to live and work. The ECLSS consists of several major systems, including atmosphere revitalization system (ARS), atmosphere pressure and composition control system, temperature and humidity control system, water reclamation system, and waste management system. Each of these major systems is broken down into subsystems, assemblies, units, and instruments. Many requirements and design drivers are different for the ECLSS of the LEO space station and the identified advanced missions (e.g., longer mission duration). This paper discusses one of the ARS assemblies, the atmosphere composition monitor assembly (ACMA), being developed for the LEO space station and addresses differences that will exist for the ACMA of future missions.

  12. Hierarchical nonlinear behavior of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Hierarchical computational procedures are described to simulate the multiple scale thermal/mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via MMLT (Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures and accompanying computer codes. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as the entire creep span; MMLT can be used to concurrently tailor the fabrication process and the interphase layer for optimum performance such as minimum residual stresses; and HITCAN can be used to predict the structural behavior such as the deformed shape due to component fabrication. These codes constitute virtual portable desk-top test laboratories for characterizing HT-MMC laminates, tailoring the fabrication process, and qualifying structural components made from them.

  13. Composite Blade Structural Analyzer (COBSTRAN) demonstration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The input deck setup is described for a computer code, composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) which was developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades. This manual is intended for use in conjunction with the COBSTRAN user's manual. Seven demonstration problems are described with pre- and postprocessing input decks. Modeling of blades which are solid thru-the-thickness and also aircraft wing airfoils with internal spars is shown. Corresponding NASTRAN and databank input decks are also shown. Detail descriptions of each line of the pre- and post-processing decks is provided with reference to the Card Groups defined in the user's manual. A dictionary of all program variables and terms used in this manual may be found in Section 6 of the user's manual.

  14. Structural design criteria for filament-wound composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Jensen, D. W.; Claus, S. J.; Pai, S. P.; Hipp, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite cylinders, manufactured by filament winding, provide a cost effective solution to many present structural applications; however, the compressive performance of filament-wound cylinders is lower than comparable shells fabricated from unidirectional tape. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of this reduction in thin filament-wound cylinders by relating the manufacturing procedures to the quality of the cylinder and to its compressive performance. The experiments on cylinder buckling were complemented by eigenvalue buckling analysis using a detailed geometric model in a finite element analysis. The applicability of classical buckling analyses was also investigated as a design tool.

  15. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft. Phase 1: Engineering development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ary, A.; Axtell, C.; Fogg, L.; Jackson, A.; James, A. M.; Mosesian, B.; Vanderwier, J.; Vanhamersveld, J.

    1976-01-01

    The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes the front and rear spars. Various design options were evaluated to arrive at a configuration which would offer the highest potential for satisfying program objectives. The preferred configuration selected consists of a hat-stiffened cover with molded integrally stiffened spars, aluminum trussed composite ribs, and composite miniwich web ribs with integrally molded caps. Material screening tests were performed to select an advanced composite material system for the Advanced Composite Vertical Fin (ACFV) that would meet the program requirements from the standpoint of quality, reproducibility, and cost. Preliminary weight and cost analysis were made, targets established, and tracking plans developed. These include FAA certification, ancillary test program, quality control, and structural integrity control plans.

  16. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials provide well-known advantages for space and aeronautical applications in terms of strength and rigidity to weight ratios and other mechanical properties. As a consequence, their use has experienced a constant increase in the past decades and it is anticipated that this trend will be maintained in the near future. At the same time, being these materials relatively new compared to metals, and having failure characteristics completely different from them, their damage growth and their failure mechanisms are not as well understood in a predictive sense. For example, while in metals fracture produces "clean" cracks with their well defined analytically stress fields at the crack tip, composite fracture is a more complex phenomenon. Instead of a crack, we confront a "damage zone" that may include fiber breakage, fiber microbuckling, fiber pullout, matrix cracking, delamination, debonding or any combination of all these different mechanisms. These phenomena are prevalent in any failure process through an aircraft structure, whether one addresses a global failure such as the ripping of a fuselage or wing section, or whether one is concerned with the failure initiation near a thickness change at stringers or other reinforcement. Thus the topic that has been under consideration has wide application in any real structure and is considered an essential contribution to the predictive failure analysis capability for aircraft containing composite components. The heterogeneity and the anisotropy of composites are not only advantageous but essential characteristics, yet these same features provide complex stress fields, especially in the presence of geometrical discontinuities such as notches, holes or cutouts or structural elements such as stiffeners, stringers, etc. To properly address the interaction between a damage/crack front and a hole with a stringer it is imperative that the stress and deformation fields of the former be (sufficiently well) characterized

  17. The use of advanced materials in space structure applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. C. G.; Slachmuylders, E. J.

    The last decade has seen the Space applications of composite materials become almost commonplace in the construction of configurations requiring high stiffness and/or dimensional stability, particularly in the field of antennas. As experience has been accumulated, applications for load carrying structures utilizing the inherent high specific strength/stiffness of carbon fibres have become more frequent. Some typical examples of these and their design development criteria are reviewed. As these structures and the use of new plastic matrices emerge, considerable attention has to be given to establishing essential integrity control requirements from both safety and cost aspects. The advent of manned European space flight places greater emphasis on such requirements. Attention is given to developments in the fields of metallic structures with discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of their application. The design and development of hot structures, thermal protection systems and air-breathing engines for future launch vehicles necessitates the use of the emerging metal/matrix and other advanced materials. Some of their important features are outlined. Means of achieving such objectives by greater harmonization within Europe are emphasized. Typical examples of on-going activities to promote such collaboration are described.

  18. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high-performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single-cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament-wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S-glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessel structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all-titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized including data from current NASA-Lewis Research Center contractual and in-house programs.

  19. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  20. Structural response of fiber composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A fiber composite airfoil, typical for high-tip speed compressor applications, is subjected to load conditions anticipated to be encountered in such applications, and its structural response is theoretically investigated. The analysis method used consists of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors and coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, centrifugal, and combinations of these. The various responses investigated include root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. Also, the core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design (core plies not highly stressed) and appears to be sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for such an analysis, and to provide quantitative data of the various responses which can be helpful in designing such composite blades.

  1. Thermal inspection of composite honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  2. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  3. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  4. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  5. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  6. Underwater shock focusing by composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanxi; Eliasson, Veronica

    2011-11-01

    Underwater explosions are threats to the structural integrity of naval vessels. In particular, if a convergent section is present on the vessel, the shock wave can focus and produce extremely high pressures near the focal region. Based on previous research on converging shock waves, a logarithmic spiral duct is considered to be an efficient shape to focus shock waves onto the focal region. Here, underwater shock tests on logarithmic spiral-shaped structures made of plastic, metal and fiber composites are conducted. High-speed schlieren photography is used to visualize the shock waves. Simultaneously, ultrafast pressure readings are recorded by laboratory- made pressure sensors, which are able to measure pressures up to 10 GPa. Comparisons between the various types of surrounding materials will be presented. The results can explore the use of composite materials in future marine applications. Supported by ONR through a MURI grant number N00014-06-1-0730.

  7. Recent advances on polyoxometalate-based molecular and composite materials.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Fei; Tsunashima, Ryo

    2012-11-21

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are a subset of metal oxides with unique physical and chemical properties, which can be reliably modified through various techniques and methods to develop sophisticated materials and devices. In parallel with the large number of new crystal structures reported in the literature, the application of these POMs towards multifunctional materials has attracted considerable attention. This critical review summarizes recent progress on POM-based molecular and composite materials, and particularly highlights the emerging areas that are closely related to surface, electronic, energy, environment, life science, etc. (171 references). PMID:22850732

  8. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  9. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  10. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-02-27

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  11. Engineering plasmonic metal colloids through composition and structural design.

    PubMed

    Motl, N E; Smith, A F; DeSantis, C J; Skrabalak, S E

    2014-06-01

    The optical properties of metal nanomaterials are determined by a set of parameters that include composition, particle size and shape, overall architecture, and local environment. This Tutorial Review examines the influence of each of these factors on the localized surface plasmon resonance of colloidal metal nanoparticles. This examination is paralleled with a discussion of the advances which have enabled the synthesis of structurally defined metal nanomaterials, as these samples serve as the best platforms for elucidating the fundamental properties of plasmonic colloids. Based on the analysis of such samples, five guidelines are presented to aid the rational design and synthesis of new metal nanostructures for advanced applications in nanomedicine, energy, chemical sensing, and colloidal plasmonics in general.

  12. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 4: Full scale ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Dorwald, F.

    1982-01-01

    The ground tests conducted on the advanced composite vertical fin (ACVF) program are described. The design and fabrication of the test fixture and the transition structure, static test of Ground Test Article (GTA) No. 1, rework of GTA No. 2, and static, damage tolerance, fail-safe and residual strength tests of GTA No. 2 are described.

  13. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft, task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.; Fogg, L. D.; Stone, R. L.; Dunning, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    Structural design and maintainability criteria were established and used as a guideline for evaluating a variety of configurations and materials for each of the major subcomponents. From this array of subcomponent designs, several aileron assemblies were formulated and analyzed. The selected design is a multirib configuration with sheet skin covers mechanically fastened to channel section ribs and spars. Qualitative analysis of currently available composite material systems led to the selection of three candidate materials on which comparative structural tests were conducted to measure the effects of environment and impact damage on mechanical property retention. In addition, each system was evaluated for producibility characteristics. From these tests, Thornel 300/5208 unidirectional tape was selected for the front spar and covers, and Thornel 300 fabric/5208 was chosen for the ribs.

  14. Advanced methods of structural and trajectory analysis for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts in two areas: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of trajectory optimization. The majority of the effort was spent in the structural weight area. A draft of 'Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft', resulting from this research, is included as an appendix.

  15. Composite Load Spectra for Select Space Propulsion Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Hing W.; Newell, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Generic load models are described with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra (CLS) that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts. These generic (coupled) models combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients are then determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. The entire simulation process is included in a CLS computer code. Applications of the computer code to various components in conjunction with the PSAM (Probabilistic Structural Analysis Method) to perform probabilistic load evaluation and life prediction evaluations are also described to illustrate the effectiveness of the coupled model approach.

  16. NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshops. Volume 3: Aerodynamics and Structures Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Advanced rotorcraft technology and tilt rotor aircraft were discussed. Rotorcraft performance, acoustics, and vibrations were discussed, as was the use of composite materials in rotorcraft structures. Rotorcraft aerodynamics, specifically the aerodynamic phenomena of a rotating and the aerodynamics of fuselages, was discussed.

  17. Long discontinuous fiber composite structure: Forming and structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.; Santare, M. H.; Otoole, B. J.; Beaussart, A. J.; Deheer, D. C.; Okine, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several new approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising new approaches is the conversion of planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. In the present study, the authors have established a framework which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. The initial study focuses upon the establishment of micromechanics models for prediction of the effective anisotropic viscosities of the oriented fiber assembly in a viscous matrix. Next, the developed constitutive relation is employed through an analogy with incompressible elasticity to exercise the finite element technique for determination of local fiber orientation and laminate thickness after forming. Results are presented for the stretch bending of a curved beam from an arbitrary composite laminate and the bulging of a clamped sheet. Structural analyses are conducted to determine the effect of microstructure on the performance of curved beams manufactured from long discontinuous fiber composites. For the purposes of this study, several curved beams with ideal and non-ideal microstructures are compared for response under pure bending. Material parameters are determined from a separate microstructural analysis.

  18. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Wound Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, Raj; Taylor, Scott; Jackson, Kurt; Myers, George; Sharma, A.

    2002-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced composite materials in the wide range of applications including Space Structures is a great impetus to the development of smart materials. Incorporating these FBG sensors for monitoring the integrity of structures during their life cycle will provide valuable information about viability of the usage of such material. The use of these sensors by surface bonding or embedding in this composite will measure internal strain and temperature, and hence the integrity of the assembled engineering structures. This paper focuses on such a structure, called a composite wound pressure vessel. This vessel was fabricated from the composite material: TRH50 (a Mitsubishi carbon fiber with a 710-ksi tensile strength and a 37 Msi modulus) impregnated with an epoxy resin from NEWPORT composites (WDE-3D-1). This epoxy resin in water dispersed system without any solvents and it cures in the 240-310 degrees F range. This is a toughened resin system specifically designed for pressure applications. These materials are a natural fit for fiber sensors since the polyimide outer buffer coating of fiber can be integrated into the polymer matrix of the composite material with negligible residual stress. The tank was wound with two helical patterns and 4 hoop wraps. The order of winding is: two hoops, two helical and two hoops. The wall thickness of the composite should be about 80 mil or less. The tank should burst near 3,000 psi or less. We can measure the actual wall thickness by ultrasonic or we can burst the tank and measure the pieces. Figure 1 shows a cylinder fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composite material. The strain in different directions is measured with a surface bonded fiber Bragg gratings and with embedded fiber Bragg gratings as the cylinder is pressurized to burst pressures. Figure 2 shows the strain as a function of pressure of carbon-epoxy cylinder as it is pressurized with water. Strain is measured in different directions by multiple gratings

  19. Techniques for measurement of the thermal expansion of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques available to measure small thermal displacements in flat laminates and structural tubular elements of advanced composite materials are described. Emphasis is placed on laser interferometry and the laser interferometric dilatometer system used at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. Thermal expansion data are presented for graphite-fiber reinforced 6061 and 2024 aluminum laminates and for graphite fiber reinforced AZ91 C and QH21 A magnesium laminates before and after processing to minimize or eliminate thermal strain hysteresis. Data are also presented on the effects of reinforcement volume content on thermal expansion of silicon-carbide whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum.

  20. Advances in experimental mechanics for advanced aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Eddie W.

    1997-03-01

    The industrial requirement for higher efficiency, lean performance, airframe structures to form the basis of more cost effective Commercial Aircraft has encouraged developments in all aspects of aeronautical design and manufacture. Until recently the main emphasis has been in the area of computer and numerical analysis, however new developments in experimental mechanics are emerging as very powerful tools for use in the validation of numerical analyses and for primary stress analysis data. The developments described have been forced by economic drivers that address more efficient analysis techniques with respect to cost, specific weight and expended time for analysis.

  1. Structural complexity of a composite amyloid fibril

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Rigney, Mike; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular structure of amyloid fibrils and the mechanism of their formation are of substantial medical and biological importance, but present an ongoing experimental and computational challenge. An early high-resolution view of amyloid-like structure was obtained on amyloid-like crystals of a small fragment of the yeast prion protein Sup35p: the peptide GNNQQNY. As GNNQQNY also forms amyloid-like fibrils under similar conditions, it has been theorized that the crystal's structural features are shared by the fibrils. Here we apply magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR to examine the structure and dynamics of these fibrils. Previously multiple NMR signals were observed for such samples, seemingly consistent with the presence of polymorphic fibrils. Here we demonstrate that peptides with these three distinct conformations instead assemble together into composite protofilaments. Electron-microscopy (EM) of the ribbon-like fibrils indicates that these protofilaments combine in differing ways to form striations of variable widths, presenting another level of structural complexity. Structural and dynamical NMR data reveal the presence of highly restricted side chain conformations involved in interfaces between differently structured peptides, likely comprising interdigitated steric zippers. We outline molecular interfaces that are consistent with the observed EM and NMR data. The rigid and uniform structure of the GNNQQNY crystals is found to contrast distinctly with the more complex structural and dynamic nature of these “composite” amyloid fibrils. These results provide insight into the fibril-crystal distinction and also indicate a necessary caution with respect to the extrapolation of crystal structures to the study of fibril structure and formation. PMID:21766841

  2. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Sheet metal hydroforming of functional composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibis, M.; Griesheimer, S.; Salun, L.; Rausch, J.; Groche, P.

    2011-03-01

    This paper studies the formability of functional composite structures, consisting of a metal substrate, insulating plastic foils, flat copper conductors and printable conductive polymers. The aim is the production of smart components in a sheet metal hydroforming process. In addition to their mechanical properties, these components can also transfer energy and data. Conventional boundaries between mechanics and electronics will be relaxed expediently. The challenge of this study is the design of the forming process, so that all elements of the multi-layer composites will withstand the process conditions. In this context, an analytical method for estimating the formability of these smart components is presented. The main objectives are the definition of basic failure modes and the depiction of the process limits.

  4. Assembly induced delaminations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Bohlmann, R.; Wanthal, S.; Kautz, E.; Neri, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the development of delaminations around fastener holes in composite structures are presented. This type of delamination is known to occur in composite skins that are mechanically fastened to a poorly mating substructure. Results of an experimental study to determine the resistance of laminates to the initiation of assembly induced delaminations and the residual strength of assembly damaged coupons are presented for AS4/3501-6, IM7/8551-7A, and AS4/PEEK material systems. A survey of existing analytical models for predicting the residual strength and stability of delaminations is presented, and the development of a new model for predicting the initiation of delaminations around a fastener hole is outlined. The fastener hole damage initiation model utilizes a finite element based Fourier series solution, and is validated through comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  5. Imperfection Insensitivity Analyses of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that serve as failure initiators. For the tow-steered shells, their circumferential variation in axial stiffness may have suppressed this sensitivity to imperfections, leading to the agreement noted between tests and analyses. To investigate this further, a numerical investigation was performed in this study using geometric imperfections measured from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with measured imperfections that were then, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load were observed for the range of imperfections studied here, which suggests that the tow steering, and resulting circumferentially varying axial stiffness, may result in the test-analysis correlation observed for these shells.

  6. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are enabling materials for a number of demanding applications in aerospace, energy, and nuclear industries. In the aerospace systems, these materials are being considered for applications in hot sections of jet engines such as the combustor liner, vanes, nozzle components, nose cones, leading edges of reentry vehicles, and space propulsion components. Applications in the energy and environmental industries include radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, heat recuperators, gas and diesel particulate filters, and components for land based turbines for power generation. These materials are also being considered for use in the first wall and blanket components of fusion reactors. In the last few years, a number of CMC components have been developed and successfully tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. They include robust fabrication and manufacturing, assembly and integration, coatings, property modeling and life prediction, design codes and databases, repair and refurbishment, and cost. Fabrication of net and complex shape components with high density and tailorable matrix properties is quite expensive, and even then various desirable properties are not achievable. In this presentation, a number of examples of successful CMC component development and testing will be provided. In addition, critical need for robust manufacturing, joining and assembly technologies in successful implementation of these systems will be discussed.

  7. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Composites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is a broad-band scanner with four to six bands, depending on the model. The AVHRR senses in the visible, near-, middle-, and thermal- infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This sensor is carried on a series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), beginning with the Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS-N) in 1978. Since 1989, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has been mapping the vegetation condition of the United States and Alaska using satellite information from the AVHRR sensor. The vegetation condition composites, more commonly called greenness maps, are produced every week using the latest information on the growth and condition of the vegetation. One of the most important aspects of USGS greenness mapping is the historical archive of information dating back to 1989. This historical stretch of information has allowed the USGS to determine a 'normal' vegetation condition. As a result, it is possible to compare the current week's vegetation condition with normal vegetation conditions. An above normal condition could indicate wetter or warmer than normal conditions, while a below normal condition could indicate colder or dryer than normal conditions. The interpretation of departure from normal will depend on the season and geography of a region.

  8. Experimental Classical Flutter Reesults of a Composite Advanced Turboprop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehmed, O.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented that show the effects of blade pitch angle and number of blades on classical flutter of a composite advanced turboprop (propfan) model. An increase in the number of blades on the rotor or the blade pitch angle is destablizing which shows an aerodynamic coupling or cascade effect between blades. The flutter came in suddenly and all blades vibrated at the same frequency but at different amplitudes and with a common predominant phase angle between consecutive blades. This further indicates aerodynamic coupling between blades. The flutter frequency was between the first two blade normal modes, signifying an aerodynamic coupling between the normal modes. Flutter was observed at all blade pitch angles from small to large angles-of-attack of the blades. A strong blade response occurred, for four blades at the two-per-revolution (2P) frequency, when the rotor speed was near the crossing of the flutter mode frequency and the 2P order line. This is because the damping is low near the flutter condition and the interblade phase angle of the flutter mode and the 2P response are the same.

  9. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic composite nacelle. [for achieving reductions in community noise and operating expense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodall, R. G.; Painter, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual nacelle designs for wide-bodied and for advanced-technology transports were studied with the objective of achieving significant reductions in community noise with minimum penalties in airplane weight, cost, and in operating expense by the application of advanced composite materials to nacelle structure and sound suppression elements. Nacelle concepts using advanced liners, annular splitters, radial splitters, translating centerbody inlets, and mixed-flow nozzles were evaluated and a preferred concept selected. A preliminary design study of the selected concept, a mixed flow nacelle with extended inlet and no splitters, was conducted and the effects on noise, direct operating cost, and return on investment determined.

  10. Characterization of mechanical and thermal properties of advanced composite pultrusions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, J.G.; Roux, J.A.; Mantena, P.R.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Group at the University of Mississippi to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of pultruded advanced composite materials. Considerable progress has been made on characterizing the effects of pultrusion process variables on the structural/dynamic and thermal properties of a mono-fiber type graphite-epoxy composite material system. The effects of process parameters on the mechanical properties of a mono-fiber type fiberglass-epoxy were also investigated and correlated with the degree of cure using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies. The mechanical properties and the failure mechanisms of these hybrids were compared with those of the mono-fiber type glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pultruded composites. The static properties examined were flexural strength and modulus, short-beam shear strength and tensile strength. For the dynamic (modulus and damping) studies, the impulse frequency response technique was used for exciting the flat specimens into flexural, and the round specimens into torsional, modes of vibration using appropriately designed test fixtures. The results of these tests demonstrate the potential for the cost-effective production of stiff, light and well damped composite products having a number of practical applications. A three-dimensional numerical model which utilizes a fixed control volume based finite difference approach was also developed to predict the axial, radial and circumferential temperature and degree of cure profiles, which were found to be in close agreement with experimental results.

  11. Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composite Blade Damping Characteristics for Aerospace Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Harris, Donald L.; Ting, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    For advanced aerospace propulsion systems, development of ceramic matrix composite integrally-bladed turbine disk technology is attractive for a number of reasons. The high strength-to-weight ratio of ceramic composites helps to reduce engine weight and the one-piece construction of a blisk will result in fewer parts count, which should translate into reduced operational costs. One shortcoming with blisk construction, however, is that blisks may be prone to high cycle fatigue due to their structural response to high vibration environments. Use of ceramic composites is expected to provide some internal damping to reduce the vibratory stresses encountered due to unsteady flow loads through the bladed turbine regions. A goal of our research was to characterize the vibration viscous damping behavior of C/SiC composites. The vibration damping properties were measured and calculated. Damping appeared to decrease with an increase in the natural frequency. While the critical damping amount of approximately 2% is required for typical aerospace turbomachinery engines, the C/SiC damping at high frequencies was less than 0.2% from our study. The advanced high-performance aerospace propulsion systems almost certainly will require even more damping than what current vehicles require. A purpose of this paper is to review some work on C/SiC vibration damping by the authors for the NASA CMC turbine blisk development program and address an importance of the further investigation of the blade vibration damping characteristics on candidate CMC materials for the NASA s advanced aerospace turbomachinery engine systems.

  12. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  13. Development of a metal-clad advanced composite shear web design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced composite web concept was developed for potential application to the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust structure. The program consisted of design synthesis, analysis, detail design, element testing, and large scale component testing. A concept was sought that offered significant weight saving by the use of Boron/Epoxy (B/E) reinforced titanium plate structure. The desired concept was one that was practical and that utilized metal to efficiently improve structural reliability. The resulting development of a unique titanium-clad B/E shear web design concept is described. Three large scale components were fabricated and tested to demonstrate the performance of the concept: a titanium-clad plus or minus 45 deg B/E web laminate stiffened with vertical B/E reinforced aluminum stiffeners.

  14. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  15. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Aerospace Structures at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for transportation to orbit calls for new vehicles built with new materials technology. The goals of this new launch system development are to improve safety, dramatically reduce cost to orbit, and improve vehicle turn around time. Planned Space Shuttle upgrades include new reusable liquid propellant boosters to replace the solid propellant boosters. These boosters are to have wings and return to the launch site for a horizontal landing on an airport runway. New single and two stages to orbit concepts are being investigated. To reduce weight and improve performance composite materials are proposed for fuel and oxidizer tanks, fuel feedlines, valve bodies, aerostructures, turbomachinery components. For large composite structures new methods of fabrication are being proposed and developed. Containment of cryogenic fuel or oxidizer requires emphases on composite material densification and chemical compatibility. Ceramic matrix and fiber composites for hot rotating turbomachinery have been developed with new fabrication processes. The new requirements on the materials for launcher components are requiring development of new manufacturing and inspection methods. This talk will examine new and proposed manufacturing methods to fabricate the revolutionary components. New NDE methods under consideration include alternative X-ray methods, X-ray laminagraphy, advanced CT, Thermography, new ultrasonic methods, and imbedded sensors. The sizes, complexity, use environment, and contamination restrictions will challenge the inspection process. In flight self-diagnosis and rapid depot inspection are also goals of the NDE development.

  16. Advanced Composites: Mechanical Properties and Hardware Programs for Selected Resin Matrix Materials. [considering space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note presents typical mechanical properties tabulated from industrial and governmental agencies' test programs. All data are correlated to specific products and all of the best known products are presented. The data include six epoxies, eight polyimides and one polyquinoxaline matrix material. Bron and graphite are the fiber reinforcements. Included are forty-two summaries of advanced (resin matrix) composite programs in existence in the United States. It is concluded that the selection of appropriate matrices, the geometric manner in which the fibers are incorporated in the matrix and the durability of the bond between fiber and matrix establish the end properties of the composite material and the performance of the fabricated structure.

  17. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  18. Durability Characterization of Advanced Polymeric Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.

    2001-01-01

    The next generation of reusable launch vehicles will require technology development in several key areas. Of these key areas, the development of polymeric composite cryogenic fuel tanks promises to present one of the most difficult technical challenges. It is envisioned that a polymer matrix composite (PMC) tank would be a large shell structure capable of containing cryogenic fuels and carrying a range of structural loads. The criteria that will be imposed on such a design include reduced weight, conformal geometry, and impermeability. It is this last criterion, impermeability, that will provide the focus of this paper. The essence of the impermeability criterion is that the tank remains leak free throughout its design lifetime. To address this criterion, one of the first steps is to conduct a complete durability assessment of the PMC materials. At Langley Research Center, a durability assessment of promising new polyimide-based PMCs is underway. This durability program has focused on designing a set of critical laboratory experiments that will determine fundamental material properties under combined thermal-mechanical loading at cryogenic temperatures. The test program provides measurements of lamina and laminate properties, including strength, stiffness, and fracture toughness. The performance of the PMC materials is monitored as a function of exposure conditions and aging time. Residual properties after exposure are measured at cryogenic temperatures and provide quantitative values of residual strength and stiffness. Primary degradation mechanisms and the associated damage modes are measured with both destructive and nondestructive techniques. In addition to mechanical properties, a range of physical properties, such as weight, glass transition, and crack density, are measured and correlated with the test conditions. This paper will report on the progress of this research program and present critical results and illustrative examples of current findings.

  19. The composition and structure of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of planetary ring systems are summarized herein; emphasis is given to the available evidence on their compositions and to their dynamical attributes. Somewhat contaminated water ice makes up the vast expanse of Saturn's rings. Modified methane ice may comprise Uranus' rings while silicates are the likely material of the Jovian ring. Saturn's rings form an elaborate system whose characteristics are still being documented and whose nature is being unravelled following the Voyager flybys. Uranus' nine narrow bands display an intriguing dynamical structure thought to be caused by unseen shephard satellites. Jupiter's ring system is a mere wisp, probably derived as ejecta off hidden parent bodies.

  20. Composition, structure, and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Different dust components present in the interstellar medium (IM) such as amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and those IM components which are organic refractory grains and icy grain mantles are discussed as well as their relative importance. The physical properties of grain surface chemistry are discussed with attention given to the surface structure of materials, the adsorption energy and residence time of species on a grain surface, and the sticking probability. Consideration is also given to the contribution of grains to the gas-phase composition of molecular clouds.

  1. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

    1993-11-16

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic. 5 figures.

  2. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  3. Dynamic Probabilistic Instability of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally effective method is described to evaluate the non-deterministic dynamic instability (probabilistic dynamic buckling) of thin composite shells. The method is a judicious combination of available computer codes for finite element, composite mechanics and probabilistic structural analysis. The solution method is incrementally updated Lagrangian. It is illustrated by applying it to thin composite cylindrical shell subjected to dynamic loads. Both deterministic and probabilistic buckling loads are evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. A universal plot is obtained for the specific shell that can be used to approximate buckling loads for different load rates and different probability levels. Results from this plot show that the faster the rate, the higher the buckling load and the shorter the time. The lower the probability, the lower is the buckling load for a specific time. Probabilistic sensitivity results show that the ply thickness, the fiber volume ratio and the fiber longitudinal modulus, dynamic load and loading rate are the dominant uncertainties in that order.

  4. Structure and Composition of the Lunar Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Hawke, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Since the first return of lunar samples indicated that global differentiation of the Moon had occurred, numerous models of crustal structure have been proposed. With the completion of the first global reconnaissance mapping by Clementine and Lunar Prospector, we are now in position to re-evaluate crustal structure and composition at a global scale. Although this is a difficult and complex task, and one requiring significant study, some first-order results are apparent now and are quite telling. We here summarize our current view of crustal structure and identify some required knowledge to better understand the origin and evolution of the lunar crust. Wood et al. attempted to estimate the amount of plagioclase in the crust, based on the average elevation difference between mare and highlands and some simple assumptions about anorthosite and basalt as responsible for the principal lunar rock types. Later, more complex models emerged, involving layered crusts of feldspathic material over more basaltic material or a laterally variable crust, with Mg-suite plutons intruding a grossly anorthositic crust. Later models attempted to reconcile these contrasting styles by incorporating both features. In part, crustal structure was inferred by the envisioned mode of crustal formation. A decade-long debate on the reality of the lunar "magma ocean," stimulated by the provocative notion of Walker that the Moon never had a magma ocean, and the recognition that the anorthosites and Mg suite probably recorded different and unrelated magmatic events. Such a scenario leaves much about crustal structure an open question, but allows for both lateral and vertical heterogeneity, thus accommodating both principal crustal models. Global maps of Fe , Ti, and Th both confirm old ideas and create new problems. It is clear that vast areas of the lunar highlands are extremely low in Fe, consistent with a significant amount of anorthosite. Such a distribution supports the magma ocean. However

  5. Aeroelastic behavior of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.P.; Yuan, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new structural and aeroelastic model capable of representing the aeroelastic stability and response of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips is presented. Where it is understood that advanced geometry tips are blade tips having sweep, anhedral and taper in the outboard 10% segment of the blade. The blade is modeled by beam finite elements. A single element is used to represent the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion are derived using the Hamilton`s principle and are based on moderate deflection theory. Thus, the nonlinearities are of the geometric type. The important structural blade attributes captured by the model are arbitrary cross-sectional shape, general anisotropic material behavior, transverse shear and out-of-plane warping. The aerodynamic loads are based on quasi-steady Greenberg theory with reverse flow effects, using an implicit formulation. The nonlinear aeroelastic response of the blade is obtained from a fully coupled propulsive trim/aeroelastic response analysis. Aeroelastic stability is obtained from linearizing the equations of motion about the steady state response of the blade and using Floquet theory. Numerical results for the aeroelastic stability and response of a hingeless composite blade with two cell type cross section are presented, together with vibratory hub shears and moments. The influence of ply orientation and tip sweep is clearly illustrated by the results.

  6. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  7. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  8. Advanced Standing and Bridge Courses: Structures and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GlenMaye, Linnea F.; Lause, Timothy W.; Bolin, Brien L.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issue of advanced standing in MSW programs in light of the new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). Advanced standing structures of MSW programs were studied using a purposive sample consisting of 203 MSW program directors with a response rate of 28% (N=58). The results indicate that slightly more than 15%…

  9. Advanced Data Structure and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peuquet, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The current state of the art in specified areas of Geographic Information Systems GIS technology is examined. Study of the question of very large, efficient, heterogeneous spatial databases is required in order to explore the potential application of remotely sensed data for studying the long term habitability of the Earth. Research includes a review of spatial data structures and storage, development of operations required by GIS, and preparation of a testbed system to compare Vaster data structure with NASA's Topological Raster Structure.

  10. Supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube fuzzy fabric structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alresheedi, Bakheet Awad

    Supercapacitors used in conjunction with batteries offer a solution to energy storage and delivery problems in systems where high power output is required, such as in fully electric cars. This project aimed to enhance current supercapacitor technology by fabricating activated carbon on a substrate consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on a carbon fiber fabric (fuzzy fabric). The fuzzy surface of CNTs lowers electrical resistance and increases porosity, resulting in a flexible fabric with high specific capacitance. Experimental results confirm that the capacitance of activated carbon fabricated on the fuzzy fiber composite is significantly higher than when activated carbon is formed simply on a bare carbon fiber substrate, indicating the usefulness of CNTs in supercapacitor technology. The fabrication of the fuzzy fiber based carbon electrode was fairly complex. The processing steps included composite curing, stabilization, carbonization and activation. Ratios of the three basic ingredients for the supercapacitor (fiber, CNT and polymer matrix) were investigated through experimentation and Grey relational analysis. The aim of Grey relational analysis was to examine factors that affect the overall performance of the supercapacitor. It is based on finding relationships in both independent and interrelated data series (parameters). Using this approach, it was determined that the amount of CNTs on the fiber surface plays a major role in the capacitor properties. An increased amount of CNTs increases the surface area and electrical conductivity of the substrate, while also reducing the required time of activation. Technical advances in the field of Materials and Structures are usually focused on attaining superior performance while reducing weight and cost. To achieve such combinations, multi-functionality has become essential; namely, to reduce weight by imparting additional functions simultaneously to a single material. In this study, a structural composite with

  11. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  12. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  13. Aromatic/aliphatic diamine derivatives for advanced compositions and polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, Donovan M. (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel compositions of matter comprise certain derivatives of 9,9-dialkyl fluorene diamine (AFDA). The resultant compositions, whether compositions of matter or monomers that are subsequently incorporated into a polymer, are unique and useful in a variety of applications. Useful applications of AFDA-based material include heavy ion radiation shielding components and components of optical and electronic devices.

  14. Advances in Composite Reflectors: From X-Ray to Radio Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, S. J.; Abusafieh, A. A.; Mehle, G. V.; Sheikh, D. A.; Giles, D. C.

    2000-12-01

    In recent years, Composite Optics, Inc. (COI) has made significant advances in the use of graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) materials for astronomical instrument applications. The inherent low density, high stiffness, and thermal stability makes GFRC a natural candidate for many astronomy applications. In order to reap these inherent benefits in astronomical applications, basic research has focused on material and process improvement. This has been accompanied by the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype reflectors that cover a broad wavelength spectrum of astronomical interests. The results of, and applications for, these efforts are summarized in the following list. X-Ray Carrier Shell: Innovative composite process yields accuracy and moisture stability. Demonstrated by vacuum optical test of 6" Wolter-I shell. Applicable to Con-X, etc. Lightweight Mirror Substrate for Visible Astronomy: Composite/glass hybrid design. Areal density < 15 kg/m2. Demonstrated by cryo-optical test (to 35K) of 1.6m NMSD mirror. Applicable to NGST, etc. Polishable Composite Facesheet: Glass-like coating applied to composite. Polishable by conventional methods. Multiple six-inch substrates polished to 20 angstroms. Technology will enable future 5 kg/m2 visible to UV optics. 10 kg/m2 Submillimeter Reflector: Apertures to 5m possible with economical, all-composite mirror design, diffraction limited at 80 microns. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test (to 70K) of FIRST 2-meter prototype mirror. Applicable to FIRST and other IR astronomy. Large, Ultra-Stable Optical Support Structure: Uniform and near-zero CTE over broad dimensions. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test of 2-meter FIRST prototype. Applicable to NGST, SIM, LISSA. Ground Based Radio Telescope Reflector: Low-cost, accurate, stable, durable all-composite design for support structure & reflective surface. Demonstrated via fab & test of 3m adjustable and 5m static prototypes. Applicable to LMT, ALMA, etc. These

  15. Advances in structure-based vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the tremendous successes of current vaccines, infectious diseases still take a heavy toll on the global population, and that provides strong rationale for broadening our vaccine development repertoire. Structural vaccinology, in which protein structure information is utilized to design immunogens, has promise to provide new vaccines against traditionally difficult targets. Crystal structures of antigens containing one or more protection epitopes, especially when in complex with a protective antibody, are the launching point for immunogen design. Integrating structure and sequence information for families of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has recently enabled the creation of germline-targeting immunogens that bind and activate germline B-cells in order to initiate the elicitation of such antibodies. The contacts between antigen and neutralizing antibody define a structural epitope, and methods have been developed to transplant epitopes to scaffold proteins for structural stabilization, and to design minimized antigens that retain one or more key epitopes while eliminating other potentially distracting or unnecessary features. To develop vaccines that protect against antigenically variable pathogens, pioneering structure-based work demonstrated that multiple strain-specific epitopes could be engineered onto a single immunogen. We review these recent structural vaccinology efforts to engineer germline-targeting, epitope-specific, and/or broad coverage immunogens. PMID:23806515

  16. Advances in structure-based vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R

    2013-06-01

    Despite the tremendous successes of current vaccines, infectious diseases still take a heavy toll on the global population, and that provides strong rationale for broadening our vaccine development repertoire. Structural vaccinology, in which protein structure information is utilized to design immunogens, has promise to provide new vaccines against traditionally difficult targets. Crystal structures of antigens containing one or more protection epitopes, especially when in complex with a protective antibody, are the launching point for immunogen design. Integrating structure and sequence information for families of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has recently enabled the creation of germline-targeting immunogens that bind and activate germline B-cells in order to initiate the elicitation of such antibodies. The contacts between antigen and neutralizing antibody define a structural epitope, and methods have been developed to transplant epitopes to scaffold proteins for structural stabilization, and to design minimized antigens that retain one or more key epitopes while eliminating other potentially distracting or unnecessary features. To develop vaccines that protect against antigenically variable pathogens, pioneering structure-based work demonstrated that multiple strain-specific epitopes could be engineered onto a single immunogen. We review these recent structural vaccinology efforts to engineer germline-targeting, epitope-specific, and/or broad coverage immunogens.

  17. Advanced Structural and Inflatable Hybrid Spacecraft Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); delaFuente, Horacio M. (Inventor); Edeen, Gregg A. (Inventor); Kennedy, Kriss J. (Inventor); Lester, James D. (Inventor); Gupta, Shalini (Inventor); Hess, Linda F. (Inventor); Lin, Chin H. (Inventor); Malecki, Richard H. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An inflatable module comprising a structural core and an inflatable shell, wherein the inflatable shell is sealingly attached to the structural core. In its launch configuration, the wall thickness of the inflatable shell is collapsed by vacuum. Also in this configuration, the inflatable shell is collapsed and efficiently folded around the structural core. Upon deployment, the wall thickness of the inflatable shell is inflated; whereby the inflatable shell itself, is thereby inflated around the structural core, defining therein a large enclosed volume. A plurality of removable shelves are arranged interior to the structural core in the launch configuration. The structural core also includes at least one longeron that, in conjunction with the shelves, primarily constitute the rigid, strong, and lightweight load-bearing structure of the module during launch. The removable shelves are detachable from their arrangement in the launch configuration so that, when the module is in its deployed configuration and launch loads no longer exist, the shelves can be rearranged to provide a module interior arrangement suitable for human habitation and work. In the preferred embodiment, to provide efficiency in structural load paths and attachments, the shape of the inflatable shell is a cylinder with semi-toroidal ends.

  18. Advanced Woven SiC/SiC Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2007-01-01

    The temperature, stress, and environmental conditions of many gas turbine, hypersonic, and even nuclear applications make the use of woven SiC/SiC composites an attractive enabling material system. The development in SiC/SiC composites over the past few years has resulted in significant advances in high temperature performance so that now these materials are being pursued for several turbine airfoil and reusable hypersonic applications. The keys to maximizing stress capability and maximizing temperature capability will be outlined for SiC/SiC. These include the type of SiC fiber, the fiber-architecture, and the matrix processing approach which leads to a variety of matrix compositions and structure. It will also be shown that a range of mechanical, thermal, and permeability properties can be attained and tailored depending on the needs of an application. Finally, some of the remaining challenges will be discussed in order for the use of these composite systems to be fully realized.

  19. Development of a new class of satellites: a composite lightweight affordable spacecraft structure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.C.; Parietti, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has successfully designed and tested a Composite Lightweight Affordable Structure (CLASS). The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. The development of this low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORT{acute E}) satellite mission will make a considerable contribution to the advanced spacecraft community. A common practice for constructing small spacecraft structures is to use an all-aluminum spacecraft bus. Compared to a composite structure, this reduces the payload capacity significantly; however, the cost of the aluminum structure has historically been lower than one of that uses lightweight components. LANL mission requirements dictate the need for a long term solution that substantially increased the ratio of payload to structural mass while maintaining a low-risk low-cost approach. LANL intends to use the concept developed for FORT{acute E} on future missions requiring similar enhanced payload capacities. 1 fig.

  20. Advances in structure elucidation of small molecules using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The structural elucidation of small molecules using mass spectrometry plays an important role in modern life sciences and bioanalytical approaches. This review covers different soft and hard ionization techniques and figures of merit for modern mass spectrometers, such as mass resolving power, mass accuracy, isotopic abundance accuracy, accurate mass multiple-stage MS(n) capability, as well as hybrid mass spectrometric and orthogonal chromatographic approaches. The latter part discusses mass spectral data handling strategies, which includes background and noise subtraction, adduct formation and detection, charge state determination, accurate mass measurements, elemental composition determinations, and complex data-dependent setups with ion maps and ion trees. The importance of mass spectral library search algorithms for tandem mass spectra and multiple-stage MS(n) mass spectra as well as mass spectral tree libraries that combine multiple-stage mass spectra are outlined. The successive chapter discusses mass spectral fragmentation pathways, biotransformation reactions and drug metabolism studies, the mass spectral simulation and generation of in silico mass spectra, expert systems for mass spectral interpretation, and the use of computational chemistry to explain gas-phase phenomena. A single chapter discusses data handling for hyphenated approaches including mass spectral deconvolution for clean mass spectra, cheminformatics approaches and structure retention relationships, and retention index predictions for gas and liquid chromatography. The last section reviews the current state of electronic data sharing of mass spectra and discusses the importance of software development for the advancement of structure elucidation of small molecules. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12566-010-0015-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21289855

  1. Probabilistic Assessment of Fracture Progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon; Mauget, Bertrand; Huang, Dade; Addi, Frank

    1999-01-01

    This report describes methods and corresponding computer codes that are used to evaluate progressive damage and fracture and to perform probabilistic assessment in built-up composite structures. Structural response is assessed probabilistically, during progressive fracture. The effects of design variable uncertainties on structural fracture progression are quantified. The fast probability integrator (FPI) is used to assess the response scatter in the composite structure at damage initiation. The sensitivity of the damage response to design variables is computed. The methods are general purpose and are applicable to stitched and unstitched composites in all types of structures and fracture processes starting from damage initiation to unstable propagation and to global structure collapse. The methods are demonstrated for a polymer matrix composite stiffened panel subjected to pressure. The results indicated that composite constituent properties, fabrication parameters, and respective uncertainties have a significant effect on structural durability and reliability. Design implications with regard to damage progression, damage tolerance, and reliability of composite structures are examined.

  2. Advanced composites - An assessment of the future. [for use in aerospace technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    An assessment concerning the possibilities of a use of advanced composites in aerospace and space technology identified a lack of confidence and high cost as the major factors inhibiting composite applications. Attention is given to the present employment of composites and plans for its future use in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Various programs conducted by NASA are concerned with the development of a technological base for the extended use of advanced composites in aerospace and space applications. A future commercial transport is considered in which virtually the entire airframe could be of advanced composites. The attitude of aircraft manufacturers, engine manufacturers, airlines, spacecraft users, and material suppliers with regard to an employment of composites is also examined.

  3. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  4. MoSi2-Base Structural Composite Passed Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    1999-01-01

    The intermetallic compound molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) is an attractive high-temperature structural material for advanced engine applications. It has excellent oxidation resistance, a high melting point, relatively low density, and high thermal conductivity; and it is easily machined. Past research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has resulted in the development of a hybrid composite consisting of a MoSi2 matrix reinforced with silicon nitride (Si3N4) particulate and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. This composite has demonstrated attractive strength, toughness, thermal fatigue, and oxidation resistance, including resistance to "pest" oxidation. These properties attracted the interest of the Office of Naval Research and Pratt & Whitney, and a joint NASA/Navy/Pratt & Whitney effort was developed to continue to mature the MoSi2 composite technology. A turbine blade outer air seal, which was part of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) program, was chosen as a first component on which to focus.

  5. Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT). Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the theories in the Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT) computer program, which was developed to perform numerical optimizations on highly swept propfan blades. The optimization procedure seeks to minimize an objective function, defined as either direct operating cost or aeroelastic differences between a blade and its scaled model, by tuning internal and external geometry variables that must satisfy realistic blade design constraints. The STAT analyses include an aerodynamic efficiency evaluation, a finite element stress and vibration analysis, an acoustic analysis, a flutter analysis, and a once-per-revolution (1-p) forced response life prediction capability. The STAT constraints include blade stresses, blade resonances, flutter, tip displacements, and a 1-P forced response life fraction. The STAT variables include all blade internal and external geometry parameters needed to define a composite material blade. The STAT objective function is dependent upon a blade baseline definition which the user supplies to describe a current blade design for cost optimization or for the tailoring of an aeroelastic scale model.

  6. On The Composition and Structure of Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda; Fu, R. R.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing evidence exists for partial differentiation in planetesimals in the early solar system and, by extension, for the existence of partially differentiated asteroids today. Remanent magnetism in angrites, meteorites from Vesta, and the Allende CV chondrite indicates that their parent bodies had core dynamos, requiring internal melting and core formation. Ceres, Pallas, and Lutetia have densities and moments of inertia consistent with internal differentiation. Lutetia also has a largely intact chondritic surface overlying a possibly differentiated interior. The hypothesis of a partially differentiated body, with a primitive lid overlying a differentiated interior, relies on the physics and chemistry that preserves the lid and is the topic of this abstract. Some of the least constrained but most important processes are release and transport of hydrous fluids, rise and eruption of silicate magma, and survival of any conductive lid. Here we will present detailed calculations of melt and crustal densities, taking into account the role of volatile release and time-dependent porosity to constrain the eruption or suppression of rising magmas in the primitive lid of a heating, internally differentiating body. We will also discuss the mechanical disruption of the primitive crust due to impacts and viscous traction from an underlying convective layer. Together, these investigations constrain the final composition and structure of the conductive lid of the planetesimal, which govern the body's long-term thermal evolution and hold implications for the capacity of planetesimals to deliver volatiles to growing planets early in solar system formation. Derived stratigraphies of planetesimal crusts help to identify the origin of meteorite groups and to evaluate the plausibility of shared parent bodies amongst distinct meteorites classes. Finally, our work further elucidates the relationship between asteroid surface compositions and interior structure, thereby informing the

  7. Study of joint designing on composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazushi, Haruna

    In this paper, strength design techniques of CFRP mechanical joints and adhesively bonded joints were examined. Remarkable stress concentration generates at the mechanical hole edge and the adhesive edge, therefore an unskillful design of joints often causes a reduction in the strength of composite structures. In mechanical joints, a study on predicting the joint strength has been performed, but bearing failure that is most important failure mode for designing joints can not be predicted. So in this paper, the strength prediction method in consideration with bearing failure was examined. On the other hand, the criterion using the intensity of stress singularity was suggested in adhesive joints, but it was clarified in this paper, that this method can not be applied the prediction of the final failure strength. So the critical stress distribution of single-lap adhesive bonded carbon/epoxy joints was examined to obtain the failure criterion of the final failure. Moreover the simulation method for an internal stress generated by cure shrinkage of adhesive was also examined. In the proposed method for mechanical joint, 2-parameter criterion, that is combined the characteristic length with the Yamada-Sun criterion, was applied and the characteristic length for compression was determined from "bearing failure test" that was newly conceived to take bearing failure into consideration. In case of adhesive joints, it was thought that 2-parameter criterion was effective. So the prediction method using 2-parameter criterion was applied to other adhesive joints. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results in both mechanical and adhesive joints. And it was cleared that an internal stress could be simulated by the proposed method. Moreover, in mechanical joints, the most suitable stacking sequence, the reduction technique of interlaminar stress, and the elevation of joint strength by application of high toughness matrix were also shown. Consequently

  8. Advances in high-resolution imaging – techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques. PMID:22685332

  9. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  10. Advanced beaded and tubular structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrove, M. D.; Greene, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program to develop lightweight beaded and tubular structural panels is described. Applications include external surfaces, where aerodynamically acceptable, and primary structure protected by heat shields. The design configurations were optimized and selected with a computer code which iterates geometric parameters to satisfy strength, stability, and weight constraints. Methods of fabricating these configurations are discussed. Nondestructive testing produced extensive combined compression, shear, and bending test data on local buckling specimens and large panels. The optimized design concepts offer 25 to 30% weight savings compared to conventional stiffened sheet construction.

  11. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, supported by a variety of materials development programs, NASA Glenn Research Center has significantly increased the thermostructural capability of SiC/SiC composite materials for high-temperature aerospace applications. These state-of-the-art advances have occurred in every key constituent of the composite: fiber, fiber coating, matrix, and environmental barrier coating, as well as processes for forming the fiber architectures needed for complex-shaped components such as turbine vanes for gas turbine engines. This presentation will briefly elaborate on the nature of these advances in terms of performance data and underlying mechanisms. Based on a list of first-order property goals for typical high-temperature applications, key data from a variety of laboratory tests are presented which demonstrate that the NASA-developed constituent materials and processes do indeed result in SiC/SiC systems with the desired thermal and structural capabilities. Remaining process and microstructural issues for further property enhancement are discussed, as well as on-going approaches at NASA to solve these issues. NASA efforts to develop physics-based property models that can be used not only for component design and life modeling, but also for constituent material and process improvement will also be discussed.

  12. Constraints on Composition, Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Gianluca; Bonadiman, Costanza; Aulbach, Sonja; Schutt, Derek

    2015-05-01

    The idea for this special issue was triggered at the Goldschmidt Conference held in Florence (August 25-30, 2013), where we convened a session titled "Integrated Geophysical-Geochemical Constraints on Composition and Structure of the Lithosphere". The invitation to contribute was extended not only to the session participants but also to a wider spectrum of colleagues working on related topics. Consequently, a diverse group of Earth scientists encompassing geophysicists, geodynamicists, geochemists and petrologists contributed to this Volume, providing a comprehensive overview on the nature and evolution of lithospheric mantle by combining studies that exploit different types of data and interpretative approaches. The integration of geochemical and geodynamic datasets and their interpretation represents the state of the art in our knowledge of the lithosphere and beyond, and could serve as a blueprint for future strategies in concept and methodology to advance our knowledge of this and other terrestrial reservoirs.

  13. Advanced glucose biosensing and nano-composite research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uba, Humphreys Douglas I.

    The fascinating and enhanced properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been of intense interest since their discovery. This is primarily due to their exceptional mechanical , electrical, and thermal properties , as well as their many and varied applications in modern industries such as in fuel cells, sensors, reinforced composites, electromagnetic interference shielding applications, actuators and fabrication of sophisticated nanostructures. During the production of CNTs, there are associated impurities such as metal nanoparticle and carbonaceous impurities. There are different types of CNTs such as single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), double-walled nanotubes (DWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs). In this study, XD-grade CNTs (XD) was used. XD is a mixture of SWNTs, DWNTs and MWNTs. The focus of this study was primarily geared toward the purification and application of CNTs. Two generally accepted cycles of purification were followed, purification under oxygen environment and purification under oxygen/argon mixture environment. XD was purified to different extents by oxidation and acid wash. The raw and purified CNTs were compounded into Epikote 862 and Epikure W epoxy resin to prepare composite materials and also in the biosensor studies. The CNTs and composite materials were characterized by means of thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transimssion electron microscopy (TEM). It was discovered that, excessive purification would not lead to further removal of metal residues; instead, it could result in disruption of the structure and property of CNTs. The use of CNTs as fillers was found to hinder the epoxy curing in general, and the removal of metal impurities seemed to worsen the situation. This would imply that the metal residue might catalyze the epoxy curing to a certain degree while the increased viscosity should be the primary reason for the slowed curing. An electrochemical

  14. Characterization and manufacture of braided composites for large commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Willden, Kurtis

    1992-01-01

    Braided composite materials has been recognized as a potential cost effective material form for fuselage structural elements. Consequently, there is a strong need for more knowledge in the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of textile structural composites. Advance braided composite technology is advanced towards applications to a large commercial transport fuselage. The mechanics are summarized of materials and manufacturing demonstration results which were obtained in order to acquire an understanding of how braided composites can be applied to a commercial fuselage. Textile composites consisting of 2-D, 2-D triaxial, and 3-D braid patterns with thermoplastic and two resin transfer molding resin systems were studied. The structural performance of braided composites was evaluated through an extensive mechanical test program. Analytical methods were also developed and applied to predict the following: internal fiber architecture; stiffness; fiber stresses; failure mechanisms; notch effects; and the history of failure of the braided composite specimens. The applicability of braided composites to a commercial transport fuselage was further assessed through a manufacturing demonstration.

  15. Composite fiber structures for catalysts and electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrion, Christopher J.; Cahela, Donald R.; Ahn, Soonho; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently envisioned a process wherein fibers of various metals in the 0.5 to 15 micron diameter range are slurried in concert with cellulose fibers and various other materials in the form of particulates and/or fibers. The resulting slurry is cast via a wet-lay process into a sheet and dried to produce a free-standing sheet of 'composite paper.' When the 'preform' sheet is sintered in hydrogen, the bulk of the cellulose is removed with the secondary fibers and/or particulates being entrapped by the sinter-locked network provided by the metal fibers. The resulting material is unique, in that it allows the intimate contacting and combination of heretofore mutually exclusive materials and properties. Moreover, due to the ease of paper manufacture and processing, the resulting materials are relatively inexpensive and can be fabricated into a wide range of three-dimensional structures. Also, because cellulose is both a binder and a pore-former, structures combining high levels of active surface area and high void volume (i.e., low pressure drop) can be prepared as freestanding flow through monoliths.

  16. Advanced SiC composites for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Schwarz, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    This is a short review of the motivation for and progress in the development of ceramic matrix composites for fusion. Chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide (SiC) composites have been fabricated from continuous fibers of either SiC or graphite and tested for strength and thermal conductivity. Of significance is the the Hi-Nicalon{trademark} SiC based fiber composite has superior unirradiated properties as compared to the standard Nicalon grade. Based on previous results on the stability of the Hi-Nicalon fiber, this system should prove more resistant to neutron irradiation. A graphite fiber composite has been fabricated with very good mechnical properties and thermal conductivity an order of magnitude higher than typical SiC/SiC composites.

  17. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, plus or minus 60 deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  18. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, +/-60deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  19. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, D.N. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Merkle, K.L. )

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l brace}222{r brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert bar}O{vert bar}Mg{hor ellipsis} and not Cu{vert bar}Mg{vert bar}O{hor ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l brace}111{r brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  20. A bioinspired micro-composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li

    2005-11-01

    This thesis involves the design, fabrication and mechanical testing of a bioinspired composite structure with characteristic dimensions of the order of tens of microns. The particular microarchitecture, designed and fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, involves two distinct length scales and represents a first attempt at mimicking the crossed-lamellar microstructure of the shell of the Giant Queen Conch Strombus gigas , which contains features the dimensions of which span five distinct length scales. After giving a review of the mechanical properties of mollusks, the detailed design of the microstructure, which approximates the crossed-lamellar arrangement of Strombus gigas, is presented. Fabrication of the microstructure using multi-microfabrication methods is conducted in terms of the designed fabrication flow. The problems encountered during the processes are discussed. The measurements of the flexural strength and toughening of the fabricated microstructure are conducted using a commercially available nanoindenter. Testing results are discussed and conclusions about the mechanical behaviors of the microstructure are drawn to summarize the achievement of this thesis. Finally, future work is outlined to point out the possible directions for improving the mechanical performance of the bioinspired composite. In parallel with my thesis research, I have developed a theoretical model for the experimentally observed cyclic loading-induced strengthening in MEMS polycrystalline silicon. The model relies on atomistic calculations that predict plastic-like behavior of amorphous silicon, which depending on initial density, is associated with dilatancy or compaction. The amorphous silicon is approximated as a Drucker-Prager plastic material, whose parameters are chosen to match the predictions of the atomistic calculations. The constitutive model is used to simulate the mechanical response to cyclic loads of notched polysilicon MEMS specimens

  1. Advanced shear-lag model applicable to discontinuous fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, H.; Chou, T.W.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis for predicting the stress distribution in unidirectional discontinuous fiber composites has been developed and is reported herein. Although the basic approach is based upon the shear-lag analysis, the load transfer at fiber ends is taken into consideration. This consideration becomes important if the bonding between the fiber and matrix at the fiber end is perfect such as the cases often observed in metal matrix composites, as well as during the early stage of loading of polymeric matrix composites. The present analysis includes the ordinary shear-lag analysis as a special case. 28 references.

  2. Advanced composites: Environmental effects on selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects that expected space flight environment has upon the mechanical properties of epoxy and polyimide matrix composites were analyzed. Environmental phenomena covered water immersion, high temperature aging, humidity, lightning strike, galvanic action, electromagnetic interference, thermal shock, rain and sand erosion, and thermal/vacuum outgassing. The technology state-of-the-art for graphite and boron reinforced epoxy and polyimide matrix materials is summarized to determine the relative merit of using composites in the space shuttle program. Resin matrix composites generally are affected to some degree by natural environmental phenomena with polyimide resin matrix materials less affected than epoxies.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Advanced Materials for Damage Prediction and Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Luke

    Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites, are increasingly being used in critical and demanding applications, challenging the current damage prediction, detection, and quantification methodologies. Multiscale computational models offer key advantages over traditional analysis techniques and can provide the necessary capabilities for the development of a comprehensive virtual structural health monitoring (SHM) framework. Virtual SHM has the potential to drastically improve the design and analysis of aerospace components through coupling the complementary capabilities of models able to predict the initiation and propagation of damage under a wide range of loading and environmental scenarios, simulate interrogation methods for damage detection and quantification, and assess the health of a structure. A major component of the virtual SHM framework involves having micromechanics-based multiscale composite models that can provide the elastic, inelastic, and damage behavior of composite material systems under mechanical and thermal loading conditions and in the presence of microstructural complexity and variability. Quantification of the role geometric and architectural variability in the composite microstructure plays in the local and global composite behavior is essential to the development of appropriate scale-dependent unit cells and boundary conditions for the multiscale model. Once the composite behavior is predicted and variability effects assessed, wave-based SHM simulation models serve to provide knowledge on the probability of detection and characterization accuracy of damage present in the composite. The research presented in this dissertation provides the foundation for a comprehensive SHM framework for advanced aerospace materials. The developed models enhance the prediction of damage formation as a result of ceramic matrix composite processing, improve the understanding of the effects of architectural and

  4. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    The key to improved helicopter gas turbine engine performance lies in the development of advanced materials and advanced structural and design concepts. The modification of the low temperature components of helicopter engines (such as the inlet particle separator), the introduction of composites for use in the engine front frame, the development of advanced materials with increased use-temperature capability for the engine hot section, can result in improved performance and/or decreased engine maintenance cost. A major emphasis in helicopter engine design is the ability to design to meet a required lifetime. This, in turn, requires that the interrelated aspects of higher operating temperatures and pressures, cooling concepts, and environmental protection schemes be integrated into component design. The major material advances, coatings, and design life-prediction techniques pertinent to helicopter engines are reviewed; the current state-of-the-art is identified; and when appropriate, progress, problems, and future directions are assessed.

  5. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Robert E.; Eberle, Cliff C.; Pastore, Christopher M.; Sudbury, Thomas Z.; Xiong, Fue; Hartman, David

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  6. Structural Durability of Damaged Metallic Panel Repaired with Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability/damage tolerance characteristics of an aluminum tension specimen possessing a short crack and repaired by applying a fiber composite surface patch is investigated via computational simulation. The composite patch is made of graphite/epoxy plies with various layups. An integrated computer code that accounts for all possible failure modes is utilized for the simulation of combined fiber-composite/aluminum structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the structural degradation stages due to tensile loading and illustrate the use of computational simulation for the investigation of a composite patch repaired cracked metallic panel.

  7. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0/ +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code, CODSTRAN, was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  8. T/BEST: Technology Benefit Estimator for Composites and Applications to Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos

    1997-01-01

    Progress in the field of aerospace propulsion has heightened the need to combine advanced technologies. These benefits will provide guidelines for identifying and prioritizing high-payoff research areas, will help manage research with limited resources, and will show the link between advanced and basic concepts. An effort was undertaken at the NASA Lewis Research Center to develop a formal computational method, T/BEST (Technology Benefit Estimator), to assess advanced aerospace technologies, such as fibrous composites, and credibly communicate the benefits of research. Fibrous composites are ideal for structural applications such as high-performance aircraft engine blades where high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios are required. These factors - along with the flexibility to select the composite system and layup, and to favorably orient fiber directions - reduce the displacements and stresses caused by large rotational speeds in aircraft engines.

  9. Recent developments of advanced structures for space optics at Astrium, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas; Wulz, Georg; Scheulen, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical division of EADS Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen Germany, the former Dornier Satellitensystem GmbH is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of three different advanced dimensionally stable composite and ceramic material structures for satellite borne optics: -CFRP Camera Structure -Planck Telescope Reflectors -NIRSpec Optical Bench Breadboard for James Web Space Telescope The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  10. ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi

    2012-02-16

    ). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relationships obtained from testing of the blade with baseline neat material were compared to the ones from analytical simulation using neat resin and using silica nanoparticles in the resin. Multi-scale PFA results for the neat material construction matched closely those from test for both load displacement and location and type of damage and failure. AlphaSTAR demonstrated that wind blade structures made from advanced composite materials can be certified with multi-scale progressive failure analysis by following building block verification approach.

  11. Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

  12. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    SciTech Connect

    Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Allamandola, L.J.

    1986-09-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase.

  13. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1986-01-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase.

  14. Deformation and Damage Studies for Advanced Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advancements made in understanding deformation and damage of advanced structural materials have enabled the development of new technologies including the attainment of a nationally significant NASA Level 1 Milestone and the provision of expertise to the Shuttle Return to Flight effort. During this collaborative agreement multiple theoretical and experimental research programs, facilitating safe durable high temperature structures using advanced materials, have been conceived, planned, executed. Over 26 publications, independent assessments of structures and materials in hostile environments, were published within this agreement. This attainment has been recognized by 2002 Space Flight Awareness Team Award, 2004 NASA Group Achievement Award and 2003 and 2004 OAI Service Awards. Accomplishments in the individual research efforts are described as follows.

  15. Selected NASA research in composite Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of the application of composite materials to aircraft structures are considered. Failure prediction techniques, buckling and postbuckling research, laminate fatigue analysis, damage tolerance, high temperature resin matrix composites and electrical hazards of carbon fiber composites are among the topics discussed.

  16. Compositional structure of the asteroid belt.

    PubMed

    Gradie, J; Tedesco, E

    1982-06-25

    The distribution of compositional types among the asteroids is found to vary systematically with heliocentric distance. Seven distinct peaks in the relative proportion of the compositional types E, R, S, M, F, C, P, and D are found from 1.8 to 5.2 astronomical units. The inferred composition of the asteroids in each semimajor axis region is consistent with the theory that the asteroids accreted from the solar nebula at or near their present locations.

  17. Composite Interstage Structural Concept Down Select Process and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Thoma, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Technologies (ACT) project evaluated several composite construction options for the Ares V Interstage to support the Constellation Program's goal of reducing the mass of vehicle dry structures. In Phase 1 of the project, eight candidate construction concepts were evaluated for the Ares V Interstage design. Trade studies were performed using finite element analyses to determine weight estimates for the construction concepts. An evaluation process was then used to down select the construction concepts down to two concepts for further consideration in Phase 2 of the project. In Phase 2 of the project, additional trade studies were performed using detailed finite element analyses of the Interstage and a final down select process was used to choose the recommended Interstage construction concept. The results of the study showed that a honeycomb sandwich design was the most favorable Interstage construction concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost. Details of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trade studies and down select process with final results are presented in the paper.

  18. Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in the Design and Manufacturing of Large Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing of large component structures, including details on the use of continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) in commercial and military aircraft and in space launch vehicles. Project risk mitigation plans must include a building-block test approach to structural design development, manufacturing process scale-up development tests, and pre-flight ground tests to verify structural integrity. The potential benefits of composite structures justifies NASA's investment in developing the technology. Advanced composite structures technology is enabling to virtually every Aero-Space Technology Enterprise Goal.

  19. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concept are summarized.

  20. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concepts are summarized.

  1. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João.; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario.

    2015-05-01

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  2. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  3. Characterization and manufacture of braided composites for large commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Willden, Kurtis

    1992-01-01

    Braided composite materials, one of the advanced material forms which is under investigation in Boeing's ATCAS program, have been recognized as a potential cost-effective material form for fuselage structural elements. Consequently, there is a strong need for more knowledge in the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of textile structural composites. The overall objective of this work is to advance braided composite technology towards applications to a large commercial transport fuselage. This paper summarizes the mechanics of materials and manufacturing demonstration results which have been obtained in order to acquire an understanding of how braided composites can be applied to a commercial fuselage. Textile composites consisting of 1D, 2D triaxial, and 3D braid patterns with thermoplastic and two RTM resin systems were investigated. The structural performance of braided composites was evaluated through an extensive mechanical test program. Analytical methods were also developed and applied to predict the following: internal fiber architectures, stiffnesses, fiber stresses, failure mechanisms, notch effects, and the entire history of failure of the braided composites specimens. The applicability of braided composites to a commercial transport fuselage was further assessed through a manufacturing demonstration. Three foot fuselage circumferential hoop frames were manufactured to demonstrate the feasibility of consistently producing high quality braided/RTM composite primary structures. The manufacturing issues (tooling requirements, processing requirements, and process/quality control) addressed during the demonstration are summarized. The manufacturing demonstration in conjunction with the mechanical test results and developed analytical methods increased the confidence in the ATCAS approach to the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of braided composites.

  4. Investigation of fatigue strength of multilayer advanced fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, H. R.; Kozik, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical characterization of a multilayer fiber composite plate (without hole) was accomplished for both static and dynamic loading conditions using the finite difference technique. Thornel 300/5208 composites with and without holes were subjected to static and tensile fatigue testing. Five (5) fiber orientations were submitted to test. Tensile fatigue testing also included three (3) loading conditions and two (2) frequencies. The low-cycle test specimens demonstrated a shorter tensile fatigue life than the high-cycle test specimens. Failure surfaces demonstrated effect of testing conditions. Secondary failure mechanisms, such as: delamination, fiber breakage, and edge fiber delamination were present. Longitudinal delamination between plies also occurred in these specimens.

  5. Summary of recent design studies of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, H. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of recent NASA-sponsored studies of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles. Conceptual nacelle designs for current wide-bodied transports and for advanced technology transports, intended for operational use in the mid-1980's, were studied by Lockheed-California Company and the Douglas Aircraft Company. These studies were conducted with the objective of achieving significant reductions in community noise and/or fuel consumption with minimum penalties in airplane weights, cost, and operating expense. The results indicate that the use of advanced composite materials offer significant potential weight and cost savings and result in reduced fuel consumption and noise when applied to nacelles. The most promising concept for realizing all of these benefits was a long duct, mixed flow acoustic composite nacelle with advanced acoustic liners.

  6. Mechanism Design and Testing of a Self-Deploying Structure Using Flexible Composite Tape Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Footdale, Joseph N.; Murphey, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed mechanical design of a novel deployable support structure that positions and tensions a membrane optic for space imagining applications is presented. This is a complex three-dimensional deployment using freely deploying rollable composite tape spring booms that become load bearing structural members at full deployment. The deployment tests successfully demonstrate a new architecture based on rolled and freely deployed composite tape spring members that achieve simultaneous deployment without mechanical synchronization. Proper design of the flexible component mounting interface and constraint systems, which were critical in achieving a functioning unit, are described. These flexible composite components have much potential for advancing the state of the art in deployable structures, but have yet to be widely adopted. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of implementing flexible composite components, including the design details on how to integrate with required traditional mechanisms.

  7. Composite isogrid structures for parabolic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, Edward M. (Inventor); Boyd, Jr., William E. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Dyer, Jack E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to high stiffness parabolic structures utilizing integral reinforced grids. The parabolic structures implement the use of isogrid structures which incorporate unique and efficient orthotropic patterns for efficient stiffness and structural stability.

  8. Titan's upper atmospheric structure and ionospheric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlake, Joseph H.

    This Dissertation investigates the density structure of the neutral upper atmosphere and the composition of the ionosphere of Titan through Cassini observations. The highly extended atmosphere of Titan consists primarily of N2, CH4, and H2. The focus is on data extracted from the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard Cassini. The INMS, which is fundamentally a quadrupole mass spectrometer, measures the abundance of neutral and ion components with masses of 1--8 and 12--99 Da. The CAPS instrument consists of three subsystems of which the Ion Beam Spectrometer (CAPS-IBS) is used in this study to derive mass spectra of thermal ions up to 400 Da. in mass in Titan's ionosphere. From measurements of molecular nitrogen in Titan's upper atmosphere an atmospheric scale height is derived implying an effective temperature. From an analysis of 29 targeted flybys of Titan we find that the thermosphere is isothermal from an altitude of 1050 km to the exobase height with an average effective temperature of 153 K. The scale height, and hence the effective temperature, is found to be highly variable. We assess this variability against the relevant geospatial, solar, and magnetospheric parameters to determine which are highly correlated to the effective temperatures. Titan's thermospheric temperature is found to be controlled by variations in the magnetospheric plasma environment. No correlation is found to exist with respect to geospatial parameters (i.e., latitude or longitude) and anti-correlation is found with solar parameters implying that Titan's nightside is hotter than its dayside. Furthermore, Titan's thermosphere is found to respond to plasma forcings on timescales less than one Titan day. To investigate the composition of Titan's ionosphere we present a 1D photochemical model of Titan's dayside ionosphere constrained by Cassini measurements. We show that the production of the primary products of

  9. Simplified design procedures for fiber composite structural components/joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified step-by-step design procedures are summarized, which are suitable for the preliminary design of composite structural components such as panels (laminates) and composite built-up structures (box beams). Similar procedures are also summarized for the preliminary design of composite bolted and adhesively bonded joints. The summary is presented in terms of sample design cases complemented with typical results. Guidelines are provided which can be used in the design selection process of composite structural components/joints. Also, procedures to account for cyclic loads, hygrothermal effects and lamination residual stresses are included.

  10. Advanced Nano-Composites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to increase energy efficiency and operating lifetime of wear-intensive industrial components and systems by developing and commercializing a family of ceramic-based monolithic composites that have shown remarkable resistance to wear in laboratory tests.

  11. Musical Composition and Creativity in an Advanced Software Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    This paper serves as a brief description of research into the use of professional level music software as a learning tool for creativity and composition by primary school children. The research formed the basis of a Master of Information Technology in Education degree at the University of Melbourne. The paper examines the physical environment, the…

  12. Reported Usage and Perceived Value of Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Curricular Requirements by High School and College Assessors of the Essay Portion of the English Language and Composition Advanced Placement Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holifield-Scott, April

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the extent to which high school and college/university Advanced Placement English Language and Composition readers value and implement the curricular requirements of Advanced Placement English Language and Composition. The participants were 158 readers of the 2010 Advanced Placement English Language and…

  13. Micromechanical models for textile structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrey, Ramesh V.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop micromechanical models for predicting the stiffness and strength properties of textile composite materials. Two models are presented to predict the homogeneous elastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of a textile composite. The first model is based on rigorous finite element analysis of the textile composite unit-cell. Periodic boundary conditions are enforced between opposite faces of the unit-cell to simulate deformations accurately. The second model implements the selective averaging method (SAM), which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging. For thin textile composites, both models can predict the plate stiffness coefficients and plate thermal coefficients. The finite element procedure is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses, and to estimate the initial failure envelope for textile composites.

  14. Structural characterization of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Glass, ceramic, and carbon matrix composite materials have emerged in recent years with potential properties and temperature resistance which make them attractive for high temperature applications such as gas turbine engines. At the outset of this study, only flexural tests were available to evaluate brittle matrix composites at temperatures in the 600 to 1000 C range. The results are described of an ongoing effort to develop appropriate tensile, compression, and shear test methods for high temperature use. A tensile test for unidirectional composites was developed and used to evaluate the properties and behavior of ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites in air at temperatures up to 1000 C. The results indicate generally efficient fiber reinforcement and tolerance to matrix cracking similar to polymer matrix composites. Limiting properties in these materials may be an inherently very low transverse strain to failure, and high temperature embrittlement due to fiber/matrix interface oxidation.

  15. Design considerations for composite fuselage structure of commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. W.; Sakata, I. F.

    1981-01-01

    The structural, manufacturing, and service and environmental considerations that could impact the design of composite fuselage structure for commercial transport aircraft application were explored. The severity of these considerations was assessed and the principal design drivers delineated. Technical issues and potential problem areas which must be resolved before sufficient confidence is established to commit to composite materials were defined. The key issues considered are: definition of composite fuselage design specifications, damage tolerance, and crashworthiness.

  16. The structural damping of composite beams with tapered boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coni, M.; Benchekchou, B.; White, R. G.

    1994-11-01

    Most metallic and composite structures of conventional construction are lightly damped. It is obviously advantageous, in terms of response to in-service dynamic loading, if damping can be increased with minimal weight addition. This report describes finite element analyses and complementary experiments carried out on composite, carbon fiber reinforced plastic, beams with tapered boundaries composed of layers of highly damped composite material. It is shown that modal damping of the structure may be significantly increased by this method.

  17. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  18. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  19. Advanced actuators for the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Hockney, Richard; Johnson, Bruce; Misovec, Kathleen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop advanced six-degree-of-freedom actuators employing magnetic suspensions suitable for the control of structural vibrations in large space structures. The advanced actuators consist of a magnetically suspended mass that has three-degrees-of-freedom in both translation and rotation. The most promising of these actuators featured a rotating suspended mass providing structural control torques in a manner similar to a control moment gyro (CMG). These actuators employ large-angle-magnetic suspensions that allow gimballing of the suspended mass without mechanical gimbals. Design definitions and sizing algorithms for these CMG type as well as angular reaction mass actuators based on multi-degree-of-freedom magnetic suspensions were developed. The performance of these actuators was analytically compared with conventional reaction mass actuators for a simple space structure model.

  20. Structural tailoring of advanced turboprops (STAT): User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    This user's manual describes the Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops program. It contains instructions to prepare the input for optimization, blade geometry and analysis, geometry generation, and finite element program control. In addition, a sample input file is provided as well as a section describing special applications (i.e., non-standard input).

  1. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  2. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  3. Advances and trends in structural and solid mechanics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Washington, DC, October 4-7, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Editor); Housner, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanics of materials and material characterization are considered, taking into account micromechanics, the behavior of steel structures at elevated temperatures, and an anisotropic plasticity model for inelastic multiaxial cyclic deformation. Other topics explored are related to advances and trends in finite element technology, classical analytical techniques and their computer implementation, interactive computing and computational strategies for nonlinear problems, advances and trends in numerical analysis, database management systems and CAD/CAM, space structures and vehicle crashworthiness, beams, plates and fibrous composite structures, design-oriented analysis, artificial intelligence and optimization, contact problems, random waves, and lifetime prediction. Earthquake-resistant structures and other advanced structural applications are also discussed, giving attention to cumulative damage in steel structures subjected to earthquake ground motions, and a mixed domain analysis of nuclear containment structures using impulse functions.

  4. Systems integration and demonstration of advanced reusable structure for ALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbins, Martin N.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the potential of advanced material to achieve life cycle cost (LCC) benefits for reusable structure on the advanced launch system. Three structural elements were investigated - all components of an Advanced Launch System reusable propulsion/avionics module. Leading aeroshell configurations included sandwich structure using titanium, graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI), or high-temperature aluminum (HTA) face sheets. Thrust structure truss concepts used titanium, graphite/epoxy, or silicon carbide/aluminum struts. Leading aft bulkhead concepts employed graphite epoxy and aluminum. The technical effort focused on the aeroshell because the greatest benefits were expected there. Thermal analyses show the structural temperature profiles during operation. Finite element analyses show stresses during splash-down. Weight statements and manufacturing cost estimates were prepared for calculation of LCC for each design. The Gr/PI aeroshell showed the lowest potential LCC, but the HTA aeroshell was judged to be lower risk. A technology development plan was prepared to validate the applicable structural technology.

  5. Current research in composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael F.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Research on the mechanics of composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center is discussed. The advantages and limitations of special purpose and general purpose analysis tools used in research are reviewed. Future directions in computational structural mechanics are described to address analysis short-comings. Research results on the buckling and postbuckling of unstiffened and stiffened composite structures are presented. Recent investigations of the mechanics of failure in compression and shear are reviewed. Preliminary studies of the dynamic response of composite structures due to impacts encountered during crash-landings are presented. Needs for future research are discussed.

  6. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  7. Development of Biobased Composites of Structural Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher Alan

    Highly biobased composites with properties and costs rivaling those consisting of synthetic constituents are a goal of much current research. The obvious material choices, vegetable oil based resins and natural fibers, present the challenges of poor resin properties and weak fiber/matrix bonding, respectively. Conventional methods of overcoming poor resin quality involve the incorporation of additives, which dilutes the resulting composite's bio-content and increases cost. To overcome these limitations while maintaining high bio-content and low cost, epoxidized sucrose soyate is combined with surface-treated flax fiber to produce biocomposites. These composites are fabricated using methods emphasizing scalability and efficiency, for cost effectiveness of the final product. This approach resulted in the successful production of biocomposites having properties that meet or exceed those of conventional pultruded members. These properties, such as tensile and flexural strengths of 223 and 253 MPa, respectively, were achieved by composites having around 85% bio-content.

  8. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  9. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T.

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four

  10. Polymer/inorganic nanocomposites with tailored hierarchical structure as advanced dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Manias, Evangelos; Randall, Clive; Tomer, Vivek; Polyzos, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    Most advances and commercial successes of polymer/inorganic nanocomposites rely only on the dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. Such approaches leave untapped opportunities where performance can be improved by controlling the larger length-scale structures. Here, we review selected examples where the hierarchical structure (from millimeter to nanometer) is tailored to control the transport properties of the materials, giving rise to marked property enhancements, relevant to dielectric materials for power capacitors. These examples address composite structures that are self-assembled, both at the nm and the micron scales, and, thus, can be produced using standard industrial practices. Specifically, polyethylene (PE) blends or poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) copolymers are reinforced with nanofillers; these composites are designed with high filler orientation, which yielded marked improvements in electric-field breakdown strength and, consequently, large improvements in their recoverable energy densities.

  11. Advances in the Lightweight Air-Liquid Composite Heat Exchanger Development for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Johnston, J. Chris; Haas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    An advanced, lightweight composite modular Air/Liquid (A/L) Heat Exchanger (HX) Prototype for potential space exploration thermal management applications was successfully designed, manufactured, and tested. This full-scale Prototype consisting of 19 modules, based on recommendations from its predecessor Engineering Development unit (EDU) but with improved thermal characteristics and manufacturability, was 11.2 % lighter than the EDU and achieves potentially a 42.7% weight reduction from the existing state-of-the-art metallic HX demonstrator. However, its higher pressure drop (0.58 psid vs. 0.16 psid of the metal HX) has to be mitigated by foam material optimizations and design modifications including a more systematic air channel design. Scalability of the Prototype design was validated experimentally by comparing manufacturability and performance between the 2-module coupon and the 19-module Prototype. The Prototype utilized the thermally conductive open-cell carbon foam material but with lower density and adopted a novel high-efficiency cooling system with significantly increased heat transfer contact surface areas, improved fabricability and manufacturability compared to the EDU. Even though the Prototype was required to meet both the thermal and the structural specifications, accomplishing the thermal requirement was a higher priority goal for this first version. Overall, the Prototype outperformed both the EDU and the corresponding metal HX, particularly in terms of specific heat transfer, but achieved 93.4% of the target. The next generation Prototype to achieve the specification target, 3,450W would need 24 core modules based on the simple scaling factor. The scale-up Prototype will weigh about 14.7 Kg vs. 21.6 Kg for the metal counterpart. The advancement of this lightweight composite HX development from the original feasibility test coupons to EDU to Prototype is discussed in this paper.

  12. Development, Implementation and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the final report to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the research project entitled Development, Implementation, and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High-Temperature Composites. The research supporting this initiative has been conducted by Dr. Brett A. Bednarcyk, a Senior Scientist at OM in Brookpark, Ohio from the period of August 1998 to March 2005. Most of the work summarized herein involved development, implementation, and application of enhancements and new capabilities for NASA GRC's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package. When the project began, this software was at a low TRL (3-4) and at release version 2.0. Due to this project, the TRL of MAC/GMC has been raised to 7 and two new versions (3.0 and 4.0) have been released. The most important accomplishments with respect to MAC/GMC are: (1) A multi-scale framework has been built around the software, enabling coupled design and analysis from the global structure scale down to the micro fiber-matrix scale; (2) The software has been expanded to analyze smart materials; (3) State-of-the-art micromechanics theories have been implemented and validated within the code; (4) The damage, failure, and lifing capabilities of the code have been expanded from a very limited state to a vast degree of functionality and utility; and (5) The user flexibility of the code has been significantly enhanced. MAC/GMC is now the premier code for design and analysis of advanced composite and smart materials. It is a candidate for the 2005 NASA Software of the Year Award. The work completed over the course of the project is summarized below on a year by year basis. All publications resulting from the project are listed at the end of this report.

  13. Application of a design-build-team approach to low cost and weight composite fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Willden, K. S.; Swanson, G. D.; Truslove, G.; Metschan, S. L.; Pfahl, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between manufacturing costs and design details must be understood to promote the application of advanced composite technologies to transport fuselage structures. A team approach, integrating the disciplines responsible for aircraft structural design and manufacturing, was developed to perform cost and weight trade studies for a twenty-foot diameter aft fuselage section. Baseline composite design and manufacturing concepts were selected for large quadrant panels in crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage section. The associated technical issues were also identified. Detailed evaluation of crown panels indicated the potential for large weight savings and costs competitive with aluminum technology in the 1995 timeframe. Different processes and material forms were selected for the various elements that comprise the fuselage structure. Additional cost and weight savings potential was estimated for future advancements.

  14. Photo-excited terahertz switch based on composite metamaterial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Jianna; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-09-01

    A photo-excited terahertz switch based on a composite metamaterial structure was designed by integration of photoconductive silicon into the gaps of split-ring resonators. The conductivity of the silicon that was used to fill the gaps in the split-ring resonators was tuned dynamically as a function of the incident pump power using laser excitation, leading to a change in the composite metamaterial structure's properties. We studied the transmission characteristics of the composite metamaterial structure for various silicon conductivities, and the results indicated that this type of composite metamaterial structure could be used as a resonance frequency tunable terahertz metamaterial switch. We also designed other structures by filling different gaps with silicon, and proved that these structures could be used as terahertz metamaterial switches can change the working mode from a single frequency to multiple frequencies.

  15. Advances in PAS-2 thermoplastic prepregs and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.M.; Register, D.F.; Lindstrom, M.R.; Campbell, R.W.

    1988-04-01

    A family of polyarylene sulfide polymers is being developed as thermoplastic engineering resins. These resins have high temperature mechanical performance, good mechanical strength, and good solvent resistance. The newest member of this family of resins is PAS-2 amorphous polyarylene sulfide. One potential application for this amorphous resin is as a matrix for high performance composites. The amorphous polyarylene sulfide resin has been formed into unidirectional prepreg tapes. These tapes have been molded into laminates of excellent quality. Recently, new levels of performance in mechanical properties and processing have been achieved.

  16. Preparation, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Advanced Polymeric and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis titles are given below: physical and mechanical behavior of amorphous poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole)s and poly(arylene ether-co-imidasole) modification epoxies; the requirements of patentability as applied to the chemical arts; fabrication of thermoplastic polymer composite ribbon; blend of reactive diluents with phenylethynyl-terminated arylene ether oligomers; the synthesis, characterization, and application of ether-containing polyimides; the synthesis of reflective and electrically conductive polyimide films via an in-situ self-metalization procedure using silver (I) complexes; the thermal cure of phenylethynyl terminated polyimides and selected model compounds; and the synthesis, characterization, and molecular modeling of cyclic arylene ether oligomers.

  17. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  18. Nonlinear displacement analysis of advanced propeller structures using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Kielb, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The steady state displacements of a rotating advanced turboprop are computed using the geometrically nonlinear capabilities of COSMIC NASTRAN Rigid Format 4 and MSC NASTRAN Solution 64. A description of the modified Newton-Raphson algorithm used by Solution 64 and the iterative scheme used by Rigid Format 4 is provided. A representative advanced turboprop, SR3, was used for the study. Displacements for SR3 are computed for rotational speeds up to 10,000 rpm. The results show Solution 64 to be superior for computating displacements of flexible rotating structures. This is attributed to its ability to update the displacement dependent centrifugal force during the solution process.

  19. Application of advanced material systems to composite frame elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorente, Steven; Minguet, Pierre; Fay, Russell; Medwin, Steven

    1992-01-01

    A three phase program has been conducted to investigate DuPont's Long Discontinuous Fiber (LDF) composites. Additional tests were conducted to compare LDF composites against toughened thermosets and a baseline thermoset system. Results have shown that the LDF AS4/PEKK offers improved interlaminar (flange bending) strength with little reduction in mechanical properties due to the discontinuous nature of the fibers. In the third phase, a series of AS4/PEKK LDF C-section curved frames (representing a typical rotorcraft light frame) were designed, manufactured and tested. Specimen reconsolidation after 'stretch forming' and frame thickness were found to be key factors in this light frame's performance. A finite element model was constructed to correlate frame test results with expected strain levels determined from material property tests. Adequately reconsolidated frames performed well and failed at strain levels at or above baseline thermoset material test strains. Finally a cost study was conducted which has shown that the use of LDF for this frame would result in a significant cost savings, for moderate to large lot sizes compared with the hand lay-up of a thermoset frame.

  20. Advances in Moire interferometry for thermal response of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, E. W., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.; Hyer, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique for the precise measurement of the thermal response of both sides of a laminated composite coupon specimen uses Moire interferometry with fringe multiplication which yields a sensitivity of 833 nm (32.8 micro in.) per fringe. The reference gratings used are virtual gratings and are formed by partially mirrorized glass prisms in close proximity to the specimen. Results are compared with both results obtained from tests which used Moire interferometry on one side of composite laminates, and with those predicted by classical lamination theory. The technique is shown to be capable of producing the sensitivity and accuracy necessary to measure a wide range of thermal responses and to detect small side to side variations in the measured response. Tests were conducted on four laminate configurations of T300/5208 graphite epoxy over a temperature range of 297 K (75 F) to 422 K (300 F). The technique presented allows for the generation of reference gratings for temperature regimes well outside that used in these tests.

  1. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  2. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  3. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  4. Advanced low-activation materials. Fibre-reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenici, P.; Scholz, H. W.

    1994-09-01

    A serious safety and environmental concern for thermonuclear fusion reactor development regards the induced radioactivity of the first wall and structural components. The use of low-activation materials (LAM) in a demonstration reactor would reduce considerably its potential risk and facilitate its maintenance. Moreover, decommissioning and waste management including disposal or even recycling of structural materials would be simplified. Ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC materials offer highly appreciable low activation characteristics in combination with good thermomechanical properties. This class of materials is now under experimental investigation for structural application in future fusion reactors. An overview on the recent results is given, covering coolant leak rates, thermophysical properties, compatibility with tritium breeder materials, irradiation effects, and LAM-consistent purity. SiC/SiC materials present characteristics likely to be optimised in order to meet the fusion application challenge. The scope is to put into practice the enormous potential of inherent safety with fusion energy.

  5. Damage Prediction Models for Advanced Materials and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Ming; Ahmad, Jalees; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the assessment and evaluation of various acoustic tile designs were conducted using three-dimensional finite element analysis, which included static analysis, thermal analysis and modal analysis of integral and non-integral tile design options. Various benchmark specimens for acoustic tile designs, including CMC integral T-joint and notched CMC plate, were tested in both room and elevated temperature environment. Various candidate ceramic matrix composite materials were used in the numerical modeling and experimental study. The research effort in this program evolved from numerical modeling and concept design to a combined numerical analysis and experimental study. Many subjects associated with the design and performance of the acoustic tile in jet engine exhaust nozzle have been investigated.

  6. Advances in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the advances that have been made in stress analyses of cracked aircraft components, in the understanding of the fatigue and fatigue-crack growth process, and in the prediction of residual strength of complex aircraft structures with widespread fatigue damage. Finite-element analyses of cracked structures are now used to determine accurate stress-intensity factors for cracks at structural details. Observations of small-crack behavior at open and rivet-loaded holes and the development of small-crack theory has lead to the prediction of stress-life behavior for components with stress concentrations under aircraft spectrum loading. Fatigue-crack growth under simulated aircraft spectra can now be predicted with the crack-closure concept. Residual strength of cracked panels with severe out-of-plane deformations (buckling) in the presence of stiffeners and multiple-site damage can be predicted with advanced elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. These advances are helping to assure continued safety of aircraft structures.

  7. Differently Structured Advance Organizers Lead to Different Initial Schemata and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurlitt, Johannes; Dummel, Sebastian; Schuster, Silvia; Nuckles, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Does the specific structure of advance organizers influence learning outcomes? In the first experiment, 48 psychology students were randomly assigned to three differently structured advance organizers: a well-structured, a well-structured and key-concept emphasizing, and a less structured advance organizer. These were followed by a sorting task, a…

  8. Structural design and fabrication techniques of composite unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Daniel Stephen

    Popularity of unmanned aerial vehicles has grown substantially in recent years both in the private sector, as well as for government functions. This growth can be attributed largely to the increased performance of the technology that controls these vehicles, as well as decreasing cost and size of this technology. What is sometimes forgotten though, is that the research and advancement of the airframes themselves are equally as important as what is done with them. With current computer-aided design programs, the limits of design optimization can be pushed further than ever before, resulting in lighter and faster airframes that can achieve longer endurances, higher altitudes, and more complex missions. However, realization of a paper design is still limited by the physical restrictions of the real world and the structural constraints associated with it. The purpose of this paper is to not only step through current design and manufacturing processes of composite UAVs at Oklahoma State University, but to also focus on composite spars, utilizing and relating both calculated and empirical data. Most of the experience gained for this thesis was from the Cessna Longitude project. The Longitude is a 1/8 scale, flying demonstrator Oklahoma State University constructed for Cessna. For the project, Cessna required dynamic flight data for their design process in order to make their 2017 release date. Oklahoma State University was privileged enough to assist Cessna with the mission of supporting the validation of design of their largest business jet to date. This paper will detail the steps of the fabrication process used in construction of the Longitude, as well as several other projects, beginning with structural design, machining, molding, skin layup, and ending with final assembly. Also, attention will be paid specifically towards spar design and testing in effort to ease the design phase. This document is intended to act not only as a further development of current

  9. MoS2 nanolayers grown on carbon nanotubes: an advanced reinforcement for epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Keqing; Liu, Jiajia; Shi, Yongqian; Jiang, Saihua; Wang, Dong; Hu, Yuan; Gui, Zhou

    2015-03-25

    In the present study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) wrapped with MoS2 nanolayers (MoS2-CNTs) were facilely synthesized to obtain advanced hybrids. The structure of the MoS2-CNT hybrids was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Subsequently, the MoS2-CNT hybrids were incorporated into EP for reducing fire hazards. Compared with pristine CNTs, MoS2-CNT hybrids showed good dispersion in EP matrix and no obvious aggregation of CNTs was observed. The obtained nanocomposites exhibited significant improvements in thermal properties, flame retardancy and mechanical properties, compared with those of neat EP and composites with a single CNT or MoS2. With the incorporation of 2.0 wt % of MoS2-CNT hybrids, the char residues and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the EP composite was significantly increased. Also, the addition of MoS2-CNT hybrids awarded excellent fire resistance to the EP matrix, which was evidenced by the significantly reduced peak heat release rate and total heat release. Moreover, the amount of organic volatiles from EP decomposition was obviously decreased, and the formation of toxic CO was effectively suppressed, implying the toxicity of the volatiles was reduced and smoke production was obviously suppressed. The dramatically reduced fire hazards were generally ascribed to the synergistic effect of MoS2 and CNTs, containing good dispersion of MoS2-CNT hybrids, catalytic char function of MoS2 nanolayers, and physical barrier effects of MoS2 nanolayers and CNT network structure. PMID:25742464

  10. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alva, T.; Henkel, J.; Johnson, R.; Carll, B.; Jackson, A.; Mosesian, B.; Brozovic, R.; Obrien, R.; Eudaily, R.

    1982-01-01

    This is the final report of technical work conducted during the fourth phase of a multiphase program having the objective of the design, development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component manufactured in a production environment at a cost competitive with those of its metal counterpart, and at a weight savings of at least 20 percent. The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes front and rear spars. During Phase 4 of the program, production quality tooling was designed and manufactured to produce three sets of covers, ribs, spars, miscellaneous parts, and subassemblies to assemble three complete ACVF units. Recurring and nonrecurring cost data were compiled and documented in the updated producibility/design to cost plan. Nondestruct inspections, quality control tests, and quality acceptance tests were performed in accordance with the quality assurance plan and the structural integrity control plan. Records were maintained to provide traceability of material and parts throughout the manufacturing development phase. It was also determined that additional tooling would not be required to support the current and projected L-1011 production rate.

  11. Applications of Isotopes in Advancing Structural & Functional Heparanomics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vy M.; Nu Nguyen, Thao Kim; Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparanomics is the study of all the biologically active oligosaccharide domain structures in the entire heparanome and the nature of interactions among these domains and their protein ligands. Structural elucidation of heparan sulfate and heparin oligosaccharides is a major obstacle in advancing structure-function relationships and the study of heparanomics. There are several factors that exacerbate challenges involved in the structural elucidation of heparin and heparan sulfate. Therefore, there is a great interest in developing novel strategies and analytical tools to overcome the barriers in decoding the enigmatic heparanome. This review article focuses on the applications of isotopes, both radioisotopes and stable isotopes, in the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome at the disaccharide or oligosaccharide level using liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This review article also outlines the utility of isotopes in determining the substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes that eventually dictate the emergence of biologically active oligosaccharides. PMID:20838780

  12. Applications of isotopes in advancing structural and functional heparanomics.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vy M; Nguyen, Thao K N; Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparanomics is the study of all the biologically active oligosaccharide domain structures in the entire heparanome and the nature of the interactions among these domains and their protein ligands. Structural elucidation of heparan sulfate and heparin oligosaccharides is a major obstacle in advancing structure-function relationships and heparanomics. There are several factors that exacerbate the challenges involved in the structural elucidation of heparin and heparan sulfate; therefore, there is great interest in developing novel strategies and analytical tools to overcome the barriers in decoding the enigmatic heparanome. This review focuses on the applications of isotopes, both radioisotopes and stable isotopes, in the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome at the disaccharide or oligosaccharide level using liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. This review also outlines the utility of isotopes in determining the substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes that eventually dictate the emergence of biologically active oligosaccharides.

  13. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  14. Composite Elastic Skins for Shape-Changing Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, Christopher M.; Schlecht, Robin W.

    2007-01-01

    Composite elastic skins having tailorable mechanical properties have been invented for covering shape-changing ( morphable ) structures. These skins are intended especially for use on advanced aircraft that change shapes in order to assume different aerodynamic properties. Many of the proposals for aircraft that could perform large aerodynamic shape changes require flexible skins that could follow shape changes of internal structures driven by actuators. Examples of such shape changes can include growth or shrinkage of bumps, conformal changes in wing planforms, cambers, twists, and bending of integrated leading- and trailing-edge flaps. Prior to this invention, there was no way of providing smooth aerodynamic surfaces capable of large deflections while maintaining smoothness and sufficient rigidity. Although latex rubber, silicone rubber, and similar conventional materials can be made into smooth coverings, they are not suitable for this purpose because, in order to impart required stiffness against out-of-plane bending, it would be necessary to make the coverings excessively thick, thereby necessitating the use of impractically large actuation forces. The basic idea of the invention is that of smoothly wrapping an underlying variable structure with a smooth skin that can be stretched or otherwise warped with low actuation force in one or both in-plane direction(s) and is relatively stiff against out-of-plane bending. It is envisioned that a skin according to the invention could be stretched as much as 20 percent in a desired direction. Because this basic idea admits of numerous variations, the following description is necessarily oversimplified for the sake of brevity.

  15. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed.

  16. Robust Joining and Integration of Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Challenges, Opportunities, and Realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2006-01-01

    Advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in a wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite components require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition, these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of high temperature joints in advanced ceramics and ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology. In addition, some examples of metal-ceramic brazing will also be presented. Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and composites will be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites will be discussed.

  17. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chovil, D. V.; Grant, W. D.; Jamison, E. S.; Syder, H.; Desper, O. E.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary design activity consisted of developing and analyzing alternate design concepts and selecting the optimum elevator configuration. This included trade studies in which durability, inspectability, producibility, repairability, and customer acceptance were evaluated. Preliminary development efforts consisted of evaluating and selecting material, identifying ancillary structural development test requirements, and defining full scale ground and flight test requirements necessary to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification. After selection of the optimum elevator configuration, detail design was begun and included basic configuration design improvements resulting from manufacturing verification hardware, the ancillary test program, weight analysis, and structural analysis. Detail and assembly tools were designed and fabricated to support a full-scope production program, rather than a limited run. The producibility development programs were used to verify tooling approaches, fabrication processes, and inspection methods for the production mode. Quality parts were readily fabricated and assembled with a minimum rejection rate, using prior inspection methods.

  18. A Thermodynamically Consistent Damage Model for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimi, Pere; Camanho, Pedro P.; Mayugo, Joan-Andreu; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A continuum damage model for the prediction of damage onset and structural collapse of structures manufactured in fiber-reinforced plastic laminates is proposed. The principal damage mechanisms occurring in the longitudinal and transverse directions of a ply are represented by a damage tensor that is fixed in space. Crack closure under load reversal effects are taken into account using damage variables established as a function of the sign of the components of the stress tensor. Damage activation functions based on the LaRC04 failure criteria are used to predict the different damage mechanisms occurring at the ply level. The constitutive damage model is implemented in a finite element code. The objectivity of the numerical model is assured by regularizing the dissipated energy at a material point using Bazant's Crack Band Model. To verify the accuracy of the approach, analyses of coupon specimens were performed, and the numerical predictions were compared with experimental data.

  19. Detection of disbonds in a honeycomb composite structure using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baid, Harsh; Banerjee, Sauvik; Joshi, Shiv; Mal, Siddhartha

    2008-03-01

    Advanced composites are being used increasingly in state-of-the-art aircraft and aerospace structures. In spite of their many advantages composite materials are highly susceptible to hidden flaws that may occur at any time during the life cycle of a structure and if undetected, may cause sudden and catastrophic failure of the entire structure. An example of such a defects critical structural component is the "honeycomb composite" in which thin composite skins are bonded with adhesives to the two faces of extremely lightweight and relatively thick metallic honeycombs. These components are often used in aircraft and aerospace structures due to their high strength to weight ratio. Unfortunately, the bond between the honeycomb and the skin may degrade with age and service loads leading to separation of the load-bearing skin from the honeycomb (called "disbonds") and compromising the safety of the structure. This paper is concerned with the noninvasive detection of disbonds using ultrasonic guided waves. Laboratory experiments are carried out on a composite honeycomb specimen containing localized disbonded regions. Ultrasonic waves are launched into the specimen using a broadband PZT transducer and are detected by a distributed array of identical transducers located on the surface of the specimen. The guided wave components of the signals are shown to be very strongly influenced by the presence of a disbond. The experimentally observed results are being used to develop an autonomous scheme to locate the disbonds and to estimate their size.

  20. Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

    2001-01-12

    The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.