Science.gov

Sample records for advanced computational fluid

  1. Computational fluid dynamics in the design and analysis of thermal processes: a review of recent advances.

    PubMed

    Norton, Tomás; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sun, Da Wen

    2013-01-01

    The design of thermal processes in the food industry has undergone great developments in the last two decades due to the availability of cheap computer power alongside advanced modelling techniques such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD uses numerical algorithms to solve the non-linear partial differential equations of fluid mechanics and heat transfer so that the complex mechanisms that govern many food-processing systems can be resolved. In thermal processing applications, CFD can be used to build three-dimensional models that are both spatially and temporally representative of a physical system to produce solutions with high levels of physical realism without the heavy costs associated with experimental analyses. Therefore, CFD is playing an ever growing role in the development of optimization of conventional as well as the development of new thermal processes in the food industry. This paper discusses the fundamental aspects involved in developing CFD solutions and forms a state-of-the-art review on various CFD applications in conventional as well as novel thermal processes. The challenges facing CFD modellers of thermal processes are also discussed. From this review it is evident that present-day CFD software, with its rich tapestries of mathematical physics, numerical methods and visualization techniques, is currently recognized as a formidable and pervasive technology which can permit comprehensive analyses of thermal processing.

  2. Computational structural mechanics and fluid dynamics: Advances and trends; Proceedings of the Symposium, Washington, DC, Oct. 17-19, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Editor); Dwoyer, Douglas L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in computational structural and fluid dynamics are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include fluid-structure interaction and aeroelasticity, CFD techniques for reacting flows, micromechanics, stability and eigenproblems, probabilistic methods and chaotic dynamics, and perturbation and spectral methods. Consideration is given to finite-element, finite-volume, and boundary-element methods; adaptive methods; parallel processing machines and applications; and visualization, mesh generation, and AI interfaces.

  3. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  4. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) activities at the Langley Research Center is given. The role of supercomputers in CFD research, algorithm development, multigrid approaches to computational fluid flows, aerodynamics computer programs, computational grid generation, turbulence research, and studies of rarefied gas flows are among the topics that are briefly surveyed.

  6. Advanced feedback control of indoor air quality using real-time computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, E.; Campbell, T.; Bradley, R.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the partial implementation of a novel method of controlling indoor air quality (IAQ) for critical applications. The proposed method uses a numerical modeling technique known as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for modeling the effect of variable ventilation rates for intelligent and rapid control of air contamination in space. This paper describes how a CFD model is made to run in real time linked to a feedback control loop. The technique was simulated in a graphical programming language. The simulation results indicate that a quasi-transient potential flow CFD model is a viable technique for feedback control of IAQ, and it is currently being implemented in an experimental validation.

  7. Advanced computational techniques for incompressible/compressible fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod

    2005-07-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems are of great importance to many fields of engineering and pose tremendous challenges to numerical analyst. This thesis addresses some of the hurdles faced for both 2D and 3D real life time-dependent FSI problems with particular emphasis on parachute systems. The techniques developed here would help improve the design of parachutes and are of direct relevance to several other FSI problems. The fluid system is solved using the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) finite element formulation for the Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible and compressible flows. The structural dynamics solver is based on a total Lagrangian finite element formulation. Newton-Raphson method is employed to linearize the otherwise nonlinear system resulting from the fluid and structure formulations. The fluid and structural systems are solved in decoupled fashion at each nonlinear iteration. While rigorous coupling methods are desirable for FSI simulations, the decoupled solution techniques provide sufficient convergence in the time-dependent problems considered here. In this thesis, common problems in the FSI simulations of parachutes are discussed and possible remedies for a few of them are presented. Further, the effects of the porosity model on the aerodynamic forces of round parachutes are analyzed. Techniques for solving compressible FSI problems are also discussed. Subsequently, a better stabilization technique is proposed to efficiently capture and accurately predict the shocks in supersonic flows. The numerical examples simulated here require high performance computing. Therefore, numerical tools using distributed memory supercomputers with message passing interface (MPI) libraries were developed.

  8. An advanced combustion research facility for validating computational fluid dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, J. B.; Hurley, C. D.; Eccles, N. C.

    1991-12-01

    The Sector Combustion Rig (SCR), built to obtain experimental data which could be used to verify computational fluid dynamic programs and to investigate the formation and consumption of combustion products through a combustor, is described. This rig was designed to accommodate sectors of full size engine combustion chambers and to test them at real or simulated engine operating conditions. Changes made to improve the operating, measurement, and data handling capabilities of the rig as a result of experience from several years of operations are described together with some of the features which contribute to the uniqueness of the SCR. The SCR gas analysis system and instrumentation are described. Extracts from some results obtained during a recent program of tests on a Rolls-Royce RB211 combustor are given.

  9. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the Posterior Airway Space After Maxillomandibular Advancement For Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.; Shih, Alan M.; Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy; Ito, Yasushi; Cure, Joel K; Harding, Susan M.; Litaker, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the soft tissue change of the upper airway after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Materials and Methods Eight OSAS patients who required MMA were recruited into this study. All participants had pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) and underwent MMA by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Upper airway CT data sets for these 8 participants were created with high-fidelity 3-D numerical models for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3-D models were simulated and analyzed to study how changes in airway anatomy affects pressure effort required for normal breathing. Airway dimensions, skeletal changes, Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), and pressure efforts of pre- and post-operative 3-D models were compared and correlations interpreted. Results After MMA, laminar and turbulent air flow was significantly decreased at every level of the airway. The cross-sectional areas at the soft palate and tongue base were significantly increased. Conclusions This study shows that MMA increases airway dimensions by the increasing the occipital base (Base) - pogonion (Pg) distance. An increase of the Base-Pg distance showed a significant correlation with an AHI improvement and a decreased pressure effort of the upper airway. Decreasing the pressure effort will decrease the breathing workload. This improves the condition of OSAS. PMID:23642544

  11. Computational fluid dynamic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Deabreu-Garcia, Alex

    1989-01-01

    A general technique is presented for modeling fluid, or gas, dynamic systems specifically for the development of control systems. The numerical methods which are generally used in computational fluid dynamics are borrowed to create either continuous-time or discrete-time models of the particular fluid system. The resulting equations can be either left in a nonlinear form, or easily linearized about an operating point. As there are typically very many states in these systems, the usual linear model reduction methods can be used on them to allow a low-order controller to be designed. A simple example is given which typifies many internal flow control problems. The resulting control is termed computational fluid dynamic control.

  12. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  13. Fluid/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Glomski, P. S.

    2011-08-01

    To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different blast peak pressure loadings has been investigated computationally. A fairly detailed (Lagrangian) finite-element model of a helmet/skull/brain assembly is first constructed and placed into an Eulerian air domain through which a single planar blast wave propagates. A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient nonlinear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is next conducted in order to assess the extent of reduction in intra-cranial shock-wave ingress (responsible for TBI). This was done by comparing temporal evolutions of intra-cranial normal and shear stresses for the cases of an unprotected head and the helmet-protected head and by correlating these quantities with the three most common types of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), i.e., axonal damage, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage. The results obtained show that the ACH provides some level of protection against all investigated types of mTBI and that the level of protection increases somewhat with an increase in blast peak pressure. In order to rationalize the aforementioned findings, a shockwave propagation/reflection analysis is carried out for the unprotected head and helmet-protected head cases. The analysis qualitatively corroborated the results pertaining to the blast-mitigation efficacy of an ACH, but also suggested that there are additional shockwave energy dissipation phenomena which play an important role in the mechanical response of the unprotected/protected head to blast impact.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    2005-03-04

    CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics LIBrary. This is a collection of hydrocodes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conservation lawsmore » is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary.« less

  15. Advances in three-dimensional coronary imaging and computational fluid dynamics: is virtual fractional flow reserve more than just a pretty picture?

    PubMed

    Poon, Eric K W; Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ooi, Andrew S H; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Moore, Stephen; Foin, Nicolas; Tu, Shengxian; Chin, Cheng; Monty, Jason P; Marusic, Ivan; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has shown a high success rate in the treatment of coronary artery disease. The decision to perform PCI often relies on the cardiologist's visual interpretation of coronary lesions during angiography. This has inherent limitations, particularly due to the low resolution and two-dimensional nature of angiography. State-of-the-art modalities such as three-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography, optical coherence tomography and invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) may improve clinicians' understanding of both the anatomical and physiological importance of coronary lesions. While invasive FFR is the gold standard technique for assessment of the haemodynamic significance of coronary lesions, recent studies have explored a surrogate for FFR derived solely from three-dimensional reconstruction of the invasive angiogram, and therefore eliminating need for a pressure wire. Utilizing advanced computational fluid dynamics research, this virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) has demonstrated reasonable correlation with invasive measurements and remains an intense area of ongoing study. However, at present, several limitations and computational fluid dynamic assumptions may preclude vFFR from widespread clinical use. This review demonstrates the tight integration of advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques and vFFR in assessing coronary artery disease, reviews the advantages and disadvantages of such techniques and attempts to provide a glimpse of how such advances may benefit future clinical decision-making during PCI. PMID:26247271

  16. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics For Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Mccroskey, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    Powerful computer codes undergoing development. Report reviews development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for prediction of airflow around rotary wings of helicopters. Reviews progress in following endeavors: Prediction and verification of flows under various operating conditions; calculation of interactions between rotor blades and vortexes; analysis of viscous, transonic flows about airfoils; and study of formation of vortexes at tips of rotors.

  18. Computer animation challenges for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Mauricio; Lee, Won-Sook; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Computer animation requirements differ from those of traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations in that visual plausibility and rapid frame update rates trump physical accuracy. We present an overview of the main techniques for fluid simulation in computer animation, starting with Eulerian grid approaches, the Lattice Boltzmann method, Fourier transform techniques and Lagrangian particle introduction. Adaptive grid methods, precomputation of results for model reduction, parallelisation and computation on graphical processing units (GPUs) are reviewed in the context of accelerating simulation computations for animation. A survey of current specific approaches for the application of these techniques to the simulation of smoke, fire, water, bubbles, mixing, phase change and solid-fluid coupling is also included. Adding plausibility to results through particle introduction, turbulence detail and concentration on regions of interest by level set techniques has elevated the degree of accuracy and realism of recent animations. Basic approaches are described here. Techniques to control the simulation to produce a desired visual effect are also discussed. Finally, some references to rendering techniques and haptic applications are mentioned to provide the reader with a complete picture of the challenges of simulating fluids in computer animation.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics - The coming revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The development of aerodynamic theory is traced from the days of Aristotle to the present, with the next stage in computational fluid dynamics dependent on superspeed computers for flow calculations. Additional attention is given to the history of numerical methods inherent in writing computer codes applicable to viscous and inviscid analyses for complex configurations. The advent of the superconducting Josephson junction is noted to place configurational demands on computer design to avoid limitations imposed by the speed of light, and a Japanese projection of a computer capable of several hundred billion operations/sec is mentioned. The NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator is described, showing capabilities of a billion operations/sec with a memory of 240 million words using existing technology. Near-term advances in fluid dynamics are discussed.

  20. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  1. Computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two papers are included in this progress report. In the first, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations have been used to compute leading edge receptivity of boundary layers over parabolic cylinders. Natural receptivity at the leading edge was simulated and Tollmien-Schlichting waves were observed to develop in response to an acoustic disturbance, applied through the farfield boundary conditions. To facilitate comparison with previous work, all computations were carried out at a free stream Mach number of 0.3. The spatial and temporal behavior of the flowfields are calculated through the use of finite volume algorithms and Runge-Kutta integration. The results are dominated by strong decay of the Tollmien-Schlichting wave due to the presence of the mean flow favorable pressure gradient. The effects of numerical dissipation, forcing frequency, and nose radius are studied. The Strouhal number is shown to have the greatest effect on the unsteady results. In the second paper, a transition model for low-speed flows, previously developed by Young et al., which incorporates first-mode (Tollmien-Schlichting) disturbance information from linear stability theory has been extended to high-speed flow by incorporating the effects of second mode disturbances. The transition model is incorporated into a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver with a one-equation turbulence model. Results using a variable turbulent Prandtl number approach demonstrate that the current model accurately reproduces available experimental data for first and second-mode dominated transitional flows. The performance of the present model shows significant improvement over previous transition modeling attempts.

  2. Interfaces for Advanced Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the coming generation of supercomputers that will have the power to make elaborate "artificial realities" that facilitate user-computer communication. Illustrates these technological advancements with examples of the use of head-mounted monitors which are connected to position and orientation sensors, and gloves that track finger and…

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Symposium on Aeropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics uses in fluid dynamics/aerodynamics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for the purpose of fluid dynamics physics education. Because of the tremendous wealth of information available from numerical simulation, certain fundamental concepts can be efficiently communicated using an interactive graphical interrogation of the appropriate numerical simulation data base. In other situations, a large amount of aerodynamic information can be communicated to the student by interactive use of simple CFD tools on a workstation or even in a personal computer environment. The emphasis in this presentation is to discuss ideas for how this process might be implemented. Specific examples, taken from previous publications, will be used to highlight the presentation.

  5. Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Hultquist, Jeff; Bryson, Steve; Kenwright, David; Lane, David; Walatka, Pamela; Clucas, Jean; Watson, Velvin; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Scientific visualization serves the dual purpose of exploration and exposition of the results of numerical simulations of fluid flow. Along with the basic visualization process which transforms source data into images, there are four additional components to a complete visualization system: Source Data Processing, User Interface and Control, Presentation, and Information Management. The requirements imposed by the desired mode of operation (i.e. real-time, interactive, or batch) and the source data have their effect on each of these visualization system components. The special requirements imposed by the wide variety and size of the source data provided by the numerical simulation of fluid flow presents an enormous challenge to the visualization system designer. We describe the visualization system components including specific visualization techniques and how the mode of operation and source data requirements effect the construction of computational fluid dynamics visualization systems.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. However, in the biomedical field, CFD is still emerging. The main reason why CFD in the biomedical field has lagged behind is the tremendous complexity of human body fluid behavior. Recently, CFD biomedical research is more accessible, because high performance hardware and software are easily available with advances in computer science. All CFD processes contain three main components to provide useful information, such as pre-processing, solving mathematical equations, and post-processing. Initial accurate geometric modeling and boundary conditions are essential to achieve adequate results. Medical imaging, such as ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for modeling, and Doppler ultrasound, pressure wire, and non-invasive pressure measurements are used for flow velocity and pressure as a boundary condition. Many simulations and clinical results have been used to study congenital heart disease, heart failure, ventricle function, aortic disease, and carotid and intra-cranial cerebrovascular diseases. With decreasing hardware costs and rapid computing times, researchers and medical scientists may increasingly use this reliable CFD tool to deliver accurate results. A realistic, multidisciplinary approach is essential to accomplish these tasks. Indefinite collaborations between mechanical engineers and clinical and medical scientists are essential. CFD may be an important methodology to understand the pathophysiology of the development and

  8. Advanced Computing for Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennels, Glenn D.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses contributions that computers and computer networks are making to the field of medicine. Emphasizes the computer's speed in storing and retrieving data. Suggests that doctors may soon be able to use computers to advise on diagnosis and treatment. (TW)

  9. Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF): Recent advances

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N.; Fagan, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1)Investigate fluid rheological behavior, dynamic fluid leak-off behavior, and proppant transport characteristics of various fracturing fluids used for stimulating oil and gas bearing formations. (2) Develop new information for characterizing the behavior of fracturing fluids under conditions more representative of the behavior in actual fractures. (3) Continue utilizing the advanced capabilities of the high pressure simulator (HPS) to perform near-term research and development activities and not to construct a large-scale simulator that was proposed originally. This paper describes equipment enhancements, data acquisition and instrumentation upgrades, R&D test results, and future research planned for the Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility.

  10. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. ); Goutagny, L. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  12. Advanced working fluids: Thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Gering, Kevin L.

    1990-10-01

    Electrolytes are used as working fluids in gas fired heat pump chiller engine cycles. To find out which molecular parameters of the electrolytes impact on cycle performance, a molecular theory is developed for calculating solution properties, enthalpies, vapor-liquid equilibria, and engine cycle performance. Aqueous and ammoniac single and mixed salt solutions in single and multisolvent systems are investigated. An accurate correlation is developed to evaluate properties for concentrated electrolyte solutions. Sensitivity analysis is used to determine the impact of molecular parameters on the thermodynamic properties and cycle performance. The preferred electrolytes are of 1-1 valence type, small ion size, high molecular weight, and in strongly colligative cosolvent. The operating windows are determined for a number of absorption fluids of industrial importance.

  13. Advanced Computing for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hut, Piet; Sussman, Gerald Jay

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributions that high-speed computing is making to the study of science. Emphasizes the use of computers in exploring complicated systems without the simplification required in traditional methods of observation and experimentation. Provides examples of computer assisted investigations in astronomy and physics. (TW)

  14. Computational fluid dynamics: Transition to design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, R. G.; Bhateley, I. C.; Howell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of aerospace vehicles, over the years, was an evolutionary process in which engineering progress in the aerospace community was based, generally, on prior experience and data bases obtained through wind tunnel and flight testing. Advances in the fundamental understanding of flow physics, wind tunnel and flight test capability, and mathematical insights into the governing flow equations were translated into improved air vehicle design. The modern day field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a continuation of the growth in analytical capability and the digital mathematics needed to solve the more rigorous form of the flow equations. Some of the technical and managerial challenges that result from rapidly developing CFD capabilites, some of the steps being taken by the Fort Worth Division of General Dynamics to meet these challenges, and some of the specific areas of application for high performance air vehicles are presented.

  15. Using Computers in Fluids Engineering Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Three approaches for using computers to improve basic fluids engineering education are presented. The use of computational fluid dynamics solutions to fundamental flow problems is discussed. The use of interactive, highly graphical software which operates on either a modern workstation or personal computer is highlighted. And finally, the development of 'textbooks' and teaching aids which are used and distributed on the World Wide Web is described. Arguments for and against this technology as applied to undergraduate education are also discussed.

  16. Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

  17. Advanced computer languages

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, H.

    1984-05-03

    If software is to become an equal partner in the so-called fifth generation of computers-which of course it must-programming languages and the human interface will need to clear some high hurdles. Again, the solutions being sought turn to cerebral emulation-here, the way that human beings understand language. The result would be natural or English-like languages that would allow a person to communicate with a computer much as he or she does with another person. In the discussion the authors look at fourth level languages and fifth level languages, used in meeting the goal of AI. The higher level languages aim to be non procedural. Application of LISP, and Forth to natural language interface are described as well as programs such as natural link technology package, written in C.

  18. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author’s laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship’s motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  19. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hideaki; Orihara, Hideo; Sato, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author's laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship's motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process.

  20. Fundamentals and recent advances in X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) applied on thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known technique nowadays, since its first practical application by Sir. G. Hounsfield (Nobel price for medicine 1979) has continually benefited from optimising improvements, especially in medical applications. Indeed, also application of CT in various engineering research fields provides fundamental informations on a wide range of applications, considering that the technique is not destructive, allowing 3D visualization without perturbation of the analysed material. Nowadays, it is technologically possible to design and realize an equipment that achieve a micrometric resolution and even improve the sensibility in revealing differences in materials having very radiotransparency, allowing i.e. to distinguish between different fluids (with different density) or states of matter (like with two-phase flows). At the University of Bergamo, a prototype of an X-ray microCT system was developed since 2008, so being fully operative from 2012, with specific customizations for investigations in thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flow researches. A technical session held at the UIT International Conference in L'Aquila (Italy), at which this paper is referring, has presented some microCT fundamentals, to allow the audience to gain basics to follow the “fil-rouge” that links all the instrumentation developments, till the recent applications. Hereinafter are reported some applications currently developed at Bergamo University at the X-ray computed micro-tomography laboratory.

  1. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  2. The AFDM (advanced fluid dynamics model) program: Scope and significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The origins and goals of the advanced fluid dynamics model (AFDM) program are described, and the models, algorithm, and coding used in the resulting AFDM computer program are summarized. A sample fuel-steel boiling pool calculation is presented and compared with a similar SIMMER-II calculation. A subjective assessment of the AFDM developments is given, and areas where future work is possible are detailed. 10 refs.

  3. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  4. The practical application of computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithby, G. D.; Galpin, P. F.

    1991-05-01

    An overview of the diverse methods used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is presented. Conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species form a closed set of equations if the constitutive relations for fluid stress, heat transfer, and mass transfer are provided. Discretization methods for the continuous equations are described including the method of weighted residuals, domain subdivision, and finite element methods. The major methods for developing computation grids are discussed along with their constraints. Several CFD applications are discussed and example computational grids are provided. Included are flow around a fin, flow through a vessel and pipes, flow through a combustor, and flow through a complex impeller.

  5. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  6. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  7. Advanced binary cycles: Optimum working fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gawlik, K.; Hassani, V.

    1997-12-31

    A computer model (Cycle Analysis Simulation Tool, CAST) and a methodology have been developed to perform value analysis for small, low- to moderate-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized electricity cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work is on evaluating the effect of mixed working fluids instead of pure fluids on the LEC of a geothermal binary plant that uses a simple Organic Rankine Cycle. Four resources were studied spanning the range of 265{degrees}F to 375{degrees}F. A variety of isobutane and propane based mixtures, in addition to pure fluids, were used as working fluids. This study shows that the use of propane mixtures at a 265{degrees}F resource can reduce the LEC by 24% when compared to a base case value that utilizes commercial isobutane as its working fluid. The cost savings drop to 6% for a 375{degrees}F resource, where an isobutane mixture is favored. Supercritical cycles were found to have the lowest cost at all resources.

  8. Advanced binary cycles: Optimum working fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gawlik, K.; Hassani, V.

    1997-12-31

    A computer model (Cycle Analysis Simulation Tool, CAST) and a methodology have been developed to perform value analysis for small, low- to moderate-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized electricity cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work is on evaluating the effect of mixed working fluids instead of pure fluids on the LEC of a geothermal binary plant that uses a simple Organic Rankine Cycle. Four resources were studied spanning the range of 265 F to 375 F. A variety of isobutane and propane based mixtures, in addition to pure fluids, were used as working fluids. This study shows that the use of propane mixtures at a 265 F resource can reduce the LEC by 24% when compared to a base case value that utilizes commercial isobutane as its working fluid. The cost savings drop to 6% for a 375 F resource, where an isobutane mixture is favored. Supercritical cycles were found to have the lowest cost at all resources.

  9. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  10. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  11. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics - A personal view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a personal view of computational fluid dynamics. The main theme is divided into two categories - one dealing with algorithms and engineering applications and the other with scientific investigations. The former category may be termed computational aerodynamics, with the objective of providing reliable aerodynamic or engineering predictions. The latter category is essentially basic research, where the algorithmic tools are used to unravel and elucidate fluid-dynamic phenomena hard to obtain in a laboratory. A critique of the numerical solution techniques for both compressible and incompressible flows is included. The discussion on scientific investigations deals in particular with transition and turbulence.

  13. Advanced flight computer. Special study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coo, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a special study to define a 32-bit radiation hardened, SEU tolerant flight computer architecture, and to investigate current or near-term technologies and development efforts that contribute to the Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) design and development. An AFC processing node architecture is defined. Each node may consist of a multi-chip processor as needed. The modular, building block approach uses VLSI technology and packaging methods that demonstrate a feasible AFC module in 1998 that meets that AFC goals. The defined architecture and approach demonstrate a clear low-risk, low-cost path to the 1998 production goal, with intermediate prototypes in 1996.

  14. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, D.C.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  15. Advanced Flicker Spectroscopy of Fluid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Gompper, Gerhard; Haluska, Christopher; Kroll, Daniel; Petrov, Peter; Riske, Karin

    2003-07-01

    The bending elasticity of a fluid membrane is characterized by its modulus and spontaneous curvature. We present a new method, advanced flicker spectroscopy of giant nonspherical vesicles, which makes it possible to simultaneously measure both parameters for the first time. Our analysis is based on the generation of a large set of reference data from Monte Carlo simulations of randomly triangulated surfaces. As an example of the potential of the procedure, we monitor thermal trajectories of vesicle shapes and discuss the elastic response of zwitterionic membranes to transmembrane pH gradients. Our technique makes it possible to easily characterize membrane curvature as a function of environmental conditions.

  16. Engineering Fracking Fluids with Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    2015-11-01

    There are no comprehensive simulation-based tools for engineering the flows of viscoelastic fluid-particle suspensions in fully three-dimensional geometries. On the other hand, the need for such a tool in engineering applications is immense. Suspensions of rigid particles in viscoelastic fluids play key roles in many energy applications. For example, in oil drilling the ``drilling mud'' is a very viscous, viscoelastic fluid designed to shear-thin during drilling, but thicken at stoppage so that the ``cuttings'' can remain suspended. In a related application known as hydraulic fracturing suspensions of solids called ``proppant'' are used to prop open the fracture by pumping them into the well. It is well-known that particle flow and settling in a viscoelastic fluid can be quite different from that which is observed in Newtonian fluids. First, it is now well known that the ``fluid particle split'' at bifurcation cracks is controlled by fluid rheology in a manner that is not understood. Second, in Newtonian fluids, the presence of an imposed shear flow in the direction perpendicular to gravity (which we term a cross or orthogonal shear flow) has no effect on the settling of a spherical particle in Stokes flow (i.e. at vanishingly small Reynolds number). By contrast, in a non-Newtonian liquid, the complex rheological properties induce a nonlinear coupling between the sedimentation and shear flow. Recent experimental data have shown both the shear thinning and the elasticity of the suspending polymeric solutions significantly affects the fluid-particle split at bifurcations, as well as the settling rate of the solids. In the present work, we use the Immersed Boundary Method to develop computer simulations of viscoelastic flow in suspensions of spheres to study these problems. These simulations allow us to understand the detailed physical mechanisms for the remarkable physical behavior seen in practice, and actually suggest design rules for creating new fluid recipes.

  17. Using artificial intelligence to control fluid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsey, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation is an essential tool for the prediction of fluid flow. Many powerful simulation programs exist today. However, using these programs to reliably analyze fluid flow and other physical situations requires considerable human effort and expertise to set up a simulation, determine whether the output makes sense, and repeatedly run the simulation with different inputs until a satisfactory result is achieved. Automating this process is not only of considerable practical importance but will also significantly advance basic artificial intelligence (AI) research in reasoning about the physical world.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics in a marine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Arthur D.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of the supercomputer and recent advances in both Reynolds averaged, and large eddy simulation fluid flow approximation techniques to the Navier-Stokes equations, have created a robust environment for the exploration of problems of interest to the Navy in general, and the Naval Underwater Systems Center in particular. The nature of problems that are of interest, and the type of resources needed for their solution are addressed. The goal is to achieve a good engineering solution to the fluid-structure interaction problem. It is appropriate to indicate that a paper by D. Champman played a major role in developing the interest in the approach discussed.

  20. Supercomputer applications in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using large-scale supercomputer applications is discussed. Formulational and computational requirements for the various governing equations, including the Euler and Navier-tokes approaches, are examined for typical problems including the viscous flow field solution about a complete aerospace vehicle. Recent computed results and experimental comparisons are given to highlight the presentation. The future of CFD associated with three-dimensional applications is found to be rapidly expanding across a broad front, including internal and external flows and flows across the entire speed regime.

  1. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  2. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-01-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  3. A Generalized Fluid Formulation for Turbomachinery Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Dorney, Daniel J.; Sondak, Douglas L.

    2003-01-01

    A generalized formulation of the equations of motion of an arbitrary fluid are developed for the purpose of defining a common iterative algorithm for computational procedures. The method makes use of the equations of motion in conservation form with separate pseudo-time derivatives used for defining the numerical flux for a Riemann solver and the convergence algorithm. The partial differential equations are complemented by an thermodynamic and caloric equations of state of a complexity necessary for describing the fluid. Representative solutions with a new code based on this general equation formulation are provided for three turbomachinery problems. The first uses air as a working fluid while the second uses gaseous oxygen in a regime in which real gas effects are of little importance. These nearly perfect gas computations provide a basis for comparing with existing perfect gas code computations. The third case is for the flow of liquid oxygen through a turbine where real gas effects are significant. Vortex shedding predictions with the LOX formulations reduce the discrepancy between perfect gas computations and experiment by approximately an order of magnitude, thereby verifying the real gas formulation as well as providing an effective case where its capabilities are necessary.

  4. Spectral Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1994-01-01

    As a tool for large-scale computations in fluid dynamics, spectral methods were prophesized in 1944, born in 1954, virtually buried in the mid-1960's, resurrected in 1969, evangalized in the 1970's, and catholicized in the 1980's. The use of spectral methods for meteorological problems was proposed by Blinova in 1944 and the first numerical computations were conducted by Silberman (1954). By the early 1960's computers had achieved sufficient power to permit calculations with hundreds of degrees of freedom. For problems of this size the traditional way of computing the nonlinear terms in spectral methods was expensive compared with finite-difference methods. Consequently, spectral methods fell out of favor. The expense of computing nonlinear terms remained a severe drawback until Orszag (1969) and Eliasen, Machenauer, and Rasmussen (1970) developed the transform methods that still form the backbone of many large-scale spectral computations. The original proselytes of spectral methods were meteorologists involved in global weather modeling and fluid dynamicists investigating isotropic turbulence. The converts who were inspired by the successes of these pioneers remained, for the most part, confined to these and closely related fields throughout the 1970's. During that decade spectral methods appeared to be well-suited only for problems governed by ordinary diSerential eqllations or by partial differential equations with periodic boundary conditions. And, of course, the solution itself needed to be smooth. Some of the obstacles to wider application of spectral methods were: (1) poor resolution of discontinuous solutions; (2) inefficient implementation of implicit methods; and (3) drastic geometric constraints. All of these barriers have undergone some erosion during the 1980's, particularly the latter two. As a result, the applicability and appeal of spectral methods for computational fluid dynamics has broadened considerably. The motivation for the use of spectral

  5. Computational fluid dynamics applications at McDonnel Douglas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Representative examples are presented of applications and development of advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for aerodynamic design at the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC). Transonic potential and Euler codes, interactively coupled with boundary layer computation, and solutions of slender-layer Navier-Stokes approximation are applied to aircraft wing/body calculations. An optimization procedure using evolution theory is described in the context of transonic wing design. Euler methods are presented for analysis of hypersonic configurations, and helicopter rotors in hover and forward flight. Several of these projects were accepted for access to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility at the NASA-Ames Research Center.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics applications at McDonnel Douglas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkinen, R. J.

    1987-03-01

    Representative examples are presented of applications and development of advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for aerodynamic design at the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC). Transonic potential and Euler codes, interactively coupled with boundary layer computation, and solutions of slender-layer Navier-Stokes approximation are applied to aircraft wing/body calculations. An optimization procedure using evolution theory is described in the context of transonic wing design. Euler methods are presented for analysis of hypersonic configurations, and helicopter rotors in hover and forward flight. Several of these projects were accepted for access to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility at the NASA-Ames Research Center.

  7. Application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, R; Athavale, M M; Makhijani, V B; Przekwas, A J

    1996-06-01

    Present-day computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques can be used to analyze the behavior of fluid flow in a variety of pumps. CFD can be a powerful tool during the design stage for rapid virtual prototyping of different designs, analyzing performance parameters, and making design improvements. Computational flow solutions provide information such as the location and size of stagnation zones and the local shear rate. These parameters can be correlated to the extent of hemolysis and thrombus formation and are critical to the success of a blood pump. CFD-ACE, an advanced commercial CFD code developed by CFD Research Corporation, has been applied to fluid flows in rotary machines, such as axial flow pumps and inducers. Preprocessing and postprocessing tools for efficient grid generation and advanced graphical flow visualization are integrated seamlessly with CFD-ACE. The code has structured multiblock grid capability, non-Newtonian fluid treatment, a variety of turbulence models, and an Eulerian-Langrangian particle tracking model. CFD-ACE has been used successfully to study the flow characteristics in an axial flow blood pump. An unstructured flow solver that greatly automates the process of grid generation and speeds up the flow simulation is under development. PMID:8817950

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics - Applications in Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beninati, Maria Laura; Kathol, Austin; Ziemian, Constance

    2012-11-01

    A new Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) exercise has been developed for the undergraduate introductory fluid mechanics course at Bucknell University. The goal is to develop a computational exercise that students complete which links the manufacturing processes course and the concurrent fluid mechanics course in a way that reinforces the concepts in both. In general, CFD is used as a tool to increase student understanding of the fundamentals in a virtual world. A ``learning factory,'' which is currently in development at Bucknell seeks to use the laboratory as a means to link courses that previously seemed to have little correlation at first glance. A large part of the manufacturing processes course is a project using an injection molding machine. The flow of pressurized molten polyurethane into the mold cavity can also be an example of fluid motion (a jet of liquid hitting a plate) that is applied in manufacturing. The students will run a CFD process that captures this flow using their virtual mold created with a graphics package, such as SolidWorks. The laboratory structure is currently being implemented and analyzed as a part of the ``learning factory''. Lastly, a survey taken before and after the CFD exercise demonstrate a better understanding of both the CFD and manufacturing process.

  9. GMRES acceleration of computational fluid dynamics codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigton, L. B.; Yu, N. J.; Young, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The generalized minimal residual algorithm (GMRES) is a conjugate-gradient like method that applies directly to nonsymmetric linear systems of equations. In this paper, GMRES is modified to handle nonlinear equations characteristic of computational fluid dynamics. Attention is devoted to the concept of preconditioning and the role it plays in assuring rapid convergence. A formulation is developed that allows GMRES to be preconditioned by the solution procedures already built into existing computer codes. Examples are provided that demonstrate the ability of GMRES to greatly improve the robustness and rate of convergence of current state-of-the-art fluid dynamics codes. Theoretical aspects of GMRES are presented that explain why it works. Finally, the advantage GMRES enjoys over related methods such as conjugate gradients are discussed.

  10. Geometric methods in computational fluid dynamics. [turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    General methods for the construction of geometric computational fluid dynamic algorithms are presented which simulate a variety of flow fields in various nontrivial regions. Included are: basic developments with tensors; various forms for the equations of motion; generalized numerical methods and boundary conditions; and methods for mesh generation to meet the strong geometric constraints of turbomachines. Coordinate generation is shown generally to yield mesh descriptions from one or more transformations that are smoothly joined together to form a composite mesh.

  11. Delaunay triangulation and computational fluid dynamics meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K.; Mount, David M.

    1992-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the Delaunay triangulation of suitable quadrilateral meshes can lead to unsuitable triangulated meshes. Here, we present case studies which illustrate the limitations of using structured grid generation methods which produce points in a curvilinear coordinate system for subsequent triangulations for CFD applications. We discuss conditions under which meshes of quadrilateral elements may not produce a Delaunay triangulation suitable for CFD calculations, particularly with regard to high aspect ratio, skewed quadrilateral elements.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics using CATIA created geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gengler, Jeanne E.

    1989-07-01

    A method has been developed to link the geometry definition residing on a CAD/CAM system with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool needed to evaluate aerodynamic designs and requiring the memory capacity of a supercomputer. Requirements for surfaces suitable for CFD analysis are discussed. Techniques for developing surfaces and verifying their smoothness are compared, showing the capability of the CAD/CAM system. The utilization of a CAD/CAM system to create a computational mesh is explained, and the mesh interaction with the geometry and input file preparation for the CFD analysis is discussed.

  13. Distributed visualization for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosoka, Don J.; Facca, Anthony A.

    1992-01-01

    Distributed concurrent visualization and computation in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is not a new concept. Specialized applications such as Realtime Interactive Particle-tracer (RIP) and vendor specific tools like Distributed Graphics Language (DGL) have been in use for some time. This paper describes a current project underway at NASA Lewis Research Center to provide the CFD researcher with an easy method for incorporating distributed processing concepts into program development. Details on the FORTRAN capable interface to a set of network and visualization functions are presented along with some results from initial CFD case studies that employ these techniques.

  14. Distributed visualization for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosoka, Don J.; Facca, Anthony A.

    1992-02-01

    Distributed concurrent visualization and computation in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is not a new concept. Specialized applications such as Realtime Interactive Particle-tracer (RIP) and vendor specific tools like Distributed Graphics Language (DGL) have been in use for some time. This paper describes a current project underway at NASA Lewis Research Center to provide the CFD researcher with an easy method for incorporating distributed processing concepts into program development. Details on the FORTRAN capable interface to a set of network and visualization functions are presented along with some results from initial CFD case studies that employ these techniques.

  15. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The current computing environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. Work is in progress on a set of software tools designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these super-computer-like environments. The visualization is concurrently executed with the CFD solver. The parallel version of Visual3, pV3 required splitting up the unsteady visualization task to allow execution across a network of workstation(s) and compute servers. In this computing model, the network is almost always the bottleneck so much of the effort involved techniques to reduce the size of the data transferred between machines.

  16. Use of advanced computers for aerodynamic flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The current and projected use of advanced computers for large-scale aerodynamic flow simulation applied to engineering design and research is discussed. The design use of mature codes run on conventional, serial computers is compared with the fluid research use of new codes run on parallel and vector computers. The role of flow simulations in design is illustrated by the application of a three dimensional, inviscid, transonic code to the Sabreliner 60 wing redesign. Research computations that include a more complete description of the fluid physics by use of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation formulations are also presented. Results of studies for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are used to project the feasibility of design applications employing these more advanced three dimensional viscous flow simulations.

  17. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  18. Shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Additional results and a revised and improved computer program listing from the shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics formulations are presented. Numerical calculations for the flame zone of solid propellants are carried out using the Galerkin finite elements, with perturbations expanded to the zeroth, first, and second orders. The results indicate that amplification of oscillatory motions does indeed prevail in high frequency regions. For the second order system, the trend is similar to the first order system for low frequencies, but instabilities may appear at frequencies lower than those of the first order system. The most significant effect of the second order system is that the admittance is extremely oscillatory between moderately high frequency ranges.

  19. Techniques for animation of CFD results. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Jay; Hanson, Jeffery C.

    1992-01-01

    Video animation is becoming increasingly vital to the computational fluid dynamics researcher, not just for presentation, but for recording and comparing dynamic visualizations that are beyond the current capabilities of even the most powerful graphic workstation. To meet these needs, Lewis Research Center has recently established a facility to provide users with easy access to advanced video animation capabilities. However, producing animation that is both visually effective and scientifically accurate involves various technological and aesthetic considerations that must be understood both by the researcher and those supporting the visualization process. These considerations include: scan conversion, color conversion, and spatial ambiguities.

  20. Advances in computational solvation thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.

    The aim of this thesis is to develop improved methods for calculating the free energy, entropy and enthalpy of solvation from molecular simulations. Solvation thermodynamics of model compounds provides quantitative measurements used to analyze the stability of protein conformations in aqueous milieus. Solvation free energies govern the favorability of the solvation process, while entropy and enthalpy decompositions give insight into the molecular mechanisms by which the process occurs. Computationally, a coupling parameter lambda modulates solute-solvent interactions to simulate an insertion process, and multiple lengthy simulations at a fixed lambda value are typically required for free energy calculations to converge; entropy and enthalpy decompositions generally take 10-100 times longer. This thesis presents three advances which accelerate the convergence of such calculations: (1) Development of entropy and enthalpy estimators which combine data from multiple simulations; (2) Optimization of lambda schedules, or the set of parameter values associated with each simulation; (3) Validation of Hamiltonian replica exchange, a technique which swaps lambda values between two otherwise independent simulations. Taken together, these techniques promise to increase the accuracy and precision of free energy, entropy and enthalpy calculations. Improved estimates, in turn, can be used to investigate the validity and limits of existing solvation models and refine force field parameters, with the goal of understanding better the collapse transition and aggregation behavior of polypeptides.

  1. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Vanka, S.P.

    1984-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  2. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  3. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  4. Domain decomposition algorithms and computation fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    In the past several years, domain decomposition was a very popular topic, partly motivated by the potential of parallelization. While a large body of theory and algorithms were developed for model elliptic problems, they are only recently starting to be tested on realistic applications. The application of some of these methods to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics are investigated. Some examples are two dimensional convection-diffusion problems and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. The construction and analysis of efficient preconditioners for the interface operator to be used in the iterative solution of the interface solution is described. For the convection-diffusion problems, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is discussed.

  5. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1992-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  6. Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.; Smith, Merritt H.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a loosely and tightly-coupled workstation cluster is compared against a conventional vector supercomputer for the solution the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The application geometries include a transonic airfoil, a tiltrotor wing/fuselage, and a wing/body/empennage/nacelle transport. Decomposition is of the manager-worker type, with solution of one grid zone per worker process coupled using the PVM message passing library. Task allocation is determined by grid size and processor speed, subject to available memory penalties. Each fluid zone is computed using an implicit diagonal scheme in an overset mesh framework, while relative body motion is accomplished using an additional worker process to re-establish grid communication.

  7. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  8. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  9. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards ‘digital patient’ or ‘virtual physiological human’ representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  13. Visualization of Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The current compute environment that most researchers are using for the calculation of 3D unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is a super-computer class machine. The Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's) such as the 160 node IBM SP2 at NAS and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (like NAS's SGI Power-Challenge array and the J90 cluster) provide the required computation bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. If we follow the traditional computational analysis steps for CFD (and we wish to construct an interactive visualizer) we need to be aware of the following: (1) Disk space requirements. A single snap-shot must contain at least the values (primitive variables) stored at the appropriate locations within the mesh. For most simple 3D Euler solvers that means 5 floating point words. Navier-Stokes solutions with turbulence models may contain 7 state-variables. (2) Disk speed vs. Computational speeds. The time required to read the complete solution of a saved time frame from disk is now longer than the compute time for a set number of iterations from an explicit solver. Depending, on the hardware and solver an iteration of an implicit code may also take less time than reading the solution from disk. If one examines the performance improvements in the last decade or two, it is easy to see that depending on disk performance (vs. CPU improvement) may not be the best method for enhancing interactivity. (3) Cluster and Parallel Machine I/O problems. Disk access time is much worse within current parallel machines and cluster of workstations that are acting in concert to solve a single problem. In this case we are not trying to read the volume of data, but are running the solver and the solver outputs the solution. These traditional network interfaces must be used for the file system. (4) Numerics of particle traces. Most visualization tools can work upon a single snap shot of the data but some visualization tools for transient

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Matthew; Francois, Marianne M.

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  15. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  16. Advances in fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Lorraine N.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The optimal fluid for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock would combine the volume expansion and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood without the need for cross-matching or the risk of disease transmission. Although the ideal fluid has yet to be discovered, current options are discussed in this review, including crystalloids, colloids, blood and blood substitutes. The future role of blood substitutes is not yet defined, but the potential advantages in trauma or elective surgery may prove to be enormous. PMID:11407826

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  18. Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Blake, D.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

  19. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  20. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  1. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  2. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  3. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  4. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics applications to improve crop production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical analysis and simulation tools of fluid flow processes have emerged from the development stage and become nowadays a robust design tool. It is widely used to study various transport phenomena which involve fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, providing det...

  6. Advanced designs for fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Research was carried out on existing and new designs for minimally intrusive measurement of flow fields in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell and the proposed Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment. The following topics are discussed: (1) identification and removal of foreign particles, (2) search for higher dielectric photochromic solutions, (3) selection of uv light source, (4) analysis of refractive techniques and (5) examination of fresnel lens applicability.

  7. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technologies for Advanced Green Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Susan M.; Meyer, Michael L.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the Exploration Vision for returning to the Moon and beyond, NASA and its partners are developing and testing critical cryogenic fluid propellant technologies that will meet the need for high performance propellants on long-term missions. Reliable knowledge of low-gravity cryogenic fluid management behavior is lacking and yet is critical in the areas of tank thermal and pressure control, fluid acquisition, mass gauging, and fluid transfer. Such knowledge can significantly reduce or even eliminate tank fluid boil-off losses for long term missions, reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, and simplify vehicle operations. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) Project is performing experimental and analytical evaluation of several areas within Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) to enable NASA's Exploration Vision. This paper discusses the status of the PCAD CFM technology focus areas relative to the anticipated CFM requirements to enable execution of the Vision for Space Exploration.

  8. Advanced algorithm for orbit computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szenbehely, V.

    1983-01-01

    Computational and analytical techniques which simplify the solution of complex problems in orbit mechanics, Astrodynamics and Celestial Mechanics were developed. The major tool of the simplification is the substitution of transformations in place of numerical or analytical integrations. In this way the rather complicated equations of orbit mechanics might sometimes be reduced to linear equations representing harmonic oscillators with constant coefficients.

  9. 77 FR 62231 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    .../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing...: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building;...

  10. 76 FR 31945 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown...

  11. Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) | DSITP

    Cancer.gov

    The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC), located in Frederick Maryland (MD), provides HPC resources for both NIH/NCI intramural scientists and the extramural biomedical research community. Its mission is to provide HPC support, to provide collaborative research, and to conduct in-house research in various areas of computational biology and biomedical research.

  12. Advances and trends in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in computational structural mechanics are reviewed with reference to computational needs for future structures technology, advances in computational models for material behavior, discrete element technology, assessment and control of numerical simulations of structural response, hybrid analysis, and techniques for large-scale optimization. Research areas in computational structural mechanics which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified. These include prediction and analysis of the failure of structural components made of new materials, development of computational strategies and solution methodologies for large-scale structural calculations, and assessment of reliability and adaptive improvement of response predictions.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics for the CFBR : challenges that lie ahead /

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B. A.; Yang, Wen-ching,

    2001-01-01

    The potential of Computational Fluid Dynamics as a tool for design and analysis of the Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor is considered. The ruminations are largely philosophical in nature, and are based mainly on experience. An assessment of where CFD may, or may not, be a helpful tool for developing the needed understanding, is furnished. To motivate this assessment, a clarification of what composes a CFD analysis is provided. Status of CFD usage in CFBR problems is summarized briefly. Some successes and failures of CFD in CFBR analysis are also discussed; this suggests a practical way to proceed toward the goal of adding CFD as a useful tool, to be used in combination with well-defined experiments, for CFBR needs. The conclusion is that there remains substantial hope that CFD could be very useful in this application. In order to make the hope a reality, nontrivial, and achievable, advances in multiphase flow theory must be made.

  14. Advances in the microrheology of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Waigh, Thomas Andrew

    2016-07-01

    New developments in the microrheology of complex fluids are considered. Firstly the requirements for a simple modern particle tracking microrheology experiment are introduced, the error analysis methods associated with it and the mathematical techniques required to calculate the linear viscoelasticity. Progress in microrheology instrumentation is then described with respect to detectors, light sources, colloidal probes, magnetic tweezers, optical tweezers, diffusing wave spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, elastic- and quasi-elastic scattering techniques, 3D tracking, single molecule methods, modern microscopy methods and microfluidics. New theoretical techniques are also reviewed such as Bayesian analysis, oversampling, inversion techniques, alternative statistical tools for tracks (angular correlations, first passage probabilities, the kurtosis, motor protein step segmentation etc), issues in micro/macro rheological agreement and two particle methodologies. Applications where microrheology has begun to make some impact are also considered including semi-flexible polymers, gels, microorganism biofilms, intracellular methods, high frequency viscoelasticity, comb polymers, active motile fluids, blood clots, colloids, granular materials, polymers, liquid crystals and foods. Two large emergent areas of microrheology, non-linear microrheology and surface microrheology are also discussed. PMID:27245584

  15. Advances in the microrheology of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waigh, Thomas Andrew

    2016-07-01

    New developments in the microrheology of complex fluids are considered. Firstly the requirements for a simple modern particle tracking microrheology experiment are introduced, the error analysis methods associated with it and the mathematical techniques required to calculate the linear viscoelasticity. Progress in microrheology instrumentation is then described with respect to detectors, light sources, colloidal probes, magnetic tweezers, optical tweezers, diffusing wave spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, elastic- and quasi-elastic scattering techniques, 3D tracking, single molecule methods, modern microscopy methods and microfluidics. New theoretical techniques are also reviewed such as Bayesian analysis, oversampling, inversion techniques, alternative statistical tools for tracks (angular correlations, first passage probabilities, the kurtosis, motor protein step segmentation etc), issues in micro/macro rheological agreement and two particle methodologies. Applications where microrheology has begun to make some impact are also considered including semi-flexible polymers, gels, microorganism biofilms, intracellular methods, high frequency viscoelasticity, comb polymers, active motile fluids, blood clots, colloids, granular materials, polymers, liquid crystals and foods. Two large emergent areas of microrheology, non-linear microrheology and surface microrheology are also discussed.

  16. Opportunities in computational mechanics: Advances in parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.A.

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, the authors will discuss recent advances in computing power and the prospects for using these new capabilities for studying plasticity and failure. They will first review the new capabilities made available with parallel computing. They will discuss how these machines perform and how well their architecture might work on materials issues. Finally, they will give some estimates on the size of problems possible using these computers.

  17. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  18. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark; Gera, Dinesh

    2001-11-06

    In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

  19. Physical aspects of computing the flow of a viscous fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    One of the main themes in fluid dynamics at present and in the future is going to be computational fluid dynamics with the primary focus on the determination of drag, flow separation, vortex flows, and unsteady flows. A computation of the flow of a viscous fluid requires an understanding and consideration of the physical aspects of the flow. This is done by identifying the flow regimes and the scales of fluid motion, and the sources of vorticity. Discussions of flow regimes deal with conditions of incompressibility, transitional and turbulent flows, Navier-Stokes and non-Navier-Stokes regimes, shock waves, and strain fields. Discussions of the scales of fluid motion consider transitional and turbulent flows, thin- and slender-shear layers, triple- and four-deck regions, viscous-inviscid interactions, shock waves, strain rates, and temporal scales. In addition, the significance and generation of vorticity are discussed. These physical aspects mainly guide computations of the flow of a viscous fluid.

  20. Parallel Domain Decomposition Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the parallel domain decomposition preconditioning for computational fluid dynamics. Details are given on some difficult fluid flow problems, stabilized spatial discretizations, and Newton's method for solving the discretized flow equations. Schur complement domain decomposition is described through basic formulation, simplifying strategies (including iterative subdomain and Schur complement solves, matrix element dropping, localized Schur complement computation, and supersparse computations), and performance evaluation.

  1. Final Report: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion Dynamics, February 15, 1995 - February 14, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip

    1998-09-22

    The HPCC Grand Challenge Project on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion Dynamics focuses on the development of advanced numerical methodologies for modeling realistic engineering problems in combustion and other areas of fluid dynamics. The project was a collaboration between two DOE Laboratories (LBNL and LANL) and two universities (University of California, Berkeley, and New York University). In this document, we report on the work done under the UC Berkeley portion of the grant.

  2. Role of HPC in Advancing Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2004-01-01

    On behalf of the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program (HPCMP) and NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS) a study is conducted to assess the role of supercomputers on computational aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles. The study is mostly based on the responses to a web based questionnaire that was designed to capture the nuances of high performance computational aeroelasticity, particularly on parallel computers. A procedure is presented to assign a fidelity-complexity index to each application. Case studies based on major applications using HPCMP resources are presented.

  3. Advances and trends in computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

  4. America's most computer advanced healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    Healthcare Informatics polled industry experts for nominations for this listing of America's Most Computer-Advanced Healthcare Facilities. Nominations were reviewed for extent of departmental automation, leading-edge applications, advanced point-of-care technologies, and networking communications capabilities. Additional consideration was given to smaller facilities automated beyond "normal expectations." Facility representatives who believe their organizations should be included in our next listing, please contact Healthcare Informatics for a nomination form.

  5. Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Conference publication includes 79 abstracts and presentations and 3 invited presentations given at the Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 20-22, 1993. The purpose of the workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  6. Computational thermo-fluid analysis of a disk brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Kuraishi, Takashi; Tabata, Shinichiro; Takagi, Hirokazu

    2016-06-01

    We present computational thermo-fluid analysis of a disk brake, including thermo-fluid analysis of the flow around the brake and heat conduction analysis of the disk. The computational challenges include proper representation of the small-scale thermo-fluid behavior, high-resolution representation of the thermo-fluid boundary layers near the spinning solid surfaces, and bringing the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) calculated in the thermo-fluid analysis of the flow to the heat conduction analysis of the spinning disk. The disk brake model used in the analysis closely represents the actual configuration, and this adds to the computational challenges. The components of the method we have developed for computational analysis of the class of problems with these types of challenges include the Space-Time Variational Multiscale method for coupled incompressible flow and thermal transport, ST Slip Interface method for high-resolution representation of the thermo-fluid boundary layers near spinning solid surfaces, and a set of projection methods for different parts of the disk to bring the HTC calculated in the thermo-fluid analysis. With the HTC coming from the thermo-fluid analysis of the flow around the brake, we do the heat conduction analysis of the disk, from the start of the breaking until the disk spinning stops, demonstrating how the method developed works in computational analysis of this complex and challenging problem.

  7. Trends in computational capabilities for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Milestones in the development of computational aerodynamics are reviewed together with past, present, and future computer performance (speed and memory) trends. Factors influencing computer performance requirements for both steady and unsteady flow simulations are identified. Estimates of computer speed and memory that are required to calculate both inviscid and viscous, steady and unsteady flows about airfoils, wings, and simple wing body configurations are presented and compared to computer performance which is either currently available, or is expected to be available before the end of this decade. Finally, estimates of the amounts of computer time that are required to determine flutter boundaries of airfoils and wings at transonic Mach numbers are presented and discussed.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  9. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  10. Recent advances in protein profiling of tissues and tissue fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2007-08-01

    Creating protein profiles of tissues and tissue fluids, which contain secreted proteins and peptides released from various cells, is critical for biomarker discovery as well as drug and vaccine target selection. It is extremely difficult to obtain pure samples from tissues or tissue fluids, however, and identification of complex protein mixtures is still a challenge for mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we summarize recent advances in techniques for extracting proteins from tissues for mass spectrometry profiling and imaging. We also introduce a novel technique using a capillary ultrafiltration (CUF) probe to enable in vivo collection of proteins from the tissue microenvironment. The CUF probe technique is compared with existing sampling techniques, including perfusion, saline wash, fine-needle aspiration and microdialysis. In this review, we also highlight quantitative mass spectrometric proteomic approaches with, and without, stable-isotope labels. Advances in quantitative proteomics will significantly improve protein profiling of tissue and tissue fluid samples collected by CUF probes.

  11. Some Aspects of uncertainty in computational fluid dynamics results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.

    1991-01-01

    Uncertainties are inherent in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These uncertainties need to be systematically addressed and managed. Sources of these uncertainty analysis are discussed. Some recommendations are made for quantification of CFD uncertainties. A practical method of uncertainty analysis is based on sensitivity analysis. When CFD is used to design fluid dynamic systems, sensitivity-uncertainty analysis is essential.

  12. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics )CFD) models to address environmental engineering challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant source emissions, atmospheric dispersion and resulting human exposure. CFD simulations ...

  13. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  14. Advanced networks and computing in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As computing and network capabilities continue to rise, it becomes increasingly important to understand the varied applications for using them to provide healthcare. The objective of this review is to identify key characteristics and attributes of healthcare applications involving the use of advanced computing and communication technologies, drawing upon 45 research and development projects in telemedicine and other aspects of healthcare funded by the National Library of Medicine over the past 12 years. Only projects publishing in the professional literature were included in the review. Four projects did not publish beyond their final reports. In addition, the authors drew on their first-hand experience as project officers, reviewers and monitors of the work. Major themes in the corpus of work were identified, characterizing key attributes of advanced computing and network applications in healthcare. Advanced computing and network applications are relevant to a range of healthcare settings and specialties, but they are most appropriate for solving a narrower range of problems in each. Healthcare projects undertaken primarily to explore potential have also demonstrated effectiveness and depend on the quality of network service as much as bandwidth. Many applications are enabling, making it possible to provide service or conduct research that previously was not possible or to achieve outcomes in addition to those for which projects were undertaken. Most notable are advances in imaging and visualization, collaboration and sense of presence, and mobility in communication and information-resource use. PMID:21486877

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  16. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  17. Recent advances in computer image generation simulation.

    PubMed

    Geltmacher, H E

    1988-11-01

    An explosion in flight simulator technology over the past 10 years is revolutionizing U.S. Air Force (USAF) operational training. The single, most important development has been in computer image generation. However, other significant advances are being made in simulator handling qualities, real-time computation systems, and electro-optical displays. These developments hold great promise for achieving high fidelity combat mission simulation. This article reviews the progress to date and predicts its impact, along with that of new computer science advances such as very high speed integrated circuits (VHSIC), on future USAF aircrew simulator training. Some exciting possibilities are multiship, full-mission simulators at replacement training units, miniaturized unit level mission rehearsal training simulators, onboard embedded training capability, and national scale simulator networking.

  18. NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference. Volume 1: Sessions 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations given at the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, March 7-9, 1989 are given. Topics covered include research facility overviews of CFD research and applications, validation programs, direct simulation of compressible turbulence, turbulence modeling, advances in Runge-Kutta schemes for solving 3-D Navier-Stokes equations, grid generation and invicid flow computation around aircraft geometries, numerical simulation of rotorcraft, and viscous drag prediction for rotor blades.

  19. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  20. Simulation methods for advanced scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.; Carlson, J.A.; Forster, R.A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to create effective new algorithms for solving N-body problems by computer simulation. The authors concentrated on developing advanced classical and quantum Monte Carlo techniques. For simulations of phase transitions in classical systems, they produced a framework generalizing the famous Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms for Ising and Potts models. For spin-glass-like problems, they demonstrated the effectiveness of an extension of the multicanonical method for the two-dimensional, random bond Ising model. For quantum mechanical systems, they generated a new method to compute the ground-state energy of systems of interacting electrons. They also improved methods to compute excited states when the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method is used and to compute longer time dynamics when the stationary phase quantum Monte Carlo method is used.

  1. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  2. Advanced tomographic flow diagnostics for opaque multiphase fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Jackson, N.B.; Shollenberger, K.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the work performed for the ``Advanced Tomographic Flow Diagnostics for Opaque Multiphase Fluids`` LDRD (Laboratory-Directed Research and Development) project and is presented as the fulfillment of the LDRD reporting requirement. Dispersed multiphase flows, particularly gas-liquid flows, are industrially important to the chemical and applied-energy industries, where bubble-column reactors are employed for chemical synthesis and waste treatment. Due to the large range of length scales (10{sup {minus}6}-10{sup 1}m) inherent in real systems, direct numerical simulation is not possible at present, so computational simulations are forced to use models of subgrid-scale processes, the accuracy of which strongly impacts simulation fidelity. The development and validation of such subgrid-scale models requires data sets at representative conditions. The ideal measurement techniques would provide spatially and temporally resolved full-field measurements of the distributions of all phases, their velocity fields, and additional associated quantities such as pressure and temperature. No technique or set of techniques is known that satisfies this requirement. In this study, efforts are focused on characterizing the spatial distribution of the phases in two-phase gas-liquid flow and in three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow. Due to its industrial importance, the bubble-column geometry is selected for diagnostics development and assessment. Two bubble-column testbeds are utilized: one at laboratory scale and one close to industrial scale. Several techniques for measuring the phase distributions at conditions of industrial interest are examined: level-rise measurements, differential-pressure measurements, bulk electrical impedance measurements, electrical bubble probes, x-ray tomography, gamma-densitometry tomography, and electrical impedance tomography.

  3. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  4. Fluid Mechanics, Drag Reduction and Advanced Configuration Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses Advanced Aircraft configurational approaches across the speed range, which are either enabled, or greatly enhanced, by clever Flow Control. Configurations considered include Channel Wings with circulation control for VTOL (but non-hovering) operation with high cruise speed, strut-braced CTOL transports with wingtip engines and extensive ('natural') laminar flow control, a midwing double fuselage CTOL approach utilizing several synergistic methods for drag-due-to-lift reduction, a supersonic strut-braced configuration with order of twice the L/D of current approaches and a very advanced, highly engine flow-path-integrated hypersonic cruise machine. This paper indicates both the promise of synergistic flow control approaches as enablers for 'Revolutions' in aircraft performance and fluid mechanic 'areas of ignorance' which impede their realization and provide 'target-rich' opportunities for Fluids Research.

  5. Toward large-scale computational fluid-solid-growth models of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Di Achille, Paolo; Humphrey, Jay D

    2012-06-01

    Complementary advances in medical imaging, vascular biology, genetics, biomechanics, and computational methods promise to enable the development of mathematical models of the enlargement and possible rupture of intracranial aneurysms that can help inform clinical decisions. Nevertheless, this ultimate goal is extremely challenging given the many diverse and complex factors that control the natural history of these lesions. As it should be expected, therefore, predictive models continue to develop in stages, with new advances incorporated as data and computational methods permit. In this paper, we submit that large-scale, patient-specific, fluid-solid interaction models of the entire circle of Willis and included intracranial aneurysm are both computationally tractable and necessary as a critical step toward fluid-solid-growth (FSG) models that can address the evolution of a lesion while incorporating information on the genetically and mechanobiologically determined microstructure of the wall.

  6. Fluid and structural measurements to advance gas turbine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the current status of fluid and structural measurements is reviewed, and some potential improvements in gas turbine machinery, directly associated with the new measuring capability are discussed. Some considerations concerning the impact of the new capability on the methods and approaches that will be used in the further development of advanced technology, in general, and to aeropropulsion gas turbine machinery, in particular, are presented.

  7. The Role of Computer Assisted Fluid Balance in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Ciccolella, Sergio A.; Halloran, Mark J.; Brimm, John E.; O'Hara, Michael R.

    1978-01-01

    Computational, reporting, and data base management needs along with growth in sophistication have propelled the application of computers in medicine. These elements are satisfying specific clinical needs in the fluid balance program design that was undertaken. Significant potential exists for extending the computer's intervention by using available transducing techniques to obtain information that is currently manually derived. Thus, the design currently satisfies the goal of maximizing information while minimizing labor intensive overhead and will continue to evolve in that direction.

  8. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  9. Application of computational fluid dynamics methods to improve thermal hydraulic code analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, Jr.

    A computational fluid dynamics code is used to model the primary natural circulation loop of a proposed small modular reactor for comparison to experimental data and best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code results. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics code modeling capabilities make them attractive alternatives to the current conservative approach of coupled best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes and uncertainty evaluations. The results from a computational fluid dynamics analysis are benchmarked against the experimental test results of a 1:3 length, 1:254 volume, full pressure and full temperature scale small modular reactor during steady-state power operations and during a depressurization transient. A comparative evaluation of the experimental data, the thermal hydraulic code results and the computational fluid dynamics code results provides an opportunity to validate the best-estimate thermal hydraulic code's treatment of a natural circulation loop and provide insights into expanded use of the computational fluid dynamics code in future designs and operations. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine those physical phenomena most impactful on operations of the proposed reactor's natural circulation loop. The combination of the comparative evaluation and sensitivity analysis provides the resources for increased confidence in model developments for natural circulation loops and provides for reliability improvements of the thermal hydraulic code.

  10. Airborne Advanced Reconfigurable Computer System (ARCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjurman, B. E.; Jenkins, G. M.; Masreliez, C. J.; Mcclellan, K. L.; Templeman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A digital computer subsystem fault-tolerant concept was defined, and the potential benefits and costs of such a subsystem were assessed when used as the central element of a new transport's flight control system. The derived advanced reconfigurable computer system (ARCS) is a triple-redundant computer subsystem that automatically reconfigures, under multiple fault conditions, from triplex to duplex to simplex operation, with redundancy recovery if the fault condition is transient. The study included criteria development covering factors at the aircraft's operation level that would influence the design of a fault-tolerant system for commercial airline use. A new reliability analysis tool was developed for evaluating redundant, fault-tolerant system availability and survivability; and a stringent digital system software design methodology was used to achieve design/implementation visibility.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics combustion analysis evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical modelling in spray combustion. These modelling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the computational efficiency in the stochastic particle tracking method as well as to incorporate the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, vaporization, and dense spray effects. The present mathematical formulation and numerical methodologies can be casted in any time-marching pressure correction methodologies (PCM) such as FDNS code and MAST code. A sequence of validation cases involving steady burning sprays and transient evaporating sprays will be included.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics on a massively parallel computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    A finite difference code was implemented for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer. The code is based on the ARC2D/ARC3D program and uses the implicit factored algorithm of Beam and Warming. The codes uses odd-even elimination to solve linear systems. Timings and computation rates are given for the code, and a comparison is made with a Cray XMP.

  13. 78 FR 6087 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  14. 75 FR 9887 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  15. 76 FR 9765 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, SC-21/Germantown Building, U.S. Department of...

  16. 78 FR 41046 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... hereby given that the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee will be renewed for a two-year... (DOE), on the Advanced Scientific Computing Research Program managed by the Office of...

  17. 75 FR 64720 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    .../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department...

  18. 76 FR 41234 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee Charter Renewal AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of... Administration, notice is hereby given that the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee will be renewed... concerning the Advanced Scientific Computing program in response only to charges from the Director of...

  19. 78 FR 56871 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  20. 77 FR 45345 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    .../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  1. 75 FR 43518 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Science, DOE. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  2. 77 FR 12823 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, SC-21/Germantown Building, U.S. Department of...

  3. Development of computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, M.

    1984-01-01

    Ames Research Center has the lead role among NASA centers to conduct research in computational fluid dynamics. The past, the present, and the future prospects in this field are reviewed. Past accomplishments include pioneering computer simulations of fluid dynamics problems that have made computers valuable in complementing wind tunnels for aerodynamic research. The present facilities include the most powerful computers built in the United States. Three examples of viscous flow simulations are presented: an afterbody with an exhaust plume, a blunt fin mounted on a flat plate, and the Space Shuttle. The future prospects include implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System that will provide the capability for solving the viscous flow field around an aircraft in a matter of minutes.

  4. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  5. Advances in computed tomography imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-07-11

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in diagnostic imaging for evaluating many clinical conditions. In recent years, there have been several notable advances in CT technology that already have had or are expected to have a significant clinical impact, including extreme multidetector CT, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dual-energy CT, cone-beam CT, portable CT, and phase-contrast CT. These techniques and their clinical applications are reviewed and illustrated in this article. In addition, emerging technologies that address deficiencies in these modalities are discussed.

  6. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  7. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  9. An introduction to NASA's advanced computing program: Integrated computing systems in advanced multichip modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Alkalai, Leon

    1996-01-01

    Recent changes within NASA's space exploration program favor the design, implementation, and operation of low cost, lightweight, small and micro spacecraft with multiple launches per year. In order to meet the future needs of these missions with regard to the use of spacecraft microelectronics, NASA's advanced flight computing (AFC) program is currently considering industrial cooperation and advanced packaging architectures. In relation to this, the AFC program is reviewed, considering the design and implementation of NASA's AFC multichip module.

  10. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases. PMID:25618456

  11. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases.

  12. Aerodynamic design optimization with sensitivity analysis and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted from October 1, 1990 to May 31, 1994 on the development of methodologies to improve the designs (more specifically, the shape) of aerodynamic surfaces of coupling optimization algorithms (OA) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms via sensitivity analyses (SA). The study produced several promising methodologies and their proof-of-concept cases, which have been reported in the open literature.

  13. Current capabilities and future directions in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A summary of significant findings is given, followed by specific recommendations for future directions of emphasis for computational fluid dynamics development. The discussion is organized into three application areas: external aerodynamics, hypersonics, and propulsion - and followed by a turbulence modeling synopsis.

  14. Computer-Managed Instruction: Crystallized and Fluid Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    Twenty-four measures of crystallized intelligence (G sub c) and fluid intelligence (G sub f) were obtained for samples of graduates and failures of an innovative instructional situation in which computer-managed mastery learning was used to teach elementary electricity and electronics. Seven stepwise multiple discriminant analyses and associated…

  15. Computer program for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braon, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer code has been developed to provide thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, and parahydrogen. Equation of state and transport coefficients are updated and other fluids added as new material becomes available.

  16. A heterogeneous computing environment for simulating astrophysical fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazes, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the Concurrent Computing Laboratory in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Louisiana State University we have constructed a heterogeneous computing environment that permits us to routinely simulate complicated three-dimensional fluid flows and to readily visualize the results of each simulation via three-dimensional animation sequences. An 8192-node MasPar MP-1 computer with 0.5 GBytes of RAM provides 250 MFlops of execution speed for our fluid flow simulations. Utilizing the parallel virtual machine (PVM) language, at periodic intervals data is automatically transferred from the MP-1 to a cluster of workstations where individual three-dimensional images are rendered for inclusion in a single animation sequence. Work is underway to replace executions on the MP-1 with simulations performed on the 512-node CM-5 at NCSA and to simultaneously gain access to more potent volume rendering workstations.

  17. On the Use of Computers for Teaching Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches for improving the teaching of basic fluid mechanics using computers are presented. There are two objectives to these approaches: to increase the involvement of the student in the learning process and to present information to the student in a variety of forms. Items discussed include: the preparation of educational videos using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the analysis of CFD flow solutions using workstation based post-processing graphics packages, and the development of workstation or personal computer based simulators which behave like desk top wind tunnels. Examples of these approaches are presented along with observations from working with undergraduate co-ops. Possible problems in the implementation of these approaches as well as solutions to these problems are also discussed.

  18. Advances in cardiovascular fluid mechanics: bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Sucosky, Philippe; de Zelicourt, Diane; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Jimenez, Jorge; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents recent advances in cardiovascular fluid mechanics that define the current state of the art. These studies include complex multimodal investigations with advanced measurement and simulation techniques. We first discuss the complex flows within the total cavopulmonary connection in Fontan patients. We emphasize the quantification of energy losses by studying the importance of caval offsets as well as the differences among various Fontan surgical protocols. In our studies of the fluid mechanics of prosthetic heart valves, we reveal for the first time the full three-dimensional complexity of flow fields in the vicinity of bileaflet and trileaflet valves and the microscopic hinge flow dynamics. We also present results of these valves functioning in a patient-specific native aorta geometry. Our in vitro mitral valve studies show the complex mechanism of the native mitral valve apparatus. We demonstrate that the different components of the mitral valve have independent and synergistically complex functions that allow the valve to operate efficiently. We also show how valve mechanics change under pathological and repair conditions associated with enlarged ventricles. Finally, our ex vivo studies on the interactions between the aortic valve and its surrounding hemodynamic environment are aimed at providing insights into normal valve function and valve pathology. We describe the development of organ- and tissue-culture systems and the biological response of the tissue subjected to their respective simulated mechanical environment. The studies noted above have enhanced our understanding of the complex fluid mechanics associated with the cardiovascular system and have led to new translational technologies.

  19. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  20. Computer program for computing the properties of seventeen fluids. [cryogenic liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, J. A.; Friend, D. G.; Arp, V. D.; Mccarty, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes modifications and additions to the MIPROPS computer program for calculating the thermophysical properties of 17 fluids. These changes include adding new fluids, new properties, and a new interface to the program. The new program allows the user to select the input and output parameters and the units to be displayed for each parameter. Fluids added to the MIPROPS program are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, deuterium, helium, normal hydrogen, and xenon. The most recent modifications to the MIPROPS program are the addition of viscosity and thermal conductivity correlations for parahydrogen and the addition of the fluids normal hydrogen and xenon. The recently added interface considerably increases the program's utility.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Dual Bell Nozzle Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Garcia, Christian; Ruf, Joseph; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) are working together to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the dual bell nozzle concept. Dual bell nozzles are a form of altitude compensating nozzle that consists of two connecting bell contours. At low altitude the nozzle flows fully in the first, relatively lower area ratio, nozzle. The nozzle flow separates from the wall at the inflection point which joins the two bell contours. This relatively low expansion results in higher nozzle efficiency during the low altitude portion of the launch. As ambient pressure decreases with increasing altitude, the nozzle flow will expand to fill the relatively large area ratio second nozzle. The larger area ratio of the second bell enables higher Isp during the high altitude and vacuum portions of the launch. Despite a long history of theoretical consideration and promise towards improving rocket performance, dual bell nozzles have yet to be developed for practical use and have seen only limited testing. One barrier to use of dual bell nozzles is the lack of control over the nozzle flow transition from the first bell to the second bell during operation. A method that this team is pursuing to enhance the controllability of the nozzle flow transition is manipulation of the film coolant that is injected near the inflection between the two bell contours. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is being run to assess the degree of control over nozzle flow transition generated via manipulation of the film injection. A cold flow dual bell nozzle, without film coolant, was tested over a range of simulated altitudes in 2004 in MSFC's nozzle test facility. Both NASA centers have performed a series of simulations of that dual bell to validate their computational models. Those CFD results are compared to the experimental results within this paper. MSFC then proceeded to add film injection to the CFD grid of the dual bell nozzle. A series of

  2. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  3. Remote Visualization and Remote Collaboration On Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A new technology has been developed for remote visualization that provides remote, 3D, high resolution, dynamic, interactive viewing of scientific data (such as fluid dynamics simulations or measurements). Based on this technology, some World Wide Web sites on the Internet are providing fluid dynamics data for educational or testing purposes. This technology is also being used for remote collaboration in joint university, industry, and NASA projects in computational fluid dynamics and wind tunnel testing. Previously, remote visualization of dynamic data was done using video format (transmitting pixel information) such as video conferencing or MPEG movies on the Internet. The concept for this new technology is to send the raw data (e.g., grids, vectors, and scalars) along with viewing scripts over the Internet and have the pixels generated by a visualization tool running on the viewer's local workstation. The visualization tool that is currently used is FAST (Flow Analysis Software Toolkit).

  4. Computational modeling of glow discharge-induced fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Balaji

    Glow discharge at atmospheric pressure using a dielectric barrier discharge can induce fluid flow and operate as an actuator for flow control. The largely isothermal surface plasma generation realized above can modify the near-wall flow structure by means of Lorentzian collisions between the ionized fluid and the neutral fluid. Such an actuator has advantages of no moving parts, performance at atmospheric conditions and devising complex control strategies through the applied voltage. However, the mechanism of the momentum coupling between the plasma and the fluid flow is not yet adequately understood. In the present work, a modeling framework is presented to simulate athermal, non-equilibrium plasma discharges in conjunction with low Mach number fluid dynamics at atmospheric pressure. The plasma and fluid species are treated as a two-fluid system exhibiting a few decades of length and time scales. The effect of the plasma dynamics on the fluid dynamics is devised via a body force treatment in the Navier-Stokes equations. Two different approaches of different degrees of fidelity are presented for modeling the plasma dynamics. The first approach, a phenomenological model, is based on a linearized force distribution approximating the discharge structure, and utilizing experimental guidance to deduce the empirical constants. A high fidelity approach is to model the plasma dynamics in a self-consistent manner using a first principle-based hydrodynamic plasma model. The atmospheric pressure regime of interest here enables us to employ local equilibrium assumptions, signifying efficient collisional energy exchange as against thermal heating from inelastic collision processes. The time scale ratios between convection, diffusion, and reaction/ionization mechanisms are O(107), making the system computationally stiff. To handle the stiffness, a sequential finite-volume operator-splitting algorithm capable of conserving space charge is developed; the approach can handle time

  5. TerraFERMA: Harnessing Advanced Computational Libraries in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M.; van Keken, P.

    2012-12-01

    Many important problems in Earth sciences can be described by non-linear coupled systems of partial differential equations. These "multi-physics" problems include thermo-chemical convection in Earth and planetary interiors, interactions of fluids and magmas with the Earth's mantle and crust and coupled flow of water and ice. These problems are of interest to a large community of researchers but are complicated to model and understand. Much of this complexity stems from the nature of multi-physics where small changes in the coupling between variables or constitutive relations can lead to radical changes in behavior, which in turn affect critical computational choices such as discretizations, solvers and preconditioners. To make progress in understanding such coupled systems requires a computational framework where multi-physics problems can be described at a high-level while maintaining the flexibility to easily modify the solution algorithm. Fortunately, recent advances in computational science provide a basis for implementing such a framework. Here we present the Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler (TerraFERMA), which leverages several advanced open-source libraries for core functionality. FEniCS (fenicsproject.org) provides a high level language for describing the weak forms of coupled systems of equations, and an automatic code generator that produces finite element assembly code. PETSc (www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc) provides a wide range of scalable linear and non-linear solvers that can be composed into effective multi-physics preconditioners. SPuD (amcg.ese.ic.ac.uk/Spud) is an application neutral options system that provides both human and machine-readable interfaces based on a single xml schema. Our software integrates these libraries and provides the user with a framework for exploring multi-physics problems. A single options file fully describes the problem, including all equations, coefficients and solver options. Custom compiled applications are

  6. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  7. Distributed interactive graphics applications in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Buning, Pieter G.; Merritt, Fergus J.

    1988-01-01

    Implementation of two interactive, distributed graphics programs used in Computational Fluid Dynamics is discussed. Both programs run on a Cray 2 supercomputer and use a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation as the graphics front-end machine. The hardware and supporting software is from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation project. Using this configuration, the supercomputer does all of the numerically intensive work and the workstation allows the user to perform real-time interactive transformations on the displayed data. The first program was written originally as a distributed program which computes particle traces for fluid flow solutions existing on the supercomputer. The second is an older post-processing and plotting program which was modified to run in a distributed mode. Both programs have realized a large increase in capability as a distributed process. Some graphical results are presented.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is beginning to play a major role in the aircraft industry of the United States because of the realization that CFD can be a new and effective design tool and thus could provide a company with a competitive advantage. It is also playing a significant role in research institutions, both governmental and academic, as a tool for researching new fluid physics, as well as supplementing and complementing experimental testing. In this presentation, some of the progress made to date in CFD at NASA Ames will be reviewed. The presentation addresses the status of CFD in terms of methods, examples of CFD solutions, and computer technology. In addition, the role CFD will play in supporting the revolutionary goals set forth by the Aeronautical Policy Review Committee established by the Office of Science and Technology Policy is noted. The need for validated CFD tools is also briefly discussed.

  9. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Jr., David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  10. OPENING REMARKS: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2006 and Denver. I share greetings from the new Undersecretary for Energy, Ray Orbach. Five years ago SciDAC was launched as an experiment in computational science. The goal was to form partnerships among science applications, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians to take advantage of the potential of emerging terascale computers. This experiment has been a resounding success. SciDAC has emerged as a powerful concept for addressing some of the biggest challenges facing our world. As significant as these successes were, I believe there is also significance in the teams that achieved them. In addition to their scientific aims these teams have advanced the overall field of computational science and set the stage for even larger accomplishments as we look ahead to SciDAC-2. I am sure that many of you are expecting to hear about the results of our current solicitation for SciDAC-2. I’m afraid we are not quite ready to make that announcement. Decisions are still being made and we will announce the results later this summer. Nearly 250 unique proposals were received and evaluated, involving literally thousands of researchers, postdocs, and students. These collectively requested more than five times our expected budget. This response is a testament to the success of SciDAC in the community. In SciDAC-2 our budget has been increased to about 70 million for FY 2007 and our partnerships have expanded to include the Environment and National Security missions of the Department. The National Science Foundation has also joined as a partner. These new partnerships are expected to expand the application space of SciDAC, and broaden the impact and visibility of the program. We have, with our recent solicitation, expanded to turbulence, computational biology, and groundwater reactive modeling and simulation. We are currently talking with the Department’s applied energy programs about risk assessment, optimization of complex systems - such

  11. 76 FR 45786 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy... Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown...

  12. 75 FR 57742 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770...: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building;...

  13. 78 FR 64931 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION... Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). This meeting replaces the cancelled ASCAC meeting that was to be held... Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of Energy;...

  14. 76 FR 64330 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  15. 78 FR 50404 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ] ACTION... Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown...

  16. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  17. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  19. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics: Current Status and Future Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Horst D.; VanDalsem, William R.; Dagum, Leonardo; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One or the key objectives of the Applied Research Branch in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Allies Research Center is the accelerated introduction of highly parallel machines into a full operational environment. In this report we discuss the performance results obtained from the implementation of some computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications on the Connection Machine CM-2 and the Intel iPSC/860. We summarize some of the experiences made so far with the parallel testbed machines at the NAS Applied Research Branch. Then we discuss the long term computational requirements for accomplishing some of the grand challenge problems in computational aerosciences. We argue that only massively parallel machines will be able to meet these grand challenge requirements, and we outline the computer science and algorithm research challenges ahead.

  20. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of hybrid rocket combustor flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with solid-phase pyrolysis, gas-phase combustion, turbulence and radiation are performed to study hybrid rocket combustor flowfields. The computational study is closely co-ordinated with a companion experimental program using a planar slab burner configuration with HTPB as fuel and gaseous oxygen. Computational predictions agree reasonably well with measurement data of fuel regression rates and surface temperatures. Additionally, most of the parametric trends predicted by the model are in general agreement with experimental trends. The computational model is applied to extend the results from the lab-scale to a full-scale axisymmetric configuration. The numerical predictions indicate that the full-scale configuration burns at a slower rate than the lab-scale combustor under identical specific flow rate conditions. The results demonstrate that detailed CFD analyses can play a useful role in the design of hybrid combustors.

  1. NASA Trapezoidal Wing Computations Including Transition and Advanced Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing is computed with several turbulence models by using grids from the first High Lift Prediction Workshop in an effort to advance understanding of computational fluid dynamics modeling for this type of flowfield. Transition is accounted for in many of the computations. In particular, a recently-developed 4-equation transition model is utilized and works well overall. Accounting for transition tends to increase lift and decrease moment, which improves the agreement with experiment. Upper surface flap separation is reduced, and agreement with experimental surface pressures and velocity profiles is improved. The predicted shape of wakes from upstream elements is strongly influenced by grid resolution in regions above the main and flap elements. Turbulence model enhancements to account for rotation and curvature have the general effect of increasing lift and improving the resolution of the wing tip vortex as it convects downstream. However, none of the models improve the prediction of surface pressures near the wing tip, where more grid resolution is needed.

  2. Microgravity fluid management requirements of advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migra, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    The advanced solar dynamic system (ASDS) program is aimed at developing the technology for highly efficient, lightweight space power systems. The approach is to evaluate Stirling, Brayton and liquid metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) over the temperature range of 1025 to 1400K, identify the critical technologies and develop these technologies. Microgravity fluid management technology is required in several areas of this program, namely, thermal energy storage (TES), heat pipe applications and liquid metal, two phase flow Rankine systems. Utilization of the heat of fusion of phase change materials offers potential for smaller, lighter TES systems. The candidate TES materials exhibit large volume change with the phase change. The heat pipe is an energy dense heat transfer device. A high temperature application may transfer heat from the solar receiver to the PCS working fluid and/or TES. A low temperature application may transfer waste heat from the PCS to the radiator. The liquid metal Rankine PCS requires management of the boiling/condensing process typical of two phase flow systems.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  4. State-of-the-art review of computational fluid dynamics modeling for fluid-solids systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyczkowski, R. W.; Bouillard, J. X.; Ding, J.; Chang, S. L.; Burge, S. W.

    1994-05-01

    As the result of 15 years of research (50 staff years of effort) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), through its involvement in fluidized-bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamics, and a variety of environmental programs, has produced extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and models to predict the multiphase hydrodynamic and reactive behavior of fluid-solids motions and interactions in complex fluidized-bed reactors (FBR's) and slurry systems. This has resulted in the FLUFIX, IRF, and SLUFIX computer programs. These programs are based on fluid-solids hydrodynamic models and can predict information important to the designer of atmospheric or pressurized bubbling and circulating FBR, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and slurry units to guarantee optimum efficiency with minimum release of pollutants into the environment. This latter issue will become of paramount importance with the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1995. Solids motion is also the key to understanding erosion processes. Erosion rates in FBR's and pneumatic and slurry components are computed by ANL's EROSION code to predict the potential metal wastage of FBR walls, intervals, feed distributors, and cyclones. Only the FLUFIX and IRF codes will be reviewed in the paper together with highlights of the validations because of length limitations. It is envisioned that one day, these codes with user-friendly pre- and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale, and biomass as energy sources; to retain energy security; and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  5. State-of-the-art review of computational fluid dynamics modeling for fluid-solids systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.X.; Ding, J.; Chang, S.L.; Burge, S.W.

    1994-05-12

    As the result of 15 years of research (50 staff years of effort) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), through its involvement in fluidized-bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamics, and a variety of environmental programs, has produced extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and models to predict the multiphase hydrodynamic and reactive behavior of fluid-solids motions and interactions in complex fluidized-bed reactors (FBRS) and slurry systems. This has resulted in the FLUFIX, IRF, and SLUFIX computer programs. These programs are based on fluid-solids hydrodynamic models and can predict information important to the designer of atmospheric or pressurized bubbling and circulating FBR, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and slurry units to guarantee optimum efficiency with minimum release of pollutants into the environment. This latter issue will become of paramount importance with the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1995. Solids motion is also the key to understanding erosion processes. Erosion rates in FBRs and pneumatic and slurry components are computed by ANL`s EROSION code to predict the potential metal wastage of FBR walls, intervals, feed distributors, and cyclones. Only the FLUFIX and IRF codes will be reviewed in the paper together with highlights of the validations because of length limitations. It is envisioned that one day, these codes with user-friendly pre and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  6. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  7. Considerations of blood properties, outlet boundary conditions and energy loss approaches in computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Joon Sang

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research, analysis of computational fluid dynamics of cerebral vessels has several limitations. Although blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, velocity and pressure fields were computed under the assumptions of incompressible, laminar, steady-state flows and Newtonian fluid dynamics. The pulsatile nature of blood flow is not properly applied in inlet and outlet boundaries. Therefore, we present these technical limitations and discuss the possible solution by comparing the theoretical and computational studies. PMID:24642855

  8. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  9. Developing an Advanced Environment for Collaborative Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becerra-Fernandez, Irma; Stewart, Helen; DelAlto, Martha; DelAlto, Martha; Knight, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge management in general tries to organize and make available important know-how, whenever and where ever is needed. Today, organizations rely on decision-makers to produce "mission critical" decisions that am based on inputs from multiple domains. The ideal decision-maker has a profound understanding of specific domains that influence the decision-making process coupled with the experience that allows them to act quickly and decisively on the information. In addition, learning companies benefit by not repeating costly mistakes, and by reducing time-to-market in Research & Development projects. Group-decision making tools can help companies make better decisions by capturing the knowledge from groups of experts. Furthermore, companies that capture their customers preferences can improve their customer service, which translates to larger profits. Therefore collaborative computing provides a common communication space, improves sharing of knowledge, provides a mechanism for real-time feedback on the tasks being performed, helps to optimize processes, and results in a centralized knowledge warehouse. This paper presents the research directions. of a project which seeks to augment an advanced collaborative web-based environment called Postdoc, with workflow capabilities. Postdoc is a "government-off-the-shelf" document management software developed at NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC).

  10. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Whole-Body Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh

    1999-01-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics for whole-body aircraft flowfield simulations is described. Recent advances in geometry modeling, surface and volume grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to accurate flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics has emerged as a crucial enabling technology for the design and development of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of transport and fighter aircraft flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future, inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology, and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  12. FAST - A multiprocessed environment for visualization of computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Merritt, Fergus J.; Plessel, Todd C.; Kelaita, Paul G.; Mccabe, R. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents the Flow Analysis Software Toolset (FAST) to be used for fluid-mechanics analysis. The design criteria for FAST including the minimization of the data path in the computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) process, consistent user interface, extensible software architecture, modularization, and the isolation of three-dimensional tasks from the application programmer are outlined. Each separate process communicates through the FAST Hub, while other modules such as FAST Central, NAS file input, CFD calculator, surface extractor and renderer, titler, tracer, and isolev might work together to generate the scene. An interprocess communication package making it possible for FAST to operate as a modular environment where resources could be shared among different machines as well as a single host is discussed.

  13. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics studies of nuclear rocket performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, R.M.; Kim, S.C.; Benson, T.J.

    1994-06-01

    A CFD analysis of a low pressure nuclear rocket concept is presented with the use of an advanced chemical kinetics, Navier-Stokes code. The computations describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamic, thermodynamic and chemical properties, as well as global performance quantities such as specific impulse. Computational studies of several rocket nozzle shapes are conducted in an attempt to maximize hydrogen recombination. These Navier-Stokes calculations, which include real gas and viscous effects, predict lower performance values than have been reported heretofore.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics studies of nuclear rocket performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A CFD analysis of a low pressure nuclear rocket concept is presented with the use of an advanced chemical kinetics, Navier-Stokes code. The computations describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamic, thermodynamic and chemical properties, as well as global performance quantities such as specific impulse. Computational studies of several rocket nozzle shapes are conducted in an attempt to maximize hydrogen recombination. These Navier-Stokes calculations, which include real gas and viscous effects, predict lower performance values than have been reported heretofore.

  16. Advanced flight computers for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, R. Rhoads

    1988-01-01

    Research concerning flight computers for use on interplanetary probes is reviewed. The history of these computers from the Viking mission to the present is outlined. The differences between ground commercial computers and computers for planetary exploration are listed. The development of a computer for the Mariner Mark II comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission is described. Various aspects of recently developed computer systems are examined, including the Max real time, embedded computer, a hypercube distributed supercomputer, a SAR data processor, a processor for the High Resolution IR Imaging Spectrometer, and a robotic vision multiresolution pyramid machine for processsing images obtained by a Mars Rover.

  17. New Challenges in Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The development of visualization systems for analyzing computational fluid dynamics data has been driven by increasing size and complexity of the data. New extensions to the system domain into analysis of data from multiple sources, parameter space studies, and multidisciplinary studies in support of integrated aeronautical design systems provide new g challenges for the visualization system developer. Recent work at NASA Ames Research Center in visualization systems, automatic flow feature detection, unsteady flow visualization techniques, and a new area, data exploitation, will be discussed in the context of NASA information technology initiatives.

  18. Executive Summary: Special Section on Credible Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1998-01-01

    This summary presents the motivation for the Special Section on the credibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, its objective, its background and context, its content, and its major conclusions. Verification and validation (V&V) are the processes for establishing the credibility of CFD simulations. Validation assesses whether correct things are performed and verification assesses whether they are performed correctly. Various aspects of V&V are discussed. Progress is made in verification of simulation models. Considerable effort is still needed for developing a systematic validation method that can assess the credibility of simulated reality.

  19. Continuing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel Guy; Trumble, Kerry A.; Kleb, Bil; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    A large step in the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) is shown through the comparison of three Navier-Stokes solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW) and wind tunnel test results. The test was designed specifically for CFD validation and was conducted in the Langley supersonic 4 x4 Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and includes variations in the number of nozzles, Mach and Reynolds numbers, thrust coefficient, and angles of orientation. Code-to-code and code-to-test comparisons are encouraging and possible error sources are discussed.

  20. Advanced Fluid--Structure Interaction Techniques in Application to Horizontal and Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Artem

    During the last several decades engineers and scientists put significant effort into developing reliable and efficient wind turbines. As a wind power production demands grow, the wind energy research and development need to be enhanced with high-precision methods and tools. These include time-dependent, full-scale, complex-geometry advanced computational simulations at large-scale. Those, computational analysis of wind turbines, including fluid-structure interaction simulations (FSI) at full scale is important for accurate and reliable modeling, as well as blade failure prediction and design optimization. In current dissertation the FSI framework is applied to most challenging class of problems, such as large scale horizontal axis wind turbines and vertical axis wind turbines. The governing equations for aerodynamics and structural mechanics together with coupled formulation are explained in details. The simulations are performed for different wind turbine designs, operational conditions and validated against field-test and wind tunnel experimental data.

  1. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li

    2008-05-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Application of a distributed network in computational fluid dynamic simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.; Deshpande, Ashish

    1994-01-01

    A general-purpose 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithm is implemented on a network of concurrently operating workstations using parallel virtual machine (PVM) and compared with its performance on a CRAY Y-MP and on an Intel iPSC/860. The problem is relatively computationally intensive, and has a communication structure based primarily on nearest-neighbor communication, making it ideally suited to message passing. Such problems are frequently encountered in computational fluid dynamics (CDF), and their solution is increasingly in demand. The communication structure is explicitly coded in the implementation to fully exploit the regularity in message passing in order to produce a near-optimal solution. Results are presented for various grid sizes using up to eight processors.

  5. Progress in Parallel Schur Complement Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We consider preconditioning methods for nonself-adjoint advective-diffusive systems based on a non-overlapping Schur complement procedure for arbitrary triangulated domains. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop scalable preconditioning algorithms for fluid flow discretizations on parallel computing architectures. In our implementation of the Schur complement preconditioning technique, the triangulation is first partitioned into a number of subdomains using the METIS multi-level k-way partitioning code. This partitioning induces a natural 2X2 partitioning of the p.d.e. discretization matrix. By considering various inverse approximations of the 2X2 system, we have developed a family of robust preconditioning techniques. A computer code based on these ideas has been developed and tested on the IBM SP2 and the SGI Power Challenge array using MPI message passing protocol. A number of example CFD calculations will be presented to illustrate and assess various Schur complement approximations.

  6. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassat, Mohammad; Bailey, Joanne; Yetisir, Metin

    2015-11-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was performed on the proposed design for the Canadian SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR). The proposed Canadian SCWR is a 1200 MW(e) supercritical light-water cooled nuclear reactor with pressurized fuel channels. The reactor concept uses an inlet plenum that all fuel channels are attached to and an outlet header nested inside the inlet plenum. The coolant enters the inlet plenum at 350 C and exits the outlet header at 625 C. The operating pressure is approximately 26 MPa. The high pressure and high temperature outlet conditions result in a higher electric conversion efficiency as compared to existing light water reactors. In this work, CFD simulations were performed to model fluid flow and heat transfer in the inlet plenum, outlet header, and various parts of the fuel assembly. The ANSYS Fluent solver was used for simulations. Results showed that mass flow rate distribution in fuel channels varies radially and the inner channels achieve higher outlet temperatures. At the outlet header, zones with rotational flow were formed as the fluid from 336 fuel channels merged. Results also suggested that insulation of the outlet header should be considered to reduce the thermal stresses caused by the large temperature gradients.

  8. Adaptive kinetic-fluid solvers for heterogeneous computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We show feasibility and benefits of porting an adaptive multi-scale kinetic-fluid code to CPU-GPU systems. Challenges are due to the irregular data access for adaptive Cartesian mesh, vast difference of computational cost between kinetic and fluid cells, and desire to evenly load all CPUs and GPUs during grid adaptation and algorithm refinement. Our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic cell-by-cell selection of kinetic or fluid solvers based on continuum breakdown criteria. Using GPUs enables hybrid simulations of mixed rarefied-continuum flows with a million of Boltzmann cells each having a 24 × 24 × 24 velocity mesh. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using the discrete velocity method (DVM), the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver, and a mesoscopic solver based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), all using adaptive Cartesian mesh. Double digit speedups on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPUs have been demonstrated.

  9. Integration of Virtual Reality with Computational Fluid Dynamics for Process Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B.; Chen, G. H.; Fu, D.; Moreland, John; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2010-03-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become a powerful simulation technology used in many industrial applications for process design and optimization to save energy, improve environment, and reduce costs. In order to better understand CFD results and more easily communicate with non-CFD experts, advanced virtual reality (VR) visualization is desired for CFD post-processing. Efforts have recently been made at Purdue University Calumet to integrate VR with CFD to visualize complex data in three dimensions in an interactive, virtual environment. The virtual engineering environment greatly enhances the value of CFD simulations and allows engineers to gain much needed process insights for the design and optimization of industrial processes.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation. 4: Commercial application of CFD in ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    In considering the commercial applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in ventilation, the following are addressed: typical markets (airport centers, large theaters, atria, shopping malls, etc.); typical problems to be solved (energy flow, draft, ventilation effectiveness, pressure distribution, etc.); and high priority areas, activities and quantities (fast preprocessing, effective visualization software, etc.). It is stated that the commercial application of CFD may be looked upon as an advanced 'zonal' model. The 'zonal' model concept is outlined and CFD with large control volumes is considered. An illustrated example of air flow simulation in a theater is given.

  11. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  12. Computing Advances in the Teaching of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, W. P.; Matthews, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses three trends in computer-oriented chemistry instruction: (1) availability of interfaces to integrate computers with experiments; (2) impact of the development of higher resolution graphics and greater memory capacity; and (3) role of videodisc technology on computer assisted instruction. Includes program listings for auto-titration and…

  13. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  14. The role of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in hair science.

    PubMed

    Spicka, Peter; Grald, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a virtual prototyping tool is widespread in the consumer packaged goods industry. CFD refers to the calculation on a computer of the velocity, pressure, and temperature and chemical species concentrations within a flowing liquid or gas. Because the performance of manufacturing equipment and product designs can be simulated on the computer, the benefit of using CFD is significant time and cost savings when compared to traditional physical testing methods. CFD has been used to design, scale-up and troubleshoot mixing tanks, spray dryers, heat exchangers and other process equipment. Recently, computer models of the capillary wicking process inside fibrous structures have been added to CFD software. These models have been used to gain a better understanding of the absorbent performance of diapers and feminine protection products. The same models can also be used to represent the movement of shampoo, conditioner, colorants and other products through the hair and scalp. In this paper, we provide an introduction to CFD and show some examples of its application to the manufacture of consumer products. We also provide sonic examples to show the potential of CFD for understanding the performance of products applied to the hair and scalp. PMID:15645102

  15. Advancing crime scene computer forensics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Chet; Feldman, John; Giordano, Joe

    1999-02-01

    Computers and network technology have become inexpensive and powerful tools that can be applied to a wide range of criminal activity. Computers have changed the world's view of evidence because computers are used more and more as tools in committing `traditional crimes' such as embezzlements, thefts, extortion and murder. This paper will focus on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of the data recovery and evidence construction tools used in both the field and laboratory for prosection purposes.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  17. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

    2011-05-04

    In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

  19. Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Loebbeck, Alfred; Singh, Hersh; Mark, Russell; Wei, Timothy

    2004-11-01

    The dolphin kick is an important component in competitive swimming and is used extensively by swimmers immediately following the starting dive as well as after turns. In this stroke, the swimmer swims about three feet under the water surface and the stroke is executed by performing an undulating wave-like motion of the body that is quite similar to the anguilliform propulsion mode in fish. Despite the relatively simple kinematics of this stoke, considerable variability in style and performance is observed even among Olympic level swimmers. Motivated by this, a joint experimental-numerical study has been initiated to examine the fluid-dynamics of this stroke. The current presentation will describe the computational portion of this study. The computations employ a sharp interface immersed boundary method (IBM) which allows us to simulate flows with complex moving boudnaries on stationary Cartesian grids. 3D body scans of male and female Olympic swimmers have been obtained and these are used in conjuction with high speed videos to recreate a realistic dolphin kick for the IBM solver. Preliminary results from these computations will be presented.

  20. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  1. The aerospace plane design challenge: Credible computational fluid dynamics results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1990-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is necessary in the design processes of all current aerospace plane programs. Single-stage-to-orbit (STTO) aerospace planes with air-breathing supersonic combustion are going to be largely designed by means of CFD. The challenge of the aerospace plane design is to provide credible CFD results to work from, to assess the risk associated with the use of those results, and to certify CFD codes that produce credible results. To establish the credibility of CFD results used in design, the following topics are discussed: CFD validation vis-a-vis measurable fluid dynamics (MFD) validation; responsibility for credibility; credibility requirement; and a guide for establishing credibility. Quantification of CFD uncertainties helps to assess success risk and safety risks, and the development of CFD as a design tool requires code certification. This challenge is managed by designing the designers to use CFD effectively, by ensuring quality control, and by balancing the design process. For designing the designers, the following topics are discussed: how CFD design technology is developed; the reasons Japanese companies, by and large, produce goods of higher quality than the U.S. counterparts; teamwork as a new way of doing business; and how ideas, quality, and teaming can be brought together. Quality control for reducing the loss imparted to the society begins with the quality of the CFD results used in the design process, and balancing the design process means using a judicious balance of CFD and MFD.

  2. Modeling of a continuous pretreatment reactor using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berson, R Eric; Dasari, Rajesh K; Hanley, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are employed to predict flow characteristics in a continuous auger driven reactor designed for the dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Slurry containing a high concentration of biomass solids exhibits a high viscosity, which poses unique mixing issues within the reactor. The viscosity increases significantly with a small increase in solids concentration and also varies with temperature. A well-mixed slurry is desirable to evenly distribute acid on biomass, prevent buildup on the walls of the reactor, and provides an uniform final product. Simulations provide flow patterns obtained over a wide range of viscosities and pressure distributions, which may affect reaction rates. Results provide a tool for analyzing sources of inconsistencies in product quality and insight into future design and operating parameters.

  3. Wind tunnel requirements for computational fluid dynamics code verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of experiment in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for aerodynamic flow field prediction is discussed. Requirements for code verification from two sources that pace the development of CFD are described for: (1) development of adequate flow modeling, and (2) establishment of confidence in the use of CFD to predict complex flows. The types of data needed and their accuracy differs in detail and scope and leads to definite wind tunnel requirements. Examples of testing to assess and develop turbulence models, and to verify code development, are used to establish future wind tunnel testing requirements. Versatility, appropriate scale and speed range, accessibility for nonintrusive instrumentation, computerized data systems, and dedicated use for verification were among the more important requirements identified.

  4. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  5. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  6. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, N.; Landwehr, S.; Ward, B.

    2013-10-01

    Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from -60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s-1 in increments of 0.5 m s-1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  7. Knowledge-based zonal grid generation for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation of flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards reducing the difficulty of three-dimensional grid generation in computational fluid dynamics. Using a knowledge-based approach makes sense, but problems arise which are caused by aspects of zoning involving perception, lack of expert consensus, and design processes. These obstacles are overcome by means of a simple shape and configuration language, a tunable zoning archetype, and a method of assembling plans from selected, predefined subplans. A demonstration system for knowledge-based two-dimensional flow field zoning has been successfully implemented and tested on representative aerodynamic configurations. The results show that this approach can produce flow field zonings that are acceptable to experts with differing evaluation criteria.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Rong

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  9. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  10. Advances in Monte Carlo computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.

    2011-03-01

    Since the invention of the Metropolis method in 1953, Monte Carlo methods have been shown to provide an efficient, practical approach to the calculation of physical properties in a wide variety of systems. In this talk, I will discuss some of the advances in the MC simulation of thermodynamics systems, with an emphasis on optimization to obtain a maximum of useful information.

  11. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  12. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J

    2014-08-13

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items. PMID:25024419

  13. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J

    2014-08-13

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items.

  14. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items. PMID:25024419

  15. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  16. Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

  17. Use of a genetic algorithm to solve fluid flow problems on an NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.J.; Cline, D.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents a method to solve partial differential equations governing two-phase fluid flow by using a genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer. Genetic algorithms represent a significant departure from traditional approaches of solving fluid flow problems. The inherent parallelism of genetic algorithms offers the prospect of obtaining solutions faster than ever possible. The paper discusses the two-phase flow equations, the genetic representation of the unknowns, the fitness function, the genetic operators, and the implementation of the genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 computer. The paper investigates the implementation efficiency using a pipe blowdown test and presents the effects of varying both the genetic parameters and the number of processors. The results show that genetic algorithms provide a major advancement in methods for solving two-phase flow problems. A desired goal of solving these equations for a specific simulation problem in real time or faster requires computers with an order of magnitude more processors or faster than the NCUBE/2's 1024.

  18. Use of a genetic algorithm to solve fluid flow problems on an NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.J.; Cline, D.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents a method to solve partial differential equations governing two-phase fluid flow by using a genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer. Genetic algorithms represent a significant departure from traditional approaches of solving fluid flow problems. The inherent parallelism of genetic algorithms offers the prospect of obtaining solutions faster than ever possible. The paper discusses the two-phase flow equations, the genetic representation of the unknowns, the fitness function, the genetic operators, and the implementation of the genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 computer. The paper investigates the implementation efficiency using a pipe blowdown test and presents the effects of varying both the genetic parameters and the number of processors. The results show that genetic algorithms provide a major advancement in methods for solving two-phase flow problems. A desired goal of solving these equations for a specific simulation problem in real time or faster requires computers with an order of magnitude more processors or faster than the NCUBE/2`s 1024.

  19. Evaluation of Advanced Computing Techniques and Technologies: Reconfigurable Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to survey the technology of reconfigurable computing determine its level of maturity and suitability for NASA applications. To better understand and assess the effectiveness of the reconfigurable design paradigm that is utilized within the HAL-15 reconfigurable computer system. This system was made available to NASA MSFC for this purpose, from Star Bridge Systems, Inc. To implement on at least one application that would benefit from the performance levels that are possible with reconfigurable hardware. It was originally proposed that experiments in fault tolerance and dynamically reconfigurability would be perform but time constraints mandated that these be pursued as future research.

  20. Space data systems: Advanced flight computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The technical objectives are to develop high-performance, space-qualifiable, onboard computing, storage, and networking technologies. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: technology challenges; state-of-the-art assessment; program description; relationship to external programs; and cooperation and coordination effort.

  1. Advances in Computer-Supported Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neto, Francisco; Brasileiro, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The Internet and growth of computer networks have eliminated geographic barriers, creating an environment where education can be brought to a student no matter where that student may be. The success of distance learning programs and the availability of many Web-supported applications and multimedia resources have increased the effectiveness of…

  2. Two-fluid cleaning technology for advanced photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Nobuo; Kurokawa, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Harumichi; Nonaka, Mikio

    2009-04-01

    Along with the increased miniaturization of electronic devices, two-fluid cleaning technology is garnering the spotlight as a solution for the manufacturing process of Photomask. This is because it is now known that implementing energy control of the particles that are sprayed on the substrate allows cleaning of miniature patterns. However, it is not yet clear just how miniature of a pattern is cleanable with two-fluid cleaning technology. This study discusses mechanisms to miniaturize the droplets created by a two-fluid nozzle. In addition, this study also considers the impact of droplet size on pattern damage to the Photomask and speaks on the potential for applying two-fluid cleaning technology in the future.

  3. Computer simulation of two-phase fluid motion in unsaturated complex fractures using a volume of fluid method

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Huang; Paul Meakin

    2005-12-01

    Complex fluid behavior in unsaturated fracture and fracture networks, such as film flow, the migration, fragmentation, and coalescence of droplets, and rivulet flow with or without meandering or pulsation, has been widely observed in laboratory experiments. In this study, a modified two-dimensional volume of fluid (VOF) method was used to simulate liquid motion in partially saturated fracture apertures under a variety of flow conditions. This modeling approach systematically incorporates the effects of inertial forces, viscosity, gravity acting on the fluid densities, fracture wall wetting, and the pressure drop across curved fluid-fluid interfaces due to surface tension. This allows us to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental physics governing unsaturated fluid flow in fracture apertures. The VOF method is able to handle the complex dynamics of fluid-fluid interfaces and free surfaces in unsaturated fractures by using a fixed Eulerian grid. Fragmentation and coalescence of the fluids are automatically handled without resorting to complex adaptive mesh refinement or interface repairing algorithms. The wetting of fracture walls was modeled by imposing contact angles near the contact lines (contact points in two-dimensional simulations), and different contact angles were automatically chosen depending on whether the liquid interface is advancing, receding, or essentially stationary. The qualitative agreements between the numerical simulations and complex multiphase fluid dynamics reported in laboratory experiments clearly demonstrate the potential value of the VOF method for the mechanistically based modeling of immiscible liquid motion in unsaturated fracture networks.

  4. Assessment of extracellular fluid volume and fluid status in hemodialysis patients: current status and technical advances.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yanna; Zhu, Fansan; Kotanko, Peter

    2012-07-01

    The assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECV) and fluid status is both important and challenging in hemodialysis patients. Extracellular fluid is distributed in two major sub-compartments: interstitial fluid and plasma. A variety of methods are used to assess the ECV, with tracer dilution techniques considered gold standard. However, ECV defined as the distribution space of bromide, sodium, chloride, and ferrocyanide appears to be larger than the distribution volume of inulin and sucrose, suggesting a partial distribution into the intracellular volume. Relative blood volume monitoring, measurement of inferior vena cava diameter by ultrasound and biochemical markers are indirect methods, which do not reflect the ECV and fluid status accurately. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) techniques enable assessment of ECV and intracellular volume. Currently, BIS appears to be the most practical method for assessing ECV volume and fluid status in dialysis patients.

  5. Analysis of sponge zones for computational fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bodony, Daniel J. . E-mail: bodony@stanford.edu

    2006-03-01

    The use of sponge regions, or sponge zones, which add the forcing term -{sigma}(q - q {sub ref}) to the right-hand-side of the governing equations in computational fluid mechanics as an ad hoc boundary treatment is widespread. They are used to absorb and minimize reflections from computational boundaries and as forcing sponges to introduce prescribed disturbances into a calculation. A less common usage is as a means of extending a calculation from a smaller domain into a larger one, such as in computing the far-field sound generated in a localized region. By analogy to the penalty method of finite elements, the method is placed on a solid foundation, complete with estimates of convergence. The analysis generalizes the work of Israeli and Orszag [M. Israeli, S.A. Orszag, Approximation of radiation boundary conditions, J. Comp. Phys. 41 (1981) 115-135] and confirms their findings when applied as a special case to one-dimensional wave propagation in an absorbing sponge. It is found that the rate of convergence of the actual solution to the target solution, with an appropriate norm, is inversely proportional to the sponge strength. A detailed analysis for acoustic wave propagation in one-dimension verifies the convergence rate given by the general theory. The exponential point-wise convergence derived by Israeli and Orszag in the high-frequency limit is recovered and found to hold over all frequencies. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the method when applied to Burgers' equation shows similar convergence properties. Three numerical examples are given to confirm the analysis: the acoustic extension of a two-dimensional time-harmonic point source, the acoustic extension of a three-dimensional initial-value problem of a sound pulse, and the introduction of unstable eigenmodes from linear stability theory into a two-dimensional shear layer.

  6. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): Future role and requirements as viewed by an applied aerodynamicist. [computer systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshihara, H.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of designing the wing-fuselage configuration of an advanced transonic commercial airliner and the optimization of a supercruiser fighter are sketched, pointing out the essential fluid mechanical phenomena that play an important role. Such problems suggest that for a numerical method to be useful, it must be able to treat highly three dimensional turbulent separations, flows with jet engine exhausts, and complex vehicle configurations. Weaknesses of the two principal tools of the aerodynamicist, the wind tunnel and the computer, suggest a complementing combined use of these tools, which is illustrated by the case of the transonic wing-fuselage design. The anticipated difficulties in developing an adequate turbulent transport model suggest that such an approach may have to suffice for an extended period. On a longer term, experimentation of turbulent transport in meaningful cases must be intensified to provide a data base for both modeling and theory validation purposes.

  8. Advances in Computationally Modeling Human Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  9. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  10. STARS: An Integrated, Multidisciplinary, Finite-Element, Structural, Fluids, Aeroelastic, and Aeroservoelastic Analysis Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, finite element-based, highly graphics-oriented, linear and nonlinear analysis capability that includes such disciplines as structures, heat transfer, linear aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and controls engineering has been achieved by integrating several new modules in the original STARS (STructural Analysis RoutineS) computer program. Each individual analysis module is general-purpose in nature and is effectively integrated to yield aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic solutions of complex engineering problems. Examples of advanced NASA Dryden Flight Research Center projects analyzed by the code in recent years include the X-29A, F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle/Thrust Vectoring Control System, B-52/Pegasus Generic Hypersonics, National AeroSpace Plane (NASP), SR-71/Hypersonic Launch Vehicle, and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) projects. Extensive graphics capabilities exist for convenient model development and postprocessing of analysis results. The program is written in modular form in standard FORTRAN language to run on a variety of computers, such as the IBM RISC/6000, SGI, DEC, Cray, and personal computer; associated graphics codes use OpenGL and IBM/graPHIGS language for color depiction. This program is available from COSMIC, the NASA agency for distribution of computer programs.

  11. Evaluation of Aircraft Platforms for SOFIA by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, S. P.; Srinivasan, G. R.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The selection of an airborne platform for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is based not only on economic cost, but technical criteria, as well. Technical issues include aircraft fatigue, resonant characteristics of the cavity-port shear layer, aircraft stability, the drag penalty of the open telescope bay, and telescope performance. Recently, two versions of the Boeing 747 aircraft, viz., the -SP and -200 configurations, were evaluated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for their suitability as SOFIA platforms. In each configuration the telescope was mounted behind the wings in an open bay with nearly circular aperture. The geometry of the cavity, cavity aperture, and telescope was identical in both platforms. The aperture was located on the port side of the aircraft and the elevation angle of the telescope, measured with respect to the vertical axis, was 500. The unsteady, viscous, three-dimensional, aerodynamic and acoustic flow fields in the vicinity of SOFIA were simulated by an implicit, finite-difference Navier-Stokes flow solver (OVERFLOW) on a Chimera, overset grid system. The computational domain was discretized by structured grids. Computations were performed at wind-tunnel and flight Reynolds numbers corresponding to one free-stream flow condition (M = 0.85, angle of attack alpha = 2.50, and sideslip angle beta = 0 degrees). The computational domains consisted of twenty-nine(29) overset grids in the wind-tunnel simulations and forty-five(45) grids in the simulations run at cruise flight conditions. The maximum number of grid points in the simulations was approximately 4 x 10(exp 6). Issues considered in the evaluation study included analysis of the unsteady flow field in the cavity, the influence of the cavity on the flow across empennage surfaces, the drag penalty caused by the open telescope bay, and the noise radiating from cavity surfaces and the cavity-port shear layer. Wind-tunnel data were also available to compare

  12. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  13. Advances in modelling of biomimetic fluid flow at different scales

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The biomimetic flow at different scales has been discussed at length. The need of looking into the biological surfaces and morphologies and both geometrical and physical similarities to imitate the technological products and processes has been emphasized. The complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems, the fluid-interface and the physics involved at multiscale and macro-, meso-, micro- and nano-scales have been discussed. The flow and heat transfer simulation is done by various CFD solvers including Navier-Stokes and energy equations, lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics method. Combined continuum-molecular dynamics method is also reviewed. PMID:21711847

  14. Hemodynamic assessment of partial mechanical circulatory support: data derived from computed tomography angiographic images and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Karmonik, Christof; Rengier, Fabian; Meredig, Hagen; Farag, Mina Berty; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Arif, Rawa; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Karck, Matthias; Ruhparwar, Arjang

    2015-01-01

    Partial mechanical circulatory support represents a new concept for the treatment of advanced heart failure. The Circulite Synergy Micro Pump®, where the inflow cannula is connected to the left atrium and the outflow cannula to the right subclavian artery, was one of the first devices to introduce this concept to the clinic. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, hemodynamics in the aortic tree was visualized and quantified from computed tomography angiographic (CTA) images in two patients. A realistic computational model was created by integrating flow information from the native heart and from the Circulite device. Diastolic flow augmentation in the descending aorta but competing/antagonizing flow patterns in the proximal innominate artery was observed. Velocity time curves in the ascending aorta correlated well with those in the left common carotid, the left subclavian and the descending aorta but poorly with the one in the innominate. Our results demonstrate that CFD may be useful in providing a better understanding of the main flow patterns in mechanical circulatory support devices. PMID:25984458

  15. Development of new flux splitting schemes. [computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Maximizing both accuracy and efficiency has been the primary objective in designing a numerical algorithm for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is especially important for solutions of complex three dimensional systems of Navier-Stokes equations which often include turbulence modeling and chemistry effects. Recently, upwind schemes have been well received for their capability in resolving discontinuities. With this in mind, presented are two new flux splitting techniques for upwind differencing. The first method is based on High-Order Polynomial Expansions (HOPE) of the mass flux vector. The second new flux splitting is based on the Advection Upwind Splitting Method (AUSM). The calculation of the hypersonic conical flow demonstrates the accuracy of the splitting in resolving the flow in the presence of strong gradients. A second series of tests involving the two dimensional inviscid flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil demonstrates the ability of the AUSM to resolve the shock discontinuity at transonic speed. A third case calculates a series of supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. Finally, the fourth case deals with tests of a two dimensional shock wave/boundary layer interaction.

  16. Computational fluid dynamic design of rocket engine pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    Integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for design and analysis of turbomachinery components is needed as the requirements of pump performance and reliability become more stringent for the new generation of rocket engine. A fast grid generator, designed specially for centrifugal pump impeller, which allows a turbomachinery designer to use CFD to optimize the component design will be presented. The CFD grid is directly generated from the impeller blade G-H blade coordinates. The grid points are first generated on the meridional plane with the desired clustering near the end walls. This is followed by the marching of grid points from the pressure side of one blade to the suction side of a neighboring blade. This fast grid generator has been used to optimize the consortium pump impeller design. A grid dependency study has been conducted for the consortium pump impeller. Two different grid sizes, one with 10,000 grid points and one with 80,000 grid points were used for the grid dependency study. The effects of grid resolution on the turnaround time, including the grid generation and completion of the CFD analysis, is discussed. The impeller overall mass average performance is compared for different designs. Optimum design is achieved through systematic change of the design parameters. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used not only for flow analysis but also for design and optimization of turbomachinery components.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, Robert; Prahl, Duncan; Lange, Rich

    2013-12-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  20. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics for turbomachinery internal air systems.

    PubMed

    Chew, John W; Hills, Nicholas J

    2007-10-15

    Considerable progress in development and application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aeroengine internal flow systems has been made in recent years. CFD is regularly used in industry for assessment of air systems, and the performance of CFD for basic axisymmetric rotor/rotor and stator/rotor disc cavities with radial throughflow is largely understood and documented. Incorporation of three-dimensional geometrical features and calculation of unsteady flows are becoming commonplace. Automation of CFD, coupling with thermal models of the solid components, and extension of CFD models to include both air system and main gas path flows are current areas of development. CFD is also being used as a research tool to investigate a number of flow phenomena that are not yet fully understood. These include buoyancy-affected flows in rotating cavities, rim seal flows and mixed air/oil flows. Large eddy simulation has shown considerable promise for the buoyancy-driven flows and its use for air system flows is expected to expand in the future.

  2. Design of airborne wind turbine and computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbreen, Faiqa

    Wind energy is a promising alternative to the depleting non-renewable sources. The height of the wind turbines becomes a constraint to their efficiency. Airborne wind turbine can reach much higher altitudes and produce higher power due to high wind velocity and energy density. The focus of this thesis is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of higher velocities in the atmosphere. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software StarCCM+. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) with K-epsilon turbulence model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine and the increase in air velocity at the throat. The analysis has been done using two ambient velocities of 12 m/s and 6 m/s. At 12 m/s inlet velocity, the velocity of air at the turbine has been recorded as 16 m/s. The power generated by the turbine is 61 kW. At inlet velocity of 6 m/s, the velocity of air at turbine increased to 10 m/s. The power generated by turbine is 25 kW.

  3. Methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification/validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The issues of verification, calibration, and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been receiving increasing levels of attention in the research literature and in engineering technology. Both CFD researchers and users of CFD codes are asking more critical and detailed questions concerning the accuracy, range of applicability, reliability and robustness of CFD codes and their predictions. This is a welcomed trend because it demonstrates that CFD is maturing from a research tool to the world of impacting engineering hardware and system design. In this environment, the broad issue of code quality assurance becomes paramount. However, the philosophy and methodology of building confidence in CFD code predictions has proven to be more difficult than many expected. A wide variety of physical modeling errors and discretization errors are discussed. Here, discretization errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential equations to algebraic equations, and their solution. Boundary conditions for both the partial differential equations and the discretized equations will be discussed. Contrasts are drawn between the assumptions and actual use of numerical method consistency and stability. Comments are also made concerning the existence and uniqueness of solutions for both the partial differential equations and the discrete equations. Various techniques are suggested for the detection and estimation of errors caused by physical modeling and discretization of the partial differential equations.

  4. Introducing Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation into Olfactory Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers various odors to the user's nose. It can be used to add special effects to movies and games by releasing odors relevant to the scenes shown on the screen. In order to provide high-presence olfactory stimuli to the users, the display must be able to generate realistic odors with appropriate concentrations in a timely manner together with visual and audio playbacks. In this paper, we propose to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in conjunction with the olfactory display. Odor molecules released from their source are transported mainly by turbulent flow, and their behavior can be extremely complicated even in a simple indoor environment. In the proposed system, a CFD solver is employed to calculate the airflow field and the odor dispersal in the given environment. An odor blender is used to generate the odor with the concentration determined based on the calculated odor distribution. Experimental results on presenting odor stimuli synchronously with movie clips show the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  5. A parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Deborah E.

    1993-12-01

    This research addressed the development of a parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator using Delaunay triangulation. The generator is applied to simple elliptical and cylindrical two-dimensional bodies. The methodologies used included Watson's point insertion algorithm, Holmes and Snyder's point creation algorithm, a discretized surface definition, Anderson's clustering function, and a Laplacian smoother. The first version of the software involved a processor boundary exchange at the end of each iteration with no inter-processor communications during the iterations. The second version used inter-processor communication during each iteration instead of the boundary exchange. Version 1 demonstrated a speedup of 1.8 for some portions of the code, but proved to be unscalable for more than two nodes due to the interdependency of the triangular elements. The results of Version 2 were similar. Two distribution methodologies, a simple 360-degree distribution and recursive spectral bisection (RSB), were examined. For the initial grid distribution, the distribution generated by the RSB code would be similar to the distribution generated by the 360-degree methodology and would require significantly more time to execute.

  6. Advances in computational studies of energy materials.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; Guo, Z X; Miskufova, M; Shevlin, S A; Smith, A G H; Sokol, A A; Walsh, A; Wilson, D J; Woodley, S M

    2010-07-28

    We review recent developments and applications of computational modelling techniques in the field of materials for energy technologies including hydrogen production and storage, energy storage and conversion, and light absorption and emission. In addition, we present new work on an Sn2TiO4 photocatalyst containing an Sn(II) lone pair, new interatomic potential models for SrTiO3 and GaN, an exploration of defects in the kesterite/stannite-structured solar cell absorber Cu2ZnSnS4, and report details of the incorporation of hydrogen into Ag2O and Cu2O. Special attention is paid to the modelling of nanostructured systems, including ceria (CeO2, mixed Ce(x)O(y) and Ce2O3) and group 13 sesquioxides. We consider applications based on both interatomic potential and electronic structure methodologies; and we illustrate the increasingly quantitative and predictive nature of modelling in this field. PMID:20566517

  7. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2001-01-01

    Considerable progress over the past thirty years has been made in the development of large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Computations are used routinely to design the cruise shapes of transport aircraft through complex-geometry simulations involving the solution of 25-100 million equations; in this arena the number of wind-tunnel tests for a new design has been substantially reduced. However, simulations of the entire flight envelope of the vehicle, including maximum lift, buffet onset, flutter, and control effectiveness have not been as successful in eliminating the reliance on wind-tunnel testing. These simulations involve unsteady flows with more separation and stronger shock waves than at cruise. The main reasons limiting further inroads of CFD into the design process are: (1) the reliability of turbulence models; and (2) the time and expense of the numerical simulation. Because of the prohibitive resolution requirements of direct simulations at high Reynolds numbers, transition and turbulence modeling is expected to remain an issue for the near term. The focus of this paper addresses the latter problem by attempting to attain optimal efficiencies in solving the governing equations. Typically current CFD codes based on the use of multigrid acceleration techniques and multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping schemes are able to converge lift and drag values for cruise configurations within approximately 1000 residual evaluations. An optimally convergent method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME), meaning the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in the discretized system of equations (residual equations). In this paper, a distributed relaxation approach to achieving TME for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RNAS) equations are discussed along with the foundations that form the

  8. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  9. Tenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion were discussed. The workshop was an open meeting of government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  10. Analysis, approximation, and computation of a coupled solid/fluid temperature control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, Max D.; Lee, Hyung C.

    1993-01-01

    An optimization problem is formulated motivated by the desire to remove temperature peaks, i.e., 'hot spots', along the bounding surfaces of containers of fluid flows. The heat equation of the solid container is coupled to the energy equations for the fluid. Heat sources can be located in the solid body, the fluid, or both. Control is effected by adjustments to the temperature of the fluid at the inflow boundary. Both mathematical analyses and computational experiments are given.

  11. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code for application to traditional incompressible flow problems has been developed. The method is actually a slight compressibility approach which takes advantage of the bulk modulus and finite sound speed of all real fluids. The finite element numerical analog uses a dynamic differencing scheme based, in part, on a variational principle for computational fluid dynamics. The code was developed in order to study the feasibility of damping seals for high speed turbomachinery. Preliminary seal analyses have been performed.

  12. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    R. James Kirkpatrick; Andrey G. Kalinichev

    2008-11-25

    Research supported by this grant focuses on molecular scale understanding of central issues related to the structure and dynamics of geochemically important fluids, fluid-mineral interfaces, and confined fluids using computational modeling and experimental methods. Molecular scale knowledge about fluid structure and dynamics, how these are affected by mineral surfaces and molecular-scale (nano-) confinement, and how water molecules and dissolved species interact with surfaces is essential to understanding the fundamental chemistry of a wide range of low-temperature geochemical processes, including sorption and geochemical transport. Our principal efforts are devoted to continued development of relevant computational approaches, application of these approaches to important geochemical questions, relevant NMR and other experimental studies, and application of computational modeling methods to understanding the experimental results. The combination of computational modeling and experimental approaches is proving highly effective in addressing otherwise intractable problems. In 2006-2007 we have significantly advanced in new, highly promising research directions along with completion of on-going projects and final publication of work completed in previous years. New computational directions are focusing on modeling proton exchange reactions in aqueous solutions using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), metadynamics (MTD), and empirical valence bond (EVB) approaches. Proton exchange is critical to understanding the structure, dynamics, and reactivity at mineral-water interfaces and for oxy-ions in solution, but has traditionally been difficult to model with molecular dynamics (MD). Our ultimate objective is to develop this capability, because MD is much less computationally demanding than quantum-chemical approaches. We have also extended our previous MD simulations of metal binding to natural organic matter (NOM) to a much longer time scale (up to 10 ns) for

  13. High-performance computational fluid dynamics: a custom-code approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannon, James; Loiseau, Jean-Christophe; Valluri, Prashant; Bethune, Iain; Náraigh, Lennon Ó.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a modified and simplified version of the pre-existing fully parallelized three-dimensional Navier–Stokes flow solver known as TPLS. We demonstrate how the simplified version can be used as a pedagogical tool for the study of computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) and parallel computing. TPLS is at its heart a two-phase flow solver, and uses calls to a range of external libraries to accelerate its performance. However, in the present context we narrow the focus of the study to basic hydrodynamics and parallel computing techniques, and the code is therefore simplified and modified to simulate pressure-driven single-phase flow in a channel, using only relatively simple Fortran 90 code with MPI parallelization, but no calls to any other external libraries. The modified code is analysed in order to both validate its accuracy and investigate its scalability up to 1000 CPU cores. Simulations are performed for several benchmark cases in pressure-driven channel flow, including a turbulent simulation, wherein the turbulence is incorporated via the large-eddy simulation technique. The work may be of use to advanced undergraduate and graduate students as an introductory study in CFDs, while also providing insight for those interested in more general aspects of high-performance computing.

  14. High-performance computational fluid dynamics: a custom-code approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannon, James; Loiseau, Jean-Christophe; Valluri, Prashant; Bethune, Iain; Náraigh, Lennon Ó.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a modified and simplified version of the pre-existing fully parallelized three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow solver known as TPLS. We demonstrate how the simplified version can be used as a pedagogical tool for the study of computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) and parallel computing. TPLS is at its heart a two-phase flow solver, and uses calls to a range of external libraries to accelerate its performance. However, in the present context we narrow the focus of the study to basic hydrodynamics and parallel computing techniques, and the code is therefore simplified and modified to simulate pressure-driven single-phase flow in a channel, using only relatively simple Fortran 90 code with MPI parallelization, but no calls to any other external libraries. The modified code is analysed in order to both validate its accuracy and investigate its scalability up to 1000 CPU cores. Simulations are performed for several benchmark cases in pressure-driven channel flow, including a turbulent simulation, wherein the turbulence is incorporated via the large-eddy simulation technique. The work may be of use to advanced undergraduate and graduate students as an introductory study in CFDs, while also providing insight for those interested in more general aspects of high-performance computing.

  15. Flight Simulation of Taketombo Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Flight Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kohei; Ueno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In the present study we have developed a numerical method to simulate the flight dynamics of a small flying body with unsteady motion, where both aerodynamics and flight dynamics are fully considered. A key point of this numerical code is to use computational fluid dynamics and computational flight dynamics at the same time, which is referred to as CFD2, or double CFDs, where several new ideas are adopted in the governing equations, the method to make each quantity nondimensional, and the coupling method between aerodynamics and flight dynamics. This numerical code can be applied to simulate the unsteady motion of small vehicles such as micro air vehicles (MAV). As a sample calculation, we take up Taketombo, or a bamboo dragonfly, and its free flight in the air is demonstrated. The eventual aim of this research is to virtually fly an aircraft with arbitrary motion to obtain aerodynamic and flight dynamic data, which cannot be taken in the conventional wind tunnel.

  16. Fluid Analysis and Improved Structure of an ATEG Heat Exchanger Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. B.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a numerical model has been employed to analyze the internal flow field distribution in a heat exchanger applied for an automotive thermoelectric generator based on computational fluid dynamics. The model simulates the influence of factors relevant to the heat exchanger, including the automotive waste heat mass flow velocity, temperature, internal fins, and back pressure. The result is in good agreement with experimental test data. Sensitivity analysis of the inlet parameters shows that increase of the exhaust velocity, compared with the inlet temperature, makes little contribution (0.1 versus 0.19) to the heat transfer but results in a detrimental back pressure increase (0.69 versus 0.21). A configuration equipped with internal fins is proved to offer better thermal performance compared with that without fins. Finally, based on an attempt to improve the internal flow field, a more rational structure is obtained, offering a more homogeneous temperature distribution, higher average heat transfer coefficient, and lower back pressure.

  17. Air Dispersion Characteristics and Thermal Comparison of Traditional and Fabric Ductwork using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreopoulou, Areti

    This thesis research compares the air dispersion and thermal comfort characteristics of conventional diffuser and fabric-based ductwork systems. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings produce and regulate airflow traveling through ductwork. The performance characteristics of conventional ductwork are compared with recent advancements in fabric-based ductwork. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, thermal and air distribution flow patterns are compared between the two types of ductwork and preliminary thermal comfort and efficiency conclusions are drawn. Results of the Air Distribution Performance Index (ADPI) for both ducting systems reflect that, under the given test conditions, the fabric duct system is approximately 23% more comfortable than the traditional diffuser system in terms of air speed flow uniformity into the space, while staying within the Effective Draft Temperature comfort zone of -3 to +2°F.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Saltstone Vault 4 Vapor Sapce

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Young

    2005-06-27

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns for vapor space inside the Saltstone Vault No.4 under different operating scenarios. The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations. A CFD model took three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the boundary conditions as provided by the customer. The present model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference baseline case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information.

  19. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  20. Advanced Placement Computer Science with Pascal. Volume 2. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide presents 100 lessons for an advanced placement course on programming in Pascal. Some of the topics covered include arrays, sorting, strings, sets, records, computers in society, files, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, searching, hashing, and chaining. Performance objectives, vocabulary, motivation, aim,…

  1. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  2. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  3. The Aerospace Plane Design Challenge: Credible Computational Fluid Dynamics Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace plane design challenge is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following topics are included: the CFD design technology development; CFD validation vs. measurable fluid dynamics validation; and discussion of results.

  4. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  5. Parallel Three-Dimensional Computation of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions of Ram-Air Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report as far as our work at University of Minnesota is concerned. The report describes our research progress and accomplishments in development of high performance computing methods and tools for 3D finite element computation of aerodynamic characteristics and fluid-structure interactions (FSI) arising in airdrop systems, namely ram-air parachutes and round parachutes. This class of simulations involves complex geometries, flexible structural components, deforming fluid domains, and unsteady flow patterns. The key components of our simulation toolkit are a stabilized finite element flow solver, a nonlinear structural dynamics solver, an automatic mesh moving scheme, and an interface between the fluid and structural solvers; all of these have been developed within a parallel message-passing paradigm.

  6. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  7. Tenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are 59 abstracts and presentations and three invited presentations given at the Tenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 28-30, 1992. The purpose of the workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed, including a computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  8. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  9. Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Conference publication includes 79 abstracts and presentations given at the Eleventh Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, April 20-22, 1993. The purpose of this workshop is to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion. The workshop is an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics are discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  10. [Role of computational fluid dynamics in thoracic aortic diseases research: technical superiority and application prospect].

    PubMed

    Li, Weihao; Shen, Chenyang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology has the potential to simulate normal or pathologic aortic blood flow changes of mechanical properties and flow field, thereby helping researchers understand and reveal the occurrence, development and prognosis of aortic disease. In aortic diseases research, the initial conditions of CFD numerical simulation has experienced a developed process from idealization (forward engineering), rigid vessel wall, uniform cross-sections, laminar flow and stable blood flow towards personalization (reverse engineering), elastic vessel wall (fluid-solid coupling technique), cone-shaped diminishing cross-sections, turbulent flow, pulsatile blood flow. In this review, the research status, the technical superiority and application prospect of CFD technology were discussed with examples in following three major application areas: (1) dynamics characteristic and mechanical properties in normal thoracic aorta; (2) occurrence, advance and disruptive risk predicting in thoracic aortic aneurysm; (3) therapeutic effect and aneurysmal dilatation simulation in thoracic aortic dissection. For the future, the CFD technology may profoundly put an influence on the awareness to aortic diseases and treatment strategies.

  11. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  12. Some recent advances in computational aerodynamics for helicopter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.; Baeder, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The growing application of computational aerodynamics to nonlinear helicopter problems is outlined, with particular emphasis on several recent quasi-two-dimensional examples that used the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and an eddy-viscosity model to approximate turbulence. Rotor blade section characteristics can now be calculated accurately over a wide range of transonic flow conditions. However, a finite-difference simulation of the complete flow field about a helicopter in forward flight is not currently feasible, despite the impressive progress that is being made in both two and three dimensions. The principal limitations are today's computer speeds and memories, algorithm and solution methods, grid generation, vortex modeling, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and a shortage of engineers who are skilled in both computational fluid dynamics and helicopter aerodynamics and dynamics.

  13. Flow study in channel with the use computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, W. D.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a tool used to numerically simulate fluid flow behavior, and all the laws that govern the study of fluids is the mass transfer and energy, chemical reactions, hydraulic behaviors, among others applications. This tool mathematical equation solves the problem in a specific manner over a region of interest, with predetermined boundary conditions on this region. This work is to study the flow channel through the CFD technique.

  14. Computational Methods for Analyzing Fluid Flow Dynamics from Digital Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Luttman, A.

    2012-03-30

    The main goal (long term) of this work is to perform computational dynamics analysis and quantify uncertainty from vector fields computed directly from measured data. Global analysis based on observed spatiotemporal evolution is performed by objective function based on expected physics and informed scientific priors, variational optimization to compute vector fields from measured data, and transport analysis proceeding with observations and priors. A mathematical formulation for computing flow fields is set up for computing the minimizer for the problem. An application to oceanic flow based on sea surface temperature is presented.

  15. Advances in computational design and analysis of airbreathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of commercial and military aircraft depends, to a large extent, on engine manufacturers being able to achieve significant increases in propulsion capability through improved component aerodynamics, materials, and structures. The recent history of propulsion has been marked by efforts to develop computational techniques that can speed up the propulsion design process and produce superior designs. The availability of powerful supercomputers, such as the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator, and the potential for even higher performance offered by parallel computer architectures, have opened the door to the use of multi-dimensional simulations to study complex physical phenomena in propulsion systems that have previously defied analysis or experimental observation. An overview of several NASA Lewis research efforts is provided that are contributing toward the long-range goal of a numerical test-cell for the integrated, multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization of propulsion systems. Specific examples in Internal Computational Fluid Mechanics, Computational Structural Mechanics, Computational Materials Science, and High Performance Computing are cited and described in terms of current capabilities, technical challenges, and future research directions.

  16. The Design and Implementation of NASA's Advanced Flight Computing Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkakaj, Leon; Straedy, Richard; Jarvis, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a working flight computer Multichip Module developed jointly by JPL and TRW under their respective research programs in a collaborative fashion. The MCM is fabricated by nCHIP and is packaged within a 2 by 4 inch Al package from Coors. This flight computer module is one of three modules under development by NASA's Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) program. Further development of the Mass Memory and the programmable I/O MCM modules will follow. The three building block modules will then be stacked into a 3D MCM configuration. The mass and volume of the flight computer MCM achieved at 89 grams and 1.5 cubic inches respectively, represent a major enabling technology for future deep space as well as commercial remote sensing applications.

  17. Accelerated algorithm for computing the motion of solid particles suspended in fluid.

    PubMed

    Ding, E J

    2009-08-01

    A fast algorithm for computing the motion of solid particles suspended in fluid is presented. The motion of solid particles suspended in Stokes flow can be calculated without fully calculating the fluid motion. When the steady-state simulation is sufficient, this algorithm can greatly accelerate the simulation of solid particle suspension in Stokes flow.

  18. Prediction of pressure drop in fluid tuned mounts using analytical and computational techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasher, William C.; Khalilollahi, Amir; Mischler, John; Uhric, Tom

    1993-11-01

    A simplified model for predicting pressure drop in fluid tuned isolator mounts was developed. The model is based on an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and was made more general through the use of empirical coefficients. The values of these coefficients were determined by numerical simulation of the flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FIDAP.

  19. Revisiting Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Using Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how a computer algebra system, such as Maple[R], can assist in the study of theoretical fluid mechanics, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The continuity equation, the stress equations of motion, the Navier-Stokes equations, and various constitutive equations are treated, using a full, but straightforward,…

  20. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.; Farmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis for modeling damping seals for use in Space Shuttle main engine turbomachinery is being produced. Development of a computational fluid mechanics code for turbulent, incompressible flow is required.

  1. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The pressure solution for incompressible flow was investigated in support of a computational fluid mechanics model which simulates the damping seals considered for use in the space shuttle main engine turbomachinery. Future work directions are discussed briefly.

  2. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  3. Computer-aided design of dry powder inhalers using computational fluid dynamics to assess performance.

    PubMed

    Suwandecha, Tan; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Srichana, Teerapol

    2016-01-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are gaining popularity for the delivery of drugs. A cost effective and efficient delivery device is necessary. Developing new DPIs by modifying an existing device may be the simplest way to improve the performance of the devices. The aim of this research was to produce a new DPIs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The new DPIs took advantages of the Cyclohaler® and the Rotahaler®. We chose a combination of the capsule chamber of the Cyclohaler® and the mouthpiece and grid of the Rotahaler®. Computer-aided design models of the devices were created and evaluated using CFD. Prototype models were created and tested with the DPI dispersion experiments. The proposed model 3 device had a high turbulence with a good degree of deagglomeration in the CFD and the experiment data. The %fine particle fraction (FPF) was around 50% at 60 L/min. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was around 2.8-4 μm. The FPF were strongly correlated to the CFD-predicted turbulence and the mechanical impaction parameters. The drug retention in the capsule was only 5-7%. In summary, a simple modification of the Cyclohaler® and Rotahaler® could produce a better performing inhaler using the CFD-assisted design.

  4. Incorporating geometrically complex vegetation in a computational fluid dynamic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Rosser, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is known to have a significant influence on the hydraulic, geomorphological, and ecological functioning of river systems. Vegetation acts as a blockage to flow, thereby causing additional flow resistance and influencing flow dynamics, in particular flow conveyance. These processes need to be incorporated into flood models to improve predictions used in river management. However, the current practice in representing vegetation in hydraulic models is either through roughness parameterisation or process understanding derived experimentally from flow through highly simplified configurations of fixed, rigid cylinders. It is suggested that such simplifications inadequately describe the geometric complexity that characterises vegetation, and therefore the modelled flow dynamics may be oversimplified. This paper addresses this issue by using an approach combining field and numerical modelling techniques. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) with waveform processing has been applied to collect a sub-mm, 3-dimensional representation of Prunus laurocerasus, an invasive species to the UK that has been increasingly recorded in riparian zones. Multiple scan perspectives produce a highly detailed point cloud (>5,000,000 individual data points) which is reduced in post processing using an octree-based voxelisation technique. The method retains the geometric complexity of the vegetation by subdividing the point cloud into 0.01 m3 cubic voxels. The voxelised representation is subsequently read into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model using a Mass Flux Scaling Algorithm, allowing the vegetation to be directly represented in the modelling framework. Results demonstrate the development of a complex flow field around the vegetation. The downstream velocity profile is characterised by two distinct inflection points. A high velocity zone in the near-bed (plant-stem) region is apparent due to the lack of significant near-bed foliage. Above this, a zone of reduced velocity is

  5. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  6. Advanced computer architecture specification for automated weld systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsinis, Constantine

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the requirements for an advanced automated weld system and the associated computer architecture, and defines the overall system specification from a broad perspective. According to the requirements of welding procedures as they relate to an integrated multiaxis motion control and sensor architecture, the computer system requirements are developed based on a proven multiple-processor architecture with an expandable, distributed-memory, single global bus architecture, containing individual processors which are assigned to specific tasks that support sensor or control processes. The specified architecture is sufficiently flexible to integrate previously developed equipment, be upgradable and allow on-site modifications.

  7. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  8. Development and Use of Engineering Standards for Computational Fluid Dynamics for Complex Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyung B.; Ghia, Urmila; Bayyuk, Sami; Oberkampf, William L.; Roy, Christopher J.; Benek, John A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Powers, Joseph M.; Bush, Robert H.; Mani, Mortaza

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) methods are increasingly relied on for predictive performance, reliability and safety of engineering systems. Analysts, designers, decision makers, and project managers, who must depend on simulation, need practical techniques and methods for assessing simulation credibility. The AIAA Guide for Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations (AIAA G-077-1998 (2002)), originally published in 1998, was the first engineering standards document available to the engineering community for verification and validation (V&V) of simulations. Much progress has been made in these areas since 1998. The AIAA Committee on Standards for CFD is currently updating this Guide to incorporate in it the important developments that have taken place in V&V concepts, methods, and practices, particularly with regard to the broader context of predictive capability and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods and approaches. This paper will provide an overview of the changes and extensions currently underway to update the AIAA Guide. Specifically, a framework for predictive capability will be described for incorporating a wide range of error and uncertainty sources identified during the modeling, verification, and validation processes, with the goal of estimating the total prediction uncertainty of the simulation. The Guide's goal is to provide a foundation for understanding and addressing major issues and concepts in predictive CFD. However, this Guide will not recommend specific approaches in these areas as the field is rapidly evolving. It is hoped that the guidelines provided in this paper, and explained in more detail in the Guide, will aid in the research, development, and use of CFD in engineering decision-making.

  9. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  10. MPI implementation of PHOENICS: A general purpose computational fluid dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S.; Zacharia, T.; Baltas, N.; Spalding, D.B.

    1995-04-01

    PHOENICS is a suite of computational analysis programs that are used for simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamical reaction processes. The parallel version of the solver EARTH for the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program PHOENICS has been implemented using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Implementation of MPI version of PHOENICS makes this computational tool portable to a wide range of parallel machines and enables the use of high performance computing for large scale computational simulations. MPI libraries are available on several parallel architectures making the program usable across different architectures as well as on heterogeneous computer networks. The Intel Paragon NX and MPI versions of the program have been developed and tested on massively parallel supercomputers Intel Paragon XP/S 5, XP/S 35, and Kendall Square Research, and on the multiprocessor SGI Onyx computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary testing results of the developed program have shown scalable performance for reasonably sized computational domains.

  11. MPI implementation of PHOENICS: A general purpose computational fluid dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, S.; Zacharia, T.; Baltas, N.; Spalding, D. B.

    1995-03-01

    PHOENICS is a suite of computational analysis programs that are used for simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamical reaction processes. The parallel version of the solver EARTH for the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program PHOENICS has been implemented using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Implementation of MPI version of PHOENICS makes this computational tool portable to a wide range of parallel machines and enables the use of high performance computing for large scale computational simulations. MPI libraries are available on several parallel architectures making the program usable across different architectures as well as on heterogeneous computer networks. The Intel Paragon NX and MPI versions of the program have been developed and tested on massively parallel supercomputers Intel Paragon XP/S 5, XP/S 35, and Kendall Square Research, and on the multiprocessor SGI Onyx computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary testing results of the developed program have shown scalable performance for reasonably sized computational domains.

  12. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  13. Soft computing in design and manufacturing of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Baaklini, George Y; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The potential of fuzzy sets and neural networks, often referred to as soft computing, for aiding in all aspects of manufacturing of advanced materials like ceramics is addressed. In design and manufacturing of advanced materials, it is desirable to find which of the many processing variables contribute most to the desired properties of the material. There is also interest in real time quality control of parameters that govern material properties during processing stages. The concepts of fuzzy sets and neural networks are briefly introduced and it is shown how they can be used in the design and manufacturing processes. These two computational methods are alternatives to other methods such as the Taguchi method. The two methods are demonstrated by using data collected at NASA Lewis Research Center. Future research directions are also discussed.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics '92; Proceedings of the European Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 1st, Brussels, Belgium, Sep. 7-11, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, Charles (Editor); Periaux, J. (Editor); Kordulla, W. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A conference was held on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and produced related papers. Topics included CFD algorithms, transition and turbulent flow, hypersonic reacting flow, incompressible flow, two phase flow and combustion, internal flow, compressible flow, grid generation and adaption, boundary layers, environmental and industrial applications, and non-Newtonian flow.

  15. Endoleak Assessment Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Image Processing Methods in Stented Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Hsun; Mani, Karthick; Panigrahi, Bivas; Hsu, Wen-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a predominant surgical procedure to reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Endoleak formation, which eventually requires additional surgical reoperation, is a major EVAR complication. Understanding the etiology and evolution of endoleak from the hemodynamic perspective is crucial to advancing the current posttreatments for AAA patients who underwent EVAR. Therefore, a comprehensive flow assessment was performed to investigate the relationship between endoleak and its surrounding pathological flow fields through computational fluid dynamics and image processing. Six patient-specific models were reconstructed, and the associated hemodynamics in these models was quantified three-dimensionally to calculate wall stress. To provide a high degree of clinical relevance, the mechanical stress distribution calculated from the models was compared with the endoleak positions identified from the computed tomography images of patients through a series of imaging processing methods. An endoleak possibly forms in a location with high local wall stress. An improved stent graft (SG) structure is conceived accordingly by increasing the mechanical strength of the SG at peak wall stress locations. The presented analytical paradigm, as well as numerical analysis using patient-specific models, may be extended to other common human cardiovascular surgeries. PMID:27660648

  16. Endoleak Assessment Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Image Processing Methods in Stented Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Hsun; Mani, Karthick; Panigrahi, Bivas; Hsu, Wen-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a predominant surgical procedure to reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Endoleak formation, which eventually requires additional surgical reoperation, is a major EVAR complication. Understanding the etiology and evolution of endoleak from the hemodynamic perspective is crucial to advancing the current posttreatments for AAA patients who underwent EVAR. Therefore, a comprehensive flow assessment was performed to investigate the relationship between endoleak and its surrounding pathological flow fields through computational fluid dynamics and image processing. Six patient-specific models were reconstructed, and the associated hemodynamics in these models was quantified three-dimensionally to calculate wall stress. To provide a high degree of clinical relevance, the mechanical stress distribution calculated from the models was compared with the endoleak positions identified from the computed tomography images of patients through a series of imaging processing methods. An endoleak possibly forms in a location with high local wall stress. An improved stent graft (SG) structure is conceived accordingly by increasing the mechanical strength of the SG at peak wall stress locations. The presented analytical paradigm, as well as numerical analysis using patient-specific models, may be extended to other common human cardiovascular surgeries.

  17. Hydrocephalus: the role of cerebral aquaporin-4 channels and computational modeling considerations of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Desai, Bhargav; Hsu, Ying; Schneller, Benjamin; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Mehta, Ankit I; Linninger, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) channels play an important role in brain water homeostasis. Water transport across plasma membranes has a critical role in brain water exchange of the normal and the diseased brain. AQP4 channels are implicated in the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus, a disease of water imbalance that leads to CSF accumulation in the ventricular system. Many molecular aspects of fluid exchange during hydrocephalus have yet to be firmly elucidated, but review of the literature suggests that modulation of AQP4 channel activity is a potentially attractive future pharmaceutical therapy. Drug therapy targeting AQP channels may enable control over water exchange to remove excess CSF through a molecular intervention instead of by mechanical shunting. This article is a review of a vast body of literature on the current understanding of AQP4 channels in relation to hydrocephalus, details regarding molecular aspects of AQP4 channels, possible drug development strategies, and limitations. Advances in medical imaging and computational modeling of CSF dynamics in the setting of hydrocephalus are summarized. Algorithmic developments in computational modeling continue to deepen the understanding of the hydrocephalus disease process and display promising potential benefit as a tool for physicians to evaluate patients with hydrocephalus. PMID:27581320

  18. The impact of CFD on development test facilities - A National Research Council projection. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkegi, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a National Research Council study on the effect that advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will have on conventional aeronautical ground testing are reported. Current CFD capabilities include the depiction of linearized inviscid flows and a boundary layer, initial use of Euler coordinates using supercomputers to automatically generate a grid, research and development on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, and preliminary research on solutions to the full N-S equations. Improvements in the range of CFD usage is dependent on the development of more powerful supercomputers, exceeding even the projected abilities of the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (1 BFLOP/sec). Full representation of the Re-averaged N-S equations will require over one million grid points, a computing level predicted to be available in 15 yr. Present capabilities allow identification of data anomalies, confirmation of data accuracy, and adequateness of model design in wind tunnel trials. Account can be taken of the wall effects and the Re in any flight regime during simulation. CFD can actually be more accurate than instrumented tests, since all points in a flow can be modeled with CFD, while they cannot all be monitored with instrumentation in a wind tunnel.

  19. The aerospace plane design challenge - Credible computational fluid dynamics results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1990-01-01

    In order to establish the credibility of CFD results utilized in aerospace plane design, the following topics are discussed: CFD validation in relation to 'measureable' fluid dynamics (MFD) validation, credibility requirements, responsibility for credibility, and a guide for establishing credibility. What is of paramount concern for fluid dynamic design is not CFD code validation but qualification of CFD unknowns so that their magnitude is greatly reduced and that these uncertainties are employed for designing with margin. The designers must be trained to properly use CFD if they are to produce good designs. In approximately 70 percent of the flight envelopes of SSTO aerospace planes with supersonic combustion, CFD will be necessary to determine dynamics performance and specifications.

  20. Assessment of Surgical Effects on Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy P.; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M.; Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is one of the most common sleep disorders. To treat patients with this health problem, it is important to detect the severity of this syndrome and occlusion sites in each patient. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that the cure of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by maxillomandibular advancement surgery can be predicted by analyzing the effect of anatomical airway changes on the pressure effort required for normal breathing using a high-fidelity, 3-D numerical model. The employed numerical model consists of: 1) 3-D upper airway geometry construction from patient-specific computed tomographic scans using an image segmentation technique, 2) mixed-element mesh generation of the numerically constructed airway geometry for discretizing the domain of interest, and 3) computational fluid dynamics simulations for predicting the flow field within the airway and the degree of severity of breathing obstruction. In the present study, both laminar and turbulent flow simulations were performed to predict the flow field in the upper airway of the selected patients before and after maxillomandibular advancement surgery. Patients of different body mass indices were also studied to assess their effects. The numerical results were analyzed to evaluate the pressure gradient along the upper airway. The magnitude of the pressure gradient is regarded as the pressure effort required for breathing, and the extent of reduction of the pressure effort is taken to measure the success of the surgery. The description of the employed numerical model, numerical results from simulations of various patients, and suggestion for future work are detailed in this paper. PMID:25530663

  1. Computing the Thermodynamic State of a Cryogenic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willen, G. Scott; Hanna, Gregory J.; Anderson, Kevin R.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Tank Analysis Program (CTAP) predicts the time-varying thermodynamic state of a cryogenic fluid in a tank or a Dewar flask. CTAP is designed to be compatible with EASY5x, which is a commercial software package that can be used to simulate a variety of processes and equipment systems. The mathematical model implemented in CTAP is a first-order differential equation for the pressure as a function of time.

  2. Computational modeling of fluid structural interaction in arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Leila; Boukedjane, Mouloud; Bahi, Lakhdar

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis affects the arterial blood vessels causing stenosis because of which the artery hardens resulting in loss of elasticity in the affected region. In this paper, we present: an approach to model the fluid-structure interaction through such an atherosclerosis affected region of the artery, The blood is assumed as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid, and the vessel wall was treated as a thick-walled, incompressible and isotropic material with uniform mechanical properties. The numerical simulation has been studied in the context of The Navier-Stokes equations for an interaction with an elastic solid. The study of fluid flow and wall motion was initially carried out separately, Discretized forms of the transformed wall and flow equations, which are coupled through the boundary conditions at their interface, are obtained by control volume method and simultaneously to study the effects of wall deformability, solutions are obtained for both rigid and elastic walls. The results indicate that deformability of the wall causes an increase in the time average of pressure drop, but a decrease in the maximum wall shear stress. Displacement and stress distributions in the wall are presented.

  3. Fluid and deformation regime of an advancing subduction system at Marlborough, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Wannamaker, Philip E; Caldwell, T Grant; Jiracek, George R; Maris, Virginie; Hill, Graham J; Ogawa, Yasuo; Bibby, Hugh M; Bennie, Stewart L; Heise, Wiebke

    2009-08-01

    Newly forming subduction zones on Earth can provide insights into the evolution of major fault zone geometries from shallow levels to deep in the lithosphere and into the role of fluids in element transport and in promoting rock failure by several modes. The transpressional subduction regime of New Zealand, which is advancing laterally to the southwest below the Marlborough strike-slip fault system of the northern South Island, is an ideal setting in which to investigate these processes. Here we acquired a dense, high-quality transect of magnetotelluric soundings across the system, yielding an electrical resistivity cross-section to depths beyond 100 km. Our data imply three distinct processes connecting fluid generation along the upper mantle plate interface to rock deformation in the crust as the subduction zone develops. Massive fluid release just inland of the trench induces fault-fracture meshes through the crust above that undoubtedly weaken it as regional shear initiates. Narrow strike-slip faults in the shallow brittle regime of interior Marlborough diffuse in width upon entering the deeper ductile domain aided by fluids and do not project as narrow deformation zones. Deep subduction-generated fluids rise from 100 km or more and invade upper crustal seismogenic zones that have exhibited historic great earthquakes on high-angle thrusts that are poorly oriented for failure under dry conditions. The fluid-deformation connections described in our work emphasize the need to include metamorphic and fluid transport processes in geodynamic models. PMID:19661914

  4. Fluid and deformation regime of an advancing subduction system at Marlborough, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Wannamaker, Philip E; Caldwell, T Grant; Jiracek, George R; Maris, Virginie; Hill, Graham J; Ogawa, Yasuo; Bibby, Hugh M; Bennie, Stewart L; Heise, Wiebke

    2009-08-01

    Newly forming subduction zones on Earth can provide insights into the evolution of major fault zone geometries from shallow levels to deep in the lithosphere and into the role of fluids in element transport and in promoting rock failure by several modes. The transpressional subduction regime of New Zealand, which is advancing laterally to the southwest below the Marlborough strike-slip fault system of the northern South Island, is an ideal setting in which to investigate these processes. Here we acquired a dense, high-quality transect of magnetotelluric soundings across the system, yielding an electrical resistivity cross-section to depths beyond 100 km. Our data imply three distinct processes connecting fluid generation along the upper mantle plate interface to rock deformation in the crust as the subduction zone develops. Massive fluid release just inland of the trench induces fault-fracture meshes through the crust above that undoubtedly weaken it as regional shear initiates. Narrow strike-slip faults in the shallow brittle regime of interior Marlborough diffuse in width upon entering the deeper ductile domain aided by fluids and do not project as narrow deformation zones. Deep subduction-generated fluids rise from 100 km or more and invade upper crustal seismogenic zones that have exhibited historic great earthquakes on high-angle thrusts that are poorly oriented for failure under dry conditions. The fluid-deformation connections described in our work emphasize the need to include metamorphic and fluid transport processes in geodynamic models.

  5. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This proposal describes an approach to validate the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft. The research described here is absolutely cutting edge. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional"validation by test only'' mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computationaf Fluid Dynamics can be used to veritY these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. The proposed research project includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT and OPEN FOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid . . . Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around

  7. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional "validation by test only" mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics

  8. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional validation by test only mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions.Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations. This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions

  9. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  10. Teaching Computer-Aided Design of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Engineering Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, A. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a teaching program for fluid mechanics and heat transfer which contains both computer aided learning (CAL) and computer aided design (CAD) components and argues that the understanding of the physical and numerical modeling taught in the CAL course is essential to the proper implementation of CAD. (Author/CMV)

  11. Static dielectric properties of the Stockmayer fluid from computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. J.; Adams, E. M.

    A number of summation methods for simulating polar liquids are compared using the Stockmayer potential fluid. The nearest image convention is found to have thermodynamic properties dependent on the cell shape. Spherical truncation and a summation proposed by Smith and Perram give reasonable agreement with the thermodynamic properties found from other methods but are not suitable for determining dielectric properties. The reaction field and Ewald-Kornfeld summation methods are in close agreement on the thermodynamic properties and have some measure of agreement on dielectric properties. However, the correlation function hΔ(r) clearly shows the effect of the truncation of the direct dipole-dipole interaction. It is concluded that an Ewald summation is the most appropriate method for simulating polar liquids. Thermodynamic and static dielectric properties of the Stockmayer fluid, determined from Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics calculations using the Ewald-Kornfeld summation, are presented. Calculations with large applied fields have been made to study dielectric saturation. The local field is examined in some detail and a distinction is made between Onsager's analysis of the local field into two components, which is supported by the present results, and Onsager's model for polar liquids which provides values for these components that do not agree well with the present results.

  12. Parallel and Distributed Computational Fluid Dynamics: Experimental Results and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, Mohammad Jahed; Biswas, R.; VanderWijngaart, R.; Yarrow, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes several results of parallel and distributed computing using a large scale production flow solver program. A coarse grained parallelization based on clustering of discretization grids combined with partitioning of large grids for load balancing is presented. An assessment is given of its performance on distributed and distributed-shared memory platforms using large scale scientific problems. An experiment with this solver, adapted to a Wide Area Network execution environment is presented. We also give a comparative performance assessment of computation and communication times on both the tightly and loosely-coupled machines.

  13. The repeated replacement method: a pure Lagrangian meshfree method for computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wade A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the repeated replacement method (RRM), a new meshfree method for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). RRM simulates fluid flow by modeling compressible fluids' tendency to evolve towards a state of constant density, velocity, and pressure. To evolve a fluid flow simulation forward in time, RRM repeatedly "chops out" fluid from active areas and replaces it with new "flattened" fluid cells with the same mass, momentum, and energy. We call the new cells "flattened" because we give them constant density, velocity, and pressure, even though the chopped-out fluid may have had gradients in these primitive variables. RRM adaptively chooses the sizes and locations of the areas it chops out and replaces. It creates more and smaller new cells in areas of high gradient, and fewer and larger new cells in areas of lower gradient. This naturally leads to an adaptive level of accuracy, where more computational effort is spent on active areas of the fluid, and less effort is spent on inactive areas. We show that for common test problems, RRM produces results similar to other high-resolution CFD methods, while using a very different mathematical framework. RRM does not use Riemann solvers, flux or slope limiters, a mesh, or a stencil, and it operates in a purely Lagrangian mode. RRM also does not evaluate numerical derivatives, does not integrate equations of motion, and does not solve systems of equations. PMID:22866175

  14. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cold plasma carrier gas injected into a fluid using level set method.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Yu, K N

    2015-01-01

    A promising application of plasma medicine is to treat living cells and tissues with cold plasma. In cold plasmas, the fraction of neutrals dominates, so the carrier gas could be considered the main component. In many realistic situations, the treated cells are covered by a fluid. The present paper developed models to determine the temperature of the fluid at the positions of the treated cells. Specifically, the authors developed a three-phase-interaction model which was coupled with heat transfer to examine the injection of the helium carrier gas into water and to investigate both the fluid dynamics and heat transfer output variables, such as temperature, in three phases, i.e., air, helium gas, and water. Our objective was to develop a model to perform complete fluid dynamics and heat transfer computations to determine the temperature at the surface of living cells. Different velocities and plasma temperatures were also investigated using finite element method, and the model was built using the comsol multiphysics software. Using the current model to simulate plasma injection into such systems, the authors were able to investigate the temperature distributions in the domain, as well as the surface and bottom boundary of the medium in which cells were cultured. The temperature variations were computed at small time intervals to analyze the temperature increase in cell targets that could be highly temperature sensisitve. Furthermore, the authors were able to investigate the volume of the plasma plume and its effects on the average temperature of the medium layer/domain. Variables such as temperature and velocity at the cell layer could be computed, and the variations due to different plume sizes could be determined. The current models would be very useful for future design of plasma medicine devices and procedures involving cold plasmas. PMID:26467659

  15. The Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Development of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Katharine H.; Taskin, M. Ertan; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2010-01-01

    Progress in the field of prosthetic cardiovascular devices has significantly contributed to the rapid advancements in cardiac therapy during the last four decades. The concept of mechanical circulatory assistance was established with the first successful clinical use of heart-lung machines for cardiopulmonary bypass. Since then a variety of devices have been developed to replace or assist diseased components of the cardiovascular system. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are basically mechanical pumps designed to augment or replace the function of one or more chambers of the failing heart. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an attractive tool in the development process of VADs, allowing numerous different designs to be characterized for their functional performance virtually, for a wide range of operating conditions, without the physical device being fabricated. However, VADs operate in a flow regime which is traditionally difficult to simulate; the transitional region at the boundary of laminar and turbulent flow. Hence different methods have been used and the best approach is debatable. In addition to these fundamental fluid dynamic issues, blood consists of biological cells. Device-induced biological complications are a serious consequence of VAD use. The complications include blood damage (haemolysis, blood cell activation), thrombosis and emboli. Patients are required to take anticoagulation medication constantly which may cause bleeding. Despite many efforts blood damage models have still not been implemented satisfactorily into numerical analysis of VADs, which severely undermines the full potential of CFD. This paper reviews the current state of the art CFD for analysis of blood pumps, including a practical critical review of the studies to date, which should help device designers choose the most appropriate methods; a summary of blood damage models and the difficulties in implementing them into CFD; and current gaps in knowledge and areas for future

  16. Experience revising an advanced-undergraduate/beginning-graduate fluid mechanics textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David

    2012-11-01

    In the fall of 2009, Elsevier Inc. approached me about taking over as the lead author of the fluid mechanics textbook by P. K. Kundu and I. M. Cohen. I subsequently agreed and this presentation provides the story of the process and the approach taken to revising this fluid mechanics textbook which has been in print for approximately 15 years. The goal of the revision was to produce an excellent textbook for second courses in fluid mechanics taken by advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students while maintaining the book's appeal to instructors who used prior editions. Thus, I sought to maintain or expand the text's fluid mechanics content, while adjusting the text's tone so that this content might be more readily reached by students who may have had only one prior course in fluid mechanics, or who may not specialize in fluid mechanics but do possess appropriate mathematical skills. The entire revision process involved seven steps: (i) formulating a revision plan that was independently reviewed, (ii) agreeing to a formal contract with deadlines, (iii) revising the text, figures, and front matter, (iv) proof reading and correcting copy-edited text, (v) correcting page proofs, (vi) generating the solutions manual, and (vii) tabulating errata. Formulating and executing the

  17. Whole-genome CNV analysis: advances in computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA copy number variation (CNV) is likely to make a significant contribution to human diversity and also play an important role in disease susceptibility. Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled the characterization of a variety of genomic features, including CNVs. This has led to the development of several bioinformatics approaches to detect CNVs from next-generation sequencing data. Here, we review recent advances in CNV detection from whole genome sequencing. We discuss the informatics approaches and current computational tools that have been developed as well as their strengths and limitations. This review will assist researchers and analysts in choosing the most suitable tools for CNV analysis as well as provide suggestions for new directions in future development. PMID:25918519

  18. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Grenda, Jeffrey; Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a computational analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability. Consideration is given to both a fully nonlinear unsteady calculation as well as a new CFD-based linearized stability analysis. An analytical solution for the linear stability problem in a constant area combustion chamber with uniform mean flow is developed to verify the numerical analyses.

  19. Tensor Arithmetic, Geometric and Mathematic Principles of Fluid Mechanics in Implementation of Direct Computational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily

    2016-02-01

    The architecture of a digital computing system determines the technical foundation of a unified mathematical language for exact arithmetic-logical description of phenomena and laws of continuum mechanics for applications in fluid mechanics and theoretical physics. The deep parallelization of the computing processes results in functional programming at a new technological level, providing traceability of the computing processes with automatic application of multiscale hybrid circuits and adaptive mathematical models for the true reproduction of the fundamental laws of physics and continuum mechanics.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics for defect control in semiconductor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, S. N.; Geller, A. S.

    Finite element simulations of mixed convection flow (Re less than 100, Gr less than 10(exp 6)) are presented for two gas flow reactors characteristic of those used in the manufacture of microchips. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of FIDAP (a finite element, Navier-Stokes code developed by Fluid Dynamics International, Inc.) as a tool to design new reactors and to assess the effects of varying operating conditions in present reactors. The calculations predict the existence of thermal plumes and recirculation regions within reactors. These flow nonuniformities are important since they can result in fatal defects in microchips. Comparisons between solutions obtained using a Boussinesq model and FIDAP's variable density model are presented. The FIDAP calculations agree with previous simulations using more detailed models, supporting the use of FIDAP as a design tool in the semiconductor industry.

  1. Software for the ACP (Advanced Computer Program) multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Biel, J.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Kaliher, C.; Hance, R.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.

    1987-02-02

    Software has been developed for use with the Fermilab Advanced Computer Program (ACP) multiprocessor system. The software was designed to make a system of a hundred independent node processors as easy to use as a single, powerful CPU. Subroutines have been developed by which a user's host program can send data to and get results from the program running in each of his ACP node processors. Utility programs make it easy to compile and link host and node programs, to debug a node program on an ACP development system, and to submit a debugged program to an ACP production system.

  2. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  3. Computer modeling for advanced life support system analysis.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, A

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the equivalent mass approach to advanced life support system analysis, describes a computer model developed to use this approach, and presents early results from modeling the NASA JSC BioPlex. The model is built using an object oriented approach and G2, a commercially available modeling package Cost factor equivalencies are given for the Volosin scenarios. Plant data from NASA KSC and Utah State University (USU) are used, together with configuration data from the BioPlex design effort. Initial results focus on the importance of obtaining high plant productivity with a flight-like configuration. PMID:11540448

  4. Development of an innovative spacer grid model utilizing computational fluid dynamics within a subchannel analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova, Maria

    In the past few decades the need for improved nuclear reactor safety analyses has led to a rapid development of advanced methods for multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses. These methods have become progressively more complex in order to account for the many physical phenomena anticipated during steady state and transient Light Water Reactor (LWR) conditions. The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF (Thurgood, M. J. et al., 1983) is used worldwide for best-estimate evaluations of the nuclear reactor safety margins. In the framework of a joint research project between the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and AREVA NP GmbH, the theoretical models and numerics of COBRA-TF have been improved. Under the name F-COBRA-TF, the code has been subjected to an extensive verification and validation program and has been applied to variety of LWR steady state and transient simulations. To enable F-COBRA-TF for industrial applications, including safety margins evaluations and design analyses, the code spacer grid models were revised and substantially improved. The state-of-the-art in the modeling of the spacer grid effects on the flow thermal-hydraulic performance in rod bundles employs numerical experiments performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Because of the involved computational cost, the CFD codes cannot be yet used for full bundle predictions, but their capabilities can be utilized for development of more advanced and sophisticated models for subchannel-level analyses. A subchannel code, equipped with improved physical models, can be then a powerful tool for LWR safety and design evaluations. The unique contributions of this PhD research are seen as development, implementation, and qualification of an innovative spacer grid model by utilizing CFD results within a framework of a subchannel analysis code. Usually, the spacer grid models are mostly related to modeling of the entrainment and deposition phenomena and the heat

  5. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data.

  6. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: image and computational analyses of behaviors of magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Yano, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids (several days). We have developed an MF seal that has a shield mechanism. The seal was perfect for 275 days in water. To investigate the effect of a shield, behaviors of MFs in a seal in water were studied both experimentally and computationally. (a) Two kinds of MF seals, one with a shield and one without a shield, were installed in a centrifugal pump. Behaviors of MFs in the seals in water were observed with a video camera and high-speed microscope. In the seal without a shield, the surface of the water in the seal waved and the turbulent flow affected behaviors of the MFs. In contrast, MFs rotated stably in the seal with a shield in water even at high rotational speeds. (b) Computational fluid dynamics analysis revealed that a stationary secondary flow pattern in the seal and small velocity difference between magnetic fluid and water at the interface. These MF behaviors prolonged the life of an MF seal in water. PMID:24109774

  7. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data. PMID:25337330

  8. Adaptive-mesh algorithms for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Roe, Philip L.; Quirk, James

    1993-01-01

    The basic goal of adaptive-mesh algorithms is to distribute computational resources wisely by increasing the resolution of 'important' regions of the flow and decreasing the resolution of regions that are less important. While this goal is one that is worthwhile, implementing schemes that have this degree of sophistication remains more of an art than a science. In this paper, the basic pieces of adaptive-mesh algorithms are described and some of the possible ways to implement them are discussed and compared. These basic pieces are the data structure to be used, the generation of an initial mesh, the criterion to be used to adapt the mesh to the solution, and the flow-solver algorithm on the resulting mesh. Each of these is discussed, with particular emphasis on methods suitable for the computation of compressible flows.

  9. Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

  10. Benefits of advanced working fluids for DHC (district heating and cooling) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-09-01

    DHC projects have positive economic and community development rewards. Today the US DHC industry has moved beyond a market consisting of institutional and military-base systems to community energy systems which cover the central business district and adjoining high density areas as well as communities that need revitalization and new development. One day DHC may be a national industry when DHC is married to electric utilities by recovering waste heat from nuclear or coal power plants (rather than wasting it causing thermal pollution) and supplying heat to customers through the DHC loop as is done in several European countries. These cogenerative DHC systems will make a significant impact on energy conservation and create the most reliable and efficient electric utility systems. The objectives of this paper, are to review the benefits and barriers of conventional DHC technology, introduce the concepts of advanced working fluids and consider the potential benefits of these advanced working fluids for DHC systems. 5 refs.

  11. Modeling near-road air quality using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Jason; Zhang, K Max

    2009-10-15

    It is well recognized that dilution is an important mechanism governing the near-road air pollutant concentrations. In this paper, we aim to advance our understanding of turbulent mixing mechanisms on and near roadways using computation fluid dynamics. Turbulent mixing mechanisms can be classified into three categories according to their origins: vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT), and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. RIT includes the turbulence generated by road embankment, road surface thermal effects, and roadside structures. Both VIT and RIT are affected by the roadway designs. We incorporate the detailed treatment of VIT and RIT into the CFD (namely CFD-VIT-RIT) and apply the model in simulating the spatial gradients of carbon monoxide near two major highways with different traffic mix and roadway configurations. The modeling results are compared to the field measurements and those from CALINE4 and CFD without considering VIT and RIT. We demonstrate that the incorporation of VIT and RIT considerably improves the modeling predictions, especially on vertical gradients and seasonal variations of carbon monoxide. Our study implies that roadway design can significantly influence the near-road air pollution. Thus we recommend that mitigating near-road air pollution through roadway designs be considered in the air quality and transportation management In addition, thanks to the rigorous representation of turbulent mixing mechanisms, CFD-VIT-RIT can become valuable tools in the roadway designs process.

  12. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  13. Advances in parallel computer technology for desktop atmospheric dispersion models

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X.; Ionescu-Niscov, S.; Fast, J.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1996-12-31

    Desktop models are those models used by analysts with varied backgrounds, for performing, for example, air quality assessment and emergency response activities. These models must be robust, well documented, have minimal and well controlled user inputs, and have clear outputs. Existing coarse-grained parallel computers can provide significant increases in computation speed in desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling without considerable increases in hardware cost. This increased speed will allow for significant improvements to be made in the scientific foundations of these applied models, in the form of more advanced diffusion schemes and better representation of the wind and turbulence fields. This is especially attractive for emergency response applications where speed and accuracy are of utmost importance. This paper describes one particular application of coarse-grained parallel computer technology to a desktop complex terrain atmospheric dispersion modeling system. By comparing performance characteristics of the coarse-grained parallel version of the model with the single-processor version, we will demonstrate that applying coarse-grained parallel computer technology to desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling systems will allow us to address critical issues facing future requirements of this class of dispersion models.

  14. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  15. Computer modeling of electromagnetic fields and fluid flows for edge containment in continuous casting

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Wang, Y.H.; Blazek, K.E.

    1996-02-01

    A computer model was developed to predict eddy currents and fluid flows in molten steel. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in electromagnetic (EM) edge dams (EMDs) designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. The model can optimize the EMD design so it is suitable for application, and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve heat transfer, fluid flow, and turbulence transport in a casting process that involves EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy- current distribution and the electromagnetic forces in complex geometries. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free surfaces. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from a static test.

  16. Interactive FORTRAN IV computer programs for the thermodynamic and transport properties of selected cryogens (fluids pack)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic and transport properties of selected cryogens had programmed into a series of computer routines. Input variables are any two of P, rho or T in the single phase regions and either P or T for the saturated liquid or vapor state. The output is pressure, density, temperature, entropy, enthalpy for all of the fluids and in most cases specific heat capacity and speed of sound. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are also given for most of the fluids. The programs are designed for access by remote terminal; however, they have been written in a modular form to allow the user to select either specific fluids or specific properties for particular needs. The program includes properties for hydrogen, helium, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and methane. The programs include properties for gaseous and liquid states usually from the triple point to some upper limit of pressure and temperature which varies from fluid to fluid.

  17. Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Vitrectomy Are Helpful in Diagnosing and Treating Eyes with Advanced Coats' Disease.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Ayako; Kusaka, Shunji; Takaesu, Sugie; Sawaguchi, Shoichi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Severe forms of Coats' disease are often associated with total retinal detachment, and a differential diagnosis from retinoblastoma is critically important. In such eyes, laser- and/or cryoablation is often ineffective or sometimes impossible to perform. We report a case of advanced Coats' disease in which a rapid pathological examination of subretinal fluid was effective for the diagnosis, and external subretinal drainage combined with vitrectomy was effective in preserving the eye. PMID:27462247

  18. Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Vitrectomy Are Helpful in Diagnosing and Treating Eyes with Advanced Coats' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Ayako; Kusaka, Shunji; Takaesu, Sugie; Sawaguchi, Shoichi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Severe forms of Coats' disease are often associated with total retinal detachment, and a differential diagnosis from retinoblastoma is critically important. In such eyes, laser- and/or cryoablation is often ineffective or sometimes impossible to perform. We report a case of advanced Coats' disease in which a rapid pathological examination of subretinal fluid was effective for the diagnosis, and external subretinal drainage combined with vitrectomy was effective in preserving the eye. PMID:27462247

  19. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  20. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  1. The Repeated Replacement Method: A Pure Lagrangian Meshfree Method for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Wade A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the repeated replacement method (RRM), a new meshfree method for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). RRM simulates fluid flow by modeling compressible fluids’ tendency to evolve towards a state of constant density, velocity, and pressure. To evolve a fluid flow simulation forward in time, RRM repeatedly “chops out” fluid from active areas and replaces it with new “flattened” fluid cells with the same mass, momentum, and energy. We call the new cells “flattened” because we give them constant density, velocity, and pressure, even though the chopped-out fluid may have had gradients in these primitive variables. RRM adaptively chooses the sizes and locations of the areas it chops out and replaces. It creates more and smaller new cells in areas of high gradient, and fewer and larger new cells in areas of lower gradient. This naturally leads to an adaptive level of accuracy, where more computational effort is spent on active areas of the fluid, and less effort is spent on inactive areas. We show that for common test problems, RRM produces results similar to other high-resolution CFD methods, while using a very different mathematical framework. RRM does not use Riemann solvers, flux or slope limiters, a mesh, or a stencil, and it operates in a purely Lagrangian mode. RRM also does not evaluate numerical derivatives, does not integrate equations of motion, and does not solve systems of equations. PMID:22866175

  2. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Icing: a Predictive Tool for In-Flight Icing Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppetelli, Danial

    In-flight icing is a hazard that continues to afflict the aviation industry, despite all the research and efforts to mitigate the risks. The recurrence of these types of accidents has given renewed impetus to the development of advanced analytical predictive tools to study both the accretion of ice on aircraft components in flight, and the aerodynamic consequences of such ice accumulations. In this work, an in-depth analysis of the occurrence of in-flight icing accidents and incidents was conducted to identify high-risk flight conditions. To investigate these conditions more thoroughly, a computational fluid dynamics model of a representative airfoil was developed to recreate experiments from the icing wind tunnel that occurred in controlled flight conditions. The ice accumulations and resulting aerodynamic performance degradations of the airfoil were computed for a range or pitch angles and flight speeds. These simulations revealed substantial performance losses such as reduced maximum lift, and decreased stall angle. From these results, an icing hazard analysis tool was developed, using risk management principles, to evaluate the dangers of in-flight icing for a specific aircraft based on the atmospheric conditions it is expected to encounter, as well as the effectiveness of aircraft certification procedures. This method is then demonstrated through the simulation of in-flight icing scenarios based on real flight data from accidents and incidents. The risk management methodology is applied to the results of the simulations and the predicted performance degradation is compared to recorded aircraft performance characteristics at the time of the occurrence. The aircraft performance predictions and resulting risk assessment are found to correspond strongly to the pilot's comments as well as to the severity of the incident.

  4. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel; Berzins, Martin; Pennington, Robert; Sarkar, Vivek; Taylor, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    On November 19, 2014, the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged with reviewing the Department of Energy’s conceptual design for the Exascale Computing Initiative (ECI). In particular, this included assessing whether there are significant gaps in the ECI plan or areas that need to be given priority or extra management attention. Given the breadth and depth of previous reviews of the technical challenges inherent in exascale system design and deployment, the subcommittee focused its assessment on organizational and management issues, considering technical issues only as they informed organizational or management priorities and structures. This report presents the observations and recommendations of the subcommittee.

  5. New Developments of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Their Applications to Practical Engineering Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hudong

    2001-06-01

    There have been considerable advances in Lattice Boltzmann (LB) based methods in the last decade. By now, the fundamental concept of using the approach as an alternative tool for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been substantially appreciated and validated in mainstream scientific research and in industrial engineering communities. Lattice Boltzmann based methods possess several major advantages: a) less numerical dissipation due to the linear Lagrange type advection operator in the Boltzmann equation; b) local dynamic interactions suitable for highly parallel processing; c) physical handling of boundary conditions for complicated geometries and accurate control of fluxes; d) microscopically consistent modeling of thermodynamics and of interface properties in complex multiphase flows. It provides a great opportunity to apply the method to practical engineering problems encountered in a wide range of industries from automotive, aerospace to chemical, biomedical, petroleum, nuclear, and others. One of the key challenges is to extend the applicability of this alternative approach to regimes of highly turbulent flows commonly encountered in practical engineering situations involving high Reynolds numbers. Over the past ten years, significant efforts have been made on this front at Exa Corporation in developing a lattice Boltzmann based commercial CFD software, PowerFLOW. It has become a useful computational tool for the simulation of turbulent aerodynamics in practical engineering problems involving extremely complex geometries and flow situations, such as in new automotive vehicle designs world wide. In this talk, we present an overall LB based algorithm concept along with certain key extensions in order to accurately handle turbulent flows involving extremely complex geometries. To demonstrate the accuracy of turbulent flow simulations, we provide a set of validation results for some well known academic benchmarks. These include straight channels, backward

  6. Fracturing fluid characterization: State-of-the-art facility and advanced technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S., Asadi, M.,

    1997-10-01

    The petroleum industry has used hydraulic fracturing technique to stimulate low and high permeability oil and gas reservoirs to enhance their potential recoveries. Nevertheless, the design and implementation of a scientifically and economically sound fracturing job, due to the lack of knowledge of theological behavior of hydraulic fracturing fluids under field conditions, remains a challenge. Furthermore, as often the case, the current level of technical knowledge with research institutes, service companies, and operators does not translate to field applications. One of the principal reasons for this technology gap, is the lack of understanding of the theological behavior of hydraulic fracturing fluids under field conditions, which primarily relates to the limitations in scaling down the field conditions to the laboratory. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) project was therefore, proposed with the intent of providing the industry with a better understanding of the behavior of these fracturing fluids and their proppant transport characteristics under downhole fracture condition. At the FFCF, a fully operational High Pressure Simulator (HPS), as seen in Figure 1, constitutes a vertical, variable width, parallel plate flow apparatus and is capable of operating at elevated temperatures (up to 2500F) and pressures (up to 1200 psi). The HPS simulates, to the maximum degree practical, all conditions experienced by a fracturing fluid from its formulation on the surface, its flow down the wellbore, through perforations, its injection into the fracture, and its leakage into the rock formation (Figure 1). Together with the onsite auxiliary equipment (Figure 2), such as Mixing and Pumping System, Pre-conditioning System, Data Acquisition System, and Rheology Measuring System (Figure 2), the HPS is the most advanced fracture simulator available to conduct research, mimicking field conditions, in the following areas: Rheology Characterization of Fracturing

  7. Internal computational fluid mechanics on supercomputers for aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Bernhard H.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The accurate calculation of three-dimensional internal flowfields for application towards aerospace propulsion systems requires computational resources available only on supercomputers. A survey is presented of three-dimensional calculations of hypersonic, transonic, and subsonic internal flowfields conducted at the Lewis Research Center. A steady state Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) solution of flow in a Mach 5.0, mixed compression inlet, a Navier-Stokes solution of flow in the vicinity of a terminal shock, and a PNS solution of flow in a diffusing S-bend with vortex generators are presented and discussed. All of these calculations were performed on either the NAS Cray-2 or the Lewis Research Center Cray XMP.

  8. Error Estimation and Uncertainty Propagation in Computational Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. Z.; He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulation has now become an integral part of engineering design process. Critical design decisions are routinely made based on the simulation results and conclusions. Verification and validation of the reliability of the numerical simulation is therefore vitally important in the engineering design processes. We propose to develop theories and methodologies that can automatically provide quantitative information about the reliability of the numerical simulation by estimating numerical approximation error, computational model induced errors and the uncertainties contained in the mathematical models so that the reliability of the numerical simulation can be verified and validated. We also propose to develop and implement methodologies and techniques that can control the error and uncertainty during the numerical simulation so that the reliability of the numerical simulation can be improved.

  9. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  10. Efficient Homotopy Continuation Algorithms with Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    New homotopy continuation algorithms are developed and applied to a parallel implicit finite-difference Newton-Krylov-Schur external aerodynamic flow solver for the compressible Euler, Navier-Stokes, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Many new analysis tools, calculations, and numerical algorithms are presented for the study and design of efficient and robust homotopy continuation algorithms applicable to solving very large and sparse nonlinear systems of equations. Several specific homotopies are presented and studied and a methodology is presented for assessing the suitability of specific homotopies for homotopy continuation. . A new class of homotopy continuation algorithms, referred to as monolithic homotopy continuation algorithms, is developed. These algorithms differ from classical predictor-corrector algorithms by combining the predictor and corrector stages into a single update, significantly reducing the amount of computation and avoiding wasted computational effort resulting from over-solving in the corrector phase. The new algorithms are also simpler from a user perspective, with fewer input parameters, which also improves the user's ability to choose effective parameters on the first flow solve attempt. Conditional convergence is proved analytically and studied numerically for the new algorithms. The performance of a fully-implicit monolithic homotopy continuation algorithm is evaluated for several inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows over NACA 0012 airfoils and ONERA M6 wings. The monolithic algorithm is demonstrated to be more efficient than the predictor-corrector algorithm for all applications investigated. It is also demonstrated to be more efficient than the widely-used pseudo-transient continuation algorithm for all inviscid and laminar cases investigated, and good performance scaling with grid refinement is demonstrated for the inviscid cases. Performance is also demonstrated

  11. Advanced Ultrasonic Measurement Methodology for Non-Invasive Interrogation and Identification of Fluids in Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-03-16

    The Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU) and the Counterterrorism and Forensic Science Research Unit (CTFSRU), Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have been mandated to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection device (HAZAID) that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The HAZAID prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the HAZAID prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with the advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) impart large amounts of energy, 2) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios, and 3) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of this feasibility study demonstrated that the HAZAID experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  12. Advanced ultrasonic measurement methodology for non-invasive interrogation and identification of fluids in sealed containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-03-01

    Government agencies and homeland security related organizations have identified the need to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection prototype that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials encountered in various law enforcement inspection activities, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with an advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios and 2) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of work conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that the prototype experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  13. Major advances in fresh milk and milk products: fluid milk products and frozen desserts.

    PubMed

    Goff, H D; Griffiths, M W

    2006-04-01

    Major technological advances in the fluid milk processing industry in the last 25 yr include significant improvements in all the unit operations of separation, standardization, pasteurization, homogenization, and packaging. Many advancements have been directed toward production capacity, automation, and hygienic operation. Extended shelf-life milks are produced by high heat treatment, sometimes coupled with microfiltration or centrifugation. Other nonthermal methods have also been investigated. Flavored milk beverages have increased in popularity, as have milk beverages packaged in single-service, closeable plastic containers. Likewise, the frozen dairy processing industry has seen the development of large-capacity, automated processing equipment for a wide range of products designed to gain market share. Significant advancements in product quality have been made, many of these arising from improved knowledge of the functional properties of ingredients and their impact on structure and texture. Incidents of foodborne disease associated with dairy products continue to occur, necessitating even greater diligence in the control of pathogen transmission. Analytical techniques for the rapid detection of specific types of microorganisms have been developed and greatly improved during this time. Despite tremendous technological advancements for processors and a greater diversity of products for consumers, per capita consumption of fluid milk has declined and consumption of frozen dairy desserts has been steady during this 25-yr period.

  14. Advanced ultrasonic measurement methodology for non-invasive interrogation and identification of fluids in sealed containers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-05-01

    Government agencies and homeland security related organizations have identified the need to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection prototype that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials encountered in various law enforcement inspection activities, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with an advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios and 2) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of work conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that the prototype experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  15. PREFACE: X Meeting on Recent Advances in the Physics of Fluids and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, Fernando Adolfo; Giavedoni, María Delia

    2009-07-01

    The X Meeting on Recent Advances in Physics of Fluids and Related Applications (Fluids 2008) was held in Santa Fe, Argentina, on 19-21 November 2008. It belongs to a series of meetings that started in 1989 and has continued - except for just one occasion - every other year. Thus, the first meeting took place in the city of Tandil in 1989 followed by three events in the city of La Plata (1991-93-95), Tunuyán (Mendoza) in 1997, Paraná (Entre Rios) in 1999, Buenos Aires in 2001, Tandil in 2003 and Mendoza in 2006. These meetings gather together most of the people working in Fluid Mechanics and related problems in Argentina. The objective of the meetings is to provide a forum to facilitate the interactions between participants in a friendly academic atmosphere. This goal is achieved by means of lectures and technical presentations on different subjects and from different points of view, the only constraint being the current academic/technical interest. Applications usually deal with problems of local interest. In the present meeting a variety of lecture topics were presented, among them we might mention Capillary Hydrodynamics, Wetting, Density Currents, Instabilities, Elastic-Dynamics, Flows in Porous Media, Sediment Transport, Plasma Dynamics, etc. In particular, we would like to highlight the specially invited lectures given by Dr Ramon Cerro (Chemical and Material Engineering Department University of Alabama in Huntsville, USA), Dr David Quéré (Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes ESPCI, FRANCE), Dr Marcelo García (College of Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) and Dr Víctor Calo (Earth and Environmental Science and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin). In addition, we had 18 invited talks and more than fifty contributions that were presented in poster sessions. On behalf of both the Honorary

  16. Research in computational fluid dynamics and analysis of algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, David

    1992-01-01

    by Carpenter (from the fluid Mechanics Division) and Gottlieb gave analytic conditions for stability as well as asymptotic stability. This had been incorporated in the code in form of stable boundary conditions. Effects of the cylinder rotations had been studied. The results differ from the known theoretical results. We are in the middle of analyzing the results. A detailed analysis of the effects of the heating of the cylinder on the shedding frequency had been studied using the above schemes. It has been found that the shedding frequency decreases when the wire was heated. Experimental work is being carried out to affirm this result.

  17. The pathophysiological mechanism of fluid retention in advanced cancer patients treated with docetaxel, but not receiving corticosteroid comedication

    PubMed Central

    Béhar, A.; Pujade-Lauraine, E.; Maurel, A.; Brun, M. D.; Lagrue, G.; Feuilhade De Chauvin, F.; Oulid-Aissa, D.; Hille, D.

    1997-01-01

    Aims Fluid retention is a phenomenon associated with taxoids. The principal objective of this study was to investigate the pathophysiological mechanism of docetaxel-induced fluid retention in advanced cancer patients. Methods Docetaxel was administered as a 1 h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks, for at least 4–6 consecutive cycles, to patients with advanced breast (n=21) or ovarian (n=3) carcinoma, who had received previous chemotherapy, 21 for advanced disease. Phase II clinical trials have shown that 5 day corticosteroid comedication, starting 1 day before docetaxel infusion, significantly reduces the incidence and severity of fluid retention. This prophylactic corticosteroid regimen is currently recommended for patients receiving docetaxel but was not permitted in this study because of its possible interference with the underlying pathophysiology of the fluid retention. Results Fluid retention occurred in 21 of the 24 patients but was mainly mild to moderate, with only five patients experiencing severe fluid retention. Eighteen patients received symptomatic flavonoid treatment, commonly prescribed after the last cycle. Specific investigations for fluid retention confirmed a relationship between cumulative docetaxel dose and development of fluid retention. Capillary filtration test analysis showed a two-step process for fluid retention generation, with progressive congestion of the interstitial space by proteins and water starting between the second and the fourth cycle, followed by insufficient lymphatic drainage. Conclusions A vascular protector such as micronized diosmine hesperidine with recommended corticosteroid premedication and benzopyrones may be useful in preventing and treating docetaxel-induced fluid retention. PMID:9205828

  18. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-01

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  19. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-22

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  20. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps. PMID:26526039

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps.

  3. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  4. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-06-26

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.

  5. Advanced information processing system: Inter-computer communication services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Masotto, Tom; Sims, J. Terry; Whittredge, Roy; Alger, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to document the functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Inter-Computer Communications Services (ICCS) of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS). An introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS and to present an overview of the ICCS. An overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a brief description of the AIPS software is given. The guarantees of the ICCS are provided, and the ICCS is described as a seven-layered International Standards Organization (ISO) Model. The ICCS functional requirements, functional design, and detailed specifications as well as each layer of the ICCS are also described. A summary of results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  6. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  7. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  8. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains

  9. Computation of Nonlinear Hydrodynamic Loads on Floating Wind Turbines Using Fluid-Impulse Theory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kok Yan Chan, G.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Jonkman, J.; Hayman, G.

    2015-04-02

    A hydrodynamics computer module was developed for the evaluation of the linear and nonlinear loads on floating wind turbines using a new fluid-impulse formulation for coupling with the FAST program. The recently developed formulation allows the computation of linear and nonlinear loads on floating bodies in the time domain and avoids the computationally intensive evaluation of temporal and nonlinear free-surface problems and efficient methods are derived for its computation. The body instantaneous wetted surface is approximated by a panel mesh and the discretization of the free surface is circumvented by using the Green function. The evaluation of the nonlinear loads is based on explicit expressions derived by the fluid-impulse theory, which can be computed efficiently. Computations are presented of the linear and nonlinear loads on the MIT/NREL tension-leg platform. Comparisons were carried out with frequency-domain linear and second-order methods. Emphasis was placed on modeling accuracy of the magnitude of nonlinear low- and high-frequency wave loads in a sea state. Although fluid-impulse theory is applied to floating wind turbines in this paper, the theory is applicable to other offshore platforms as well.

  10. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,…

  11. Application of Heat-Transfer Calculations and Computational Fluid Mechanics to the Design of Protective Clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherunova, I.; Kornev, N.; Jacobi, G.; Treshchun, I.; Gross, A.; Turnow, J.; Schreier, S.; Paschen, M.

    2014-07-01

    Three examples of use of computational fluid dynamics for designing clothing protecting a human body from high and low temperatures with an incident air fl ow and without it are presented. The internal thermodynamics of a human body and the interaction of it with the surroundings were investigated. The inner and outer problems were considered separately with their own boundary conditions.

  12. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses a framework for fine-scale CFD modeling that may be developed to complement the present Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system which itself is a computational fluid dynamics model. A goal of this presentation is to stimulate discussions on w...

  13. 77 FR 64834 - Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... COMMISSION Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications AGENCY: Nuclear... Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications.'' The draft NUREG-2152 report provides best... can be controlled and quantified by the user are then discussed in detail, and best...

  14. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of a Spinning Helicopter Slung Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theorn, J. N.; Duque, E. P. N.; Cicolani, L.; Halsey, R.

    2005-01-01

    After performing steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations using OVERFLOW to validate the CFD method against static wind-tunnel data of a box-shaped cargo container, the same setup was used to investigate unsteady flow with a moving body. Results were compared to flight test data previously collected in which the container is spinning.

  15. CFD application to supersonic/hypersonic inlet airframe integration. [computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic external compression inlets are introduced, and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and tests needed to study flow associated with these inlets are outlined. Normal shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is discussed. Boundary layer control is considered. Glancing sidewall shock interaction is treated. The CFD validation of hypersonic inlet configurations is explained. Scramjet inlet modules are shown.

  16. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  18. REMOVAL OF TANK AND SEWER SEDIMENT BY GATE FLUSHING: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss the application of a computational fluid dynamics 3D flow model to simulate gate flushing for removing tank/sewer sediments. The physical model of the flushing device was a tank fabricated and installed at the head-end of a hydraulic flume. The fl...

  19. Mesh and Time-Step Independent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijdam, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    A homework assignment is outlined in which students learn Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts of discretization, numerical stability and accuracy, and verification in a hands-on manner by solving physically realistic problems of practical interest to engineers. The students solve a transient-diffusion problem numerically using the common…

  20. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of chemical looping fuel reactors utilizing gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O'Brien, T.

    2011-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic(CFD) model for the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion technology has been developed,withspecialfocusonaccuratelyrepresentingtheheterogeneous chemicalreactions.Acontinuumtwo-fluidmodelwasusedtodescribeboththegasandsolidphases. Detailedsub-modelstoaccountforfluid–particleandparticle–particleinteractionforceswerealso incorporated.Twoexperimentalcaseswereanalyzedinthisstudy(Son andKim,2006; Mattisonetal., 2001). SimulationswerecarriedouttotestthecapabilityoftheCFDmodeltocapturechangesinoutletgas concentrationswithchangesinnumberofparameterssuchassuperficialvelocity,metaloxide concentration,reactortemperature,etc.Fortheexperimentsof Mattissonetal.(2001), detailedtime varyingoutletconcentrationvalueswerecompared,anditwasfoundthatCFDsimulationsprovideda reasonablematchwiththisdata.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis; Ilie, Marcel; Schallhorn, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft components may be damaged due to airflow produced by Environmental Control Systems (ECS). There are uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict the flow field around a spacecraft from the ECS System. This paper describes an approach to estimate the uncertainty in using CFD to predict the airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft.

  2. 5 CFR 550.404 - Computation of advance payments and evacuation payments; time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of advance payments and... Computation of advance payments and evacuation payments; time periods. (a) Payments shall be based on the rate... others, when applicable, shall be made before advance payments or evacuation payments are made....

  3. 5 CFR 550.404 - Computation of advance payments and evacuation payments; time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation of advance payments and... Computation of advance payments and evacuation payments; time periods. (a) Payments shall be based on the rate... others, when applicable, shall be made before advance payments or evacuation payments are made....

  4. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  5. Reliability of an Interactive Computer Program for Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Benjamin H.; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83–0.95, and 0.86–0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  6. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  7. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  8. Advanced optical measuring systems for measuring the properties of fluids and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Four advanced optical models are reviewed for the measurement of visualization of flow and structural properties. Double-exposure, diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry can be used for three-dimensional flow visualization. When this method is combined with optical heterodyning, precise measurements of structural displacements or fluid density are possible. Time-average holography is well known as a method for displaying vibrational mode shapes, but it also can be used for flow visualization and flow measurements. Deflectometry is used to measure or visualize the deflection of light rays from collimation. Said deflection occurs because of refraction in a fluid or because of reflection from a tilted surface. The moire technique for deflectometry, when combined with optical heterodyning, permits very precise measurements of these quantities. The rainbow schlieren method of deflectometry allows varying deflection angles to be encoded with colors for visualization.

  9. Computation of the Fluid and Optical Fields About the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the Coupling of Fluids, Dynamics, and Control Laws on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    The June 1992 to May 1993 grant NCC-2-677 provided for the continued demonstration of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as applied to the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). While earlier grant years allowed validation of CFD through comparison against experiments, this year a new design proposal was evaluated. The new configuration would place the cavity aft of the wing, as opposed to the earlier baseline which was located immediately aft of the cockpit. This aft cavity placement allows for simplified structural and aircraft modification requirements, thus lowering the program cost of this national astronomy resource. Three appendices concerning this subject are presented.

  10. Advances in computer technology: impact on the practice of medicine.

    PubMed

    Groth-Vasselli, B; Singh, K; Farnsworth, P N

    1995-01-01

    Advances in computer technology provide a wide range of applications which are revolutionizing the practice of medicine. The development of new software for the office creates a web of communication among physicians, staff members, health care facilities and associated agencies. This provides the physician with the prospect of a paperless office. At the other end of the spectrum, the development of 3D work stations and software based on computational chemistry permits visualization of protein molecules involved in disease. Computer assisted molecular modeling has been used to construct working 3D models of lens alpha-crystallin. The 3D structure of alpha-crystallin is basic to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lens fiber cell maturation, stabilization of the inner nuclear region, the maintenance of lens transparency and cataractogenesis. The major component of the high molecular weight aggregates that occur during cataractogenesis is alpha-crystallin subunits. Subunits of alpha-crystallin occur in other tissues of the body. In the central nervous system accumulation of these subunits in the form of dense inclusion bodies occurs in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and toxoplasmosis (Iwaki, Wisniewski et al., 1992), as well as neoplasms of astrocyte origin (Iwaki, Iwaki, et al., 1991). Also cardiac ischemia is associated with an increased alpha B synthesis (Chiesi, Longoni et al., 1990). On a more global level, the molecular structure of alpha-crystallin may provide information pertaining to the function of small heat shock proteins, hsp, in maintaining cell stability under the stress of disease.

  11. FAST: A multi-processed environment for visualization of computational fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Merritt, Fergus J.; Plessel, Todd C.; Kelaita, Paul G.; Mccabe, R. Kevin; Globus, AL

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional, unsteady, multizoned fluid dynamics simulations over full scale aircraft is typical of problems being computed at NASA-Ames on CRAY2 and CRAY-YMP supercomputers. With multiple processor workstations available in the 10 to 30 Mflop range, it is felt that these new developments in scientific computing warrant a new approach to the design and implementation of analysis tools. These large, more complex problems create a need for new visualization techniques not possible with the existing software or systems available as of this time. These visualization techniques will change as the supercomputing environment, and hence the scientific methods used, evolve ever further. Visualization of computational aerodynamics require flexible, extensible, and adaptable software tools for performing analysis tasks. FAST (Flow Analysis Software Toolkit), an implementation of a software system for fluid mechanics analysis that is based on this approach is discussed.

  12. Computational study of trimer self-assembly and fluid phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, Harold W. Shen, Vincent K.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-04-28

    The fluid phase diagram of trimer particles composed of one central attractive bead and two repulsive beads was determined as a function of simple geometric parameters using flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods. A variety of self-assembled structures were obtained including spherical micelle-like clusters, elongated clusters, and densely packed cylinders, depending on both the state conditions and shape of the trimer. Advanced simulation techniques were employed to determine transitions between self-assembled structures and macroscopic phases using thermodynamic and structural definitions. Simple changes in particle geometry yield dramatic changes in phase behavior, ranging from macroscopic fluid phase separation to molecular-scale self-assembly. In special cases, both self-assembled, elongated clusters and bulk fluid phase separation occur simultaneously. Our work suggests that tuning particle shape and interactions can yield superstructures with controlled architecture.

  13. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the

  14. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  15. Computer simulation to predict energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and costs for production of fluid milk using alternative processing methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computer simulation is a useful tool for benchmarking the electrical and fuel energy consumption and water use in a fluid milk plant. In this study, a computer simulation model of the fluid milk process based on high temperature short time (HTST) pasteurization was extended to include models for pr...

  16. Computer simulation of preflight blood volume reduction as a countermeasure to fluid shifts in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R.; Charles, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid shifts in weightlessness may cause a central volume expansion, activating reflexes to reduce the blood volume. Computer simulation was used to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume prior to exposure to weightlessness could counteract the central volume expansion due to fluid shifts and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses resulting in large losses of fluid from body water compartments. The Guyton Model of Fluid, Electrolyte, and Circulatory Regulation was modified to simulate the six degree head down tilt that is frequently use as an experimental analog of weightlessness in bedrest studies. Simulation results show that preadaptation of the blood volume by a procedure resembling a blood donation immediately before head down bedrest is beneficial in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After ten hours of head down tilt, blood volume after preadaptation is higher than control for 20 to 30 days of bedrest. Preadaptation also produces potentially beneficial higher extracellular volume and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest.

  17. Concurrent extensions to the FORTRAN language for parallel programming of computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Cindy Lou

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center to define multi-tasking software requirements for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computer architectures. The focus was on specifying solutions for algorithms in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The program objectives were to allow researchers to produce usable parallel application software as soon as possible after acquiring MIMD computer equipment, to provide researchers with an easy-to-learn and easy-to-use parallel software language which could be implemented on several different MIMD machines, and to enable researchers to list preferred design specifications for future MIMD computer architectures. Analysis of CFD algorithms indicated that extensions of an existing programming language, adaptable to new computer architectures, provided the best solution to meeting program objectives. The CoFORTRAN Language was written in response to these objectives and to provide researchers a means to experiment with parallel software solutions to CFD algorithms on machines with parallel architectures.

  18. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  19. Bilateral meningoencephaloceles with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea after facial advancement in the Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panuganti, Bharat A.; Leach, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and encephaloceles are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures performed in patients with craniofacial dysostoses (CD) to address the ramifications of their midface hypoplasia including obstructed nasal airway, exorbitism, and impaired mastication. Surgical repair of this CSF rhinorrhea is complicated by occult elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP), potentially necessitating open, transcranial repair. We report the first case in otolaryngology literature of a patient with Crouzon syndrome with late CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation after previous LeFort III facial advancement surgery. Objectives: Describe the case of a patient with Crouzon syndrome who presented with CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles as complications of Le Fort III facial advancement surgery. Review the literature pertaining to the incidence and management of post-operative CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles. Analyze issues related to repair of these complications, including occult elevations in ICP, the utility of perioperative CSF shunts, and the importance of considering alternative repair schemes to the traditional endonasal, endoscopic approach. Methods: Review of the literature describing CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation following facial advancement in CD, focusing on management strategies. Results: CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures. Occult elevations in ICP complicate the prospect of permanent surgical repair, potentially necessitating transcranial repair and the use of CSF shunts. Though no consensus exists regarding the utility of perioperative CSF drains, strong associations exist between elevated ICP and failed surgical repair. Additionally, the anatomic changes in the frontal and ethmoid sinuses after facial advancement present a challenge to endoscopic repair. Conclusion: Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of

  20. Validation of computational fluid dynamics methods with anatomically exact, 3D printed MRI phantoms and 4D pcMRI.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeff R; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard; Zhang, Y Jonathan; Britz, Gavin W; Grossman, Robert G; Lv, Nan; Huang, Qinghai; Karmonik, Christof

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of rapid 3D prototyping was implemented using cost-effective 3D printing for creating anatomically correct replica of cerebral aneurysms. With a dedicated flow loop set-up in a full body human MRI scanner, flow measurements were performed using 4D phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to visualize and quantify intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. Ultrashort TE sequences were employed to obtain high-resolution 3D image data to visualize the lumen inside the plastic replica. In-vitro results were compared with retrospectively obtained in-vivo data and results from computational fluid dynamics simulations (CFD). Rapid prototyping of anatomically realistic 3D models may have future impact in treatment planning, design of image acquisition methods for MRI and angiographic systems and for the design and testing of advanced image post-processing technologies.

  1. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  2. Enabling the environmentally clean air transportation of the future: a vision of computational fluid dynamics in 2030

    PubMed Central

    Slotnick, Jeffrey P.; Khodadoust, Abdollah; Alonso, Juan J.; Darmofal, David L.; Gropp, William D.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Venkatakrishnan, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    As global air travel expands rapidly to meet demand generated by economic growth, it is essential to continue to improve the efficiency of air transportation to reduce its carbon emissions and address concerns about climate change. Future transports must be ‘cleaner’ and designed to include technologies that will continue to lower engine emissions and reduce community noise. The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be critical to enable the design of these new concepts. In general, the ability to simulate aerodynamic and reactive flows using CFD has progressed rapidly during the past several decades and has fundamentally changed the aerospace design process. Advanced simulation capabilities not only enable reductions in ground-based and flight-testing requirements, but also provide added physical insight, and enable superior designs at reduced cost and risk. In spite of considerable success, reliable use of CFD has remained confined to a small region of the operating envelope due, in part, to the inability of current methods to reliably predict turbulent, separated flows. Fortunately, the advent of much more powerful computing platforms provides an opportunity to overcome a number of these challenges. This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations from a recent NASA-funded study that provides a vision for CFD in the year 2030, including an assessment of critical technology gaps and needed development, and identifies the key CFD technology advancements that will enable the design and development of much cleaner aircraft in the future. PMID:25024413

  3. Enabling the environmentally clean air transportation of the future: a vision of computational fluid dynamics in 2030.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Jeffrey P; Khodadoust, Abdollah; Alonso, Juan J; Darmofal, David L; Gropp, William D; Lurie, Elizabeth A; Mavriplis, Dimitri J; Venkatakrishnan, Venkat

    2014-08-13

    As global air travel expands rapidly to meet demand generated by economic growth, it is essential to continue to improve the efficiency of air transportation to reduce its carbon emissions and address concerns about climate change. Future transports must be 'cleaner' and designed to include technologies that will continue to lower engine emissions and reduce community noise. The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be critical to enable the design of these new concepts. In general, the ability to simulate aerodynamic and reactive flows using CFD has progressed rapidly during the past several decades and has fundamentally changed the aerospace design process. Advanced simulation capabilities not only enable reductions in ground-based and flight-testing requirements, but also provide added physical insight, and enable superior designs at reduced cost and risk. In spite of considerable success, reliable use of CFD has remained confined to a small region of the operating envelope due, in part, to the inability of current methods to reliably predict turbulent, separated flows. Fortunately, the advent of much more powerful computing platforms provides an opportunity to overcome a number of these challenges. This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations from a recent NASA-funded study that provides a vision for CFD in the year 2030, including an assessment of critical technology gaps and needed development, and identifies the key CFD technology advancements that will enable the design and development of much cleaner aircraft in the future. PMID:25024413

  4. Thermodynamic properties of double square-well fluids: Computer simulations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solana, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Computer simulations have been performed to obtain the thermodynamic properties of fluids with double square-well potentials, that is, potentials consisting of two adjacent square wells with different depths. The compressibility factor, excess energy, chemical potential, constant-volume excess heat capacity, and other derived properties have been obtained. These data have been used to test the performance of several perturbation theories for predicting the thermodynamic properties of this kind of fluids. Good agreement is found on the whole between theory and simulation at supercritical temperatures. The possible presence of anomalous behavior at high densities in the fluids considered has been also analyzed in light of the same theories, with the result that in general, they do not predict such anomalous behavior, with the possible exception of a Monte Carlo-based perturbation theory for relatively large potential widths at high densities and very low temperatures.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Aeroservoelastic Analysis with Hyper-X Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Bach, C.

    2007-01-01

    A finite element computational fluids dynamics-based aeroservoelastic analysis methodology is presented in this paper, in which both structural and fluids discretization are achieved by the finite element method, and their interaction is modeled by the transpiration boundary condition technique. In the fluids discipline either inviscid or viscous flow may be accounted for, usually employing unstructured grids.Adescription of a novel viscous flow solver employing unstructured grids is given in detail. Provisions are made for digital as well as analog controllers. These new aeroservoelastic analysis techniques are next applied for the solution of a number of example problems including the novel Hyper-X launch vehicle. Experimental and actual flight test data are also compared with analysis results that signify to the efficacy and accuracy of the newly developed solution procedures.

  6. Multiscale Computational Modeling of Bio-fluids in Real Anatomies and Microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebotich, David; Miller, Greg

    2004-11-01

    We present new simulation results of bio-fluids in microfluidic devices and real anatomies using recently developed state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics algorithms. These results include flows of both Newtonian and non-Newtonian (viscoelastic) continua as well as discrete particle chains embedded in the continuum. The flow domains considered for continuum flow are a stenotic carotid artery and a trachea which has undergone tracheostomy, where both geometries have been obtained from MRI images. These anatomical flows are highly resolved in both 2D and 3D. We also model DNA molecules in solution flowing through an extraction device used for amplification. We use a particle method where molecular chains are tightly coupled to the continuum via a hydrodynamic drag law such that the bulk fluid feels the effect of the particles.

  7. Process Optimization of Seed Precipitation Tank with Multiple Impellers Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-Liang; Lv, Chao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ting-An

    2015-07-01

    The complex fluid flow in a large-scale tank stirred with multiple Ekato Intermig impellers used in the seed precipitation process was numerically analyzed by the computational fluid dynamics method. The flow field, liquid-solid mixing, and power consumption were simulated by adopting the Eulerian granular multiphase model and standard k- ɛ turbulence model. A steady multiple reference frame approach was used to represent impeller rotation. The simulated results showed that the five-stage multiple Intermig impeller coupled with sloped baffles could generate circulation loops in axial, which is good for solid uniform mixing. The fluid is overmixed under the current industrial condition. Compared with the current process conditions, a three-stage impeller with L/ D of 1.25 not only could meet the industrial requirements, but also more than 20% power could be saved. The results have important implications for reliable design and optimal performance for industry.

  8. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  9. Computational Modeling of Fluid Flow and Intra-Ocular Pressure following Glaucoma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Coote, Michael; Crowston, Jonathan G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Glaucoma surgery is the most effective means for lowering intraocular pressure by providing a new route for fluid to exit the eye. This new pathway is through the sclera of the eye into sub-conjunctival tissue, where a fluid filled bleb typically forms under the conjunctiva. The long-term success of the procedure relies on the capacity of the sub-conjunctival tissue to absorb the excess fluid presented to it, without generating excessive scar tissue during tissue remodeling that will shut-down fluid flow. The role of inflammatory factors that promote scarring are well researched yet little is known regarding the impact of physical forces on the healing response. Methodology To help elucidate the interplay of physical factors controlling the distribution and absorption of aqueous humor in sub-conjunctival tissue, and tissue remodeling, we have developed a computational model of fluid production in the eye and removal via the trabecular/uveoscleral pathways and the surgical pathway. This surgical pathway is then linked to a porous media computational model of a fluid bleb positioned within the sub-conjunctival tissue. The computational analysis is centered on typical functioning bleb geometry found in a human eye following glaucoma surgery. A parametric study is conducted of changes in fluid absorption by the sub-conjunctival blood vessels, changes in hydraulic conductivity due to scarring, and changes in bleb size and shape, and eye outflow facility. Conclusions This study is motivated by the fact that some blebs are known to have ‘successful’ characteristics that are generally described by clinicians as being low, diffuse and large without the formation of a distinct sub-conjunctival encapsulation. The model predictions are shown to accord with clinical observations in a number of key ways, specifically the variation of intra-ocular pressure with bleb size and shape and the correspondence between sites of predicted maximum interstitial fluid pressure

  10. Automatic Generation of Individual Finite-Element Models for Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Structure Mechanics Simulations in the Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, D.; Schmidt, E.; Unterhinninghofen, R.; Richter, G. M.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-08-01

    Abnormal hemodynamics and biomechanics of blood flow and vessel wall conditions in the arteries may result in severe cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases result from complex flow pattern and fatigue of the vessel wall and are prevalent causes leading to high mortality each year. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structure Mechanics (CSM) and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) have become efficient tools in modeling the individual hemodynamics and biomechanics as well as their interaction in the human arteries. The computations allow non-invasively simulating patient-specific physical parameters of the blood flow and the vessel wall needed for an efficient minimally invasive treatment. The numerical simulations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and require exact and individual mesh models to be provided. In the present study, we developed a numerical tool to automatically generate complex patient-specific Finite Element (FE) mesh models from image-based geometries of healthy and diseased vessels. The mesh generation is optimized based on the integration of mesh control functions for curvature, boundary layers and mesh distribution inside the computational domain. The needed mesh parameters are acquired from a computational grid analysis which ensures mesh-independent and stable simulations. Further, the generated models include appropriate FE sets necessary for the definition of individual boundary conditions, required to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations governed by the fluid and solid domains. Based on the results, we have performed computational blood flow and vessel wall simulations in patient-specific aortic models providing a physical insight into the pathological vessel parameters. Automatic mesh generation with individual awareness in terms of geometry and conditions is a prerequisite for performing fast, accurate and realistic FEM-based computations of hemodynamics and biomechanics in the

  11. Flowfield-Dependent Mixed Explicit-Implicit (FDMEL) Algorithm for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, S. M.; Chung, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Despite significant achievements in computational fluid dynamics, there still remain many fluid flow phenomena not well understood. For example, the prediction of temperature distributions is inaccurate when temperature gradients are high, particularly in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions close to the wall. Complexities of fluid flow phenomena include transition to turbulence, relaminarization separated flows, transition between viscous and inviscid incompressible and compressible flows, among others, in all speed regimes. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new approach, called the Flowfield-Dependent Mixed Explicit-Implicit (FDMEI) method, in an attempt to resolve these difficult issues in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In this process, a total of six implicitness parameters characteristic of the current flowfield are introduced. They are calculated from the current flowfield or changes of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, Peclet numbers, and Damkoehler numbers (if reacting) at each nodal point and time step. This implies that every nodal point or element is provided with different or unique numerical scheme according to their current flowfield situations, whether compressible, incompressible, viscous, inviscid, laminar, turbulent, reacting, or nonreacting. In this procedure, discontinuities or fluctuations of an variables between adjacent nodal points are determined accurately. If these implicitness parameters are fixed to certain numbers instead of being calculated from the flowfield information, then practically all currently available schemes of finite differences or finite elements arise as special cases. Some benchmark problems to be presented in this paper will show the validity, accuracy, and efficiency of the proposed methodology.

  12. SALE: a simplified ALE computer program for fluid flow at all speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.; Hirt, C.W.

    1980-06-01

    A simplified numerical fluid-dynamics computing technique is presented for calculating two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds. It combines an implicit treatment of the pressure equation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique with the grid rezoning philosophy of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. As a result, it can handle flow speeds from supersonic to the incompressible limit in a grid that may be moved with the fluid in typical Lagrangian fashion, or held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or moved in some arbitrary way to give a continuous rezoning capability. The report describes the combined (ICEd-ALE) technique in the framework of the SALE (Simplified ALE) computer program, for which a general flow diagram and complete FORTRAN listing are included. A set of sample problems show how to use or modify the basic code for a variety of applications. Numerical listings are provided for a sample problem run with the SALE program.

  13. Computational and Experimental Models of Cancer Cell Response to Fluid Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    It has become evident that mechanical forces play a key role in cancer metastasis, a complex series of steps that is responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. One such force is fluid shear stress, exerted on circulating tumor cells by blood flow in the vascular microenvironment, and also on tumor cells exposed to slow interstitial flows in the tumor microenvironment. Computational and experimental models have the potential to elucidate metastatic behavior of cells exposed to such forces. Here, we review the fluid-generated forces that tumor cells are exposed to in the vascular and tumor microenvironments, and discuss recent computational and experimental models that have revealed mechanotransduction phenomena that may play a role in the metastatic process. PMID:23467856

  14. Computational fluid dynamics applied to flows in an internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, M. D.; Diwakar, R.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Jones, E.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is a continuation of studies conducted by Diwakar et al. (1976) and Griffin et al. (1976), who reported the first computational fluid dynamic results for the two-dimensional flowfield for all four strokes of a reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engine cycle. An analysis of rectangular and cylindrical three-dimensional engine models is performed. The working fluid is assumed to be inviscid air of constant specific heats. Calculations are carried out of a four-stroke IC engine flowfield wherein detailed finite-rate chemical combustion of a gasoline-air mixture is included. The calculations remain basically inviscid, except that in some instances thermal conduction is included to allow a more realistic model of the localized sparking of the mixture. All the results of the investigation are obtained by means of an explicity time-dependent finite-difference technique, using a high-speed digital computer.

  15. Modeling Potential Carbon Monoxide Exposure Due to Operation of a Major Rocket Engine Altitude Test Facility Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blotzer, Michael J.; Woods, Jody L.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews computational fluid dynamics as a tool for modelling the dispersion of carbon monoxide at the Stennis Space Center's A3 Test Stand. The contents include: 1) Constellation Program; 2) Constellation Launch Vehicles; 3) J2X Engine; 4) A-3 Test Stand; 5) Chemical Steam Generators; 6) Emission Estimates; 7) Located in Existing Test Complex; 8) Computational Fluid Dynamics; 9) Computational Tools; 10) CO Modeling; 11) CO Model results; and 12) Next steps.

  16. Arterial pulsation-driven cerebrospinal fluid flow in the perivascular space: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Bilston, Lynne E; Fletcher, David F; Brodbelt, Andrew R; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2003-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether local arterial pulsations are sufficient to cause cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow along perivascular spaces (PVS) within the spinal cord. A theoretical model of the perivascular space surrounding a "typical" small artery was analysed using computational fluid dynamics. Systolic pulsations were modelled as travelling waves on the arterial wall. The effects of wave geometry and variable pressure conditions on fluid flow were investigated. Arterial pulsations induce fluid movement in the PVS in the direction of arterial wave travel. Perivascular flow continues even in the presence of adverse pressure gradients of a few kilopascals. Flow rates are greater with increasing pulse wave velocities and arterial deformation, as both an absolute amplitude and as a proportion of the PVS. The model suggests that arterial pulsations are sufficient to cause fluid flow in the perivascular space even against modest adverse pressure gradients. Local increases in flow in this perivascular pumping mechanism or reduction in outflow may be important in the etiology of syringomyelia.

  17. Computation of Coupled Thermal-Fluid Problems in Distributed Memory Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, H.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal-fluid coupling problems are very important to aerospace and engineering applications. Instead of analyzing heat transfer and fluid flow separately, this study merged two well-accepted engineering solution methods, SINDA for thermal analysis and FDNS for fluid flow simulation, into a unified multi-disciplinary thermal fluid prediction method. A fully conservative patched grid interface algorithm for arbitrary two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry has been developed. The state-of-the-art parallel computing concept was used to couple SINDA and FDNS for the communication of boundary conditions through PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) libraries. Therefore, the thermal analysis performed by SINDA and the fluid flow calculated by FDNS are fully coupled to obtain steady state or transient solutions. The natural convection between two thick-walled eccentric tubes was calculated and the predicted results match the experiment data perfectly. A 3-D rocket engine model and a real 3-D SSME geometry were used to test the current model, and the reasonable temperature field was obtained.

  18. Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Hysteresis around Supersonic Biplane in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Masahito; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Kusunose, Kazuhiro

    The Busemann biplane is well known as the airfoil that has zero wave drag at the supersonic flight in the linear theory. It is found that this airfoil has a hysteresis in drag values from the transonic speeds through the low supersonic speeds based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. This paper shows that this hysteresis is explained by the Kantrowitz-Donaldson Criteria that usually defines the start and unstart of the supersonic intake.

  19. The NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program - Building technology to solve future challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Pamela F.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kutler, Paul; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics program in terms of a strategic vision and goals as well as NASA's financial commitment and personnel levels. The paper also identifies the CFD program customers and the support to those customers. In addition, the paper discusses technical emphasis and direction of the program and some recent achievements. NASA's Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers are the research hubs of the CFD program while the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics represents and advocates the program.

  20. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  1. Calculation of shipboard fire conditions for radioactive materials packages with the methods of computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Shipboard fires both in the same ship hold and in an adjacent hold aboard a break-bulk cargo ship are simulated with a commercial finite-volume computational fluid mechanics code. The fire models and modeling techniques are described and discussed. Temperatures and heat fluxes to a simulated materials package are calculated and compared to experimental values. The overall accuracy of the calculations is assessed.

  2. A compendium of computational fluid dynamics at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Through numerous summary examples, the scope and general nature of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) effort at Langley is identified. These summaries will help inform researchers in CFD and line management at Langley of the overall effort. In addition to the inhouse efforts, out of house CFD work supported by Langley through industrial contracts and university grants are included. Researchers were encouraged to include summaries of work in preliminary and tentative states of development as well as current research approaching definitive results.

  3. High performance computing for a 3-D optical diffraction tomographic application in fluid velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Lobera, Julia; Ortega, Gloria; García, Inmaculada; Arroyo, María del Pilar; Garzón, Ester M

    2015-02-23

    Optical Diffraction Tomography has been recently introduced in fluid velocimetry to provide three dimensional information of seeding particle locations. In general, image reconstruction methods at visible wavelengths have to account for diffraction. Linear approximation has been used for three-dimensional image reconstruction, but a non-linear and iterative reconstruction method is required when multiple scattering is not negligible. Non-linear methods require the solution of the Helmholtz equation, computationally highly demanding due to the size of the problem. The present work shows the results of a non-linear method customized for spherical particle location using GPU computing and a made-to-measure storing format.

  4. A perspective on high-order methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhiJian

    2016-01-01

    There has been an intensive international effort to develop high-order Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods into design tools in aerospace engineering during the last one and half decades. These methods offer the potential to significantly improve solution accuracy and efficiency for vortex dominated turbulent flows. Enough progresses have been made in algorithm development, mesh generation and parallel computing that these methods are on the verge of being applied in a production design environment. Since many review papers have been written on the subject, I decide to offer a personal perspective on the state-of-the-art in high-order CFD methods and the challenges that must be overcome.

  5. A Combined Geometric Approach for Computational Fluid Dynamics on Dynamic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    1995-01-01

    A combined geometric approach for computational fluid dynamics is presented for the analysis of unsteady flow about mechanisms in which its components are in moderate relative motion. For a CFD analysis, the total dynamics problem involves the dynamics of the aspects of geometry modeling, grid generation, and flow modeling. The interrelationships between these three aspects allow for a more natural formulation of the problem and the sharing of information which can be advantageous to the computation of the dynamics. The approach is applied to planar geometries with the use of an efficient multi-block, structured grid generation method to compute unsteady, two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow. The applications presented include the computation of the unsteady, inviscid flow about a hinged-flap with flap deflections and a high-speed inlet with centerbody motion as part of the unstart / restart operation.

  6. Influence of computational fluid dynamics on experimental aerospace facilities: A fifteen year projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An assessment was made of the impact of developments in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the traditional role of aerospace ground test facilities over the next fifteen years. With improvements in CFD and more powerful scientific computers projected over this period it is expected to have the capability to compute the flow over a complete aircraft at a unit cost three orders of magnitude lower than presently possible. Over the same period improvements in ground test facilities will progress by application of computational techniques including CFD to data acquisition, facility operational efficiency, and simulation of the light envelope; however, no dramatic change in unit cost is expected as greater efficiency will be countered by higher energy and labor costs.

  7. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  8. PREFACE: FLUIDOS 2010: XI Meeting on Recent Advances in the Physics of Fluids and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, Italo; Cabeza, Cecilia; Martí, Arturo C.; Sarasúa, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    The papers published in this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series were selected from the manuscripts submitted to the XI Meeting on Recent Advances in the Physics of Fluids and their Applications (FLUIDOS2010), which was held in Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay, 3-5 November 2010. FLUIDOS takes place every two years, usually in November, with the aim of gathering together researchers from all areas of the Physics of Fluids, to update themselves on the latest technical developments and applications, share knowledge and stimulate new ideas. This 11th meeting continues the successful experience of the previous ones which were held in different Argentinian cities. For the first time, the meeting was celebrated in Uruguay, more specifically, in the peaceful town of Colonia del Sacramento, designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The conference presented an outstanding program of papers covering the most recent advances in Physics of Fluids in the following areas: General Fluid Dynamics General and non-Newtonian Flows Magnetohydrodynamics Electrohydrodynamics and Plasmas Hydraulics, Thermohydraulics and Multiple Phase Flows A website with full details of the conference program, abstracts and other information can be found at http://fluidos2010.fisica.edu.uy. We would like to thank all the participants, especially those who contributed with talks, posters and manuscripts, for making FLUDOS2010 such a successful conference. Our thanks also go to our colleagues for their support and encouragement, particularly in the refereeing of papers. We would like to acknowledge additional financial support from Comisión Sectorial de Investigación Científica (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), Programa de Desarrollo de las Ciencias Básicas (Uruguay) and the Centro Latinoamericano de Física (CLAF). Our thanks are extended to the local government of Colonia del Sacramento. The next FLUIDOS conference will be held in November 2013, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. We

  9. Recent advances in data assimilation in computational geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik

    2010-05-01

    . The QRV method was most recently introduced in geodynamic modelling (Ismail-Zadeh et al., 2007, 2008; Tantsyrev, 2008; Glisovic et al., 2009). The advances in computational geodynamics and in data assimilation attract an interest of the community dealing with lithosphere, mantle and core dynamics.

  10. Massively parallel computational fluid dynamics calculations for aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.L.; Hassan, B.

    1998-09-01

    Massively parallel computers have enabled the analyst to solve complicated flow fields (turbulent, chemically reacting) that were previously intractable. Calculations are presented using a massively parallel CFD code called SACCARA (Sandia Advanced Code for Compressible Aerothermodynamics Research and Analysis) currently under development at Sandia National Laboratories as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). Computations were made on a generic reentry vehicle in a hypersonic flowfield utilizing three different distributed parallel computers to assess the parallel efficiency of the code with increasing numbers of processors. The parallel efficiencies for the SACCARA code will be presented for cases using 1, 150, 100 and 500 processors. Computations were also made on a subsonic/transonic vehicle using both 236 and 521 processors on a grid containing approximately 14.7 million grid points. Ongoing and future plans to implement a parallel overset grid capability and couple SACCARA with other mechanics codes in a massively parallel environment are discussed.

  11. Multiscale computational model of fluid flow and matrix deformation in decellularized liver.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Kenichiro; Reese, Greg; Moran, Emma C; Sparks, Jessica L

    2016-04-01

    Currently little is known about the biomechanical environment in decellularized tissue. The goal of this research is to quantify the mechanical microenvironment in decellularized liver, for varying organ-scale perfusion conditions, using a combined experimental/computational approach. Needle-guided ultra-miniature pressure sensors were inserted into liver tissue to measure parenchymal fluid pressure ex-situ in portal vein-perfused native (n=5) and decellularized (n=7) ferret liver, for flow rates from 3-12mL/min. Pressures were also recorded at the inlet near the portal vein cannula to estimate total vascular resistance of the specimens. Experimental results were fit to a multiscale computational model to simulate perfusion conditions inside native versus decellularized livers for four experimental flow rates. The multiscale model consists of two parts: an organ-scale electrical analog model of liver hemodynamics and a tissue-scale model that predicts pore fluid pressure, pore fluid velocity, and solid matrix stress and deformation throughout the 3D hepatic lobule. Distinct models were created for native versus decellularized liver. Results show that vascular resistance decreases by 82% as a result of decellularization. The hydraulic conductivity of the decellularized liver lobule, a measure of tissue permeability, was 5.6 times that of native liver. For the four flow rates studied, mean fluid pressures in the decellularized lobule were 0.6-2.4mmHg, mean fluid velocities were 211-767μm/s, and average solid matrix principal strains were 1.7-6.1%. In the future this modeling platform can be used to guide the optimization of perfusion seeding and conditioning strategies for decellularized scaffolds in liver bioengineering.

  12. Wind Turbine Wake Characterization with Remote Sensing and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Matthew Lawrence

    Because of the dense arrays at most wind farms, the region of disturbed flow downstream of an individual turbine leads to reduced power production and increased structural loading for its leeward counterparts. Currently, wind farm wake modeling, and hence turbine layout optimization, suffer from an unacceptable degree of uncertainty, largely because of a lack of adequate experimental data for model verification. Accordingly, wake measurements were taken in two separate experiments, (1) using the ground-based High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and (2) using nacelle-based long-range lidar at a wind farm in the western United States. The vantage point from the nacelle is favorable in that scans can more consistently transect the central part of the wake. The work presented here outlines a set of quantitative procedures for determining critical parameters from these extensive datasets---such as the velocity deficit, the size of the wake boundary, and the location of the wake centerline---and the results are categorized by ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability. Despite specific reference to lidar, the methodology is general and can be applied to extract wake characteristics from other remote sensor datasets, as well as output from numerical simulations. In an effort to help advance computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of wind turbine wake dynamics, experimental results are compared to a large eddy simulation (LES) of a turbine operating in the stable boundary layer using the actuator disk parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. With the wake characteristics described above as metrics for model verification, the simulations show good agreement with the observations. Moreover, new features---namely rotor tilt and drag from the

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  14. Important advances in technology and unique applications to cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  15. A locally refined rectangular grid finite element method - Application to computational fluid dynamics and computational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David P.; Melvin, Robin G.; Bieterman, Michael B.; Johnson, Forrester T.; Samant, Satish S.

    1991-01-01

    The present FEM technique addresses both linear and nonlinear boundary value problems encountered in computational physics by handling general three-dimensional regions, boundary conditions, and material properties. The box finite elements used are defined by a Cartesian grid independent of the boundary definition, and local refinements proceed by dividing a given box element into eight subelements. Discretization employs trilinear approximations on the box elements; special element stiffness matrices are included for boxes cut by any boundary surface. Illustrative results are presented for representative aerodynamics problems involving up to 400,000 elements.

  16. Some Hail 'Computational Science' as Biggest Advance Since Newton, Galileo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Judith Axler

    1987-01-01

    Computational science is defined as science done on a computer. A computer can serve as a laboratory for researchers who cannot experiment with their subjects, and as a calculator for those who otherwise might need centuries to solve some problems mathematically. The National Science Foundation's support of supercomputers is discussed. (MLW)

  17. First 3 years of operation of RIACS (Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science) (1983-1985)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) is to explore matches between advanced computing architectures and the processes of scientific research. An architecture evaluation of the MIT static dataflow machine, specification of a graphical language for expressing distributed computations, and specification of an expert system for aiding in grid generation for two-dimensional flow problems was initiated. Research projects for 1984 and 1985 are summarized.

  18. Infrared imaging - A validation technique for computational fluid dynamics codes used in STOVL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, R. R.; Mahan, J. R.; Smith, M. H.; Gelhausen, P. A.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    The need for a validation technique for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes in STOVL applications has led to research efforts to apply infrared thermal imaging techniques to visualize gaseous flow fields. Specifically, a heated, free-jet test facility was constructed. The gaseous flow field of the jet exhaust was characterized using an infrared imaging technique in the 2 to 5.6 micron wavelength band as well as conventional pitot tube and thermocouple methods. These infrared images are compared to computer-generated images using the equations of radiative exchange based on the temperature distribution in the jet exhaust measured with the thermocouple traverses. Temperature and velocity measurement techniques, infrared imaging, and the computer model of the infrared imaging technique are presented and discussed. From the study, it is concluded that infrared imaging techniques coupled with the radiative exchange equations applied to CFD models are a valid method to qualitatively verify CFD codes used in STOVL applications.

  19. Automatic Generation of OpenMP Directives and Its Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry; Jin, Haoqiang; Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shared-memory programming model is a very effective way to achieve parallelism on shared memory parallel computers. As great progress was made in hardware and software technologies, performance of parallel programs with compiler directives has demonstrated large improvement. The introduction of OpenMP directives, the industrial standard for shared-memory programming, has minimized the issue of portability. In this study, we have extended CAPTools, a computer-aided parallelization toolkit, to automatically generate OpenMP-based parallel programs with nominal user assistance. We outline techniques used in the implementation of the tool and discuss the application of this tool on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks and several computational fluid dynamics codes. This work demonstrates the great potential of using the tool to quickly port parallel programs and also achieve good performance that exceeds some of the commercial tools.

  20. Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-08-31

    This paper presents the application of parallel computing techniques to large-scale modeling of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this study, parallel computing techniques, as implemented into the TOUGH2 code, are applied in large-scale numerical simulations on a distributed-memory parallel computer. The modeling study has been conducted using an over-one-million-cell three-dimensional numerical model, which incorporates a wide variety of field data for the highly heterogeneous fractured formation at Yucca Mountain. The objective of this study is to analyze the impact of various surface infiltration scenarios (under current and possible future climates) on flow through the UZ system, using various hydrogeological conceptual models with refined grids. The results indicate that the one-million-cell models produce better resolution results and reveal some flow patterns that cannot be obtained using coarse-grid modeling models.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Bee, Jared S; Biddlecombe, James G; Chen, Quanmin; Leach, W Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Agitation of small amounts of liquid is performed routinely in biopharmaceutical process, formulation, and packaging development. Protein degradation commonly results from agitation, but the specific stress responsible or degradation mechanism is usually not well understood. Characterization of the agitation stress methods is critical to identifying protein degradation mechanisms or specific sensitivities. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model agitation of 1 mL of fluid by four types of common laboratory agitation instruments, including a rotator, orbital shaker, magnetic stirrer and vortex mixer. Fluid stresses in the bulk liquid and near interfaces were identified, quantified and compared. The vortex mixer provides the most intense stresses overall, while the stir bar system presented locally intense shear proximal to the hydrophobic stir bar surface. The rotator provides gentler fluid stresses, but the air-water interfacial area and surface stresses are relatively high given its low rotational frequency. The orbital shaker provides intermediate-level stresses but with the advantage of a large stable platform for consistent vial-to-vial homogeneity. Selection of experimental agitation methods with targeted types and intensities of stresses can facilitate better understanding of protein degradation mechanisms and predictability for "real world" applications. PMID:22172288

  2. A computational model for thermal fluid design analysis of nuclear thermal rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Given, J.A.; Anghaie, S.

    1997-01-01

    A computational model for simulation and design analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems has been developed. The model simulates a full-topping expander cycle engine system and the thermofluid dynamics of the core coolant flow, accounting for the real gas properties of the hydrogen propellant/coolant throughout the system. Core thermofluid studies reveal that near-wall heat transfer models currently available may not be applicable to conditions encountered within some nuclear rocket cores. Additionally, the possibility of a core thermal fluid instability at low mass fluxes and the effects of the core power distribution are investigated. Results indicate that for tubular core coolant channels, thermal fluid instability is not an issue within the possible range of operating conditions in these systems. Findings also show the advantages of having a nonflat centrally peaking axial core power profile from a fluid dynamic standpoint. The effects of rocket operating conditions on system performance are also investigated. Results show that high temperature and low pressure operation is limited by core structural considerations, while low temperature and high pressure operation is limited by system performance constraints. The utility of these programs for finding these operational limits, optimum operating conditions, and thermal fluid effects is demonstrated.

  3. Towards determining appropriate hydrodynamic conditions for in vitro in vivo correlations using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Deirdre M; Healy, Anne Marie; Corrigan, Owen I

    2009-06-28

    One of the earliest level A in vitro dissolution in vivo absorption correlations (IVIVCs) was established by Levy and co-workers in 1965 using a beaker dissolution apparatus Levy et al., 1965. In the current work, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, Fluent((R)), was used to simulate the hydrodynamics within the Levy beaker apparatus and compare them to those within the paddle and basket apparatuses. In vitro velocity values relevant to in vivo dissolution, presented as apparent gastrointestinal fluid velocity (AGV) values, were calculated. The AGV values were estimated from IVIVCs of immediate release (IR) dosage forms in each apparatus and CFD simulations. The simulations from the Levy apparatus revealed complex hydrodynamics in the region of the stirrer blades, and radial inflow at the centre of the beaker base. The calculated AGV values ranged from 0.001 to 0.026ms(-1). In vitro fluid velocities should reflect in vivo dissolution rates affected by natural convection and gastrointestinal motility, in addition to local fluid velocity. The maximum CFD generated velocity at the base of the paddle apparatus at 20rpm was similar to the average maximum AGV value determined, suggesting use of agitation rates which are lower than those commonly used (e.g. 50rpm in the paddle apparatus) may be appropriate when attempting an IVIVC for IR dosage forms.

  4. GPU-accelerated model for fast, three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computations.

    PubMed

    Nita, Cosmin; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Rapaka, Saikiran

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a methodology for performing one-way Fluid-Structure interaction (FSI), i.e. where the motion of the wall boundaries is imposed. We use a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) implementation and present an efficient workflow for embedding the moving geometry, given as a set of polygonal meshes, in the LBM computation. The proposed method is first validated in a synthetic experiment: a vessel which is periodically expanding and contracting. Next, the evaluation focuses on the 3D Peristaltic flow problem: a fluid flows inside a flexible tube, where a periodic wave-like deformation produces a fluid motion along the centerline of the tube. Different geometry configurations are used and results are compared against previously published solutions. The efficient approach leads to an average execution time of approx. one hour per computation, whereas 50% of it is required for the geometry update operations. Finally, we also analyse the effect of changing the Reynolds number on the flow streamlines: the flow regime is significantly affected by the Reynolds number. PMID:26736424

  5. Computational modelling of the mechanics of trabecular bone and marrow using fluid structure interaction techniques.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, E; Grogan, J A; Niebur, G L; McNamara, L M; McHugh, P E

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow found within the porous structure of trabecular bone provides a specialized environment for numerous cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Studies have sought to characterize the mechanical environment imposed on MSCs, however, a particular challenge is that marrow displays the characteristics of a fluid, while surrounded by bone that is subject to deformation, and previous experimental and computational studies have been unable to fully capture the resulting complex mechanical environment. The objective of this study was to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model of trabecular bone and marrow to predict the mechanical environment of MSCs in vivo and to examine how this environment changes during osteoporosis. An idealized repeating unit was used to compare FSI techniques to a computational fluid dynamics only approach. These techniques were used to determine the effect of lower bone mass and different marrow viscosities, representative of osteoporosis, on the shear stress generated within bone marrow. Results report that shear stresses generated within bone marrow under physiological loading conditions are within the range known to stimulate a mechanobiological response in MSCs in vitro. Additionally, lower bone mass leads to an increase in the shear stress generated within the marrow, while a decrease in bone marrow viscosity reduces this generated shear stress.

  6. Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS). Volume 2: Computer program user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, L.; Crawford, D. R.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Swigart, R. J.; Wong, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS) computer code is described. GAPAS was developed to analyze advanced technology multi-bladed propellers which operate on aircraft with speeds up to Mach 0.8 and altitudes up to 40,000 feet. GAPAS includes technology for analyzing aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic performance of propellers. The computer code was developed for the CDC 7600 computer and is currently available for industrial use on the NASA Langley computer. A description of all the analytical models incorporated in GAPAS is included. Sample calculations are also described as well as users requirements for modifying the analysis system. Computer system core requirements and running times are also discussed.

  7. Free surface fluid behavior in two-dimensional container with arbitrary configuration - Computer simulation and experiment by using drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Mitsuru; Ogiwara, Sachio; Yoshihara, Shoichi; Azuma, Hisao

    1989-10-01

    A new and powerful program based on the SOLA-VOF code is presented which is designed to study the behavior of fluids with free surfaces under reduced gravity. The capability of the program is demonstrated using a drop tower for fluid transportation and formation of spherical voids. Good agreement is found between the results and computational findings.

  8. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  9. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations provide a number of unique opportunities for expanding and improving capabilities for modeling exposures to environmental pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been c...

  10. Manipulating fluids: Advances in micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh

    This dissertation describes work in three inter-related areas---micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self-assembly. Micro-fluidics has gotten a boost in recent years with the development of multilayered elastomeric devices made of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), allowing active elements like valves and pumps. However, while PDMS has many advantages, it is not resistant to organic solvents. New materials and/or new designs are needed for solvent resistance. I describe how novel fluorinated elastomers can replace PDMS when combined with the three dimensional (3-D) solid printing. I also show how another 3-D fabrication method, multilayer photo-lithography, allows for fabrication of devices integrating filters. In general, 3-D fabrications allow new kinds of micro-fluidic devices to be made that would be impossible to emulate with two dimensional chips. In opto-fluidics, I describe a number of experiments with quantum dots both inside and outside chips. Inside chips, I manipulate quantum dots using hydrodynamic focusing to pattern fine lines, like a barcode. Outside chips, I describe our attempts to create quantum dot composites with micro-spheres. I also show how evaporated gold films and chemical passivation can then be used to enhance the emission of quantum dots. Finally, within fluids, self assembly is an attractive way to manipulate materials, and I provide two examples: first, a DNA-based energy transfer molecule that relies on quantum mechanics and self-assembles inside fluids. This kind of molecular photonics mimics parts of the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and bacteria. The second example of self-assembly in fluids describes a new phenomena---the surface tension mediated self assembly of particles like quantum dots and micro-spheres into fine lines. This self assembly by capillary flows can be combined with photo-lithography, and is expected to find use in future nano- and micro-fabrication schemes. In conclusion, advances in fludics, integrating

  11. FAST: A multi-processed environment for visualization of computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Merritt, Fergus J.; Plessel, Todd C.; Kelaita, Paul G.; Mccabe, R. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional, unsteady, multi-zoned fluid dynamics simulations over full scale aircraft are typical of the problems being investigated at NASA Ames' Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility on CRAY2 and CRAY-YMP supercomputers. With multiple processor workstations available in the 10-30 Mflop range, we feel that these new developments in scientific computing warrant a new approach to the design and implementation of analysis tools. These larger, more complex problems create a need for new visualization techniques not possible with the existing software or systems available as of this writing. The visualization techniques will change as the supercomputing environment, and hence the scientific methods employed, evolves even further. The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit (FAST), an implementation of a software system for fluid mechanics analysis, is discussed.

  12. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Gerhard; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-05-01

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions — one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid.

  13. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gerhard; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-05-28

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions - one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid. PMID:27250276

  14. User's manual for PELE3D: a computer code for three-dimensional incompressible fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, W H

    1982-05-07

    The PELE3D code is a three-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics computer program for the solution of incompressible fluid flow coupled to a structure. The fluid and coupling algorithms have been adapted from the previously developed two-dimensional code PELE-IC. The PELE3D code is written in both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is general enough to handle a variety of structural shapes. The free surface algorithm is able to accommodate a top surface and several independent bubbles. The code is in a developmental status since all the intended options have not been fully implemented and tested. Development of this code ended in 1980 upon termination of the contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  15. Flow in the well: computational fluid dynamics is essential in flow chamber construction

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Jörg; Frank, Wolfram; Schroten, Horst

    2007-01-01

    A perfusion system was developed to generate well defined flow conditions within a well of a standard multidish. Human vein endothelial cells were cultured under flow conditions and cell response was analyzed by microscopy. Endothelial cells became elongated and spindle shaped. As demonstrated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), cells were cultured under well defined but time varying shear stress conditions. A damper system was introduced which reduced pulsatile flow when using volumetric pumps. The flow and the wall shear stress distribution were analyzed by CFD for the steady and unsteady flow field. Usage of the volumetric pump caused variations of the wall shear stresses despite the controlled fluid environment and introduction of a damper system. Therefore the use of CFD analysis and experimental validation is critical in developing flow chambers and studying cell response to shear stress. The system presented gives an effortless flow chamber setup within a 6-well standard multidish. PMID:19002993

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 7th, Cincinnati, OH, July 15-17, 1985, Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are a novel three-dimensional vortex method, unsteady viscous flow around circular cylinders and airfoils, a time-accurate multiple grid algorithm, the numerical solution of incompressible flows by a marching multigrid nonlinear method, the Navier-Stokes solution for hypersonic flow over an indented nosetip, graphics and flow visualization in computational fluid dynamics, and a Navier-Stokes solution for the flow around a complete aircraft. Also covered are implicit schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws in curvilinear coordinates, an incremental multigrid strategy for fluid dynamic equations, numerical flow simulation by means of zonal grids, overset grids in compressible flow, noniterative parabolic grid generation for parabolized equations, FEM for high speed flows, and finite element approaches for aerothermal load prediction.

  17. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  18. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Hydrodynamic Force Acting on a Swimmer’S Hand in a Swimming Competition

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yohei; Hino, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    A stroke-analysis system based on a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation has been developed to evaluate the hydrodynamic forces acting on a swimmer’s hand. Using the present stroke-analysis system, a stroke technique of top swimmers can be recognized with regard to the hydrodynamic forces. The developed analysis system takes into account the effect of a transient stroke motion including acceleration and a curved stroke path without using assumptions such as a quasi-static approach. An unsteady Navier-Stokes solver based on an unstructured grid method is employed as the CFD method to calculate a viscous flow around a swimmer’s hand which can cope with the complicated geometry of hands. The CFD method is validated by comparison with experiments in steady-state and transient conditions. Following the validations, a stroke-analysis system is proposed, in which a hand moves in accordance with a stroke path measured by synchronized video cameras, and the fluid forces acting on the hand are computed with the CFD method. As a demonstration of the stroke-analysis system, two world class swimmers’ strokes in a race of 200 m freestyle are analyzed. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the hands of the top swimmers are computed, and the comparison of two swimmers shows that the stroke of the faster swimmer, who advanced at 1.84 m·s-1 during the stroke-analysis, generated larger thrust with higher thrust efficiency than that of the slower swimmer, who advanced at 1.75 m·s-1. The applicability of the present stroke analysis system has been proved through this analysis. Key Points The stroke-analysis system using CFD technique has been established. The stroke path and the hand orientation are obtained from a swimming competition with two synchronized underwater video camera, and used for the input data to the CFD analysis. The hydrodynamic force acting on the swimmer’s hand and thrust efficiency are analyzed, and the stroke technique can be evaluated. PMID

  19. A computational fluid dynamics analysis of hydrodynamic force acting on a swimmer's hand in a swimming competition.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yohei; Hino, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    A stroke-analysis system based on a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation has been developed to evaluate the hydrodynamic forces acting on a swimmer's hand. Using the present stroke-analysis system, a stroke technique of top swimmers can be recognized with regard to the hydrodynamic forces. The developed analysis system takes into account the effect of a transient stroke motion including acceleration and a curved stroke path without using assumptions such as a quasi-static approach. An unsteady Navier-Stokes solver based on an unstructured grid method is employed as the CFD method to calculate a viscous flow around a swimmer's hand which can cope with the complicated geometry of hands. The CFD method is validated by comparison with experiments in steady-state and transient conditions. Following the validations, a stroke-analysis system is proposed, in which a hand moves in accordance with a stroke path measured by synchronized video cameras, and the fluid forces acting on the hand are computed with the CFD method. As a demonstration of the stroke-analysis system, two world class swimmers' strokes in a race of 200 m freestyle are analyzed. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the hands of the top swimmers are computed, and the comparison of two swimmers shows that the stroke of the faster swimmer, who advanced at 1.84 m·s(-1) during the stroke-analysis, generated larger thrust with higher thrust efficiency than that of the slower swimmer, who advanced at 1.75 m·s(-1). The applicability of the present stroke analysis system has been proved through this analysis. Key PointsThe stroke-analysis system using CFD technique has been established.The stroke path and the hand orientation are obtained from a swimming competition with two synchronized underwater video camera, and used for the input data to the CFD analysis.The hydrodynamic force acting on the swimmer's hand and thrust efficiency are analyzed, and the stroke technique can be evaluated. PMID:24421727

  20. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the upper airway of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by Muller maneuver.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ping; Xu, Xiao-Long; Tang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Xue, Xiao-Chen; Wu, Ya-Dong; Zhu, Min

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to use computer simulation to describe the fluid dynamic characteristics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to evaluate the difference between during quiet respiration and the Muller maneuver (MM). Seven patients with OSAS were involved to perform computed tomographic (CT) scanning during quiet respiration and the MM. CT data in DICOM format were transformed into an anatomically three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the upper airway. The velocity magnitude, relative pressure, and flow distribution were obtained. Numerical simulation of airflow was performed to discuss how the MM affected airflow in the upper airway. To measure the discrepancy, the SPSS19.0 software package was utilized for statistic analysis. The results showed that the shape of the upper airway became narrower, and the pressure decreased during the MM. The minimal cross-sectional area (MCSA) of velopharynx was significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the airflow velocity in MCSAs of velopharynx and glossopharynx significantly accelerated (P<0.05) during the MM. This study demonstrated the possibility of CFD model combined with the MM for understanding pharyngeal aerodynamics in the pathophysiology of OSAS. PMID:26072090