Science.gov

Sample records for advanced computer simulation

  1. Simulation methods for advanced scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.; Carlson, J.A.; Forster, R.A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to create effective new algorithms for solving N-body problems by computer simulation. The authors concentrated on developing advanced classical and quantum Monte Carlo techniques. For simulations of phase transitions in classical systems, they produced a framework generalizing the famous Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms for Ising and Potts models. For spin-glass-like problems, they demonstrated the effectiveness of an extension of the multicanonical method for the two-dimensional, random bond Ising model. For quantum mechanical systems, they generated a new method to compute the ground-state energy of systems of interacting electrons. They also improved methods to compute excited states when the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method is used and to compute longer time dynamics when the stationary phase quantum Monte Carlo method is used.

  2. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rummel, E.

    2015-07-09

    To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

  3. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY17 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Michel; Archer, Bill; Hendrickson, Bruce; Wade, Doug; Hoang, Thuc

    2016-08-29

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balance of resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. ASC is now focused on increasing predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (sufficient resolution, dimensionality, and scientific details), and quantifying critical margins and uncertainties. Resolving each issue requires increasingly difficult analyses because the aging process has progressively moved the stockpile further away from the original test base. Where possible, the program also enables the use of high performance computing (HPC) and simulation tools to address broader national security needs, such as foreign nuclear weapon assessments and counter nuclear terrorism.

  4. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  5. Advanced Simulation and Computing Co-Design Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, James A.; Hoang, Thuc T.; Kelly, Suzanne M.; McPherson, Allen; Neely, Rob

    2015-11-01

    This ASC Co-design Strategy lays out the full continuum and components of the co-design process, based on what we have experienced thus far and what we wish to do more in the future to meet the program’s mission of providing high performance computing (HPC) and simulation capabilities for NNSA to carry out its stockpile stewardship responsibility.

  6. Advanced Computation Dynamics Simulation of Protective Structures Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    between the steel and CMU, grout, a flowable concrete mixture, is placed into the reinforced cells. If grout is placed into every cell (including...multi-wythe walls that were fully grouted and had a brick veneer filled with a foam insulated cavity. He simulated the grout and CMU with a single

  7. FY05-FY06 Advanced Simulation and Computing Implementation Plan, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, A L

    2004-07-19

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program will require the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapon design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile life extension programs and the resolution of significant finding investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced system of technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions.

  8. Computational cardiology: how computer simulations could be used to develop new therapies and advance existing ones

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.; O'Hara, Thomas; Bayer, Jason D.; Boyle, Patrick M.; McDowell, Kathleen S.; Constantino, Jason; Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Hu, Yuxuan; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the latest developments in computational cardiology. It focuses on the contribution of cardiac modelling to the development of new therapies as well as the advancement of existing ones for cardiac arrhythmias and pump dysfunction. Reviewed are cardiac modelling efforts aimed at advancing and optimizing existent therapies for cardiac disease (defibrillation, ablation of ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac resynchronization therapy) and at suggesting novel treatments, including novel molecular targets, as well as efforts to use cardiac models in stratification of patients likely to benefit from a given therapy, and the use of models in diagnostic procedures. PMID:23104919

  9. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY15 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Michel; Archer, Bill; Matzen, M. Keith

    2014-09-16

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balance of resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. As the program approaches the end of its second decade, ASC is intently focused on increasing predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (sufficient resolution, dimensionality, and scientific details), quantify critical margins and uncertainties, and resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Where possible, the program also enables the use of high-performance simulation and computing tools to address broader national security needs, such as foreign nuclear weapon assessments and counternuclear terrorism.

  10. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  11. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

    2010-04-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model

  12. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan Volume 2 Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M; Kusnezov, D; Bikkel, T; Hopson, J

    2007-04-25

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  13. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY07-08 Implementation Plan Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D; Hale, A; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2006-06-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program will require the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from

  14. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2008-04-30

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

    2008-10-07

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  16. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2007-09-13

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kissel, L

    2009-04-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that

  18. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2009-09-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model

  19. Advanced manned space flight simulation and training: An investigation of simulation host computer system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, Bruce C.; Bishop, Alfred M.; Redfield, Joe B.

    1989-01-01

    The findings of a preliminary investigation by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in simulation host computer concepts is presented. It is designed to aid NASA in evaluating simulation technologies for use in spaceflight training. The focus of the investigation is on the next generation of space simulation systems that will be utilized in training personnel for Space Station Freedom operations. SwRI concludes that NASA should pursue a distributed simulation host computer system architecture for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) rather than a centralized mainframe based arrangement. A distributed system offers many advantages and is seen by SwRI as the only architecture that will allow NASA to achieve established functional goals and operational objectives over the life of the Space Station Freedom program. Several distributed, parallel computing systems are available today that offer real-time capabilities for time critical, man-in-the-loop simulation. These systems are flexible in terms of connectivity and configurability, and are easily scaled to meet increasing demands for more computing power.

  20. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  1. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  2. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2016 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.; Archer, B.; Hendrickson, B.

    2015-08-27

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The purpose of this IP is to outline key work requirements to be performed and to control individual work activities within the scope of work. Contractors may not deviate from this plan without a revised WA or subsequent IP.

  3. An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

    2003-11-09

    The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

  4. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  5. Advanced Simulation and Computing: A Summary Report to the Director's Review

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M G; Peck, T

    2003-06-01

    It has now been three years since the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASCI), as managed by Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT) Directorate, has been reviewed by this Director's Review Committee (DRC). Since that time, there has been considerable progress for all components of the ASCI Program, and these developments will be highlighted in this document and in the presentations planned for June 9 and 10, 2003. There have also been some name changes. Today, the Program is called ''Advanced Simulation and Computing,'' Although it retains the familiar acronym ASCI, the initiative nature of the effort has given way to sustained services as an integral part of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). All computing efforts at LLNL and the other two Defense Program (DP) laboratories are funded and managed under ASCI. This includes the so-called legacy codes, which remain essential tools in stockpile stewardship. The contract between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC) specifies an independent appraisal of Directorate technical work and programmatic management. Such represents the work of this DNT Review Committee. Beginning this year, the Laboratory is implementing a new review system. This process was negotiated between UC, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Laboratory Directors. Central to this approach are eight performance objectives that focus on key programmatic and administrative goals. Associated with each of these objectives are a number of performance measures to more clearly characterize the attainment of the objectives. Each performance measure has a lead directorate and one or more contributing directorates. Each measure has an evaluation plan and has identified expected documentation to be included in the ''Assessment File''.

  6. A Computational Methodology for Simulating Thermal Loss Testing of the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Terry V.; Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two highefficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. In an effort to improve net heat input predictions, numerous tasks have been performed which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs, including the use of multidimensional numerical models. Validation test hardware has also been used to provide a direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multi-dimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input and efficiency. These validation tests were designed to simulate the temperature profile of an operating Stirling convertor and resulted in a measured net heat input of 244.4 W. The methodology was applied to the multi-dimensional numerical model which resulted in a net heat input of 240.3 W. The computational methodology resulted in a value of net heat input that was 1.7 percent less than that measured during laboratory testing. The resulting computational methodology and results are discussed.

  7. Influence of setback and advancement osseous genioplasty on facial outcome: A computer-simulated study.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Heussen, Nicole; Kamal, Mohammad; Peters, Florian; Fritz, Ulrike; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this virtual study was to investigate the influence of angular deviation and displacement distance on the overlying soft tissue during chin genioplasty. Computed tomography data from 21 patients were read using ProPlan CMF software. Twelve simulated genioplasties were performed per patient with variable osteotomy angles and displacement distances. Soft-tissue deformations and cephalometric analysis were compared. Changes in anterior and inferior soft-tissue of the chin along with resultant lower facial third area were determined. Maximum average changes in soft-tissue were obtained anterior after 10-mm advancement about 4.19 SD 0.84 mm and inferior about -1.55 SD 0.96 mm. After 10-mm setback anterior -4.63 SD 0.56 mm and inferior 0.75 SD 1.16 mm were deviations found. The anterior soft tissue showed a statistically significant change with bony displacement in both directions independent of osteotomy angle (p < 0.001) and only after a 10-mm advancement with an angle of -5° significant differences at inferior soft-tissue were noted (p = 0.0055). The average area of the total lower third of the face was 24,807.80 SD 4,091.72 mm(2) and up to 62.75% was influenced. Advanced genioplasty leads to greater changes in the overlying soft tissue, whereas the affected area is larger after setback displacement. The ratio between soft and hard tissue movements largely depends on the displacement distance.

  8. A computer program for estimating the power-density spectrum of advanced continuous simulation language generated time histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program for performing frequency analysis of time history data is presented. The program uses circular convolution and the fast Fourier transform to calculate power density spectrum (PDS) of time history data. The program interfaces with the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL) so that a frequency analysis may be performed on ACSL generated simulation variables. An example of the calculation of the PDS of a Van de Pol oscillator is presented.

  9. Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T.; Toridis, T.G.; Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

  10. Advancing the boundaries of high-connectivity network simulation with distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Abigail; Mehring, Carsten; Geisel, Theo; Aertsen, A D; Diesmann, Markus

    2005-08-01

    The availability of efficient and reliable simulation tools is one of the mission-critical technologies in the fast-moving field of computational neuroscience. Research indicates that higher brain functions emerge from large and complex cortical networks and their interactions. The large number of elements (neurons) combined with the high connectivity (synapses) of the biological network and the specific type of interactions impose severe constraints on the explorable system size that previously have been hard to overcome. Here we present a collection of new techniques combined to a coherent simulation tool removing the fundamental obstacle in the computational study of biological neural networks: the enormous number of synaptic contacts per neuron. Distributing an individual simulation over multiple computers enables the investigation of networks orders of magnitude larger than previously possible. The software scales excellently on a wide range of tested hardware, so it can be used in an interactive and iterative fashion for the development of ideas, and results can be produced quickly even for very large networks. In contrast to earlier approaches, a wide class of neuron models and synaptic dynamics can be represented.

  11. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  12. Advanced Computer Typography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY .(U) DEC 81 A V HERSHEY UNCLASSIFIED NPS012-81-005 M MEEEIEEEII IIUJIL15I.4 MICROCQP RE SO.JjI ON ft R NPS012-81-005...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0Monterey, California DTIC SELECTEWA APR 5 1982 B ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY by A. V. HERSHEY December 1981 OApproved for...Subtitle) S. TYPE Or REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY Dec 1979 - Dec 1981 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S CONTRACT

  13. Development of advanced computational fluid dynamics tools and their application to simulation of internal turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, V. N.; Karpenko, A. G.; Volkov, K. N.

    2015-06-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPU) provide architectures and new programming models that enable to harness their large processing power and to design computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations at both high performance and low cost. Possibilities of the use of GPUs for the simulation of internal fluid flows are discussed. The finite volume method is applied to solve three-dimensional (3D) unsteady compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. Compute Inified Device Architecture (CUDA) technology is used for programming implementation of parallel computational algorithms. Solution of some fluid dynamics problems on GPUs is presented and approaches to optimization of the CFD code related to the use of different types of memory are discussed. Speedup of solution on GPUs with respect to the solution on central processor unit (CPU) is compared with the use of different meshes and different methods of distribution of input data into blocks. Performance measurements show that numerical schemes developed achieve 20 to 50 speedup on GPU hardware compared to CPU reference implementation. The results obtained provide promising perspective for designing a GPU-based software framework for applications in CFD.

  14. Proceedings of the 1991 summer computer simulation conference

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D.

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the following topics in computer simulation: validation, languages, algorithms, computer performance and advanced processing, intelligent simulation, simulations in power and propulsion systems, and biomedical simulations.

  15. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  16. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  17. Advances in the Thermodynamics of Ideal Gases by Means of Computer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, David; Dunning-Davies, Jeremy

    2010-12-01

    Irreversible thermodynamic processes in ideal gases are investigated by computer simulations of the compound piston. A hard-sphere model of the gas on either side of a compound piston shows that damping occurs naturally without invoking extraneous mechanisms such as friction. Inter-particle collisions are identified as being responsible, as these redistribute the particle energies by altering all the components of momentum. In collisions with the piston, on the other hand, only the component of particle momentum in the direction of the piston motion is affected. Thus inter-particle collisions effectively dissipate the energy of the piston. These ideas are then incorporated into a simpler, one dimensional model based on kinetic theory in which all the particles have the same initial energy and inter-particle collisions are simulated by randomly adjusting the energy distribution. Varying the rate of energy redistribution alters the rate of decay of the piston motion. In addition, this simple model allows thermal interactions with the walls of the vessel to be simulated easily, and we observe a second mechanism of damping due to delayed heating and cooling. These ideas lead directly to a macroscopic formulation of thermodynamics in terms of rate equations. The models give an insight into the micro-dynamical origins of irreversibility in ideal gases and allow the thermodynamics of these irreversible processes to be investigated. We find surprisingly simple relationships between the volume changes and characteristic pressures in the system. Finally, we apply these idea s to the Carnot cycle and show that a dynamic cycle is executed if the piston is allowed to move under alternately ideal isothermal and adiabatic conditions. In this dynamic Carnot cycle not only is work done but power is developed through the motion of the piston. The implications for classical thermodynamics are discussed briefly.

  18. Advanced Computation in Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2001-10-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. This talk will review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically-confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop MPP's to produce 3-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for tens of thousands time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to stimulate improved cross-cutting collaborations with other fields and also to help attract

  19. Displaying Computer Simulations Of Physical Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses computer simulation as means of experiencing and learning to understand physical phenomena. Covers both present simulation capabilities and major advances expected in near future. Visual, aural, tactile, and kinesthetic effects used to teach such physical sciences as dynamics of fluids. Recommends classrooms in universities, government, and industry be linked to advanced computing centers so computer simulations integrated into education process.

  20. Advances in Computational Radiation Biophysics for Cancer Therapy: Simulating Nano-Scale Damage by Low-Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncic, Zdenka

    2015-10-01

    Computational radiation biophysics is a rapidly growing area that is contributing, alongside new hardware technologies, to ongoing developments in cancer imaging and therapy. Recent advances in theoretical and computational modeling have enabled the simulation of discrete, event-by-event interactions of very low energy (≪ 100 eV) electrons with water in its liquid thermodynamic phase. This represents a significant advance in our ability to investigate the initial stages of radiation induced biological damage at the molecular level. Such studies are important for the development of novel cancer treatment strategies, an example of which is given by microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). Here, new results are shown demonstrating that when excitations and ionizations are resolved down to nano-scales, their distribution extends well outside the primary microbeam path, into regions that are not directly irradiated. This suggests that radiation dose alone is insufficient to fully quantify biological damage. These results also suggest that the radiation cross-fire may be an important clue to understanding the different observed responses of healthy cells and tumor cells to MRT.

  1. Advances in Computational Radiation Biophysics for Cancer Therapy: Simulating Nano-Scale Damage by Low-Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncic, Zdenka

    Computational radiation biophysics is a rapidly growing area that is contributing, alongside new hardware technologies, to ongoing developments in cancer imaging and therapy. Recent advances in theoretical and computational modeling have enabled the simulation of discrete, event-by-event interactions of very low energy (≪ 100 eV) electrons with water in its liquid thermodynamic phase. This represents a significant advance in our ability to investigate the initial stages of radiation induced biological damage at the molecular level. Such studies are important for the development of novel cancer treatment strategies, an example of which is given by microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). Here, new results are shown demonstrating that when excitations and ionizations are resolved down to nano-scales, their distribution extends well outside the primary microbeam path, into regions that are not directly irradiated. This suggests that radiation dose alone is insufficient to fully quantify biological damage. These results also suggest that the radiation cross-fire may be an important clue to understanding the different observed responses of healthy cells and tumor cells to MRT.

  2. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  3. A Computational Methodology for Simulating Thermal Loss Testing of the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Terry V.; Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2011-01-01

    Convertor and generator testing is carried out in tests designed to characterize convertor performance when subjected to environments intended to simulate launch and space conditions. The value of net heat input must be known in order to calculate convertor efficiency and to validate convertor performance. Specially designed test hardware was used to verify and validate a two step methodology for the prediction of net heat input. This lessons learned from these simulations have been applied to previous convertor simulations. As heat is supplied to the convertors, electric power is produced and measured. Net heat input to the convertor is one parameter that will contribute to the calculation of efficiency. This parameter is not measured directly. Insulation Loss. Determine the current status of the thermal conductivity of the micro-porous insulation. - Match heat source and hot end temperatures. - Match temperature difference across Kaowool insulation

  4. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  5. Recent advances in renal hemodynamics: insights from bench experiments and computer simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It has been long known that the kidney plays an essential role in the control of body fluids and blood pressure and that impairment of renal function may lead to the development of diseases such as hypertension (Guyton AC, Coleman TG, Granger Annu Rev Physiol 34: 13–46, 1972). In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of renal hemodynamics, obtained from experimental and theoretical studies. Some of these studies were published in response to a recent Call for Papers of this journal: Renal Hemodynamics: Integrating with the Nephron and Beyond. PMID:25715984

  6. Simultaneous Multiple-Jet Impacts in Concrete-Experiments and Advanced Computational Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Routh, J.W.; Simonson, S.C.

    1999-08-12

    The simultaneous impact of multiple shaped-charge jets on a concrete target has been observed experimentally to lead to the formation of a larger and deeper entrance crater than would be expected from the superposition of the craters of the individual jets. The problem has been modeled with the 3-D simulation code ALE3D, running on massively parallel processors. These calculations indicate that the enlarged damage area is the result of tensile stresses caused by the interactions among the pressure waves simultaneously emanating from the three impact sites. This phenomenon has the potential for enhancing the penetration of a follow-on projectile.

  7. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  9. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L

    2009-05-01

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems

  10. Advances in time-domain electromagnetic simulation capabilities through the use of overset grids and massively parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Douglas Clifton

    A new methodology is presented for conducting numerical simulations of electromagnetic scattering and wave-propagation phenomena on massively parallel computing platforms. A process is constructed which is rooted in the Finite-Volume Time-Domain (FVTD) technique to create a simulation capability that is both versatile and practical. In terms of versatility, the method is platform independent, is easily modifiable, and is capable of solving a large number of problems with no alterations. In terms of practicality, the method is sophisticated enough to solve problems of engineering significance and is not limited to mere academic exercises. In order to achieve this capability, techniques are integrated from several scientific disciplines including computational fluid dynamics, computational electromagnetics, and parallel computing. The end result is the first FVTD solver capable of utilizing the highly flexible overset-gridding process in a distributed-memory computing environment. In the process of creating this capability, work is accomplished to conduct the first study designed to quantify the effects of domain-decomposition dimensionality on the parallel performance of hyperbolic partial differential equations solvers; to develop a new method of partitioning a computational domain comprised of overset grids; and to provide the first detailed assessment of the applicability of overset grids to the field of computational electromagnetics. Using these new methods and capabilities, results from a large number of wave propagation and scattering simulations are presented. The overset-grid FVTD algorithm is demonstrated to produce results of comparable accuracy to single-grid simulations while simultaneously shortening the grid-generation process and increasing the flexibility and utility of the FVTD technique. Furthermore, the new domain-decomposition approaches developed for overset grids are shown to be capable of producing partitions that are better load balanced and

  11. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  12. Computer-Graphical Simulation Of Robotic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ken; Cook, George

    1988-01-01

    Computer program ROBOSIM, developed to simulate operations of robots, applied to preliminary design of robotic arc-welding operation. Limitations on equipment investigated in advance to prevent expensive mistakes. Computer makes drawing of robotic welder and workpiece on positioning table. Such numerical simulation used to perform rapid, safe experiments in computer-aided design or manufacturing.

  13. Advanced simulation of digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, G. S.

    1980-09-01

    An Advanced Simulation of Digital Filters has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 computer utilizing Tektronix hardware and software. The program package is appropriate for use by persons beginning their study of digital signal processing or for filter analysis. The ASDF programs provide the user with an interactive method by which filter pole and zero locations can be manipulated. Graphical output on both the Tektronix graphics screen and the Versatec plotter are provided to observe the effects of pole-zero movement.

  14. Advances and challenges in computational plasma science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.

    2005-02-01

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behaviour. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper, with illustrative examples, chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics and other topics. Progress has been stimulated, in particular, by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modelling. This was enabled by two key factors: (a) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (b) access to powerful new computational resources. Excellent progress has been made in developing codes for which computer run-time and problem-size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Examples include the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPPs to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations that have accelerated advances in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. These calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In looking towards the future, the current results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. This

  15. Simulating chemistry using quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Kassal, Ivan; Whitfield, James D; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors.

  16. Advances in Computational Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Alan C.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-03-01

    I was invited to be the guest editor for a special issue of Computing in Science and Engineering along with a colleague from Stony Brook. This is the guest editors' introduction to a special issue of Computing in Science and Engineering. Alan and I have written this introduction and have been the editors for the 4 papers to be published in this special edition.

  17. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between

  18. Computationally efficient multibody simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, Jayant; Kumar, Manoj

    1994-01-01

    Computationally efficient approaches to the solution of the dynamics of multibody systems are presented in this work. The computational efficiency is derived from both the algorithmic and implementational standpoint. Order(n) approaches provide a new formulation of the equations of motion eliminating the assembly and numerical inversion of a system mass matrix as required by conventional algorithms. Computational efficiency is also gained in the implementation phase by the symbolic processing and parallel implementation of these equations. Comparison of this algorithm with existing multibody simulation programs illustrates the increased computational efficiency.

  19. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  20. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V. S.

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  1. Advances and trends in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Atluri, Satya N.

    1987-01-01

    The development status and applicational range of techniques in computational structural mechanics (CSM) are evaluated with a view to advances in computational models for material behavior, discrete-element technology, quality assessment, the control of numerical simulations of structural response, hybrid analysis techniques, techniques for large-scale optimization, and the impact of new computing systems on CSM. Primary pacers of CSM development encompass prediction and analysis of novel materials for structural components, computational strategies for large-scale structural calculations, and the assessment of response prediction reliability together with its adaptive improvement.

  2. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a multi-track'' simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  3. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a ``multi-track`` simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  4. Computer-simulated phacoemulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Nordh, Leif; Skarman, Eva; Andersson, Mats; Nordqvist, Per

    2001-06-01

    Phacoemulsification makes the cataract operation easier for the patient but involves a demanding technique for the surgeon. It is therefore important to increase the quality of surgical training in order to shorten the learning period for the beginner. This should diminish the risks of the patient. We are developing a computer-based simulator for training of phacoemulsification. The simulator is built on a platform that can be used as a basis for several different training simulators. A prototype has been made that has been partly tested by experienced surgeons.

  5. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  6. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  7. Probabilistic Fatigue: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue is a primary consideration in the design of aerospace structures for long term durability and reliability. There are several types of fatigue that must be considered in the design. These include low cycle, high cycle, combined for different cyclic loading conditions - for example, mechanical, thermal, erosion, etc. The traditional approach to evaluate fatigue has been to conduct many tests in the various service-environment conditions that the component will be subjected to in a specific design. This approach is reasonable and robust for that specific design. However, it is time consuming, costly and needs to be repeated for designs in different operating conditions in general. Recent research has demonstrated that fatigue of structural components/structures can be evaluated by computational simulation based on a novel paradigm. Main features in this novel paradigm are progressive telescoping scale mechanics, progressive scale substructuring and progressive structural fracture, encompassed with probabilistic simulation. These generic features of this approach are to probabilistically telescope scale local material point damage all the way up to the structural component and to probabilistically scale decompose structural loads and boundary conditions all the way down to material point. Additional features include a multifactor interaction model that probabilistically describes material properties evolution, any changes due to various cyclic load and other mutually interacting effects. The objective of the proposed paper is to describe this novel paradigm of computational simulation and present typical fatigue results for structural components. Additionally, advantages, versatility and inclusiveness of computational simulation versus testing are discussed. Guidelines for complementing simulated results with strategic testing are outlined. Typical results are shown for computational simulation of fatigue in metallic composite structures to demonstrate the

  8. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  11. Parallel Computing for Brain Simulation.

    PubMed

    Pastur-Romay, L A; Porto-Pazos, A B; Cedrón, F; Pazos, A

    2016-11-04

    The human brain is the most complex system in the known universe, but it is the most unknown system. It allows the human beings to possess extraordinary capacities. However, we don´t understand yet how and why most of these capacities are produced. For decades, it have been tried that the computers reproduces these capacities. On one hand, to help understanding the nervous system. On the other hand, to process the data in a more efficient way than before. It is intended to make the computers process the information like the brain does it. The important technological developments and the big multidisciplinary projects have allowed create the first simulation with a number of neurons similar to the human brain neurons number. This paper presents an update review about the main research projects that are trying of simulate and/or emulate the human brain. They employ different types of computational models using parallel computing: digital models, analog models and hybrid models. This review includes the actual applications of these works and also the future trends. We have reviewed some works that look for a step forward in Neuroscience and other ones that look for a breakthrough in Computer Science (neuromorphic hardware, machine learning techniques). We summarize the most outstanding characteristics of them and present the latest advances and future plans. In addition, this review remarks the importance of considering not only neurons: the computational models of the brain should include glial cells, given the proven importance of the astrocytes in the information processing.

  12. Experimentation and evaluation of threat detection and local area awareness using advanced computational technologies in a simulated military environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Jason S.; Brick Larkin, Gabriella; Johnson, Tony; Oie, Kelvin; Paul, Victor; Davis, James

    2010-04-01

    Tomorrows military systems will require novel methods for assessing Soldier performance and situational awareness (SA) in mobile operations involving mixed-initiative systems. Although new methods may augment Soldier assessments, they may also reduce Soldier performance as a function of demand on workload, requiring concurrent performance of mission and assessment tasks. The present paper describes a unique approach that supports assessment in environments approximating the operational context within which future systems will be deployed. A complex distributed system was required to emulate the operational environment. Separate computational and visualization systems provided an environment representative of the military operational context, including a 3D urban environment with dynamic human entities. Semi-autonomous driving was achieved with a simulated autonomous mobility system and SA was assessed through digital reports. A military crew station mounted on a 6-DOF motion simulator was used to create the physical environment. Cognitive state evaluation was enabled using physiological monitoring. Analyses indicated individual differences in temporal and accuracy components when identifying key features of potential threats; i.e., comparing Soldiers and insurgents with non-insurgent civilians. The assessment approach provided a natural, operationally-relevant means of assessing needs of future secure mobility systems and detecting key factors affecting Soldier-system performance as foci for future development.

  13. MO-E-18C-04: Advanced Computer Simulation and Visualization Tools for Enhanced Understanding of Core Medical Physics Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Most medical physics programs emphasize proficiency in routine clinical calculations and QA. The formulaic aspect of these calculations and prescriptive nature of measurement protocols obviate the need to frequently apply basic physical principles, which, therefore, gradually decay away from memory. E.g. few students appreciate the role of electron transport in photon dose, making it difficult to understand key concepts such as dose buildup, electronic disequilibrium effects and Bragg-Gray theory. These conceptual deficiencies manifest when the physicist encounters a new system, requiring knowledge beyond routine activities. Methods: Two interactive computer simulation tools are developed to facilitate deeper learning of physical principles. One is a Monte Carlo code written with a strong educational aspect. The code can “label” regions and interactions to highlight specific aspects of the physics, e.g., certain regions can be designated as “starters” or “crossers,” and any interaction type can be turned on and off. Full 3D tracks with specific portions highlighted further enhance the visualization of radiation transport problems. The second code calculates and displays trajectories of a collection electrons under arbitrary space/time dependent Lorentz force using relativistic kinematics. Results: Using the Monte Carlo code, the student can interactively study photon and electron transport through visualization of dose components, particle tracks, and interaction types. The code can, for instance, be used to study kerma-dose relationship, explore electronic disequilibrium near interfaces, or visualize kernels by using interaction forcing. The electromagnetic simulator enables the student to explore accelerating mechanisms and particle optics in devices such as cyclotrons and linacs. Conclusion: The proposed tools are designed to enhance understanding of abstract concepts by highlighting various aspects of the physics. The simulations serve as

  14. Advanced electromagnetic gun simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. L.; George, E. B.; Lippert, J. R.; Balius, A. R.

    1986-11-01

    The architecture, software and application of a simulation system for evaluating electromagnetic gun (EMG) operability, maintainability, test data and performance tradeoffs are described. The system features a generic preprocessor designed for handling the large data rates necessary for EMG simulations. The preprocessor and postprocessor operate independent of the EMG simulation, which is viewed through windows by the user, who can then select the areas of the simulation desired. The simulation considers a homopolar generator, busbars, pulse shaping coils, the barrel, switches, and prime movers. In particular, account is taken of barrel loading by the magnetic field, Lorentz force and plasma pressure.

  15. Advanced flight computer. Special study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coo, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a special study to define a 32-bit radiation hardened, SEU tolerant flight computer architecture, and to investigate current or near-term technologies and development efforts that contribute to the Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) design and development. An AFC processing node architecture is defined. Each node may consist of a multi-chip processor as needed. The modular, building block approach uses VLSI technology and packaging methods that demonstrate a feasible AFC module in 1998 that meets that AFC goals. The defined architecture and approach demonstrate a clear low-risk, low-cost path to the 1998 production goal, with intermediate prototypes in 1996.

  16. Inversion based on computational simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Saquib, S.S.

    1998-09-01

    A standard approach to solving inversion problems that involve many parameters uses gradient-based optimization to find the parameters that best match the data. The authors discuss enabling techniques that facilitate application of this approach to large-scale computational simulations, which are the only way to investigate many complex physical phenomena. Such simulations may not seem to lend themselves to calculation of the gradient with respect to numerous parameters. However, adjoint differentiation allows one to efficiently compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to all the variables of a simulation. When combined with advanced gradient-based optimization algorithms, adjoint differentiation permits one to solve very large problems of optimization or parameter estimation. These techniques will be illustrated through the simulation of the time-dependent diffusion of infrared light through tissue, which has been used to perform optical tomography. The techniques discussed have a wide range of applicability to modeling including the optimization of models to achieve a desired design goal.

  17. Computational Models of Human Performance: Validation of Memory and Procedural Representation in Advanced Air/Ground Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Labacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Man-Machine Interaction Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) under joint U.S. Army and NASA cooperative is intended to assist designers of complex human/automation systems in successfully incorporating human performance capabilities and limitations into decision and action support systems. MIDAS is a computational representation of multiple human operators, selected perceptual, cognitive, and physical functions of those operators, and the physical/functional representation of the equipment with which they operate. MIDAS has been used as an integrated predictive framework for the investigation of human/machine systems, particularly in situations with high demands on the operators. We have extended the human performance models to include representation of both human operators and intelligent aiding systems in flight management, and air traffic service. The focus of this development is to predict human performance in response to aiding system developed to identify aircraft conflict and to assist in the shared authority for resolution. The demands of this application requires representation of many intelligent agents sharing world-models, coordinating action/intention, and cooperative scheduling of goals and action in an somewhat unpredictable world of operations. In recent applications to airborne systems development, MIDAS has demonstrated an ability to predict flight crew decision-making and procedural behavior when interacting with automated flight management systems and Air Traffic Control. In this paper, we describe two enhancements to MIDAS. The first involves the addition of working memory in the form of an articulatory buffer for verbal communication protocols and a visuo-spatial buffer for communications via digital datalink. The second enhancement is a representation of multiple operators working as a team. This enhanced model was used to predict the performance of human flight crews and their level of compliance with commercial aviation communication

  18. Development and validation of a computational finite element model of the rabbit upper airway: simulations of mandibular advancement and tracheal displacement.

    PubMed

    Amatoury, Jason; Cheng, Shaokoon; Kairaitis, Kristina; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Bilston, Lynne E

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms leading to upper airway (UA) collapse during sleep are complex and poorly understood. We previously developed an anesthetized rabbit model for studying UA physiology. On the basis of this body of physiological data, we aimed to develop and validate a two-dimensional (2D) computational finite element model (FEM) of the passive rabbit UA and peripharyngeal tissues. Model geometry was reconstructed from a midsagittal computed tomographic image of a representative New Zealand White rabbit, which included major soft (tongue, soft palate, constrictor muscles), cartilaginous (epiglottis, thyroid cartilage), and bony pharyngeal tissues (mandible, hard palate, hyoid bone). Other UA muscles were modeled as linear elastic connections. Initial boundary and contact definitions were defined from anatomy and material properties derived from the literature. Model parameters were optimized to physiological data sets associated with mandibular advancement (MA) and caudal tracheal displacement (TD), including hyoid displacement, which featured with both applied loads. The model was then validated against independent data sets involving combined MA and TD. Model outputs included UA lumen geometry, peripharyngeal tissue displacement, and stress and strain distributions. Simulated MA and TD resulted in UA enlargement and nonuniform increases in tissue displacement, and stress and strain. Model predictions closely agreed with experimental data for individually applied MA, TD, and their combination. We have developed and validated an FEM of the rabbit UA that predicts UA geometry and peripharyngeal tissue mechanical changes associated with interventions known to improve UA patency. The model has the potential to advance our understanding of UA physiology and peripharyngeal tissue mechanics.

  19. Computer simulation of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ping; Morris, J. W.

    1992-11-01

    The microstructure that results from a martensitic transformation is largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, it is useful to have computer simulation models that mimic the process. One such model is a finite-element model in which the transforming body is divided into elementary cells that transform when it is energetically favorable to do so. Using the linear elastic theory, the elastic energy of an arbitrary distribution of transformed cells can be calculated, and the elastic strain field can be monitored as the transformation proceeds. In the present article, a model of this type is developed and evaluated by testing its ability to generate the preferred configurations of isolated martensite particles, which can be predicted analytically from the linear elastic theory. Both two- and three-dimensional versions of the model are used. The computer model is in good agreement with analytic theory when the latter predicts single-variant martensite particles. The three-dimensional model also generates twinned martensite in reason- able agreement with the analytic predictions when the fractions of the two variants in the particle are near 0.5. It is less successful in reproducing twinned martensites when one variant is dom- inant; however, in this case, it does produce unusual morphologies, such as “butterfly mar- tensite,” that have been observed experimentally. Neither the analytic theory nor the computer simulation predicts twinned martensites in the two-dimensional transformations considered here, revealing an inherent limitation of studies that are restricted to two dimensions.

  20. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Elber, Ron

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  1. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elber, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances. PMID:26874473

  2. Advances in Time-Domain Electromagnetic Simulation Capabilities Through the Use of Overset Grids and Massively Parallel Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    to construct their computer codes (written largely in FORTRAN) to exploit this type of architecture. Towards the end of the 1980s, however, vector...for exploiting parallel architectures using both single and overset grids in conjunction with typical grid-based PDE solvers in general and FVTD...8217. Furthermore, it naturally exploits the means by which the electric and magnetic fields are related through the curl operators. Unfortunately, although stag

  3. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  4. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  5. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  6. Grid computing and biomolecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christopher J; Ng, Muan Hong; Johnston, Steven; Murdock, Stuart E; Wu, Bing; Tai, Kaihsu; Fangohr, Hans; Jeffreys, Paul; Cox, Simon; Frey, Jeremy G; Sansom, Mark S P; Essex, Jonathan W

    2005-08-15

    Biomolecular computer simulations are now widely used not only in an academic setting to understand the fundamental role of molecular dynamics on biological function, but also in the industrial context to assist in drug design. In this paper, two applications of Grid computing to this area will be outlined. The first, involving the coupling of distributed computing resources to dedicated Beowulf clusters, is targeted at simulating protein conformational change using the Replica Exchange methodology. In the second, the rationale and design of a database of biomolecular simulation trajectories is described. Both applications illustrate the increasingly important role modern computational methods are playing in the life sciences.

  7. Advanced concepts flight simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Chappell, S L; Sexton, G A

    1986-12-01

    The cockpit environment is changing rapidly. New technology allows airborne computerised information, flight automation and data transfer with the ground. By 1995, not only will the pilot's task have changed, but also the tools for doing that task. To provide knowledge and direction for these changes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Lockheed-Georgia Company have completed three identical Advanced Concepts Flight Simulation Facilities. Many advanced features have been incorporated into the simulators - e g, cathode ray tube (CRT) displays of flight and systems information operated via touch-screen or voice, print-outs of clearances, cockpit traffic displays, current databases containing navigational charts, weather and flight plan information, and fuel-efficient autopilot control from take-off to touchdown. More importantly, this cockpit is a versatile test bed for studying displays, controls, procedures and crew management in a full-mission context. The facility also has an air traffic control simulation, with radio and data communications, and an outside visual scene with variable weather conditions. These provide a veridical flight environment to evaluate accurately advanced concepts in flight stations.

  8. Software simulator for multiple computer simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogrady, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the structure and use of a computer program that simulates the operation of a parallel processor simulation system. The program is part of an investigation to determine algorithms that are suitable for simulating continous systems on a parallel processor configuration. The simulator is designed to accurately simulate the problem-solving phase of a simulation study. Care has been taken to ensure the integrity and correctness of data exchanges and to correctly sequence periods of computation and periods of data exchange. It is pointed out that the functions performed during a problem-setup phase or a reset phase are not simulated. In particular, there is no attempt to simulate the downloading process that loads object code into the local, transfer, and mapping memories of processing elements or the memories of the run control processor and the system control processor. The main program of the simulator carries out some problem-setup functions of the system control processor in that it requests the user to enter values for simulation system parameters and problem parameters. The method by which these values are transferred to the other processors, however, is not simulated.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  10. Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

  11. Flow simulation and high performance computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, T.; Aliabadi, S.; Behr, M.; Johnson, A.; Kalro, V.; Litke, M.

    1996-10-01

    Flow simulation is a computational tool for exploring science and technology involving flow applications. It can provide cost-effective alternatives or complements to laboratory experiments, field tests and prototyping. Flow simulation relies heavily on high performance computing (HPC). We view HPC as having two major components. One is advanced algorithms capable of accurately simulating complex, real-world problems. The other is advanced computer hardware and networking with sufficient power, memory and bandwidth to execute those simulations. While HPC enables flow simulation, flow simulation motivates development of novel HPC techniques. This paper focuses on demonstrating that flow simulation has come a long way and is being applied to many complex, real-world problems in different fields of engineering and applied sciences, particularly in aerospace engineering and applied fluid mechanics. Flow simulation has come a long way because HPC has come a long way. This paper also provides a brief review of some of the recently-developed HPC methods and tools that has played a major role in bringing flow simulation where it is today. A number of 3D flow simulations are presented in this paper as examples of the level of computational capability reached with recent HPC methods and hardware. These examples are, flow around a fighter aircraft, flow around two trains passing in a tunnel, large ram-air parachutes, flow over hydraulic structures, contaminant dispersion in a model subway station, airflow past an automobile, multiple spheres falling in a liquid-filled tube, and dynamics of a paratrooper jumping from a cargo aircraft.

  12. Computer Simulation of Mutagenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, J. C.; Dent, M. T.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is described which simulates point-substitution mutations in the DNA strands of typical organisms. Its objective is to help students to understand the significance and structure of the genetic code, and the mechanisms and effect of mutagenesis. (Author/BB)

  13. Computer Simulations: An Integrating Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilan, Bohdan J.

    This introduction to computer simulations as an integrated learning experience reports on their use with students in grades 5 through 10 using commercial software packages such as SimCity, SimAnt, SimEarth, and Civilization. Students spent an average of 60 hours with the simulation games and reported their experiences each week in a personal log.…

  14. Composite Erosion by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    Composite degradation is evaluated by computational simulation when the erosion degradation occurs on a ply-by-ply basis and the degrading medium (device) is normal to the ply. The computational simulation is performed by a multi factor interaction model and by a multi scale and multi physics available computer code. The erosion process degrades both the fiber and the matrix simultaneously in the same slice (ply). Both the fiber volume ratio and the matrix volume ratio approach zero while the void volume ratio increases as the ply degrades. The multi factor interaction model simulates the erosion degradation, provided that the exponents and factor ratios are selected judiciously. Results obtained by the computational composite mechanics show that most composite characterization properties degrade monotonically and approach "zero" as the ply degrades completely.

  15. Proceedings of the 1990 Summer computer simulation conference

    SciTech Connect

    Svrcek, B.; McRae, J.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers simulation methodologies, computer systems and applications that will serve the simulation practitioner for the next decade. Specifically, the simulation applications range from Computer-Integrated-Manufacturing, Computer-Aided-Design, Radar and Communications, Transportation, Biomedical, Energy and the Environment, Government/Management and Social Sciences, and Training Simulators to Aerospace, Missiles and SDI. Additionally, new approaches to simulation are offered by neural networks, expert systems and parallel processing. Two applications deal with these new approaches, Intelligent Simulation Environments and Advanced Information Processing and Simulation.

  16. Computer simulation improves remedial cementing success

    SciTech Connect

    Kulakofsky, D.; Creel, P. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports that computer simulation has been used successfully to design remedial cement squeeze jobs and efficiently evaluate actual downhole performance and results. The program uses fluid properties, well parameters and wellbore configuration to estimate surface pressure at progressive stages of pumping operations. This new tool predicts surface pumping pressures in advance, allowing operators to effectively address changes that occur downhole during workover operations.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Advances and challenges in computational plasma science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.; Chan, V. S.

    2005-02-01

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behaviour. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper, with illustrative examples, chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics and other topics. Progress has been stimulated, in particular, by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modelling. This was enabled by two key factors: (a) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (b) access to powerful new computational resources. Excellent progress has been made in developing codes for which computer run-time and problem-size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Examples include the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPPs to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations that have accelerated advances in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. These calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In looking towards the future, the current results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. This

  18. Computer simulation of astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Claire E.

    1991-01-01

    The role of sophisticated numerical models and simulations in the field of plasma astrophysics is discussed. The need for an iteration between microphysics and macrophysics in order for astrophysical plasma physics to produce quantitative results that can be related to astronomical data is stressed. A discussion on computational requirements for simulations of astrophysical plasmas contrasts microscopic plasma simulations with macroscopic system models. An overview of particle-in-cell simulations (PICS) is given and two examples of PICS of astrophysical plasma are discussed including particle acceleration by collisionless shocks in relativistic plasmas and magnetic field reconnection in astrophysical plasmas.

  19. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  20. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  1. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  2. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  3. Computer Simulation Of Cyclic Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.; Lowell, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    Computer model developed to simulate cyclic oxidation of metals. With relatively few input parameters, kinetics of cyclic oxidation simulated for wide variety of temperatures, durations of cycles, and total numbers of cycles. Program written in BASICA and run on any IBM-compatible microcomputer. Used in variety of ways to aid experimental research. In minutes, effects of duration of cycle and/or number of cycles on oxidation kinetics of material surveyed.

  4. Onyx-Advanced Aeropropulsion Simulation Framework Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a new software environment for analyzing and designing aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation systems. Its purpose is to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines by creating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system (refs. 1 and 2). Through a university grant as part of that effort, researchers at the University of Toledo have developed Onyx, an extensible Java-based (Sun Micro-systems, Inc.), objectoriented simulation framework, to investigate how advanced software design techniques can be successfully applied to aeropropulsion system simulation (refs. 3 and 4). The design of Onyx's architecture enables users to customize and extend the framework to add new functionality or adapt simulation behavior as required. It exploits object-oriented technologies, such as design patterns, domain frameworks, and software components, to develop a modular system in which users can dynamically replace components with others having different functionality.

  5. A computer management system for patient simulations.

    PubMed

    Finkelsteine, M W; Johnson, L A; Lilly, G E

    1991-04-01

    A series of interactive videodisc patient simulations is being used to teach clinical problem-solving skills, including diagnosis and management, to dental students. This series is called Oral Disease Simulations for Diagnosis and Management (ODSDM). A computer management system has been developed in response to the following needs. First, the sequence in which students perform simulations is critical. Second, maintaining records of completed simulations and student performance on each simulation is a time-consuming task for faculty. Third, the simulations require ongoing evaluation to ensure high quality instruction. The primary objective of the management system is to ensure that each student masters diagnosis. Mastery must be obtained at a specific level before advancing to the next level. The management system does this by individualizing the sequence of the simulations to adapt to the needs of each student. The management system generates reports which provide information about students or the simulations. Student reports contain demographic and performance information. System reports include information about individual patient simulations and act as a quality control mechanism for the simulations.

  6. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  7. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  8. Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) | DSITP

    Cancer.gov

    The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC), located in Frederick Maryland (MD), provides HPC resources for both NIH/NCI intramural scientists and the extramural biomedical research community. Its mission is to provide HPC support, to provide collaborative research, and to conduct in-house research in various areas of computational biology and biomedical research.

  9. Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following areas of hand carried computers and mobile workstation technology are covered: background, applications, high end products, technology trends, requirements for the Control Center application, and recommendations for the future.

  10. Computational Challenges in Nuclear Weapons Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    McMillain, C F; Adams, T F; McCoy, M G; Christensen, R B; Pudliner, B S; Zika, M R; Brantley, P S; Vetter, J S; May, J M

    2003-08-29

    After a decade of experience, the Stockpile Stewardship Program continues to ensure the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) program was established to provide leading edge, high-end simulation capabilities needed to meet the program's assessment and certification requirements. The great challenge of this program lies in developing the tools and resources necessary for the complex, highly coupled, multi-physics calculations required to simulate nuclear weapons. This paper describes the hardware and software environment we have applied to fulfill our nuclear weapons responsibilities. It also presents the characteristics of our algorithms and codes, especially as they relate to supercomputing resource capabilities and requirements. It then addresses impediments to the development and application of nuclear weapon simulation software and hardware and concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations on an approach for working with industry and government agencies to address these impediments.

  11. Computer-based vertebral tumor cryoablation planning and procedure simulation involving two cases using MRI-visible 3D printing and advanced visualization

    PubMed Central

    Guenette, Jeffrey P.; Himes, Nathan; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Kelil, Tatiana; Mitsouras, Dimitris; Lee, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the development and use of MRI-compatible and MRI-visible 3D printed models in conjunction with advanced visualization software models to plan and simulate safe access routes to achieve a theoretical zone of cryoablation for percutaneous image-guided treatment of a C7 pedicle osteoid osteoma and an L1 lamina osteoblastoma. Both models altered procedural planning and patient care. Patient-specific MRI-visible models can be helpful in planning complex percutaneous image-guided cryoablation procedures. PMID:27505064

  12. Opportunities in computational mechanics: Advances in parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.A.

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, the authors will discuss recent advances in computing power and the prospects for using these new capabilities for studying plasticity and failure. They will first review the new capabilities made available with parallel computing. They will discuss how these machines perform and how well their architecture might work on materials issues. Finally, they will give some estimates on the size of problems possible using these computers.

  13. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping

    1993-11-01

    The characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, a finite-element computer simulation model was constructed to mimic the transformation process. The transformation is athermal and simulated at each incremental step by transforming the cell which maximizes the decrease in the free energy. To determine the free energy change, the elastic energy developed during martensite growth is calculated from the theory of linear elasticity for elastically homogeneous media, and updated as the transformation proceeds.

  14. Biomes computed from simulated climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Martin; Esch, Monika

    1994-01-01

    The biome model of Prentice et al. (1992a) is used to predict global patterns of potential natural plant formations, or biomes, from climatologies simulated by ECHAM, a model used for climate simulations at the Max-Planck-Institut fur Meteorologie. This study is undertaken in order to show the advantage of this biome model in diagnosing the performance of a climate model and assessing effects of past and future climate changes predicted by a climate model. Good overall agreement is found between global patterns of biomes computed from observed and simulated data of present climate. But there are also major discrepancies indicated by a difference in biomes in Australia, in the Kalahari Desert, and in the Middle West of North America. These discrepancies can be traced back to failures in simulated rainfall as well as summer or winter temperatures. Global patterns of biomes computed from an ice age simulation reveal that North America, Europe, and Siberia should have been covered largely by tundra and taiga, whereas only small differences are seen for the tropical rain forests. A potential northeast shift of biomes is expected from a simulation with enhanced C02 concentration according to the IPCC Scenario A. Little change is seen in the tropical rain forest and the Sahara. Since the biome model used is not capable of predicting changes in vegetation patterns due to a rapid climate change, the latter simulation has to be taken as a prediction of changes in conditions favourable for the existence of certain biomes, not as a prediction of a future distribution of biomes.[/ab

  15. Biomes computed from simulated climatologies

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, M.; Esch, M.

    1994-01-01

    The biome model of Prentice et al. is used to predict global patterns of potential natural plant formations, or biomes, from climatologies simulated by ECHAM, a model used for climate simulations at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie. This study undertaken in order to show the advantage of this biome model in diagnosing the performance of a climate model and assessing effects of past and future climate changes predicted by a climate model. Good overall agreement is found between global patterns of biomes computed from observed and simulated data of present climate. But there are also major discrepancies indicated by a difference in biomes in Australia, in the Kalahari Desert, and in the Middle West of North America. These discrepancies can be traced back to in simulated rainfall as well as summer or winter temperatures. Global patterns of biomes computed from an ice age simulation reveal that North America, Europe, and Siberia should have been covered largely by tundra and taiga, whereas only small differences are for the tropical rain forests. A potential northeast shift of biomes is expected from a simulation with enhanced CO{sub 2} concentration according to the IPCC Scenario A. Little change is seen in the tropical rain forest and the Sahara. Since the biome model used is not capable of predicting chances in vegetation patterns due to a rapid climate change, the latter simulation to be taken as a prediction of chances in conditions favourable for the existence of certain biomes, not as a reduction of a future distribution of biomes. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Role of HPC in Advancing Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2004-01-01

    On behalf of the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program (HPCMP) and NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS) a study is conducted to assess the role of supercomputers on computational aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles. The study is mostly based on the responses to a web based questionnaire that was designed to capture the nuances of high performance computational aeroelasticity, particularly on parallel computers. A procedure is presented to assign a fidelity-complexity index to each application. Case studies based on major applications using HPCMP resources are presented.

  17. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  18. Computer simulation in mechanical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanter, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    Several examples are given for use of computer simulation in mechanical spectroscopy. On one hand simulation makes it possible to study relaxation mechanisms, and on the other hand to use the colossal accumulation of experimental material to study metals and alloys. The following examples are considered: the effect of Al atom ordering on the Snoek carbon peak in alloys of the system Fe - Al - C; the effect of plastic strain on Finkel'shtein - Rozin relaxation in Fe - Ni - C austenitic steel; checking the adequacy of energy interactions of interstitial atoms, calculated on the basis of a first-principle model by simulation of the concentration dependence of Snoek relaxation parameters in Nb - O.

  19. Computer Simulation for Emergency Incident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L

    2004-12-03

    This report describes the findings and recommendations resulting from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Incident Management Simulation Workshop held by the DHS Advanced Scientific Computing Program in May 2004. This workshop brought senior representatives of the emergency response and incident-management communities together with modeling and simulation technologists from Department of Energy laboratories. The workshop provided an opportunity for incident responders to describe the nature and substance of the primary personnel roles in an incident response, to identify current and anticipated roles of modeling and simulation in support of incident response, and to begin a dialog between the incident response and simulation technology communities that will guide and inform planned modeling and simulation development for incident response. This report provides a summary of the discussions at the workshop as well as a summary of simulation capabilities that are relevant to incident-management training, and recommendations for the use of simulation in both incident management and in incident management training, based on the discussions at the workshop. In addition, the report discusses areas where further research and development will be required to support future needs in this area.

  20. OPENING REMARKS: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2006 and Denver. I share greetings from the new Undersecretary for Energy, Ray Orbach. Five years ago SciDAC was launched as an experiment in computational science. The goal was to form partnerships among science applications, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians to take advantage of the potential of emerging terascale computers. This experiment has been a resounding success. SciDAC has emerged as a powerful concept for addressing some of the biggest challenges facing our world. As significant as these successes were, I believe there is also significance in the teams that achieved them. In addition to their scientific aims these teams have advanced the overall field of computational science and set the stage for even larger accomplishments as we look ahead to SciDAC-2. I am sure that many of you are expecting to hear about the results of our current solicitation for SciDAC-2. I’m afraid we are not quite ready to make that announcement. Decisions are still being made and we will announce the results later this summer. Nearly 250 unique proposals were received and evaluated, involving literally thousands of researchers, postdocs, and students. These collectively requested more than five times our expected budget. This response is a testament to the success of SciDAC in the community. In SciDAC-2 our budget has been increased to about 70 million for FY 2007 and our partnerships have expanded to include the Environment and National Security missions of the Department. The National Science Foundation has also joined as a partner. These new partnerships are expected to expand the application space of SciDAC, and broaden the impact and visibility of the program. We have, with our recent solicitation, expanded to turbulence, computational biology, and groundwater reactive modeling and simulation. We are currently talking with the Department’s applied energy programs about risk assessment, optimization of complex systems - such

  1. Advanced Computing Architectures for Cognitive Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    AND IS APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. FOR THE DIRECTOR: / s ... s / LOK YAN EDWARD J. JONES, Deputy Chief Work Unit Manager Advanced Computing Division...ELEMENT NUMBER 62702F 6. AUTHOR( S ) Gregory D. Peterson 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 459T 5e. TASK NUMBER AC 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER CP 7. PERFORMING

  2. Preface to advances in numerical simulation of plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott E.; Chacon, Luis

    2016-10-01

    This Journal of Computational Physics Special Issue, titled "Advances in Numerical Simulation of Plasmas," presents a snapshot of the international state of the art in the field of computational plasma physics. The articles herein are a subset of the topics presented as invited talks at the 24th International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP), August 12-14, 2015 in Golden, Colorado. The choice of papers was highly selective. The ICNSP is held every other year and is the premier scientific meeting in the field of computational plasma physics.

  3. Digital computer simulation of synthetic aperture systems and images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, Claudio; Galati, Gaspare

    1991-06-01

    Digital computer simulation is a powerful tool for the design, the mission planning and the image quality analysis of advanced SAR Systems. 'End-to-end' simulators describe the whole process of the SAR imaging including the generation of the coherent echoes and their processing and allow, unlike the 'product simulators', to evaluate the effects of the various impairments on the final image. The main disadvantage of the 'end-to-end' approach, as described in this paper, is the heavy computation burden; therefore, a new type of simulator is presented, attempting to reduce the burden but presenting a greater degree of completeness and realism than the SAR product simulators, already existing.

  4. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  5. Computer Simulation of Martensitic Transformations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifkin, Jonathan A.

    This investigation attempted to determine the mechanism of martensitic nucleation by employing computer molecular dynamics; simulations were conducted of various lattices defects to see if they can serve as nucleation sites. As a prerequisite to the simulations the relation between transformation properties and interatomic potential was studied. It was found that the interatomic potential must have specific properties to successfully simulate solid-solid transformations; in particular it needs a long range oscillating tail. We've also studied homogeneous transformations between BCC and FCC structures and concluded it is unlikely that any has a lower energy barrier energy than the Bain transformation. A two dimensional solid was modelled first to gain experience on a relatively simple system; the transformation was from a square lattice to a triangular one. Next a three dimensional system was studied whose interatomic potential was chosen to mimic sodium. Because of the low transition temperature (18K) the transformation from the low temperature phase to high temperature phase was studied (FCC to BCC). The two dimensional system displayed many phenomena characteristic of real martensitic systems: defects promoted nucleation, the martensite grew in plates, some plates served to nucleate new plates (autocatalytic nucleation) and some defects gave rise to multiple plates (butterfly martensite). The three dimensional system did not undergo a permanent martensitic transformation but it did show signs of temporary transformations where some martensite formed and then dissipated. This happened following the dissociation of a screw dislocation into two partial dislocations.

  6. Advances in Computational Capabilities for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Moss, James N.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews the growth and advances in computational capabilities for hypersonic applications over the period from the mid-1980's to the present day. The current status of the code development issues such as surface and field grid generation, algorithms, physical and chemical modeling, and validation is provided. A brief description of some of the major codes being used at NASA Langley Research Center for hypersonic continuum and rarefied flows is provided, along with their capabilities and deficiencies. A number of application examples are presented, and future areas of research to enhance accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and robustness of computational codes are discussed.

  7. New Computer Simulations of Macular Neural Functioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Doshay, D.; Linton, S.; Parnas, B.; Montgomery, K.; Chimento, T.

    1994-01-01

    We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the functional significance of the three-dimensional (3-D) organization of gravity sensors. These sensors have a prototypic architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scaled-up, 3-D versions run on a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. A semi-automated method of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial sections studied in a transmission electron microscope has been developed to eliminate tedious conventional photography. The reconstructions use a mesh as a step in generating a neural surface for visualization. Two meshes are required to model calyx surfaces. The meshes are connected and the resulting prisms represent the cytoplasm and the bounding membranes. A finite volume analysis method is employed to simulate voltage changes along the calyx in response to synapse activation on the calyx or on calyceal processes. The finite volume method insures that charge is conserved at the calyx-process junction. These and other models indicate that efferent processes act as voltage followers, and that the morphology of some afferent processes affects their functioning. In a final application, morphological information is symbolically represented in three dimensions in a computer. The possible functioning of the connectivities is tested using mathematical interpretations of physiological parameters taken from the literature. Symbolic, 3-D simulations are in progress to probe the functional significance of the connectivities. This research is expected to advance computer-based studies of macular functioning and of synaptic plasticity.

  8. Time parallelization of advanced operation scenario simulations of ITER plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samaddar, D.; Casper, T. A.; Kim, S. H.; Berry, Lee A; Elwasif, Wael R; Batchelor, Donald B; Houlberg, Wayne A

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates that simulations of advanced burning plasma operation scenarios can be successfully parallelized in time using the parareal algorithm. CORSICA - an advanced operation scenario code for tokamak plasmas is used as a test case. This is a unique application since the parareal algorithm has so far been applied to relatively much simpler systems except for the case of turbulence. In the present application, a computational gain of an order of magnitude has been achieved which is extremely promising. A successful implementation of the Parareal algorithm to codes like CORSICA ushers in the possibility of time efficient simulations of ITER plasmas.

  9. Priority Queues for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in new priority queue data structures for event list management of computer simulations, and includes a new priority queue data structure and an improved event horizon applied to priority queue data structures. ne new priority queue data structure is a Qheap and is made out of linked lists for robust, fast, reliable, and stable event list management and uses a temporary unsorted list to store all items until one of the items is needed. Then the list is sorted, next, the highest priority item is removed, and then the rest of the list is inserted in the Qheap. Also, an event horizon is applied to binary tree and splay tree priority queue data structures to form the improved event horizon for event management.

  10. Computer Simulation of Radial Immunodiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Trautman, Rodes

    1972-01-01

    Theories of diffusion with chemical reaction are reviewed as to their contributions toward developing an algorithm needed for computer simulation of immunodiffusion. The Spiers-Augustin moving sink and the Engelberg stationary sink theories show how the antibody-antigen reaction can be incorporated into boundary conditions of the free diffusion differential equations. For this, a stoichiometric precipitate was assumed and the location of precipitin lines could be predicted. The Hill simultaneous linear adsorption theory provides a mathematical device for including another special type of antibody-antigen reaction in antigen excess regions of the gel. It permits an explanation for the lowered antigen diffusion coefficient, observed in the Oudin arrangement of single linear diffusion, but does not enable prediction of the location of precipitin lines. The most promising mathematical approach for a general solution is implied in the Augustin alternating cycle theory. This assumes the immunodiffusion process can be evaluated by alternating computation cycles: free diffusion without chemical reaction and chemical reaction without diffusion. The algorithm for the free diffusion update cycle, extended to both linear and radial geometries, is given in detail since it was based on gross flow rather than more conventional expressions in terms of net flow. Limitations on the numerical integration process using this algorithm are illustrated for free diffusion from a cylindrical well. PMID:4629869

  11. Advanced Computer Science on Internal Ballistics of Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Toru; Kato, Kazushige; Sekino, Nobuhiro; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Seike, Yoshio; Fukunaga, Mihoko; Daimon, Yu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Hiroya

    In this paper, described is the development of a numerical simulation system, what we call “Advanced Computer Science on SRM Internal Ballistics (ACSSIB)”, for the purpose of improvement of performance and reliability of solid rocket motors (SRM). The ACSSIB system is consisting of a casting simulation code of solid propellant slurry, correlation database of local burning-rate of cured propellant in terms of local slurry flow characteristics, and a numerical code for the internal ballistics of SRM, as well as relevant hardware. This paper describes mainly the objectives, the contents of this R&D, and the output of the fiscal year of 2008.

  12. Multiscale Computer Simulation of Failure in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2008-01-01

    Aerogels have been of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While such gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. We have previously performed computer simulations of aerogel thermal conductivity and tensile and compressive failure, with results that are in qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, agreement with experiment. However, recent experiments in our laboratory suggest that gels having similar densities may exhibit substantially different properties. In this work, we extend our original diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) model for gel structure to incorporate additional variation in DLCA simulation parameters, with the aim of producing DLCA clusters of similar densities that nevertheless have different fractal dimension and secondary particle coordination. We perform particle statics simulations of gel strain on these clusters, and consider the effects of differing DLCA simulation conditions, and the resultant differences in fractal dimension and coordination, on gel strain properties.

  13. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  14. Computer simulation studies of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganov, Artem Romaevich

    Applications of state-of-the-art computer simulations to important Earth- and rock-forming minerals (Al2SiO5 polymorphs, albite (NaAlSi3O8), and MgSiO3 perovskite) are described. Detailed introductions to equations of state and elasticity, phase transitions, computer simulations, and geophysical background are given. A new general classification of phase transitions is proposed, providing a natural framework for discussion of structural, thermodynamic, and kinetic aspects of phase transitions. The concept of critical bond distances is introduced. For Si-O bonds this critical distance is 2.25 A. Using atomistic simulations, anomalous Al-Si antiordering in albite is explained. A first-order isosymmetric transition associated with a change in the ordering scheme is predicted at high pressures. A quantum-mechanical study is presented for the Al2SiO5 polymorphs: kyanite, andalusite, sillimanite, and hypothetical pseudobrookite-like and V3O5-like phases (the latter phase was believed to be the main Al mineral of the lower mantle). It is shown that above 11 GPa all the Al2SiO5 phases break down into the mixture of oxides: corundum (Al2O3) and stishovite (SiO2). Atomisation energies, crystal structures and equations of state of all the Al2SiO5 polymorphs, corundum, stishovite, quartz (SiO2) have been determined. Metastable pressure-induced transitions in sillimanite and andalusite are predicted at ~30-50 GPa and analysed in terms of structural changes and lattice dynamics. Sillimanite (Pbnm) transforms into incommensurate and isosymmetric (Pbnm) phases; andalusite undergoes pressure-induced amorphisation. Accurate quantum-mechanical thermal equation of state is obtained for MgSiO3 perovskite, the main Earth-forming mineral. Results imply that a pure-perovskite mantle is unlikely. I show that MgSiO3 perovskite is not a Debye-like solid, contrary to a common assumption. First ever ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of elastic constants at finite temperatures are

  15. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  16. Airborne Advanced Reconfigurable Computer System (ARCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjurman, B. E.; Jenkins, G. M.; Masreliez, C. J.; Mcclellan, K. L.; Templeman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A digital computer subsystem fault-tolerant concept was defined, and the potential benefits and costs of such a subsystem were assessed when used as the central element of a new transport's flight control system. The derived advanced reconfigurable computer system (ARCS) is a triple-redundant computer subsystem that automatically reconfigures, under multiple fault conditions, from triplex to duplex to simplex operation, with redundancy recovery if the fault condition is transient. The study included criteria development covering factors at the aircraft's operation level that would influence the design of a fault-tolerant system for commercial airline use. A new reliability analysis tool was developed for evaluating redundant, fault-tolerant system availability and survivability; and a stringent digital system software design methodology was used to achieve design/implementation visibility.

  17. Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Doughty, C.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Moridis, G.J.; Pan,L.; Xu, T.; Zhang, Y.; Pruess, K.

    2007-02-01

    The vadose zone can be characterized as a complex subsurfacesystem in which intricate physical and biogeochemical processes occur inresponse to a variety of natural forcings and human activities. Thismakes it difficult to describe, understand, and predict the behavior ofthis specific subsurface system. The TOUGH nonisothermal multiphase flowsimulators are well-suited to perform advanced vadose zone studies. Theconceptual models underlying the TOUGH simulators are capable ofrepresenting features specific to the vadose zone, and of addressing avariety of coupled phenomena. Moreover, the simulators are integratedinto software tools that enable advanced data analysis, optimization, andsystem-level modeling. We discuss fundamental and computationalchallenges in simulating vadose zone processes, review recent advances inmodeling such systems, and demonstrate some capabilities of the TOUGHsuite of codes using illustrative examples.

  18. The Shuttle Mission Simulator computer generated imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    Equipment available in the primary training facility for the Space Transportation System (STS) flight crews includes the Fixed Base Simulator, the Motion Base Simulator, the Spacelab Simulator, and the Guidance and Navigation Simulator. The Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) consists of the Fixed Base Simulator and the Motion Base Simulator. The SMS utilizes four visual Computer Generated Image (CGI) systems. The Motion Base Simulator has a forward crew station with six-degrees of freedom motion simulation. Operation of the Spacelab Simulator is planned for the spring of 1983. The Guidance and Navigation Simulator went into operation in 1982. Aspects of orbital visual simulation are discussed, taking into account the earth scene, payload simulation, the generation and display of 1079 stars, the simulation of sun glare, and Reaction Control System jet firing plumes. Attention is also given to landing site visual simulation, and night launch and landing simulation.

  19. Development of simulation computer complex specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Training Simulation Computer Complex Study was one of three studies contracted in support of preparations for procurement of a shuttle mission simulator for shuttle crew training. The subject study was concerned with definition of the software loads to be imposed on the computer complex to be associated with the shuttle mission simulator and the development of procurement specifications based on the resulting computer requirements. These procurement specifications cover the computer hardware and system software as well as the data conversion equipment required to interface the computer to the simulator hardware. The development of the necessary hardware and software specifications required the execution of a number of related tasks which included, (1) simulation software sizing, (2) computer requirements definition, (3) data conversion equipment requirements definition, (4) system software requirements definition, (5) a simulation management plan, (6) a background survey, and (7) preparation of the specifications.

  20. Protocols for Handling Messages Between Simulation Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcerowski, John P.; Dunnam, Milton

    2006-01-01

    Practical Simulator Network (PSimNet) is a set of data-communication protocols designed especially for use in handling messages between computers that are engaging cooperatively in real-time or nearly-real-time training simulations. In a typical application, computers that provide individualized training at widely dispersed locations would communicate, by use of PSimNet, with a central host computer that would provide a common computational- simulation environment and common data. Originally intended for use in supporting interfaces between training computers and computers that simulate the responses of spacecraft scientific payloads, PSimNet could be especially well suited for a variety of other applications -- for example, group automobile-driver training in a classroom. Another potential application might lie in networking of automobile-diagnostic computers at repair facilities to a central computer that would compile the expertise of numerous technicians and engineers and act as an expert consulting technician.

  1. Simulating Drosophila Genetics with the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, James W., Jr.; Edwards, Kathryn L.

    1979-01-01

    Presents some techniques developed to help improve student understanding of Mendelian principles through the use of a computer simulation model by the genetic system of the fruit fly. Includes discussion and evaluation of this computer assisted program. (MA)

  2. Advances in atomic oxygen simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, Joseph F.; Bareiss, Lyle E.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) present in the atmosphere at orbital altitudes of 200 to 700 km has been shown to degrade various exposed materials on Shuttle flights. The relative velocity of the AO with the spacecraft, together with the AO density, combine to yield an environment consisting of a 5 eV beam energy with a flux of 10(exp 14) to 10(exp 15) oxygen atoms/sq cm/s. An AO ion beam apparatus that produces flux levels and energy similar to that encountered by spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been in existence since 1987. Test data was obtained from the interaction of the AO ion beam with materials used in space applications (carbon, silver, kapton) and with several special coatings of interest deposited on various surfaces. The ultimate design goal of the AO beam simulation device is to produce neutral AO at sufficient flux levels to replicate on-orbit conditions. A newly acquired mass spectrometer with energy discrimination has allowed 5 eV neutral oxygen atoms to be separated and detected from the background of thermal oxygen atoms of approx 0.2 eV. Neutralization of the AO ion beam at 5 eV was shown at the Martin Marietta AO facility.

  3. 75 FR 64720 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    .../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department...

  4. 75 FR 9887 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  5. 78 FR 6087 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  6. 75 FR 43518 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Science, DOE. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  7. 76 FR 41234 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee Charter Renewal AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of... Administration, notice is hereby given that the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee will be renewed... concerning the Advanced Scientific Computing program in response only to charges from the Director of...

  8. 76 FR 9765 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, SC-21/Germantown Building, U.S. Department of...

  9. 77 FR 45345 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    .../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  10. 78 FR 41046 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... hereby given that the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee will be renewed for a two-year... (DOE), on the Advanced Scientific Computing Research Program managed by the Office of...

  11. Monte Carlo Computer Simulation of a Rainbow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Donald; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discusses making a computer-simulated rainbow using principles of physics, such as reflection and refraction. Provides BASIC program for the simulation. Appends a program illustrating the effects of dispersion of the colors. (YP)

  12. Advances in Cross-Cutting Ideas for Computational Climate Science

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Esmond; Evans, Katherine J.; Caldwell, Peter; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jackson, Charles; Kerstin, Van Dam; Leung, Ruby; Martin, Daniel F.; Ostrouchov, George; Tuminaro, Raymond; Ullrich, Paul; Wild, S.; Williams, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    This report presents results from the DOE-sponsored workshop titled, ``Advancing X-Cutting Ideas for Computational Climate Science Workshop,'' known as AXICCS, held on September 12--13, 2016 in Rockville, MD. The workshop brought together experts in climate science, computational climate science, computer science, and mathematics to discuss interesting but unsolved science questions regarding climate modeling and simulation, promoted collaboration among the diverse scientists in attendance, and brainstormed about possible tools and capabilities that could be developed to help address them. Emerged from discussions at the workshop were several research opportunities that the group felt could advance climate science significantly. These include (1) process-resolving models to provide insight into important processes and features of interest and inform the development of advanced physical parameterizations, (2) a community effort to develop and provide integrated model credibility, (3) including, organizing, and managing increasingly connected model components that increase model fidelity yet complexity, and (4) treating Earth system models as one interconnected organism without numerical or data based boundaries that limit interactions. The group also identified several cross-cutting advances in mathematics, computer science, and computational science that would be needed to enable one or more of these big ideas. It is critical to address the need for organized, verified, and optimized software, which enables the models to grow and continue to provide solutions in which the community can have confidence. Effectively utilizing the newest computer hardware enables simulation efficiency and the ability to handle output from increasingly complex and detailed models. This will be accomplished through hierarchical multiscale algorithms in tandem with new strategies for data handling, analysis, and storage. These big ideas and cross-cutting technologies for enabling

  13. Computer Based Simulation of Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edward, Norrie S.

    1997-01-01

    Examines computer based simulations of practical laboratory experiments in engineering. Discusses the aims and achievements of lab work (cognitive, process, psychomotor, and affective); types of simulations (model building and behavioral); and the strengths and weaknesses of simulations. Describes the development of a centrifugal pump simulation,…

  14. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  15. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    ScienceCinema

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2016-07-12

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Simulation: Future Applications in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gwendolyn B.; And Others

    The report describes three advanced technologies--robotics, artificial intelligence, and computer simulation--and identifies the ways in which they might contribute to special education. A hybrid methodology was employed to identify existing technology and forecast future needs. Following this framework, each of the technologies is defined,…

  18. Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Simulation: Future Applications in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gwendolyn B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes possible applications of new technologies to special education. Discusses results of a study designed to explore the use of robotics, artificial intelligence, and computer simulations to aid people with handicapping conditions. Presents several scenarios in which specific technological advances may contribute to special education…

  19. Computer Simulation of Colliding Galaxies

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulation of the formation of the galaxy known as "The Mice." The simulation depicts the merger of two spiral galaxies, pausing and rotating at the stage resembling the Hubble Space Telescope Adva...

  20. Computer Simulation in Undergraduate Instruction: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Warren R.; And Others

    These symposium papers discuss the instructional use of computers in psychology, with emphasis on computer-produced simulations. The first, by Rich Edwards, briefly outlines LABSIM, a general purpose system of FORTRAN programs which simulate data collection in more than a dozen experimental models in psychology and are designed to train students…

  1. Computationally Lightweight Air-Traffic-Control Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for computationally lightweight simulation of automated air traffic control (ATC) at a busy airport has been derived. The algorithm is expected to serve as the basis for development of software that would be incorporated into flight-simulator software, the ATC component of which is not yet capable of handling realistic airport loads. Software based on this algorithm could also be incorporated into other computer programs that simulate a variety of scenarios for purposes of training or amusement.

  2. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  3. Advances in Electromagnetic Modelling through High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Folwell, N.; Ge, L.; Guetz, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Under the DOE SciDAC project on Accelerator Science and Technology, a suite of electromagnetic codes has been under development at SLAC that are based on unstructured grids for higher accuracy, and use parallel processing to enable large-scale simulation. The new modeling capability is supported by SciDAC collaborations on meshing, solvers, refinement, optimization and visualization. These advances in computational science are described and the application of the parallel eigensolver Omega3P to the cavity design for the International Linear Collider is discussed.

  4. Computer Simulation of the Neuronal Action Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Paul R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A series of computer simulations of the neuronal resting and action potentials are described. Discusses the use of simulations to overcome the difficulties of traditional instruction, such as blackboard illustration, which can only illustrate these events at one point in time. Describes systems requirements necessary to run the simulations.…

  5. Computer Clinical Simulations in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gary L; Keith, Kenneth D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the key characteristics of clinical simulation, some developmental foundations, two current research studies, and some implications for the future of health science education. Investigations of the effects of computer-based simulation indicate that acquisition of decision-making skills is greater than with noncomputerized simulations.…

  6. Micromechanics-Based Computational Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mutal, Subodh K.; Duff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Advanced high-temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aerospace propulsion system components and certain land-based applications. However, being relatively new materials, a reliable design properties database of sufficient fidelity does not yet exist. To characterize these materials solely by testing is cost and time prohibitive. Computational simulation then becomes very useful to limit the experimental effort and reduce the design cycle time, Authors have been involved for over a decade in developing micromechanics- based computational simulation techniques (computer codes) to simulate all aspects of CMC behavior including quantification of scatter that these materials exhibit. A brief summary/capability of these computer codes with typical examples along with their use in design/analysis of certain structural components is the subject matter of this presentation.

  7. Computational challenges in modeling and simulating living matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena, Alexandre C.; Silva, Dilson; Marzulo, Leandro A. J.; de Castro, Maria Clicia Stelling

    2016-12-01

    Computational modeling has been successfully used to help scientists understand physical and biological phenomena. Recent technological advances allowthe simulation of larger systems, with greater accuracy. However, devising those systems requires new approaches and novel architectures, such as the use of parallel programming, so that the application can run in the new high performance environments, which are often computer clusters composed of different computation devices, as traditional CPUs, GPGPUs, Xeon Phis and even FPGAs. It is expected that scientists take advantage of the increasing computational power to model and simulate more complex structures and even merge different models into larger and more extensive ones. This paper aims at discussing the challenges of using those devices to simulate such complex systems.

  8. Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

  9. Defense Science Board Report on Advanced Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    complex computational  issues are  pursued , and that several vendors remain at  the  leading edge of  supercomputing  capability  in  the U.S.  In... pursuing   the  ASC  program  to  help  assure  that  HPC  advances  are  available  to  the  broad  national  security  community. As  in  the past, many...apply HPC  to  technical  problems  related  to  weapons  physics,  but  that  are  entirely  unclassified.  Examples include explosive  astrophysical

  10. Advanced high-performance computer system architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, V. I.

    2007-02-01

    Convergence of computer systems and communication technologies are moving to switched high-performance modular system architectures on the basis of high-speed switched interconnections. Multi-core processors become more perspective way to high-performance system, and traditional parallel bus system architectures (VME/VXI, cPCI/PXI) are moving to new higher speed serial switched interconnections. Fundamentals in system architecture development are compact modular component strategy, low-power processor, new serial high-speed interface chips on the board, and high-speed switched fabric for SAN architectures. Overview of advanced modular concepts and new international standards for development high-performance embedded and compact modular systems for real-time applications are described.

  11. Combining high performance simulation, data acquisition, and graphics display computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Issues involved in the continuing development of an advanced simulation complex are discussed. This approach provides the capability to perform the majority of tests on advanced systems, non-destructively. The controlled test environments can be replicated to examine the response of the systems under test to alternative treatments of the system control design, or test the function and qualification of specific hardware. Field tests verify that the elements simulated in the laboratories are sufficient. The digital computer is hosted by a Digital Equipment Corp. MicroVAX computer with an Aptec Computer Systems Model 24 I/O computer performing the communication function. An Applied Dynamics International AD100 performs the high speed simulation computing and an Evans and Sutherland PS350 performs on-line graphics display. A Scientific Computer Systems SCS40 acts as a high performance FORTRAN program processor to support the complex, by generating numerous large files from programs coded in FORTRAN that are required for the real time processing. Four programming languages are involved in the process, FORTRAN, ADSIM, ADRIO, and STAPLE. FORTRAN is employed on the MicroVAX host to initialize and terminate the simulation runs on the system. The generation of the data files on the SCS40 also is performed with FORTRAN programs. ADSIM and ADIRO are used to program the processing elements of the AD100 and its IOCP processor. STAPLE is used to program the Aptec DIP and DIA processors.

  12. FEL Simulation Using Distributed Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, Joshua; Bernabeu Altayo, Gerard; Biedron, Sandra; Freund, Henry; Milton, Stephen; van der Slot, Peter

    2016-06-01

    While simulation tools are available and have been used regularly for simulating light sources, the increasing availability and lower cost of GPU-based processing opens up new opportunities. This poster highlights a method of how accelerating and parallelizing code processing through the use of COTS software interfaces.

  13. Filtration theory using computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Corey, I.

    1997-08-01

    We have used commercially available fluid dynamics codes based on Navier-Stokes theory and the Langevin particle equation of motion to compute the particle capture efficiency and pressure drop through selected two- and three-dimensional fiber arrays. The approach we used was to first compute the air velocity vector field throughout a defined region containing the fiber matrix. The particle capture in the fiber matrix is then computed by superimposing the Langevin particle equation of motion over the flow velocity field. Using the Langevin equation combines the particle Brownian motion, inertia and interception mechanisms in a single equation. In contrast, most previous investigations treat the different capture mechanisms separately. We have computed the particle capture efficiency and the pressure drop through one, 2-D and two, 3-D fiber matrix elements. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  14. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  15. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  16. 75 FR 57742 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770...: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building;...

  17. 76 FR 45786 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy... Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown...

  18. Thermal analysis simulation for a spin-motor used in the advanced main combustion chamber vacuum plasma spray project using the SINDA computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Gary H.

    1990-01-01

    One of the many design challenges of this project is predicting the thermal effects due to the environment inside the vacuum chamber on the turntable and spin motor spindle assembly. The objective of the study is to model the spin motor using the computer program System Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA). By formulating the appropriate input information concerning the motor's geometry, coolant flow path, material composition, and bearing and motor winding characteristics, SINDA should predict temperatures at various predefined nodes. From these temperatures, hopefully, one can predict if the coolant flow rate is sufficient or if certain mechanical elements such as bearings, O ring seals, or motor windings will exceed maximum design temperatures.

  19. Environments for online maritime simulators with cloud computing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicu, Gabriel; Raicu, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the cloud computing environments, network principles and methods for graphical development in realistic naval simulation, naval robotics and virtual interactions. The aim of this approach is to achieve a good simulation quality in large networked environments using open source solutions designed for educational purposes. Realistic rendering of maritime environments requires near real-time frameworks with enhanced computing capabilities during distance interactions. E-Navigation concepts coupled with the last achievements in virtual and augmented reality will enhance the overall experience leading to new developments and innovations. We have to deal with a multiprocessing situation using advanced technologies and distributed applications using remote ship scenario and automation of ship operations.

  20. Evaluation of Visual Computer Simulator for Computer Architecture Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imai, Yoshiro; Imai, Masatoshi; Moritoh, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents trial evaluation of a visual computer simulator in 2009-2011, which has been developed to play some roles of both instruction facility and learning tool simultaneously. And it illustrates an example of Computer Architecture education for University students and usage of e-Learning tool for Assembly Programming in order to…

  1. Computational Spectrum of Agent Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2010-01-01

    The study of human social behavioral systems is finding renewed interest in military, homeland security and other applications. Simulation is the most generally applied approach to studying complex scenarios in such systems. Here, we outline some of the important considerations that underlie the computational aspects of simulation-based study of human social systems. The fundamental imprecision underlying questions and answers in social science makes it necessary to carefully distinguish among different simulation problem classes and to identify the most pertinent set of computational dimensions associated with those classes. We identify a few such classes and present their computational implications. The focus is then shifted to the most challenging combinations in the computational spectrum, namely, large-scale entity counts at moderate to high levels of fidelity. Recent developments in furthering the state-of-the-art in these challenging cases are outlined. A case study of large-scale agent simulation is provided in simulating large numbers (millions) of social entities at real-time speeds on inexpensive hardware. Recent computational results are identified that highlight the potential of modern high-end computing platforms to push the envelope with respect to speed, scale and fidelity of social system simulations. Finally, the problem of shielding the modeler or domain expert from the complex computational aspects is discussed and a few potential solution approaches are identified.

  2. Computer simulation of upset welding

    SciTech Connect

    Spingarn, J R; Mason, W E; Swearengen, J C

    1982-04-01

    Useful process modeling of upset welding requires contributions from metallurgy, welding engineering, thermal analysis and experimental mechanics. In this report, the significant milestones for such an effort are outlined and probable difficult areas are pointed out. Progress to date is summarized and directions for future research are offered. With regard to the computational aspects of this problem, a 2-D heat conduction computer code has been modified to incorporate electrical heating, and computations have been run for an axisymmetric problem with simple viscous material laws and d.c. electrical boundary conditions. In the experimental endeavor, the boundary conditions have been measured during the welding process, although interpretation of voltage drop measurements is not straightforward. The ranges of strain, strain rate and temperature encountered during upset welding have been measured or calculated, and the need for a unifying constitutive law is described. Finally, the possible complications of microstructure and interfaces are clarified.

  3. Teaching by Simulation with Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, James E.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the use of a small digital computer to simulate a peripheral nerve demonstration in which the action potential responses to pairs of stimuli are used to illustrate the properties of excitable membranes. (Author/MA)

  4. Computer Simulation of Community Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Gary B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an ongoing research project designed to develop a computer model capable of simulating the service delivery activities of community mental health care centers and human service agencies. The goal and methodology of the project are described. (NB)

  5. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  6. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  7. XII Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, Thomas; Carminati, Federico; Werlen, Monique

    November 2008 will be a few months after the official start of LHC when the highest quantum energy ever produced by mankind will be observed by the most complex piece of scientific equipment ever built. LHC will open a new era in physics research and push further the frontier of Knowledge This achievement has been made possible by new technological developments in many fields, but computing is certainly the technology that has made possible this whole enterprise. Accelerator and detector design, construction management, data acquisition, detectors monitoring, data analysis, event simulation and theoretical interpretation are all computing based HEP activities but also occurring many other research fields. Computing is everywhere and forms the common link between all involved scientists and engineers. The ACAT workshop series, created back in 1990 as AIHENP (Artificial Intelligence in High Energy and Nuclear Research) has been covering the tremendous evolution of computing in its most advanced topics, trying to setup bridges between computer science, experimental and theoretical physics. Conference web-site: http://acat2008.cern.ch/ Programme and presentations: http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=34666

  8. 77 FR 12823 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... final report, Advanced Networking update Status from Computer Science COV Early Career technical talks Summary of Applied Math and Computer Science Workshops ASCR's new SBIR awards Data-intensive...

  9. Psychology on Computers: Simulations, Experiments and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, Duane M.; Smith, Stephen D.

    PSYCOM is a unique mixed media package which combines high interest projects on the computer with a written text of expository material. It goes beyond most computer-assisted instruction which emphasizes drill and practice and testing of knowledge. A project might consist of a simulation or an actual experiment, or it might be a demonstration, a…

  10. Computer-simulated phacoemulsification improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soederberg, Per G.; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Artzen, D.; Nordh, Leif; Skarman, Eva; Nordqvist, P.; Andersson, Mats

    2002-06-01

    A simulator for phacoemulsification cataract extraction is developed. A three-dimensional visual interface and foot pedals for phacoemulsification power, x-y positioning, zoom and focus were established. An algorithm that allows real time visual feedback of the surgical field was developed. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure. The operation requires input from both feet and both hands and provides visual feedback through the operation microscope essentially without tactile feedback. Experience demonstrates that the number of complications for an experienced surgeon learning phacoemulsification, decreases exponentially, reaching close to the asymptote after the first 500 procedures despite initial wet lab training on animal eyes. Simulator training is anticipated to decrease training time, decrease complication rate for the beginner and reduce expensive supervision by a high volume surgeon.

  11. [Animal experimentation, computer simulation and surgical research].

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alain

    2009-11-01

    We live in a digital world In medicine, computers are providing new tools for data collection, imaging, and treatment. During research and development of complex technologies and devices such as artificial hearts, computer simulation can provide more reliable information than experimentation on large animals. In these specific settings, animal experimentation should serve more to validate computer models of complex devices than to demonstrate their reliability.

  12. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Paul, Kevin; Mullowney, Paul J.; Messmer, Peter; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Leemans, Wim; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-22

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating >10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of {approx}2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  13. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  14. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  15. Criterion Standards for Evaluating Computer Simulation Courseware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholeben, Brent Edward

    This paper explores the role of computerized simulations as a decision-modeling intervention strategy, and views the strategy's different attribute biases based upon the varying primary missions of instruction versus application. The common goals associated with computer simulations as a training technique are discussed and compared with goals of…

  16. Simulations of Probabilities for Quantum Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-LIpschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices (such as random number generators). Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  17. Salesperson Ethics: An Interactive Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleberry, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A new interactive computer simulation designed to teach sales ethics is described. Simulation learner objectives include gaining a better understanding of legal issues in selling; realizing that ethical dilemmas do arise in selling; realizing the need to be honest when selling; seeing that there are conflicting demands from a salesperson's…

  18. Computer Simulation Of A Small Turboshaft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Mark G.

    1991-01-01

    Component-type mathematical model of small turboshaft engine developed for use in real-time computer simulations of dynamics of helicopter flight. Yields shaft speeds, torques, fuel-consumption rates, and other operating parameters with sufficient accuracy for use in real-time simulation of maneuvers involving large transients in power and/or severe accelerations.

  19. Computational simulation of drug delivery at molecular level.

    PubMed

    Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2010-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is advancing rapidly. By controlling the precise level and/or location of a given drug in the body, side effects are reduced, doses are lowered, and new therapies are possible. Nonetheless, substantial challenges remain for delivering specific drugs into specific cells. Computational methods to predict the binding and dynamics between drug molecule and its carrier are increasingly desirable to minimize the investment in drug design and development. Significant progress in computational simulation is making it possible to understand the mechanism of drug delivery. This review summarizes the computational methods and progress of four categories of drug delivery systems: dendrimers, polymer micelle, liposome and carbon nanotubes. Computational simulations are particularly valuable in designing better drug carriers and addressing issues that are difficult to be explored by laboratory experiments, such as diffusion, dynamics, etc.

  20. Developing an Advanced Environment for Collaborative Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becerra-Fernandez, Irma; Stewart, Helen; DelAlto, Martha; DelAlto, Martha; Knight, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge management in general tries to organize and make available important know-how, whenever and where ever is needed. Today, organizations rely on decision-makers to produce "mission critical" decisions that am based on inputs from multiple domains. The ideal decision-maker has a profound understanding of specific domains that influence the decision-making process coupled with the experience that allows them to act quickly and decisively on the information. In addition, learning companies benefit by not repeating costly mistakes, and by reducing time-to-market in Research & Development projects. Group-decision making tools can help companies make better decisions by capturing the knowledge from groups of experts. Furthermore, companies that capture their customers preferences can improve their customer service, which translates to larger profits. Therefore collaborative computing provides a common communication space, improves sharing of knowledge, provides a mechanism for real-time feedback on the tasks being performed, helps to optimize processes, and results in a centralized knowledge warehouse. This paper presents the research directions. of a project which seeks to augment an advanced collaborative web-based environment called Postdoc, with workflow capabilities. Postdoc is a "government-off-the-shelf" document management software developed at NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC).

  1. Computational and design methods for advanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Gabriel C.

    This dissertation merges the optical design and computational aspects of imaging systems to create novel devices that solve engineering problems in optical science and attempts to expand the solution space available to the optical designer. This dissertation is divided into two parts: the first discusses a new active illumination depth sensing modality, while the second part discusses a passive illumination system called plenoptic, or lightfield, imaging. The new depth sensing modality introduced in part one is called depth through controlled aberration. This technique illuminates a target with a known, aberrated projected pattern and takes an image using a traditional, unmodified imaging system. Knowing how the added aberration in the projected pattern changes as a function of depth, we are able to quantitatively determine depth of a series of points from the camera. A major advantage this method permits is the ability for illumination and imaging axes to be coincident. Plenoptic cameras capture both spatial and angular data simultaneously. This dissertation present a new set of parameters that permit the design and comparison of plenoptic devices outside the traditionally published plenoptic 1.0 and plenoptic 2.0 configurations. Additionally, a series of engineering advancements are presented, including full system raytraces of raw plenoptic images, Zernike compression techniques of raw image files, and non-uniform lenslet arrays to compensate for plenoptic system aberrations. Finally, a new snapshot imaging spectrometer is proposed based off the plenoptic configuration.

  2. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  3. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  4. Cluster computing software for GATE simulations.

    PubMed

    De Beenhouwer, Jan; Staelens, Steven; Kruecker, Dirk; Ferrer, Ludovic; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Rannou, Fernando R

    2007-06-01

    Geometry and tracking (GEANT4) is a Monte Carlo package designed for high energy physics experiments. It is used as the basis layer for Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear medicine acquisition systems in GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). GATE allows the user to realistically model experiments using accurate physics models and time synchronization for detector movement through a script language contained in a macro file. The downside of this high accuracy is long computation time. This paper describes a platform independent computing approach for running GATE simulations on a cluster of computers in order to reduce the overall simulation time. Our software automatically creates fully resolved, nonparametrized macros accompanied with an on-the-fly generated cluster specific submit file used to launch the simulations. The scalability of GATE simulations on a cluster is investigated for two imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Due to a higher sensitivity, PET simulations are characterized by relatively high data output rates that create rather large output files. SPECT simulations, on the other hand, have lower data output rates but require a long collimator setup time. Both of these characteristics hamper scalability as a function of the number of CPUs. The scalability of PET simulations is improved here by the development of a fast output merger. The scalability of SPECT simulations is improved by greatly reducing the collimator setup time. Accordingly, these two new developments result in higher scalability for both PET and SPECT simulations and reduce the computation time to more practical values.

  5. Recovery Act: Advanced Interaction, Computation, and Visualization Tools for Sustainable Building Design

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Donald P.; Hencey, Brandon M.

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactive graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.

  6. Polymer Composites Corrosive Degradation: A Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation of polymer composites corrosive durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured pH factor and is represented by voids, temperature and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  7. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  8. Computer simulation of bubble formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Bazhirov, T.; Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Institute for High Energy Densities of Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-01-01

    Properties of liquid metals (Li, Pb, Na) containing nanoscale cavities were studied by atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD). Two atomistic models of cavity simulation were developed that cover a wide area in the phase diagram with negative pressure. In the first model, the thermodynamics of cavity formation, stability and the dynamics of cavity evolution in bulk liquid metals have been studied. Radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of nano-scale cavities of various radii were calculated for liquid Li, Na, and Pb at various temperatures and densities, and at small negative pressures near the liquid-gas spinodal, and the work functions for cavity formation in liquid Li were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The cavitation rate can further be obtained by using the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The second model is based on the stability study and on the kinetics of cavitation of the stretched liquid metals. A MD method was used to simulate cavitation in a metastable Pb and Li melts and determine the stability limits. States at temperatures below critical (T < 0.5Tc) and large negative pressures were considered. The kinetic boundary of liquid phase stability was shown to be different from the spinodal. The kinetics and dynamics of cavitation were studied. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained for several temperatures. The results of MD calculations were compared with estimates based on classical nucleation theory.

  9. Creating science simulations through Computational Thinking Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basawapatna, Ashok Ram

    Computational thinking aims to outline fundamental skills from computer science that everyone should learn. As currently defined, with help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), these skills include problem formulation, logically organizing data, automating solutions through algorithmic thinking, and representing data through abstraction. One aim of the NSF is to integrate these and other computational thinking concepts into the classroom. End-user programming tools offer a unique opportunity to accomplish this goal. An end-user programming tool that allows students with little or no prior experience the ability to create simulations based on phenomena they see in-class could be a first step towards meeting most, if not all, of the above computational thinking goals. This thesis describes the creation, implementation and initial testing of a programming tool, called the Simulation Creation Toolkit, with which users apply high-level agent interactions called Computational Thinking Patterns (CTPs) to create simulations. Employing Computational Thinking Patterns obviates lower behavior-level programming and allows users to directly create agent interactions in a simulation by making an analogy with real world phenomena they are trying to represent. Data collected from 21 sixth grade students with no prior programming experience and 45 seventh grade students with minimal programming experience indicates that this is an effective first step towards enabling students to create simulations in the classroom environment. Furthermore, an analogical reasoning study that looked at how users might apply patterns to create simulations from high- level descriptions with little guidance shows promising results. These initial results indicate that the high level strategy employed by the Simulation Creation Toolkit is a promising strategy towards incorporating Computational Thinking concepts in the classroom environment.

  10. Computer simulation of space station computer steered high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    The mathematical modeling and programming of a complete simulation program for a space station computer-steered high gain antenna are described. The program provides for reading input data cards, numerically integrating up to 50 first order differential equations, and monitoring up to 48 variables on printed output and on plots. The program system consists of a high gain antenna, an antenna gimbal control system, an on board computer, and the environment in which all are to operate.

  11. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  12. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... simulator instructors and check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  15. Advanced flight computers for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, R. Rhoads

    1988-01-01

    Research concerning flight computers for use on interplanetary probes is reviewed. The history of these computers from the Viking mission to the present is outlined. The differences between ground commercial computers and computers for planetary exploration are listed. The development of a computer for the Mariner Mark II comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission is described. Various aspects of recently developed computer systems are examined, including the Max real time, embedded computer, a hypercube distributed supercomputer, a SAR data processor, a processor for the High Resolution IR Imaging Spectrometer, and a robotic vision multiresolution pyramid machine for processsing images obtained by a Mars Rover.

  16. COMPARISON OF CLASSIFICATION STRATEGIES BY COMPUTER SIMULATION METHODS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NAVAL TRAINING, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING), (*NAVAL PERSONNEL, CLASSIFICATION), SELECTION, SIMULATION, CORRELATION TECHNIQUES , PROBABILITY, COSTS, OPTIMIZATION, PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, DECISION THEORY, COMPUTERS

  17. Numerical characteristics of quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavskiy, A.; Khamitov, K.; Teplov, A.; Voevodin, V.; Voevodin, Vl.

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of quantum circuits is significantly important for the implementation of quantum information technologies. The main difficulty of such modeling is the exponential growth of dimensionality, thus the usage of modern high-performance parallel computations is relevant. As it is well known, arbitrary quantum computation in circuit model can be done by only single- and two-qubit gates, and we analyze the computational structure and properties of the simulation of such gates. We investigate the fact that the unique properties of quantum nature lead to the computational properties of the considered algorithms: the quantum parallelism make the simulation of quantum gates highly parallel, and on the other hand, quantum entanglement leads to the problem of computational locality during simulation. We use the methodology of the AlgoWiki project (algowiki-project.org) to analyze the algorithm. This methodology consists of theoretical (sequential and parallel complexity, macro structure, and visual informational graph) and experimental (locality and memory access, scalability and more specific dynamic characteristics) parts. Experimental part was made by using the petascale Lomonosov supercomputer (Moscow State University, Russia). We show that the simulation of quantum gates is a good base for the research and testing of the development methods for data intense parallel software, and considered methodology of the analysis can be successfully used for the improvement of the algorithms in quantum information science.

  18. Airport Simulations Using Distributed Computational Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermott, William J.; Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Tran, Peter; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual National Airspace Simulation (VNAS) will improve the safety of Air Transportation. In 2001, using simulation and information management software running over a distributed network of super-computers, researchers at NASA Ames, Glenn, and Langley Research Centers developed a working prototype of a virtual airspace. This VNAS prototype modeled daily operations of the Atlanta airport by integrating measured operational data and simulation data on up to 2,000 flights a day. The concepts and architecture developed by NASA for this prototype are integral to the National Airspace Simulation to support the development of strategies improving aviation safety, identifying precursors to component failure.

  19. Research in computer simulation of integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, A. R.; Pdederson, D. O.

    1983-07-01

    The performance of the new LSI simulator CLASSIE is evaluated on several circuits with a few hundred to over one thousand semiconductor devices. A more accurate run time prediction formula has been found to be appropriate for circuit simulators. The design decisions for optimal performance under the constraints of the hardware (CRAY-1) are presented. Vector computers have an increased potential for fast, accurate simulation at the transistor level of Large-Scale-Integrated Circuits. Design considerations for a new circuit simulator are developed based on the specifics of the vector computer architecture and of LSI circuits. The simulation of Large-Scale-Integrated (LSI) circuits requires very long run time on conventional circuit analysis programs such as SPICE2 and super-mini computers. A new simulator for LSI circuits, CLASSIE, which takes advantage of circuit hierarchy and repetitiveness, and array processors capable of high-speed floating-point computation are a promising combination. While a large number of powerful design verfication tools have been developed for IC design at the transistor and logic gate levels, there are very few silicon-oriented tools for architectural design and evaluation.

  20. Advanced Computer Simulations of Military Incinerators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    REI analysis has identified the phosphorus in the ash of the coconut shell charcoal as the main cause of the slagging problems. Reacting, two phase...consists of munitions, including mines, rockets, artillery shells , and bombs containing warfare agents stored at eight sites in the continental United...Furnace (MPF) used to decontaminate drained shells , bulk containers, and self generated wastes; and • The Deactivation Furnace System (DFS) used to

  1. Some Recent Advances in Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitted, Turner

    1982-01-01

    General principles of computer graphics are reviewed, including discussions of display hardware, geometric modeling, algorithms, and applications in science, computer-aided design, flight training, communications, business, art, and entertainment. (JN)

  2. Computer Series, 108. Computer Simulation of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, John F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a computer simulation called "The Great Chemical Bead Game" which can be used to teach the concepts of equilibrium and kinetics to introductory chemistry students more clearly than through an experiment. Discussed are the rules of the game, the application of rate laws and graphical analysis. (CW)

  3. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  4. Enabling Computational Technologies for Terascale Scientific Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.

    2000-08-24

    We develop scalable algorithms and object-oriented code frameworks for terascale scientific simulations on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Our research in multigrid-based linear solvers and adaptive mesh refinement enables Laboratory programs to use MPPs to explore important physical phenomena. For example, our research aids stockpile stewardship by making practical detailed 3D simulations of radiation transport. The need to solve large linear systems arises in many applications, including radiation transport, structural dynamics, combustion, and flow in porous media. These systems result from discretizations of partial differential equations on computational meshes. Our first research objective is to develop multigrid preconditioned iterative methods for such problems and to demonstrate their scalability on MPPs. Scalability describes how total computational work grows with problem size; it measures how effectively additional resources can help solve increasingly larger problems. Many factors contribute to scalability: computer architecture, parallel implementation, and choice of algorithm. Scalable algorithms have been shown to decrease simulation times by several orders of magnitude.

  5. Computer simulation of breathing systems for divers

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, P.G.; Nuckols, M.L.

    1983-02-01

    A powerful new tool for the analysis and design of underwater breathing gas systems is being developed. A versatile computer simulator is described which makes possible the modular ''construction'' of any conceivable breathing gas system from computer memory-resident components. The analysis of a typical breathing gas system is demonstrated using this simulation technique, and the effects of system modifications on performance of the breathing system are shown. This modeling technique will ultimately serve as the foundation for a proposed breathing system simulator under development by the Navy. The marriage of this computer modeling technique with an interactive graphics system will provide the designer with an efficient, cost-effective tool for the development of new and improved diving systems.

  6. Computing Advances in the Teaching of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, W. P.; Matthews, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses three trends in computer-oriented chemistry instruction: (1) availability of interfaces to integrate computers with experiments; (2) impact of the development of higher resolution graphics and greater memory capacity; and (3) role of videodisc technology on computer assisted instruction. Includes program listings for auto-titration and…

  7. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  8. A decade of computer simulations for Space Shuttle aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1988-01-01

    Ten years ago computer simulations of the flow field around the Space Shuttle Orbiter were limited to inviscid calculations for the windward side of the forebody and viscous calculations for selected 2-D problems. Advances in computer hardware and numerical methods during the past ten years made it possible to calculate viscous flow over the complete orbiter configuration at angle of attack. The equations solved are the Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes equation, simplified by either the thin-layer or parabolized approximation. An algebraic eddy viscosity model is used for turbulent flow. The free stream is assumed to be a perfect gas for wind tunnel conditions and a real gas in thermodynamic equilibrium for flight conditions. Four examples of recent computer simulations are presented. Flow field results include oil flow patterns on the surface and Mach number contours, isobars, and cross-flow velocity vectors in the shock layer.

  9. A decade of computer simulations for space shuttle aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1988-01-01

    Ten years ago computer simulations of the flow field around the Space Shuttle Orbiter were limited to inviscid calculations for the windward side of the forebody and viscous calculations for selected 2-D problems. Advances in computer hardware and numerical methods during the past ten years made it possible to calculate viscous flow over the complete orbiter configuration at angle of attack. The equations solved are the Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes equation, simplified by either the thin-layer or parabolized approximation. An algebraic eddy viscosity model is used for turbulent flow. The free stream is assumed to be a perfect gas for wind tunnel conditions and a real gas in thermodynamic equilibrium for flight conditions. Four examples of recent computer simulations are presented. Flow field results include oil flow patterns on the surface and Mach number contours, isobars, and cross-flow velocity vectors in the shock layer.

  10. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  11. Computer simulation: A modern day crystal ball?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sham, Michael; Siprelle, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    It has long been the desire of managers to be able to look into the future and predict the outcome of decisions. With the advent of computer simulation and the tremendous capability provided by personal computers, that desire can now be realized. This paper presents an overview of computer simulation and modeling, and discusses the capabilities of Extend. Extend is an iconic-driven Macintosh-based software tool that brings the power of simulation to the average computer user. An example of an Extend based model is presented in the form of the Space Transportation System (STS) Processing Model. The STS Processing Model produces eight shuttle launches per year, yet it takes only about ten minutes to run. In addition, statistical data such as facility utilization, wait times, and processing bottlenecks are produced. The addition or deletion of resources, such as orbiters or facilities, can be easily modeled and their impact analyzed. Through the use of computer simulation, it is possible to look into the future to see the impact of today's decisions.

  12. Computer simulation of the threshold sensitivity determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A computer simulation study was carried out to evaluate various methods for determining threshold stimulus levels for impact sensitivity tests. In addition, the influence of a number of variables (initial stimulus level, particular stimulus response curve, and increment size) on the apparent threshold values and on the corresponding population response levels was determined. Finally, a critical review of previous assumptions regarding the stimulus response curve for impact testing is presented in the light of the simulation results.

  13. Experiments and simulation models of a basic computation element of an autonomous molecular computing system.

    PubMed

    Takinoue, Masahiro; Kiga, Daisuke; Shohda, Koh-Ichiroh; Suyama, Akira

    2008-10-01

    Autonomous DNA computers have been attracting much attention because of their ability to integrate into living cells. Autonomous DNA computers can process information through DNA molecules and their molecular reactions. We have already proposed an idea of an autonomous molecular computer with high computational ability, which is now named Reverse-transcription-and-TRanscription-based Autonomous Computing System (RTRACS). In this study, we first report an experimental demonstration of a basic computation element of RTRACS and a mathematical modeling method for RTRACS. We focus on an AND gate, which produces an output RNA molecule only when two input RNA molecules exist, because it is one of the most basic computation elements in RTRACS. Experimental results demonstrated that the basic computation element worked as designed. In addition, its behaviors were analyzed using a mathematical model describing the molecular reactions of the RTRACS computation elements. A comparison between experiments and simulations confirmed the validity of the mathematical modeling method. This study will accelerate construction of various kinds of computation elements and computational circuits of RTRACS, and thus advance the research on autonomous DNA computers.

  14. Recent advances in superconducting-mixer simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, S.; Kennedy, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last few years, considerable progress have been made in the development of techniques for fabricating high-quality superconducting circuits, and this success, together with major advances in the theoretical understanding of quantum detection and mixing at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, has made the development of CAD techniques for superconducting nonlinear circuits an important new enterprise. For example, arrays of quasioptical mixers are now being manufactured, where the antennas, matching networks, filters and superconducting tunnel junctions are all fabricated by depositing niobium and a variety of oxides on a single quartz substrate. There are no adjustable tuning elements on these integrated circuits, and therefore, one must be able to predict their electrical behavior precisely. This requirement, together with a general interest in the generic behavior of devices such as direct detectors and harmonic mixers, has lead us to develop a range of CAD tools for simulating the large-signal, small-signal, and noise behavior of superconducting tunnel junction circuits.

  15. Advancing crime scene computer forensics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Chet; Feldman, John; Giordano, Joe

    1999-02-01

    Computers and network technology have become inexpensive and powerful tools that can be applied to a wide range of criminal activity. Computers have changed the world's view of evidence because computers are used more and more as tools in committing `traditional crimes' such as embezzlements, thefts, extortion and murder. This paper will focus on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of the data recovery and evidence construction tools used in both the field and laboratory for prosection purposes.

  16. Recent advances in computational mechanics of the human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, M; Dabiri, Y; Li, L P

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling.

  17. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  18. Simulating physical phenomena with a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo

    2003-03-01

    In a keynote speech at MIT in 1981 Richard Feynman raised some provocative questions in connection to the exact simulation of physical systems using a special device named a ``quantum computer'' (QC). At the time it was known that deterministic simulations of quantum phenomena in classical computers required a number of resources that scaled exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom, and also that the probabilistic simulation of certain quantum problems were limited by the so-called sign or phase problem, a problem believed to be of exponential complexity. Such a QC was intended to mimick physical processes exactly the same as Nature. Certainly, remarks coming from such an influential figure generated widespread interest in these ideas, and today after 21 years there are still some open questions. What kind of physical phenomena can be simulated with a QC?, How?, and What are its limitations? Addressing and attempting to answer these questions is what this talk is about. Definitively, the goal of physics simulation using controllable quantum systems (``physics imitation'') is to exploit quantum laws to advantage, and thus accomplish efficient imitation. Fundamental is the connection between a quantum computational model and a physical system by transformations of operator algebras. This concept is a necessary one because in Quantum Mechanics each physical system is naturally associated with a language of operators and thus can be considered as a possible model of quantum computation. The remarkable result is that an arbitrary physical system is naturally simulatable by another physical system (or QC) whenever a ``dictionary'' between the two operator algebras exists. I will explain these concepts and address some of Feynman's concerns regarding the simulation of fermionic systems. Finally, I will illustrate the main ideas by imitating simple physical phenomena borrowed from condensed matter physics using quantum algorithms, and present experimental

  19. Uncertainty and error in computational simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Alvin, K.F.; Rutherford, B.M.

    1997-10-01

    The present paper addresses the question: ``What are the general classes of uncertainty and error sources in complex, computational simulations?`` This is the first step of a two step process to develop a general methodology for quantitatively estimating the global modeling and simulation uncertainty in computational modeling and simulation. The second step is to develop a general mathematical procedure for representing, combining and propagating all of the individual sources through the simulation. The authors develop a comprehensive view of the general phases of modeling and simulation. The phases proposed are: conceptual modeling of the physical system, mathematical modeling of the system, discretization of the mathematical model, computer programming of the discrete model, numerical solution of the model, and interpretation of the results. This new view is built upon combining phases recognized in the disciplines of operations research and numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The characteristics and activities of each of these phases is discussed in general, but examples are given for the fields of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer. They argue that a clear distinction should be made between uncertainty and error that can arise in each of these phases. The present definitions for uncertainty and error are inadequate and. therefore, they propose comprehensive definitions for these terms. Specific classes of uncertainty and error sources are then defined that can occur in each phase of modeling and simulation. The numerical sources of error considered apply regardless of whether the discretization procedure is based on finite elements, finite volumes, or finite differences. To better explain the broad types of sources of uncertainty and error, and the utility of their categorization, they discuss a coupled-physics example simulation.

  20. Simulation Concept - How to Exploit Tools for Computing Hybrids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    multiphysics design tools (Simulation of Biological Systems - SIMBIOSYS ), provide an open source environment for biological simulation tools (Bio...SCHETCH Simulation Concept – How to Exploit Tools for Computing Project SIMBIOSYS Simulation of Biological Systems Program SPICE Simulation

  1. Assessing Moderator Variables: Two Computer Simulation Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Craig A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for conceptualizing moderating relationships based on their type (strictly correlational and classically correlational) and form, whether continuous, noncontinuous, logistic, or quantum. Results of computer simulations comparing three statistical approaches for assessing moderator variables are presented, and advantages of…

  2. Designing Online Scaffolds for Interactive Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Wu, I-Chia; Jen, Fen-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of online scaffolds in computer simulation to facilitate students' science learning. We first introduced online scaffolds to assist and model students' science learning and to demonstrate how a system embedded with online scaffolds can be designed and implemented to help high school…

  3. Making Students Decide: The Vietnam Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Kevin

    1994-01-01

    Contends that an important goal in history instruction is helping students understand the complexity of events. Describes the use of "Escalation," a commercially available computer simulation, in a high school U.S. history class. Includes excerpts from student journals kept during the activity. (CFR)

  4. Progress in Computational Simulation of Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Lyzenga, Gregory; Judd, Michele; Li, P. Peggy; Norton, Charles; Tisdale, Edwin; Granat, Robert

    2006-01-01

    GeoFEST(P) is a computer program written for use in the QuakeSim project, which is devoted to development and improvement of means of computational simulation of earthquakes. GeoFEST(P) models interacting earthquake fault systems from the fault-nucleation to the tectonic scale. The development of GeoFEST( P) has involved coupling of two programs: GeoFEST and the Pyramid Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library. GeoFEST is a message-passing-interface-parallel code that utilizes a finite-element technique to simulate evolution of stress, fault slip, and plastic/elastic deformation in realistic materials like those of faulted regions of the crust of the Earth. The products of such simulations are synthetic observable time-dependent surface deformations on time scales from days to decades. Pyramid Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library is a software library that facilitates the generation of computational meshes for solving physical problems. In an application of GeoFEST(P), a computational grid can be dynamically adapted as stress grows on a fault. Simulations on workstations using a few tens of thousands of stress and displacement finite elements can now be expanded to multiple millions of elements with greater than 98-percent scaled efficiency on over many hundreds of parallel processors (see figure).

  5. Factors Promoting Engaged Exploration with Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolefsky, Noah S.; Perkins, Katherine K.; Adams, Wendy K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends prior research on student use of computer simulations (sims) to engage with and explore science topics, in this case wave interference. We describe engaged exploration; a process that involves students actively interacting with educational materials, sense making, and exploring primarily via their own questioning. We analyze…

  6. Macromod: Computer Simulation For Introductory Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Thomas

    1977-01-01

    The Macroeconomic model (Macromod) is a computer assisted instruction simulation model designed for introductory economics courses. An evaluation of its utilization at a community college indicates that it yielded a 10 percent to 13 percent greater economic comprehension than lecture classes and that it met with high student approval. (DC)

  7. Computer Graphics Simulations of Sampling Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer graphics simulations to enhance student understanding of sampling distributions that arise in introductory statistics. Highlights include the distribution of sample proportions, the distribution of the difference of sample means, the distribution of the difference of sample proportions, and the distribution of sample…

  8. Quantitative computer simulations of extraterrestrial processing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Nikravesh, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    The automation of a small, solid propellant mixer was studied. Temperature control is under investigation. A numerical simulation of the system is under development and will be tested using different control options. Control system hardware is currently being put into place. The construction of mathematical models and simulation techniques for understanding various engineering processes is also studied. Computer graphics packages were utilized for better visualization of the simulation results. The mechanical mixing of propellants is examined. Simulation of the mixing process is being done to study how one can control for chaotic behavior to meet specified mixing requirements. An experimental mixing chamber is also being built. It will allow visual tracking of particles under mixing. The experimental unit will be used to test ideas from chaos theory, as well as to verify simulation results. This project has applications to extraterrestrial propellant quality and reliability.

  9. Advanced Training Techniques Using Computer Generated Imagery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-28

    School instructors find either lacking or much to subtle in the ASPT simulator. Their theory as to why this is missing is that the simulator does 59 not...same direction as the aircraft! The difference between the aircraft and ASPT simulator perceptions of the shearing effect may be due to several...elements compared to the late 1960’s, when the ASPT was designed. In addition, present day calligraphic visuals offer very high contrast and

  10. Application of advanced computational technology to propulsion CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuch, John R.

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid dynamics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion system design. This paper presents an overview of efforts underway at NASA Lewis to advance and apply computational technology to ICFM. These efforts include the use of modern, software engineering principles for code development, the development of an AI-based user-interface for large codes, the establishment of a high-performance, data communications network to link ICFM researchers and facilities, and the application of parallel processing to speed up computationally intensive and/or time-critical ICFM problems. A multistage compressor flow physics program is cited as an example of efforts to use advanced computational technology to enhance a current NASA Lewis ICFM research program.

  11. Computation of Viscous Flow about Advanced Projectiles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-09

    Domain". Journal of Comp. Physics, Vol. 8, 1971, pp. 392-408. 10. Thompson , J . F ., Thames, F. C., and Mastin, C. M., "Automatic Numerical Generation of...computations, USSR Comput. Math. Math. Phys., 12, 2 (1972), 182-195. I~~ll A - - 18. Thompson , J . F ., F. C. Thames, and C. M. Mastin, Automatic

  12. Computer simulations of WIGWAM underwater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamegai, Minao; White, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    We performed computer simulations of the WIGWAM underwater experiment with a 2-D hydro-code, CALE. First, we calculated the bubble pulse and the signal strength at the closest gauge in one-dimensional geometry. The calculation shows excellent agreement with the measured data. Next, we made two-dimensional simulations of WIGWAM applying the gravity over-pressure, and calculated the signals at three selected gauge locations where measurements were recorded. The computed peak pressures at those gauge locations come well within the 15% experimental error bars. The signal at the farthest gauge is of the order of 200 bars. This is significant, because at this pressure the CALE output can be linked to a hydro-acoustics computer program, NPE Code (Nonlinear Progressive Wave-equation Code), to analyze the long distance propagation of acoustical signals from the underwater explosions on a global scale.

  13. Computational algorithms for simulations in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Konyaev, P A; Lukin, V P

    2016-04-20

    A computer simulation technique for atmospheric and adaptive optics based on parallel programing is discussed. A parallel propagation algorithm is designed and a modified spectral-phase method for computer generation of 2D time-variant random fields is developed. Temporal power spectra of Laguerre-Gaussian beam fluctuations are considered as an example to illustrate the applications discussed. Implementation of the proposed algorithms using Intel MKL and IPP libraries and NVIDIA CUDA technology is shown to be very fast and accurate. The hardware system for the computer simulation is an off-the-shelf desktop with an Intel Core i7-4790K CPU operating at a turbo-speed frequency up to 5 GHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX-960 graphics accelerator with 1024 1.5 GHz processors.

  14. Simulating fermions on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.

    2002-07-01

    The real-time probabilistic simulation of quantum systems in classical computers is known to be limited by the so-called dynamical sign problem, a problem leading to exponential complexity. In 1981 Richard Feynman raised some provocative questions in connection to the "exact imitation" of such systems using a special device named a "quantum computer". Feynman hesitated about the possibility of imitating fermion systems using such a device. Here we address some of his concerns and, in particular, investigate the simulation of fermionic systems. We show how quantum computers avoid the sign problem in some cases by reducing the complexity from exponential to polynomial. Our demonstration is based upon the use of isomorphisms of algebras. We present specific quantum algorithms that illustrate the main points of our algebraic approach.

  15. Computer simulation of surface and film processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.; Halicioglu, M. T.

    1983-01-01

    Adequate computer methods, based on interactions between discrete particles, provide information leading to an atomic level understanding of various physical processes. The success of these simulation methods, however, is related to the accuracy of the potential energy function representing the interactions among the particles. The development of a potential energy function for crystalline SiO2 forms that can be employed in lengthy computer modelling procedures was investigated. In many of the simulation methods which deal with discrete particles, semiempirical two body potentials were employed to analyze energy and structure related properties of the system. Many body interactions are required for a proper representation of the total energy for many systems. Many body interactions for simulations based on discrete particles are discussed.

  16. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  17. Cosmological Simulations on a Grid of Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depardon, Benjamin; Caron, Eddy; Desprez, Frédéric; Blaizot, Jérémy; Courtois, Hélène

    2010-06-01

    The work presented in this paper aims at restricting the input parameter values of the semi-analytical model used in GALICS and MOMAF, so as to derive which parameters influence the most the results, e.g., star formation, feedback and halo recycling efficiencies, etc. Our approach is to proceed empirically: we run lots of simulations and derive the correct ranges of values. The computation time needed is so large, that we need to run on a grid of computers. Hence, we model GALICS and MOMAF execution time and output files size, and run the simulation using a grid middleware: DIET. All the complexity of accessing resources, scheduling simulations and managing data is harnessed by DIET and hidden behind a web portal accessible to the users.

  18. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  19. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  20. Computing Algorithms for Nuffield Advanced Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    Defines all recurrence relations used in the Nuffield course, to solve first- and second-order differential equations, and describes a typical algorithm for computer generation of solutions. (Author/GA)

  1. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  2. Advanced Computational Techniques for Power Tube Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    fixturing applications, in addition to the existing computer-aided engineering capabilities. o Helix TWT Manufacturing has Implemented a tooling and fixturing...illustrates the ajor features of this computer network. ) The backbone of our system is a Sytek Broadband Network (LAN) which Interconnects terminals and...automatic network analyzer (FANA) which electrically characterizes the slow-wave helices of traveling-wave tubes ( TWTs ) -- both for engineering design

  3. Advanced Crew Personal Support Computer (CPSC) task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include: background; objectives of task; benefits to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Program; technical approach; baseline integration; and growth and evolution options. The objective is to: (1) introduce new computer technology into the SSF Program; (2) augment core computer capabilities to meet additional mission requirements; (3) minimize risk in upgrading technology; and (4) provide a low cost way to enhance crew and ground operations support.

  4. Frontiers of research in advanced computations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The principal mission of the Institute for Scientific Computing Research is to foster interactions among LLNL researchers, universities, and industry on selected topics in scientific computing. In the area of computational physics, the Institute has developed a new algorithm, GaPH, to help scientists understand the chemistry of turbulent and driven plasmas or gases at far less cost than other methods. New low-frequency electromagnetic models better describe the plasma etching and deposition characteristics of a computer chip in the making. A new method for modeling realistic curved boundaries within an orthogonal mesh is resulting in a better understanding of the physics associated with such boundaries and much quicker solutions. All these capabilities are being developed for massively parallel implementation, which is an ongoing focus of Institute researchers. Other groups within the Institute are developing novel computational methods to address a range of other problems. Examples include feature detection and motion recognition by computer, improved monitoring of blood oxygen levels, and entirely new models of human joint mechanics and prosthetic devices.

  5. Computer modeling and simulation of human movement.

    PubMed

    Pandy, M G

    2001-01-01

    Recent interest in using modeling and simulation to study movement is driven by the belief that this approach can provide insight into how the nervous system and muscles interact to produce coordinated motion of the body parts. With the computational resources available today, large-scale models of the body can be used to produce realistic simulations of movement that are an order of magnitude more complex than those produced just 10 years ago. This chapter reviews how the structure of the neuromusculoskeletal system is commonly represented in a multijoint model of movement, how modeling may be combined with optimization theory to simulate the dynamics of a motor task, and how model output can be analyzed to describe and explain muscle function. Some results obtained from simulations of jumping, pedaling, and walking are also reviewed to illustrate the approach.

  6. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  7. Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

    2007-07-01

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

  8. Advanced Computational Techniques in Regional Wave Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-03

    the new GERESS data. The dissertation work emphasized the development and use of advanced computa- tional techniques for studying regional seismic...hand, the possibility of new data sources at regional distances permits using previously ignored signals. Unfortunately, these regional signals will...the Green’s function around this new reference point is containing the propagation effects, and V is the source Gnk(x,t;r,t) - (2) volume where fJk

  9. Computer simulations of learning in neural systems.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y

    1983-04-01

    Recent experiments have shown that, in some cases, strengths of synaptic ties are being modified in learning. However, it is not known what the rules that control those modifications are, especially what determines which synapses will be modified and which will remain unchanged during a learning episode. Two postulated rules that may solve that problem are introduced. To check their effectiveness, the rules are tested in many computer models that simulate learning in neural systems. The simulations demonstrate that, theoretically, the two postulated rules are effective in organizing the synaptic changes. If they are found to also exist in biological systems, these postulated rules may be an important element in the learning process.

  10. Weld fracture criteria for computer simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the complexity of welding, not all of the important factors are always properly considered and controlled. An automatic system is required. This report outlines a simulation method and all the important considerations to do this. As in many situations where a defect or failure has occurrred, it is freqently necessary to trouble shoot the system and eventually identify those factors that were neglected. This is expensive and time consuming. Very frequently the causes are materials-related that might have been anticipated. Computer simulation can automatically consider all important variables. The major goal of this presentation is to identify the proper relationship to design, processing and materials variables to welding.

  11. Unsteady flow simulation on a parallel computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faden, M.; Pokorny, S.; Engel, K.

    For the simulation of the flow through compressor stages, an interactive flow simulation system is set up on an MIMD-type parallel computer. An explicit scheme is used in order to resolve the time-dependent interaction between the blades. The 2D Navier-Stokes equations are transformed into their general moving coordinates. The parallelization of the solver is based on the idea of domain decomposition. Results are presented for a problem of fixed size (4096 grid nodes for the Hakkinen case).

  12. Computer Simulation of the VASIMR Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, David

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) computer code for simulation of the VASIMR engine. This code is designed be easy to modify and use. We achieve this using the Cactus framework, a system originally developed for research in numerical relativity. Since its release, Cactus has become an extremely powerful and flexible open source framework. The development of the code will be done in stages, starting with a basic fluid dynamic simulation and working towards a more complex MHD code. Once developed, this code can be used by students and researchers in order to further test and improve the VASIMR engine.

  13. Real-time simulation of an automotive gas turbine using the hybrid computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costakis, W.; Merrill, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A hybrid computer simulation of an Advanced Automotive Gas Turbine Powertrain System is reported. The system consists of a gas turbine engine, an automotive drivetrain with four speed automatic transmission, and a control system. Generally, dynamic performance is simulated on the analog portion of the hybrid computer while most of the steady state performance characteristics are calculated to run faster than real time and makes this simulation a useful tool for a variety of analytical studies.

  14. Advanced Computer Image Generation Techniques Exploiting Perceptual Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Anthony J.; And Others

    This study suggests and identifies computer image generation (CIG) algorithms for visual simulation that improve the training effectiveness of CIG simulators and identifies areas of basic research in visual perception that are significant for improving CIG technology. The first phase of the project entailed observing three existing CIG simulators.…

  15. Advances in Computer-Supported Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neto, Francisco; Brasileiro, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The Internet and growth of computer networks have eliminated geographic barriers, creating an environment where education can be brought to a student no matter where that student may be. The success of distance learning programs and the availability of many Web-supported applications and multimedia resources have increased the effectiveness of…

  16. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  17. Evaluation of Advanced Computing Techniques and Technologies: Reconfigurable Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to survey the technology of reconfigurable computing determine its level of maturity and suitability for NASA applications. To better understand and assess the effectiveness of the reconfigurable design paradigm that is utilized within the HAL-15 reconfigurable computer system. This system was made available to NASA MSFC for this purpose, from Star Bridge Systems, Inc. To implement on at least one application that would benefit from the performance levels that are possible with reconfigurable hardware. It was originally proposed that experiments in fault tolerance and dynamically reconfigurability would be perform but time constraints mandated that these be pursued as future research.

  18. Computational plasticity algorithm for particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Lyamin, A. V.; Vignes, C.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of particle dynamics simulation is interpreted in the framework of computational plasticity leading to an algorithm which is mathematically indistinguishable from the common implicit scheme widely used in the finite element analysis of elastoplastic boundary value problems. This algorithm provides somewhat of a unification of two particle methods, the discrete element method and the contact dynamics method, which usually are thought of as being quite disparate. In particular, it is shown that the former appears as the special case where the time stepping is explicit while the use of implicit time stepping leads to the kind of schemes usually labelled contact dynamics methods. The framing of particle dynamics simulation within computational plasticity paves the way for new approaches similar (or identical) to those frequently employed in nonlinear finite element analysis. These include mixed implicit-explicit time stepping, dynamic relaxation and domain decomposition schemes.

  19. Understanding Membrane Fouling Mechanisms through Computational Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yuan

    This dissertation focuses on a computational simulation study on the organic fouling mechanisms of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration (RO/NF) membranes, which have been widely used in industry for water purification. The research shows that through establishing a realistic computational model based on available experimental data, we are able to develop a deep understanding of membrane fouling mechanism. This knowledge is critical for providing a strategic plan for membrane experimental community and RO/NF industry for further improvements in membrane technology for water treatment. This dissertation focuses on three major research components (1) Development of the realistic molecular models, which could well represent the membrane surface properties; (2) Investigation of the interactions between the membrane surface and foulants by steered molecular dynamics simulations, in order to determine the major factors that contribute to surface fouling; and (3) Studies of the interactions between the surface-modified membranes (polyethylene glycol) to provide strategies for antifouling.

  20. Understanding membrane fouling mechanisms through computational simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yuan

    This dissertation focuses on a computational simulation study on the organic fouling mechanisms of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration (RO/NF) membranes, which have been widely used in industry for water purification. The research shows that through establishing a realistic computational model based on available experimental data, we are able to develop a deep understanding of membrane fouling mechanism. This knowledge is critical for providing a strategic plan for membrane experimental community and RO/NF industry for further improvements in membrane technology for water treatment. This dissertation focuses on three major research components (1) Development of the realistic molecular models, which could well represent the membrane surface properties; (2) Investigation of the interactions between the membrane surface and foulants by steered molecular dynamics simulations, in order to determine the major factors that contribute to surface fouling; and (3) Studies of the interactions between the surface-modified membranes (polyethylene glycol) to provide strategies for antifouling.

  1. Computer simulation of the micropulse imaging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yongjiang; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Xiaoou

    2000-10-01

    In this paper a design method of the Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) is introduced, that is a computer simulation of the MPL. Some of the MPL parameters concerned air scattered and the effects on the performance of the lidar are discussed. The design software for the lidar with diode pumped solid laser is programmed by MATLAB. This software is consisted of six modules, that is transmitter, atmosphere, target, receiver, processor and display system. The method can be extended some kinds of lidar.

  2. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  3. Accelerating Climate Simulations Through Hybrid Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shujia; Sinno, Scott; Cruz, Carlos; Purcell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Unconventional multi-core processors (e.g., IBM Cell B/E and NYIDIDA GPU) have emerged as accelerators in climate simulation. However, climate models typically run on parallel computers with conventional processors (e.g., Intel and AMD) using MPI. Connecting accelerators to this architecture efficiently and easily becomes a critical issue. When using MPI for connection, we identified two challenges: (1) identical MPI implementation is required in both systems, and; (2) existing MPI code must be modified to accommodate the accelerators. In response, we have extended and deployed IBM Dynamic Application Virtualization (DAV) in a hybrid computing prototype system (one blade with two Intel quad-core processors, two IBM QS22 Cell blades, connected with Infiniband), allowing for seamlessly offloading compute-intensive functions to remote, heterogeneous accelerators in a scalable, load-balanced manner. Currently, a climate solar radiation model running with multiple MPI processes has been offloaded to multiple Cell blades with approx.10% network overhead.

  4. Communication: Spin-free quantum computational simulations and symmetry adapted states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The ideas of digital simulation of quantum systems using a quantum computer parallel the original ideas of numerical simulation using a classical computer. In order for quantum computational simulations to advance to a competitive point, many techniques from classical simulations must be imported into the quantum domain. In this article, we consider the applications of symmetry in the context of quantum simulation. Building upon well established machinery, we propose a form of first quantized simulation that only requires the spatial part of the wave function, thereby allowing spin-free quantum computational simulations. We go further and discuss the preparation of N-body states with specified symmetries based on projection techniques. We consider two simple examples, molecular hydrogen and cyclopropenyl cation, to illustrate the ideas. The methods here are the first to explicitly deal with preparing N-body symmetry-adapted states and open the door for future investigations into group theory, chemistry, and quantum simulation.

  5. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  6. Technology, Pedagogy, and Epistemology: Opportunities and Challenges of Using Computer Modeling and Simulation Tools in Elementary Science Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Christina V.; Meyer, Jason; Sharma, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    This study infused computer modeling and simulation tools in a 1-semester undergraduate elementary science methods course to advance preservice teachers' understandings of computer software use in science teaching and to help them learn important aspects of pedagogy and epistemology. Preservice teachers used computer modeling and simulation tools…

  7. Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.

    2001-04-03

    Feature extraction and evaluation are two procedures common to the development of any pattern recognition application. These features are the primary pieces of information which are used to train the pattern recognition tool, whether that tool is a neural network, a fuzzy logic rulebase, or a genetic algorithm. Careful selection of the features to be used by the pattern recognition tool can significantly streamline the overall development and training of the solution for the pattern recognition application. This report summarizes the development of an integrated, computer-based software package called the Feature Extraction Toolbox (FET), which can be used for the development and deployment of solutions to generic pattern recognition problems. This toolbox integrates a number of software techniques for signal processing, feature extraction and evaluation, and pattern recognition, all under a single, user-friendly development environment. The toolbox has been developed to run on a laptop computer, so that it may be taken to a site and used to develop pattern recognition applications in the field. A prototype version of this toolbox has been completed and is currently being used for applications development on several projects in support of the Department of Energy.

  8. Advances in computer imaging/applications in facial plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D; Jiannetto, D F

    1999-01-01

    Rapidly progressing computer technology, ever-increasing expectations of patients, and a confusing medicolegal environment requires a clarification of the role of computer imaging/applications. Advances in computer technology and its applications are reviewed. A brief historical discussion is included for perspective. Improvements in both hardware and software with the advent of digital imaging have allowed great increases in speed and accuracy in patient imaging. This facilitates doctor-patient communication and possibly realistic patient expectations. Patients seeking cosmetic surgery now often expect preoperative imaging. Although society in general has become more litigious, a literature search up to 1998 reveals no lawsuits directly involving computer imaging. It appears that conservative utilization of computer imaging by the facial plastic surgeon may actually reduce liability and promote communication. Recent advances have significantly enhanced the value of computer imaging in the practice of facial plastic surgery. These technological advances in computer imaging appear to contribute a useful technique for the practice of facial plastic surgery. Inclusion of computer imaging should be given serious consideration as an adjunct to clinical practice.

  9. Neural network computer simulation of medical aerosols.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C J; Barlow, D J

    1996-06-01

    Preliminary investigations have been conducted to assess the potential for using artificial neural networks to simulate aerosol behaviour, with a view to employing this type of methodology in the evaluation and design of pulmonary drug-delivery systems. Details are presented of the general purpose software developed for these tasks; it implements a feed-forward back-propagation algorithm with weight decay and connection pruning, the user having complete run-time control of the network architecture and mode of training. A series of exploratory investigations is then reported in which different network structures and training strategies are assessed in terms of their ability to simulate known patterns of fluid flow in simple model systems. The first of these involves simulations of cellular automata-generated data for fluid flow through a partially obstructed two-dimensional pipe. The artificial neural networks are shown to be highly successful in simulating the behaviour of this simple linear system, but with important provisos relating to the information content of the training data and the criteria used to judge when the network is properly trained. A second set of investigations is then reported in which similar networks are used to simulate patterns of fluid flow through aerosol generation devices, using training data furnished through rigorous computational fluid dynamics modelling. These more complex three-dimensional systems are modelled with equal success. It is concluded that carefully tailored, well trained networks could provide valuable tools not just for predicting but also for analysing the spatial dynamics of pharmaceutical aerosols.

  10. A computer simulation of chromosomal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Cornforth, M.

    The transformation of a normal cell into a cancerous growth can be described as a process of mutation and selection occurring within the context of clonal expansion. Radiation, in addition to initial DNA damage, induces a persistent and still poorly understood genomic instability process that contributes to the mutational burden. It will be essential to include a quantitative description of this phenomenon in any attempt at science-based risk assessment. Monte Carlo computer simulations are a relatively simple way to model processes that are characterized by an element of randomness. A properly constructed simulation can capture the essence of a phenomenon that, as is often the case in biology, can be extraordinarily complex, and can do so even though the phenomenon itself is incompletely understood. A simple computer simulation of one manifestation of genomic instability known as chromosomal instability will be presented. The model simulates clonal expansion of a single chromosomally unstable cell into a colony. Instability is characterized by a single parameter, the rate of chromosomal rearrangement. With each new chromosome aberration, a unique subclone arises (subclones are defined as having a unique karyotype). The subclone initially has just one cell, but it can expand with cell division if the aberration is not lethal. The computer program automatically keeps track of the number of subclones within the expanding colony, and the number of cells within each subclone. Because chromosome aberrations kill some cells during colony growth, colonies arising from unstable cells tend to be smaller than those arising from stable cells. For any chosen level of instability, the computer program calculates the mean number of cells per colony averaged over many runs. These output should prove useful for investigating how such radiobiological phenomena as slow growth colonies, increased doubling time, and delayed cell death depend on chromosomal instability. Also of

  11. An Advanced Leakage Scheme for Neutrino Treatment in Astrophysical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Cabezón, R. M.; Käppeli, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  12. AN ADVANCED LEAKAGE SCHEME FOR NEUTRINO TREATMENT IN ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Perego, A.; Cabezón, R. M.; Käppeli, R.

    2016-04-15

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

    2004-12-22

    , immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

  14. Advancements in Afterbody Radiative Heating Simulations for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Panesi, Marco; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Four advancements to the simulation of backshell radiative heating for Earth entry are presented. The first of these is the development of a flow field model that treats electronic levels of the dominant backshell radiator, N, as individual species. This is shown to allow improvements in the modeling of electron-ion recombination and two-temperature modeling, which are shown to increase backshell radiative heating by 10 to 40%. By computing the electronic state populations of N within the flow field solver, instead of through the quasi-steady state approximation in the radiation code, the coupling of radiative transition rates to the species continuity equations for the levels of N, including the impact of non-local absorption, becomes feasible. Implementation of this additional level of coupling between the flow field and radiation codes represents the second advancement presented in this work, which is shown to increase the backshell radiation by another 10 to 50%. The impact of radiative transition rates due to non-local absorption indicates the importance of accurate radiation transport in the relatively complex flow geometry of the backshell. This motivates the third advancement, which is the development of a ray-tracing radiation transport approach to compute the radiative transition rates and divergence of the radiative flux at every point for coupling to the flow field, therefore allowing the accuracy of the commonly applied tangent-slab approximation to be assessed for radiative source terms. For the sphere considered at lunar-return conditions, the tangent-slab approximation is shown to provide a sufficient level of accuracy for the radiative source terms, even for backshell cases. This is in contrast to the agreement between the two approaches for computing the radiative flux to the surface, which differ by up to 40%. The final advancement presented is the development of a nonequilibrium model for NO radiation, which provides significant backshell

  15. Emulation of an Advanced G-Seat on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    ASPT ) which culminated in the emulation of an advanced approach to G-seat simulation. The development of the software, the design of the advanced seat...components, the implementation of the advanced design on the ASPT , and the results of the study are presented. (Author)

  16. Human shank experimental investigation and computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoschekov, Viktor V.; Maslov, Leonid B.

    2000-01-01

    A new combined approach to analyze a physiological state of the human shank is developed. Investigated vibration research complex records resonance curve of the shank tissues automatically for different kinds of vibration excitation and for various positions of the foot. A special computer model is implemented for the estimation of the experimental data, for a priori prognosis of the bio-object behavior and its dynamic characteristics in the case of various kinds and of different degrees of injury. The method is described by the viscous-elasticity non-homogeneous 1D continuum equation. It is solved by finite element method. The problem in shank cross-section is solved by boundary element method. The analysis of computer simulated resonance curves makes it possible to understand the experimental data correctly and to check the diagnostic criteria of the injury.

  17. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  18. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; ...

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We reviewmore » the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.« less

  19. Fast computation algorithms for speckle pattern simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nascov, Victor; Samoilă, Cornel; Ursuţiu, Doru

    2013-11-13

    We present our development of a series of efficient computation algorithms, generally usable to calculate light diffraction and particularly for speckle pattern simulation. We use mainly the scalar diffraction theory in the form of Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula and its Fresnel approximation. Our algorithms are based on a special form of the convolution theorem and the Fast Fourier Transform. They are able to evaluate the diffraction formula much faster than by direct computation and we have circumvented the restrictions regarding the relative sizes of the input and output domains, met on commonly used procedures. Moreover, the input and output planes can be tilted each to other and the output domain can be off-axis shifted.

  20. Parallel Proximity Detection for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Wieland, Frederick P. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a system for performing proximity detection in computer simulations on parallel processing architectures utilizing a distribution list which includes movers and sensor coverages which check in and out of grids. Each mover maintains a list of sensors that detect the mover's motion as the mover and sensor coverages check in and out of the grids. Fuzzy grids are included by fuzzy resolution parameters to allow movers and sensor coverages to check in and out of grids without computing exact grid crossings. The movers check in and out of grids while moving sensors periodically inform the grids of their coverage. In addition, a lookahead function is also included for providing a generalized capability without making any limiting assumptions about the particular application to which it is applied. The lookahead function is initiated so that risk-free synchronization strategies never roll back grid events. The lookahead function adds fixed delays as events are scheduled for objects on other nodes.

  1. Parallel Proximity Detection for Computer Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Wieland, Frederick P. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a system for performing proximity detection in computer simulations on parallel processing architectures utilizing a distribution list which includes movers and sensor coverages which check in and out of grids. Each mover maintains a list of sensors that detect the mover's motion as the mover and sensor coverages check in and out of the grids. Fuzzy grids are includes by fuzzy resolution parameters to allow movers and sensor coverages to check in and out of grids without computing exact grid crossings. The movers check in and out of grids while moving sensors periodically inform the grids of their coverage. In addition, a lookahead function is also included for providing a generalized capability without making any limiting assumptions about the particular application to which it is applied. The lookahead function is initiated so that risk-free synchronization strategies never roll back grid events. The lookahead function adds fixed delays as events are scheduled for objects on other nodes.

  2. Computer simulations of charged colloids in confinement.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Antonio M; de las Nieves, F Javier; Cuetos, Alejandro

    2015-02-15

    We study by computer simulations the interaction between two similarly charged colloidal particles confined between parallel planes, in salt free conditions. Both the colloids and ions are simulated explicitly, in a fine-mesh lattice, and the electrostatic interaction is calculated using Ewald summation in two dimensions. The internal energy is measured by setting the colloidal particles at a given position and equilibrating the ions, whereas the free energy is obtained introducing a bias (attractive) potential between the colloids. Our results show that upon confining the system, the internal energy decreases, resulting in an attractive contribution to the interaction potential for large charges and strong confinement. However, the loss of entropy of the ions is the dominant mechanism in the interaction, irrespective of the confinement of the system. The interaction potential is therefore repulsive in all cases, and is well described by the DLVO functional form, but effective values have to be used for the interaction strength and Debye length.

  3. Computational simulation of the blood separation process.

    PubMed

    De Gruttola, Sandro; Boomsma, Kevin; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this work is to construct a computational fluid dynamics model capable of simulating the quasitransient process of apheresis. To this end a Lagrangian-Eulerian model has been developed which tracks the blood particles within a delineated two-dimensional flow domain. Within the Eulerian method, the fluid flow conservation equations within the separator are solved. Taking the calculated values of the flow field and using a Lagrangian method, the displacement of the blood particles is calculated. Thus, the local blood density within the separator at a given time step is known. Subsequently, the flow field in the separator is recalculated. This process continues until a quasisteady behavior is reached. The simulations show good agreement with experimental results. They shows a complete separation of plasma and red blood cells, as well as nearly complete separation of red blood cells and platelets. The white blood cells build clusters in the low concentrate cell bed.

  4. Computer simulation of solder joint failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, S.N.; Frear, D.R.; Rashid, M.M.

    1997-04-01

    The thermomechanical fatigue failure of solder joints is increasingly becoming an important reliability issue for electronic packages. The purpose of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop computational tools for simulating the behavior of solder joints under strain and temperature cycling, taking into account the microstructural heterogeneities that exist in as-solidified near eutectic Sn-Pb joints, as well as subsequent microstructural evolution. The authors present two computational constitutive models, a two-phase model and a single-phase model, that were developed to predict the behavior of near eutectic Sn-Pb solder joints under fatigue conditions. Unique metallurgical tests provide the fundamental input for the constitutive relations. The two-phase model mathematically predicts the heterogeneous coarsening behavior of near eutectic Sn-Pb solder. The finite element simulations with this model agree qualitatively with experimental thermomechanical fatigue tests. The simulations show that the presence of an initial heterogeneity in the solder microstructure could significantly degrade the fatigue lifetime. The single-phase model was developed to predict solder joint behavior using materials data for constitutive relation constants that could be determined through straightforward metallurgical experiments. Special thermomechanical fatigue tests were developed to give fundamental materials input to the models, and an in situ SEM thermomechanical fatigue test system was developed to characterize microstructural evolution and the mechanical behavior of solder joints during the test. A shear/torsion test sample was developed to impose strain in two different orientations. Materials constants were derived from these tests. The simulation results from the two-phase model showed good fit to the experimental test results.

  5. The Learning Effects of Computer Simulations in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Nico; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van der Veen, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the (quasi)experimental research of the past decade on the learning effects of computer simulations in science education. The focus is on two questions: how use of computer simulations can enhance traditional education, and how computer simulations are best used in order to improve learning processes and outcomes. We report on…

  6. COMPUTER MODEL AND SIMULATION OF A GLOVE BOX PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    C. FOSTER; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    most glove box operations and demonstrates the ability and advantages of advance computer based modeling. The three-dimensional model also enables better comprehension of problems to non-technical staff. There are many barriers to the seamless integration between the initial design specifications and a computer simulation. Problems include the lack of a standard model and inexact manufacturing of components used in the glove box. The benefits and drawbacks are discussed; however, the results are useful.

  7. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

    2002-07-28

    This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of the IGCC workbench. A series of parametric CFD simulations for single stage and two stage generic gasifier configurations have been performed. An advanced flowing slag model has been implemented into the CFD based gasifier model. A literature review has been performed on published gasification kinetics. Reactor models have been developed and implemented into the workbench for the majority of the heat exchangers, gas clean up system and power generation system for the Vision 21 reference configuration. Modifications to the software infrastructure of the workbench have been commenced to allow interfacing to the workbench reactor models that utilize the CAPE{_}Open software interface protocol.

  8. Computational simulation of liquid fuel rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. Brian

    1994-01-01

    A major component of any liquid propellant rocket is the propellant injection system. Issues of interest include the degree of liquid vaporization and its impact on the combustion process, the pressure and temperature fields in the combustion chamber, and the cooling of the injector face and chamber walls. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code is a primary computational tool used in the MSFC Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch. The branch has dedicated a significant amount of resources to development of this code for prediction of both liquid and solid fuel rocket performance. The FDNS code is currently being upgraded to include the capability to model liquid/gas multi-phase flows for fuel injection simulation. An important aspect of this effort is benchmarking the code capabilities to predict existing experimental injection data. The objective of this MSFC/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship term was to evaluate the capabilities of the modified FDNS code to predict flow fields with liquid injection. Comparisons were made between code predictions and existing experimental data. A significant portion of the effort included a search for appropriate validation data. Also, code simulation deficiencies were identified.

  9. A Computational Framework for Bioimaging Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Masaki; Arjunan, Satya N. V.; Fukushima, Seiya; Iwamoto, Kazunari; Kozuka, Jun; Matsuoka, Satomi; Shindo, Yuki; Ueda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Using bioimaging technology, biologists have attempted to identify and document analytical interpretations that underlie biological phenomena in biological cells. Theoretical biology aims at distilling those interpretations into knowledge in the mathematical form of biochemical reaction networks and understanding how higher level functions emerge from the combined action of biomolecules. However, there still remain formidable challenges in bridging the gap between bioimaging and mathematical modeling. Generally, measurements using fluorescence microscopy systems are influenced by systematic effects that arise from stochastic nature of biological cells, the imaging apparatus, and optical physics. Such systematic effects are always present in all bioimaging systems and hinder quantitative comparison between the cell model and bioimages. Computational tools for such a comparison are still unavailable. Thus, in this work, we present a computational framework for handling the parameters of the cell models and the optical physics governing bioimaging systems. Simulation using this framework can generate digital images of cell simulation results after accounting for the systematic effects. We then demonstrate that such a framework enables comparison at the level of photon-counting units. PMID:26147508

  10. Computational simulation for concurrent engineering of aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Results are summarized for an investigation to assess the infrastructure available and the technology readiness in order to develop computational simulation methods/software for concurrent engineering. These results demonstrate that development of computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering is timely. Extensive infrastructure, in terms of multi-discipline simulation, component-specific simulation, system simulators, fabrication process simulation, and simulation of uncertainties--fundamental to develop such methods, is available. An approach is recommended which can be used to develop computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering of propulsion systems and systems in general. Benefits and issues needing early attention in the development are outlined.

  11. Computational simulation of concurrent engineering for aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    Results are summarized of an investigation to assess the infrastructure available and the technology readiness in order to develop computational simulation methods/software for concurrent engineering. These results demonstrate that development of computational simulations methods for concurrent engineering is timely. Extensive infrastructure, in terms of multi-discipline simulation, component-specific simulation, system simulators, fabrication process simulation, and simulation of uncertainties - fundamental in developing such methods, is available. An approach is recommended which can be used to develop computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering for propulsion systems and systems in general. Benefits and facets needing early attention in the development are outlined.

  12. Computer simulation of fatigue under diametrical compression

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, H. A.; Kun, F.; Andrade, J. S. Jr.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2007-04-15

    We study the fatigue fracture of disordered materials by means of computer simulations of a discrete element model. We extend a two-dimensional fracture model to capture the microscopic mechanisms relevant for fatigue and we simulate the diametric compression of a disc shape specimen under a constant external force. The model allows us to follow the development of the fracture process on the macrolevel and microlevel varying the relative influence of the mechanisms of damage accumulation over the load history and healing of microcracks. As a specific example we consider recent experimental results on the fatigue fracture of asphalt. Our numerical simulations show that for intermediate applied loads the lifetime of the specimen presents a power law behavior. Under the effect of healing, more prominent for small loads compared to the tensile strength of the material, the lifetime of the sample increases and a fatigue limit emerges below which no macroscopic failure occurs. The numerical results are in a good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings.

  13. Computer simulation of surface and film processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.; Halicioglu, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    All the investigations which were performed employed in one way or another a computer simulation technique based on atomistic level considerations. In general, three types of simulation methods were used for modeling systems with discrete particles that interact via well defined potential functions: molecular dynamics (a general method for solving the classical equations of motion of a model system); Monte Carlo (the use of Markov chain ensemble averaging technique to model equilibrium properties of a system); and molecular statics (provides properties of a system at T = 0 K). The effects of three-body forces on the vibrational frequencies of triatomic cluster were investigated. The multilayer relaxation phenomena for low index planes of an fcc crystal was analyzed also as a function of the three-body interactions. Various surface properties for Si and SiC system were calculated. Results obtained from static simulation calculations for slip formation were presented. The more elaborate molecular dynamics calculations on the propagation of cracks in two-dimensional systems were outlined.

  14. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, Juan; Hubbard, Susan; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Moulton, David; Denham, Miles E.

    2011-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high performance computing tool will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. As part of the initial development process, a series of demonstrations were defined to test ASCEM components and provide feedback to developers, engage end users in applications, and lead to an outcome that would benefit the sites. The demonstration was implemented for a sub-region of the Savannah River Site General Separations Area that includes the F-Area Seepage Basins. The physical domain included the unsaturated and saturated zones in the vicinity of the seepage basins and Fourmile Branch, using an unstructured mesh fit to the hydrostratigraphy and topography of the site. The calculations modeled variably saturated flow and the resulting flow field was used in simulations of the advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of uranium. As part of the demonstrations, a new set of data management, visualization, and uncertainty quantification tools were developed to analyze simulation results and existing site data. These new tools can be used to provide summary statistics, including information on which simulation parameters were most important in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output.

  15. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  16. 76 FR 64330 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... Reliability, Diffusion on Complex Networks, and Reversible Software Execution Systems Report from Applied Math... at: (301) 903-7486 or by email at: Melea.Baker@science.doe.gov . You must make your request for...

  17. 78 FR 56871 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION... Exascale technical approaches subcommittee Facilities update Report from Applied Math Committee of Visitors...: ( Melea.Baker@science.doe.gov ). You must make your request for an oral statement at least five...

  18. The Federal Government's Role in Advancing Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Hotline, 1978

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Federal Data Processing Reorganization Study submitted by the Science and Technology Team, the Federal Government's role in advancing and diffusing computer technology is discussed. Findings and conclusions assess the state-of-the-art in government and in industry, and five recommendations provide directions for government policy…

  19. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1994-12-31

    The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

  20. An efficient time advancing strategy for energy-preserving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, F.; Coppola, G.; de Luca, L.

    2015-08-01

    Energy-conserving numerical methods are widely employed within the broad area of convection-dominated systems. Semi-discrete conservation of energy is usually obtained by adopting the so-called skew-symmetric splitting of the non-linear convective term, defined as a suitable average of the divergence and advective forms. Although generally allowing global conservation of kinetic energy, it has the drawback of being roughly twice as expensive as standard divergence or advective forms alone. In this paper, a general theoretical framework has been developed to derive an efficient time-advancement strategy in the context of explicit Runge-Kutta schemes. The novel technique retains the conservation properties of skew-symmetric-based discretizations at a reduced computational cost. It is found that optimal energy conservation can be achieved by properly constructed Runge-Kutta methods in which only divergence and advective forms for the convective term are used. As a consequence, a considerable improvement in computational efficiency over existing practices is achieved. The overall procedure has proved to be able to produce new schemes with a specified order of accuracy on both solution and energy. The effectiveness of the method as well as the asymptotic behavior of the schemes is demonstrated by numerical simulation of Burgers' equation.

  1. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  2. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Zumao Chen; Temi Linjewile; Mike Maguire; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior; Changguan Yang; Hong-Shig Shim

    2004-04-28

    This is the fourteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a Virtual Engineering-based framework for simulating the performance of Advanced Power Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on all aspects of the project. Software development efforts have focused primarily on completing a prototype detachable user interface for the framework and on integrating Carnegie Mellon Universities IECM model core with the computational engine. In addition to this work, progress has been made on several other development and modeling tasks for the program. These include: (1) improvements to the infrastructure code of the computational engine, (2) enhancements to the model interfacing specifications, (3) additional development to increase the robustness of all framework components, (4) enhanced coupling of the computational and visualization engine components, (5) a series of detailed simulations studying the effects of gasifier inlet conditions on the heat flux to the gasifier injector, and (6) detailed plans for implementing models for mercury capture for both warm and cold gas cleanup have been created.

  3. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Zumao Chen; Temi Linjewile; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

    2003-04-25

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on all aspects of the project. Calculations for a full Vision 21 plant configuration have been performed for two gasifier types. An improved process model for simulating entrained flow gasifiers has been implemented into the workbench. Model development has focused on: a pre-processor module to compute global gasification parameters from standard fuel properties and intrinsic rate information; a membrane based water gas shift; and reactors to oxidize fuel cell exhaust gas. The data visualization capabilities of the workbench have been extended by implementing the VTK visualization software that supports advanced visualization methods, including inexpensive Virtual Reality techniques. The ease-of-use, functionality and plug-and-play features of the workbench were highlighted through demonstrations of the workbench at a DOE sponsored coal utilization conference. A white paper has been completed that contains recommendations on the use of component architectures, model interface protocols and software frameworks for developing a Vision 21 plant simulator.

  4. Simulating Subsurface Reactive Flows on Ultrascale Computers with PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Lu, C.; Smith, B. F.; Philip, B.

    2009-12-01

    To provide true predictive utility, subsurface simulations often must accurately resolve--in three dimensions--complicated, multi-phase flow fields in highly heterogeneous geology with numerous chemical species and complex chemistry. This task is especially daunting because of the wide range of spatial scales involved--from the pore scale to the field scale--ranging over six orders of magnitude, and the wide range of time scales ranging from seconds or less to millions of years. This represents a true "Grand Challenge" computational problem, requiring not only the largest-scale ("ultrascale") supercomputers, but accompanying advances in algorithms for the efficient numerical solution of systems of PDEs using these machines, and in mathematical modeling techniques that can adequately capture the truly multi-scale nature of these problems. We describe some of the specific challenges involved and present the software and algorithmic approaches that are being using in the computer code PFLOTRAN to provide scalable performance for such simulations on tens of thousands of processors. We focus particularly on scalable techniques for solving the large (up to billions of total degrees of freedom), sparse algebraic systems that arise. We also describe ongoing work to address disparate time and spatial scales by both the development of adaptive mesh refinement methods and the use of multiple continuum formulations. Finally, we present some examples from recent simulations conducted on Jaguar, the 150152 processor core Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is currently one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world.

  5. Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  6. Enhanced Capabilities of Advanced Airborne Radar Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    RCF UNIX-Based Machine 65 BAUHAUS A-l Illustrations to Understand How GTD Files are Read 78 C-l Input File for Sidelobe Jammer Nulling...on the UNIX-based machine BAUHAUS are provided to illustrate the enhancements in run time, as compared to the original version of the simulation [1...Figure 27 presents some CPU run times for executing the enhanced simulation on the RCF UNIX-based machine BAUHAUS . The run times are shown only for

  7. Predicting Performance in Technical Preclinical Dental Courses Using Advanced Simulation.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Riki; Baechle, Mary A; Janus, Charles; Lanning, Sharon K

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether advanced simulation parameters, such as simulation exam scores, number of student self-evaluations, time to complete the simulation, and time to complete self-evaluations, served as predictors of dental students' preclinical performance. Students from three consecutive classes (n=282) at one U.S. dental school completed advanced simulation training and exams within the first four months of their dental curriculum. The students then completed conventional preclinical instruction and exams in operative dentistry (OD) and fixed prosthodontics (FP) courses, taken during the first and second years of dental school, respectively. Two advanced simulation exam scores (ASES1 and ASES2) were tested as predictors of performance in the two preclinical courses based on final course grades. ASES1 and ASES2 were found to be predictors of OD and FP preclinical course grades. Other advanced simulation parameters were not significantly related to grades in the preclinical courses. These results highlight the value of an early psychomotor skills assessment in dentistry. Advanced simulation scores may allow early intervention in students' learning process and assist in efficient allocation of resources such as faculty coverage and tutor assignment.

  8. Chip level simulation of fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Chip level modeling techniques, functional fault simulation, simulation software development, a more efficient, high level version of GSP, and a parallel architecture for functional simulation are discussed.

  9. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result, it is not possible for instructors to take full advantage of this equipment. Therefore, to facilitate accessibility to this tool, we have developed a realistic computer-based simulator. Using this software, students are able to practice their ability to identify the components of the original gas, thereby gaining a better understanding of the underlying physical laws. The software is available as a free download.

  10. Miller experiments in atomistic computer simulations

    PubMed Central

    Saitta, Antonino Marco; Saija, Franz

    2014-01-01

    The celebrated Miller experiments reported on the spontaneous formation of amino acids from a mixture of simple molecules reacting under an electric discharge, giving birth to the research field of prebiotic chemistry. However, the chemical reactions involved in those experiments have never been studied at the atomic level. Here we report on, to our knowledge, the first ab initio computer simulations of Miller-like experiments in the condensed phase. Our study, based on the recent method of treatment of aqueous systems under electric fields and on metadynamics analysis of chemical reactions, shows that glycine spontaneously forms from mixtures of simple molecules once an electric field is switched on and identifies formic acid and formamide as key intermediate products of the early steps of the Miller reactions, and the crucible of formation of complex biological molecules. PMID:25201948

  11. Protein Dynamics from NMR and Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Kravchenko, Olga; Kemple, Marvin; Likic, Vladimir; Klimtchuk, Elena; Prendergast, Franklyn

    2002-03-01

    Proteins exhibit internal motions from the millisecond to sub-nanosecond time scale. The challenge is to relate these internal motions to biological function. A strategy to address this aim is to apply a combination of several techniques including high-resolution NMR, computer simulation of molecular dynamics (MD), molecular graphics, and finally molecular biology, the latter to generate appropriate samples. Two difficulties that arise are: (1) the time scale which is most directly biologically relevant (ms to μs) is not readily accessible by these techniques and (2) the techniques focus on local and not collective motions. We will outline methods using ^13C-NMR to help alleviate the second problem, as applied to intestinal fatty acid binding protein, a relatively small intracellular protein believed to be involved in fatty acid transport and metabolism. This work is supported in part by PHS Grant GM34847 (FGP) and by a fellowship from the American Heart Association (QW).

  12. Ceramic matrix composite behavior -- Computational simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chamis, C.C.; Murthy, P.L.N.; Mital, S.K.

    1996-10-01

    Development of analytical modeling and computational capabilities for the prediction of high temperature ceramic matrix composite behavior has been an ongoing research activity at NASA-Lewis Research Center. These research activities have resulted in the development of micromechanics based methodologies to evaluate different aspects of ceramic matrix composite behavior. The basis of the approach is micromechanics together with a unique fiber substructuring concept. In this new concept the conventional unit cell (the smallest representative volume element of the composite) of micromechanics approach has been modified by substructuring the unit cell into several slices and developing the micromechanics based equations at the slice level. Main advantage of this technique is that it can provide a much greater detail in the response of composite behavior as compared to a conventional micromechanics based analysis and still maintains a very high computational efficiency. This methodology has recently been extended to model plain weave ceramic composites. The objective of the present paper is to describe the important features of the modeling and simulation and illustrate with select examples of laminated as well as woven composites.

  13. Experiential Learning through Computer-Based Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, Bill; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes experiential learning instructional model and simulation for student principals. Describes interactive laser videodisc simulation. Reports preliminary findings about student principal learning from simulation. Examines learning approaches by unsuccessful and successful students and learning levels of model learners. Simulation's success…

  14. Advanced sensor-computer technology for urban runoff monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byunggu; Behera, Pradeep K.; Ramirez Rochac, Juan F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the project team's advanced sensor-computer sphere technology for real-time and continuous monitoring of wastewater runoff at the sewer discharge outfalls along the receiving water. This research significantly enhances and extends the previously proposed novel sensor-computer technology. This advanced technology offers new computation models for an innovative use of the sensor-computer sphere comprising accelerometer, programmable in-situ computer, solar power, and wireless communication for real-time and online monitoring of runoff quantity. This innovation can enable more effective planning and decision-making in civil infrastructure, natural environment protection, and water pollution related emergencies. The paper presents the following: (i) the sensor-computer sphere technology; (ii) a significant enhancement to the previously proposed discrete runoff quantity model of this technology; (iii) a new continuous runoff quantity model. Our comparative study on the two distinct models is presented. Based on this study, the paper further investigates the following: (1) energy-, memory-, and communication-efficient use of the technology for runoff monitoring; (2) possible sensor extensions for runoff quality monitoring.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... check airmen must include training policies and procedures, instruction methods and techniques... and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced airplane simulators. The requirements in... Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or D training under this appendix all...

  16. Computational Modeling and Simulation of Genital Tubercle ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hypospadias is a developmental defect of urethral tube closure that has a complex etiology. Here, we describe a multicellular agent-based model of genital tubercle development that simulates urethrogenesis from the urethral plate stage to urethral tube closure in differentiating male embryos. The model, constructed in CompuCell3D, implemented spatially dynamic signals from SHH, FGF10, and androgen signaling pathways. These signals modulated stochastic cell behaviors, such as differential adhesion, cell motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Urethral tube closure was an emergent property of the model that was quantitatively dependent on SHH and FGF10 induced effects on mesenchymal proliferation and endodermal apoptosis, ultimately linked to androgen signaling. In the absence of androgenization, simulated genital tubercle development defaulted to the female condition. Intermediate phenotypes associated with partial androgen deficiency resulted in incomplete closure. Using this computer model, complex relationships between urethral tube closure defects and disruption of underlying signaling pathways could be probed theoretically in multiplex disturbance scenarios and modeled into probabilistic predictions for individual risk for hypospadias and potentially other developmental defects of the male genital tubercle. We identify the minimal molecular network that determines the outcome of male genital tubercle development in mice.

  17. Computer simulations of the mouse spermatogenic cycle.

    PubMed

    Ray, Debjit; Pitts, Philip B; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Whitmore, Leanne S; Griswold, Michael D; Ye, Ping

    2014-12-12

    The spermatogenic cycle describes the periodic development of germ cells in the testicular tissue. The temporal-spatial dynamics of the cycle highlight the unique, complex, and interdependent interaction between germ and somatic cells, and are the key to continual sperm production. Although understanding the spermatogenic cycle has important clinical relevance for male fertility and contraception, there are a number of experimental obstacles. For example, the lengthy process cannot be visualized through dynamic imaging, and the precise action of germ cells that leads to the emergence of testicular morphology remains uncharacterized. Here, we report an agent-based model that simulates the mouse spermatogenic cycle on a cross-section of the seminiferous tubule over a time scale of hours to years, while considering feedback regulation, mitotic and meiotic division, differentiation, apoptosis, and movement. The computer model is able to elaborate the germ cell dynamics in a time-lapse movie format, allowing us to trace individual cells as they change state and location. More importantly, the model provides mechanistic understanding of the fundamentals of male fertility, namely how testicular morphology and sperm production are achieved. By manipulating cellular behaviors either individually or collectively in silico, the model predicts causal events for the altered arrangement of germ cells upon genetic or environmental perturbations. This in silico platform can serve as an interactive tool to perform long-term simulation and to identify optimal approaches for infertility treatment and contraceptive development.

  18. Space Shuttle flight crew/computer interface simulation studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callihan, J. C.; Rybarczyk, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    An approach to achieving an optimized set of crew/computer interface requirements on the Space Shuttle program is described. It consists of defining the mission phases and crew timelines, developing a functional description of the crew/computer interface displays and controls software, conducting real-time simulations using pilot evaluation of the interface displays and controls, and developing a set of crew/computer functional requirements specifications. The simulator is a two-man crew station which includes three CRTs with keyboards for simulating the crew/computer interface. The programs simulate the mission phases and the flight hardware, including the flight computer and CRT displays.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  20. Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip; Selkowitz, Stephen; Wetter, Michael

    2008-07-23

    This paper presents an approach to comparing computer run time of building simulation programs. The computing run time of a simulation program depends on several key factors, including the calculation algorithm and modeling capabilities of the program, the run period, the simulation time step, the complexity of the energy models, the run control settings, and the software and hardware configurations of the computer that is used to make the simulation runs. To demonstrate the approach, simulation runs are performed for several representative DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus energy models. The computer run time of these energy models are then compared and analyzed.

  1. Engineering Fracking Fluids with Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    2015-11-01

    There are no comprehensive simulation-based tools for engineering the flows of viscoelastic fluid-particle suspensions in fully three-dimensional geometries. On the other hand, the need for such a tool in engineering applications is immense. Suspensions of rigid particles in viscoelastic fluids play key roles in many energy applications. For example, in oil drilling the ``drilling mud'' is a very viscous, viscoelastic fluid designed to shear-thin during drilling, but thicken at stoppage so that the ``cuttings'' can remain suspended. In a related application known as hydraulic fracturing suspensions of solids called ``proppant'' are used to prop open the fracture by pumping them into the well. It is well-known that particle flow and settling in a viscoelastic fluid can be quite different from that which is observed in Newtonian fluids. First, it is now well known that the ``fluid particle split'' at bifurcation cracks is controlled by fluid rheology in a manner that is not understood. Second, in Newtonian fluids, the presence of an imposed shear flow in the direction perpendicular to gravity (which we term a cross or orthogonal shear flow) has no effect on the settling of a spherical particle in Stokes flow (i.e. at vanishingly small Reynolds number). By contrast, in a non-Newtonian liquid, the complex rheological properties induce a nonlinear coupling between the sedimentation and shear flow. Recent experimental data have shown both the shear thinning and the elasticity of the suspending polymeric solutions significantly affects the fluid-particle split at bifurcations, as well as the settling rate of the solids. In the present work, we use the Immersed Boundary Method to develop computer simulations of viscoelastic flow in suspensions of spheres to study these problems. These simulations allow us to understand the detailed physical mechanisms for the remarkable physical behavior seen in practice, and actually suggest design rules for creating new fluid recipes.

  2. A Framework to Simulate Semiconductor Devices Using Parallel Computer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Singh, Mandeep; Bulusu, Anand; Trivedi, Gaurav

    2016-10-01

    Device simulations have become an integral part of semiconductor technology to address many issues (short channel effects, narrow width effects, hot-electron effect) as it goes into nano regime, helping us to continue further with the Moore's Law. TCAD provides a simulation environment to design and develop novel devices, thus a leap forward to study their electrical behaviour in advance. In this paper, a parallel 2D simulator for semiconductor devices using Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method (DG-FEM) is presented. Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is used to discretize essential device equations and later these equations are analyzed by using a suitable methodology to find the solution. DG method is characterized to provide more accurate solution as it efficiently conserve the flux and easily handles complex geometries. OpenMP is used to parallelize solution of device equations on manycore processors and a speed of 1.4x is achieved during assembly process of discretization. This study is important for more accurate analysis of novel devices (such as FinFET, GAAFET etc.) on a parallel computing platform and will help us to develop a parallel device simulator which will be able to address this issue efficiently. A case study of PN junction diode is presented to show the effectiveness of proposed approach.

  3. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  4. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  5. Computer-aided Instructional System for Transmission Line Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Erwin A.; Roth, Charles H., Jr.

    A computer-aided instructional system has been developed which utilizes dynamic computer-controlled graphic displays and which requires student interaction with a computer simulation in an instructional mode. A numerical scheme has been developed for digital simulation of a uniform, distortionless transmission line with resistive terminations and…

  6. Interactive visualization to advance earthquake simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, L.H.; Bawden, G.W.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kreylos, O.; Staadt, O.; Sumner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. For example, simulations of earthquake-related processes typically generate complex, time-varying data sets in two or more dimensions. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these data sets, evaluate the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. Virtual mapping tools allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions. Interactive tools allow us to manipulate shapes in order to construct models of geological features for geodynamic models, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulation or field observations, thereby enabling us to improve our interpretation of the dynamical processes that drive earthquakes. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool, albeit with active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. This approach also takes advantage of the specialized skills of geological scientists who are trained to interpret, the often limited, geological and geophysical data available from field observations. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  7. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics ;core simulator; based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  8. Using Computational Simulations to Confront Students' Mental Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, R.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show an example of how to use a computational simulation to obtain visual feedback for students' mental models, and compare their predictions with the simulated system's behaviour. Additionally, we use the computational simulation to incrementally modify the students' mental models in order to accommodate new data,…

  9. Computer-aided simulation study of photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaghloul, Mona E.; Rhee, Do Jun

    1989-01-01

    A computer model that simulates the response of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and the associated voltage divider circuit is developed. An equivalent circuit that approximates the operation of the device is derived and then used to develop a computer simulation of the PMT. Simulation results are presented and discussed.

  10. Simulation Credibility: Advances in Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B. (Editor); Eklund, Dean R.; Romero, Vicente J.; Pearce, Jeffrey A.; Keim, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Decision makers and other users of simulations need to know quantified simulation credibility to make simulation-based critical decisions and effectively use simulations, respectively. The credibility of a simulation is quantified by its accuracy in terms of uncertainty, and the responsibility of establishing credibility lies with the creator of the simulation. In this volume, we present some state-of-the-art philosophies, principles, and frameworks. The contributing authors involved in this publication have been dedicated to advancing simulation credibility. They detail and provide examples of key advances over the last 10 years in the processes used to quantify simulation credibility: verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification. The philosophies and assessment methods presented here are anticipated to be useful to other technical communities conducting continuum physics-based simulations; for example, issues related to the establishment of simulation credibility in the discipline of propulsion are discussed. We envision that simulation creators will find this volume very useful to guide and assist them in quantitatively conveying the credibility of their simulations.

  11. Simulation Toolkit for Renewable Energy Advanced Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Scott; Kemper, Travis; Larsen, Ross; Graf, Peter

    2013-11-13

    STREAMM is a collection of python classes and scripts that enables and eases the setup of input files and configuration files for simulations of advanced energy materials. The core STREAMM python classes provide a general framework for storing, manipulating and analyzing atomic/molecular coordinates to be used in quantum chemistry and classical molecular dynamics simulations of soft materials systems. The design focuses on enabling the interoperability of materials simulation codes such as GROMACS, LAMMPS and Gaussian.

  12. The Design and Implementation of NASA's Advanced Flight Computing Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkakaj, Leon; Straedy, Richard; Jarvis, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a working flight computer Multichip Module developed jointly by JPL and TRW under their respective research programs in a collaborative fashion. The MCM is fabricated by nCHIP and is packaged within a 2 by 4 inch Al package from Coors. This flight computer module is one of three modules under development by NASA's Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) program. Further development of the Mass Memory and the programmable I/O MCM modules will follow. The three building block modules will then be stacked into a 3D MCM configuration. The mass and volume of the flight computer MCM achieved at 89 grams and 1.5 cubic inches respectively, represent a major enabling technology for future deep space as well as commercial remote sensing applications.

  13. Projected role of advanced computational aerodynamic methods at the Lockheed-Georgia company

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Experience with advanced computational methods being used at the Lockheed-Georgia Company to aid in the evaluation and design of new and modified aircraft indicates that large and specialized computers will be needed to make advanced three-dimensional viscous aerodynamic computations practical. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility should be used to provide a tool for designing better aerospace vehicles while at the same time reducing development costs by performing computations using Navier-Stokes equations solution algorithms and permitting less sophisticated but nevertheless complex calculations to be made efficiently. Configuration definition procedures and data output formats can probably best be defined in cooperation with industry, therefore, the computer should handle many remote terminals efficiently. The capability of transferring data to and from other computers needs to be provided. Because of the significant amount of input and output associated with 3-D viscous flow calculations and because of the exceedingly fast computation speed envisioned for the computer, special attention should be paid to providing rapid, diversified, and efficient input and output.

  14. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  15. Real-time hybrid computer simulation of a small turboshaft engine and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, C. E.; Wenzel, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The development of an analytical model of a small turboshaft engine designed for helicopter propulsion systems is described. The model equations were implemented on a hybrid computer system to provide a real time nonlinear simulation of the engine performance over a wide operating range. The real time hybrid simulation of the engine was used to evaluate a microprocessor based digital control module. This digital control module was developed as part of an advanced rotorcraft control program. After tests with the hybrid engine simulation the digital control module was used to control a real engine in an experimental program. A hybrid simulation of the engine's electrical hydromechanical control system was developed. This allowed to vary the fuel flow and torque load inputs to the hybrid engine simulation for simulating transient operation. A steady-state data and the experimental tests are compared. Analytical model equations, analog computer diagrams, and a digital computer flow chart are included.

  16. A scalable parallel black oil simulator on distributed memory parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Hui; Chen, Zhangxin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents our work on developing a parallel black oil simulator for distributed memory computers based on our in-house parallel platform. The parallel simulator is designed to overcome the performance issues of common simulators that are implemented for personal computers and workstations. The finite difference method is applied to discretize the black oil model. In addition, some advanced techniques are employed to strengthen the robustness and parallel scalability of the simulator, including an inexact Newton method, matrix decoupling methods, and algebraic multigrid methods. A new multi-stage preconditioner is proposed to accelerate the solution of linear systems from the Newton methods. Numerical experiments show that our simulator is scalable and efficient, and is capable of simulating extremely large-scale black oil problems with tens of millions of grid blocks using thousands of MPI processes on parallel computers.

  17. Soft computing in design and manufacturing of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Baaklini, George Y; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The potential of fuzzy sets and neural networks, often referred to as soft computing, for aiding in all aspects of manufacturing of advanced materials like ceramics is addressed. In design and manufacturing of advanced materials, it is desirable to find which of the many processing variables contribute most to the desired properties of the material. There is also interest in real time quality control of parameters that govern material properties during processing stages. The concepts of fuzzy sets and neural networks are briefly introduced and it is shown how they can be used in the design and manufacturing processes. These two computational methods are alternatives to other methods such as the Taguchi method. The two methods are demonstrated by using data collected at NASA Lewis Research Center. Future research directions are also discussed.

  18. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  19. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  20. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations (ITAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, Mark S

    2010-02-05

    Efforts during the past year have contributed to the continued development of the ITAPS interfaces and services as well as specific efforts to support ITAPS applications. The ITAPS interface efforts have two components. The first is working with the ITAPS team on improving the ITAPS software infrastructure and level of compliance of our implementations of ITAPS interfaces (iMesh, iMeshP, iRel and iGeom). The second is being involved with the discussions on the design of the iField fields interface. Efforts to move the ITAPS technologies to petascale computers has identified a number of key technical developments that are required to effectively execute the ITAPS interfaces and services. Research to address these parallel method developments has been a major emphasis of the RPI’s team efforts over the past year. Efforts to move the ITAPS technologies to petascale computers has identified a number of key technical developments that are required to effectively execute the ITAPS interfaces and services. Research to address these parallel method developments has been a major emphasis of the RPI’s team efforts over the past year. The development of parallel unstructured mesh methods has considered the need to scale unstructured mesh solves to massively parallel computers. These efforts, summarized in section 2.1 show that with the addition of the ITAPS procedures described in sections 2.2 and 2.3 we are able to obtain excellent strong scaling with our unstructured mesh CFD code on up to 294,912 cores of IBM Blue Gene/P which is the highest core count machine available. The ITAPS developments that have contributed to the scaling and performance of PHASTA include an iterative migration algorithm to improve the combined region and vertex balance of the mesh partition, which increases scalability, and mesh data reordering, which improves computational performance. The other developments are associated with the further development of the ITAPS parallel unstructured mesh

  1. Advanced Chemical Modeling for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    combustor conditions. The resolved DNS dissipation rate is reasonably well described by the resolved component of the LES model (black solid line...our computed results with the non-linearly extrapolated burning velocities for m-xylene. 66 0 100 200 300 400 0 30 60 90 120 M ol e fr ac ...tio n [p pm ] t [ms] A1(CH3)2 x0.2 A1CH3 (a) 0 2 4 6 8 0 30 60 90 120 M ol e fr ac tio n [p pm ] t [ms] A1C2H5 (b) 0 20 40 60 80 100

  2. Computer simulation and the features of novel empirical data.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In an attempt to determine the epistemic status of computer simulation results, philosophers of science have recently explored the similarities and differences between computer simulations and experiments. One question that arises is whether and, if so, when, simulation results constitute novel empirical data. It is often supposed that computer simulation results could never be empirical or novel because simulations never interact with their targets, and cannot go beyond their programming. This paper argues against this position by examining whether, and under what conditions, the features of empiricality and novelty could be displayed by computer simulation data. I show that, to the extent that certain familiar measurement results have these features, so can some computer simulation results.

  3. Simulating granular media on the computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. J.

    Granular materials, like sand or powder, can present very intriguing effects. When shaken, sheared or poured they show segregation, convection and spontaneous fluctuations in densities and stresses. I will discuss the modeling of a granular medium on a computer by simulating a packing of elastic spheres via Molecular Dynamics. Dissipation of energy and shear friction at collisions are included. In the physical range the friction coefficient is found to be a linear function of the angle of repose. On a vibrating plate the formation of convection cells due to walls or amplitude modulations can be observed. The onset of fluidization can be determined and is in good agreement with experiments. Segregation of larger particles is found to be always accompanied by convection cells. There is also ample experimental evidence showing the existence of spontaneous density patterns in granular material flowing through pipes or hoppers. The Molecular Dynamics simulations show that these density fluctuations follow a 1/f α spectrum. I compare this behavior to deterministic one-dimensional traffic models. A model with continuous positions and velocities shows self-organized critical jamming behind a slower car. The experimentally observed effects are also reproduced by Lattice Gas and Boltzmann Lattice Models. Density waves are spontaneously generated when the viscosity has a nonlinear dependence on density which characterizes granular flow. We also briefly sketch a thermodynamic formalism for loose granular material. In a dense packing non-linear acoustic phenomena, like the pressure dependence of the sound velocity are studied. Finally the plastic shear bands occurring in large scale deformations of compactified granular media are investigated using an explicit Lagrangian technique.

  4. Computer Simulations of Quantum Theory of Hydrogen Atom for Natural Science Education Students in a Virtual Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2012-01-01

    The present article is primarily targeted for the advanced college/university undergraduate students of chemistry/physics education, computational physics/chemistry, and computer science. The most recent software system such as MS Visual Studio .NET version 2010 is employed to perform computer simulations for modeling Bohr's quantum theory of…

  5. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaolin

    2013-01-14

    Our final report on the accomplishments of ITAPS at Stony Brook during period covered by the research award includes component service, interface service and applications. On the component service, we have designed and implemented a robust functionality for the Lagrangian tracking of dynamic interface. We have migrated the hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic solver from stage-wise second order toward global second order schemes. We have implemented high order coupling between interface propagation and interior PDE solvers. On the interface service, we have constructed the FronTier application programer's interface (API) and its manual page using doxygen. We installed the FronTier functional interface to conform with the ITAPS specifications, especially the iMesh and iMeshP interfaces. On applications, we have implemented deposition and dissolution models with flow and implemented the two-reactant model for a more realistic precipitation at the pore level and its coupling with Darcy level model. We have continued our support to the study of fluid mixing problem for problems in inertial comfinement fusion. We have continued our support to the MHD model and its application to plasma liner implosion in fusion confinement. We have simulated a step in the reprocessing and separation of spent fuels from nuclear power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill and parachute simulations. We have continued our collaboration with PNNL, BNL, LANL, ORNL, and other SciDAC institutions.

  6. Advances in computational design and analysis of airbreathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of commercial and military aircraft depends, to a large extent, on engine manufacturers being able to achieve significant increases in propulsion capability through improved component aerodynamics, materials, and structures. The recent history of propulsion has been marked by efforts to develop computational techniques that can speed up the propulsion design process and produce superior designs. The availability of powerful supercomputers, such as the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator, and the potential for even higher performance offered by parallel computer architectures, have opened the door to the use of multi-dimensional simulations to study complex physical phenomena in propulsion systems that have previously defied analysis or experimental observation. An overview of several NASA Lewis research efforts is provided that are contributing toward the long-range goal of a numerical test-cell for the integrated, multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization of propulsion systems. Specific examples in Internal Computational Fluid Mechanics, Computational Structural Mechanics, Computational Materials Science, and High Performance Computing are cited and described in terms of current capabilities, technical challenges, and future research directions.

  7. Computer simulation of FCC riser reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.; Golchert, B.; Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-04-20

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, ICRKFLO, was developed to simulate the multiphase reacting flow system in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactor. The code solve flow properties based on fundamental conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy for gas, liquid, and solid phases. Useful phenomenological models were developed to represent the controlling FCC processes, including droplet dispersion and evaporation, particle-solid interactions, and interfacial heat transfer between gas, droplets, and particles. Techniques were also developed to facilitate numerical calculations. These techniques include a hybrid flow-kinetic treatment to include detailed kinetic calculations, a time-integral approach to overcome numerical stiffness problems of chemical reactions, and a sectional coupling and blocked-cell technique for handling complex geometry. The copyrighted ICRKFLO software has been validated with experimental data from pilot- and commercial-scale FCC units. The code can be used to evaluate the impacts of design and operating conditions on the production of gasoline and other oil products.

  8. Computer Simulation of Glioma Growth and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Frieboes, Hermann B.; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, S.; Zheng, X.; Macklin, Paul; Bearer, Elaine; Cristini, Vittorio

    2007-01-01

    Despite major advances in the study of glioma, the quantitative links between intra-tumor molecular/cellular properties, clinically observable properties such as morphology, and critical tumor behaviors such as growth and invasiveness remain unclear, hampering more effective coupling of tumor physical characteristics with implications for prognosis and therapy. Although molecular biology, histopathology, and radiological imaging are employed in this endeavor, studies are severely challenged by the multitude of different physical scales involved in tumor growth, i.e., from molecular nanoscale to cell microscale and finally to tissue centimeter scale. Consequently, it is often difficult to determine the underlying dynamics across dimensions. New techniques are needed to tackle these issues. Here, we address this multi-scalar problem by employing a novel predictive three-dimensional mathematical and computational model based on first-principle equations (conservation laws of physics) that describe mathematically the diffusion of cell substrates and other processes determining tumor mass growth and invasion. The model uses conserved variables to represent known determinants of glioma behavior, e.g., cell density and oxygen concentration, as well as biological functional relationships and parameters linking phenomena at different scales whose specific forms and values are hypothesized and calculated based on in-vitro and in-vivo experiments and from histopathology of tissue specimens from human gliomas. This model enables correlation of glioma morphology to tumor growth by quantifying interdependence of tumor mass on the microenvironment (e.g., hypoxia, tissue disruption) and on the cellular phenotypes (e.g., mitosis and apoptosis rates, cell adhesion strength). Once functional relationships between variables and associated parameter values have been informed, e.g. from histopathology or intra-operative analysis, this model can be used for disease diagnosis

  9. Materials by design and the exciting role of quantum computation/simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    It is now well-recognized that we are witnessing a golden age of innovation with novel materials, with discoveries important for both basic science and device applications--some of which will be treated at this Workshop. In this talk, we discuss the role of computation and simulation in the dramatic advances of the past and those we are witnessing today. We will also describe the growing acceptance and impact of computational materials science as a major component of materials research and its import for the future. In the process, we will demonstrate how the well-recognized goal driving computational physics/computational materials science--simulations of ever-increasing complexity on more and more realistic models--has been brought into greater focus with the introduction of greater computing power that is readily available to run sophisticated and powerful software codes like our highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, now also running on massively parallel computer platforms. We will then describe some specific advances we are witnessing today, and computation and simulation as a major component of quantum materials design and its import for the future, with the goal--to synthesize materials with desired properties in a controlled way via materials engineering on the atomic scale. The theory continues to develop along with computing power. With the universality and applicability of these methods to essentially all materials and properties, these simulations are starting to fill the increasingly urgent demands of material scientists and engineers.

  10. Computer Simulation Methods for Defect Configurations and Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will describe general computer simulation methods, including ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo method, and their applications to the calculations of defect configurations in various materials (metals, ceramics and oxides) and the simulations of nanoscale structures due to ion-solid interactions. The multiscale theory, modeling, and simulation techniques (both time scale and space scale) will be emphasized, and the comparisons between computer simulation results and exprimental observations will be made.

  11. Advanced Numerical methods for F. E. Simulation of Metal Forming Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenot, Jean-Loup; Bernacki, Marc; Fourment, Lionel; Ducloux, Richard

    2010-06-01

    The classical scientific basis for finite element modeling of metal forming processes is first recalled. Several developments in advanced topics are summarized: adaptive and anisotropic remeshing, parallel solving, multi material deformation. More recent researches in numerical analysis are outlined, including multi grid and multi mesh methods, mainly devoted to decrease computation time, automatic optimization method for faster and more effective design of forming processes. The link of forming simulation and structural computations is considered with emphasis on the necessity to predict the final mechanical properties. Finally a brief account of computation at the micro scale level is given.

  12. Description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, C. T.; Groom, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory model is presented. The AMCD is a momentum exchange device which is under development as an advanced control effector for spacecraft attitude control systems. The digital computer simulation of this device incorporates the following models: six degree of freedom rigid body dynamics; rim warp; controller dynamics; nonlinear distributed element axial bearings; as well as power driver and power supply current limits. An annotated FORTRAN IV source code listing of the computer program is included.

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison

    2002-04-30

    This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of our IGCC workbench. Preliminary CFD simulations for single stage and two stage ''generic'' gasifiers using firing conditions based on the Vision 21 reference configuration have been performed. Work is continuing on implementing an advanced slagging model into the CFD based gasifier model. An investigation into published gasification kinetics has highlighted a wide variance in predicted performance due to the choice of kinetic parameters. A plan has been outlined for developing the reactor models required to simulate the heat transfer and gas clean up equipment downstream of the gasifier. Three models that utilize the CCA software protocol have been integrated into a version of the IGCC workbench. Tests of a CCA implementation of our CFD code into the workbench demonstrated that the CCA CFD module can execute on a geographically remote PC (linked via the Internet) in a manner that is transparent to the user. Software tools to create ''walk-through'' visualizations of the flow field within a gasifier have been demonstrated.

  14. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  15. A stochastic model updating strategy-based improved response surface model and advanced Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xue; Fei, Cheng-Wei; Choy, Yat-Sze; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    To improve the accuracy and efficiency of computation model for complex structures, the stochastic model updating (SMU) strategy was proposed by combining the improved response surface model (IRSM) and the advanced Monte Carlo (MC) method based on experimental static test, prior information and uncertainties. Firstly, the IRSM and its mathematical model were developed with the emphasis on moving least-square method, and the advanced MC simulation method is studied based on Latin hypercube sampling method as well. And then the SMU procedure was presented with experimental static test for complex structure. The SMUs of simply-supported beam and aeroengine stator system (casings) were implemented to validate the proposed IRSM and advanced MC simulation method. The results show that (1) the SMU strategy hold high computational precision and efficiency for the SMUs of complex structural system; (2) the IRSM is demonstrated to be an effective model due to its SMU time is far less than that of traditional response surface method, which is promising to improve the computational speed and accuracy of SMU; (3) the advanced MC method observably decrease the samples from finite element simulations and the elapsed time of SMU. The efforts of this paper provide a promising SMU strategy for complex structure and enrich the theory of model updating.

  16. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-15

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics “core simulator” based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  17. Computing Environment for Adaptive Multiscale Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    Computation Research Center (SCOREC). The primary component is a parallel computing cluster with 22 Dell R620 compute nodes, each with two 8-core...cluster with 22 Dell R620 compute nodes, each with two 8-core 2.6 GHz Intel Xeon processors (352 processors) and a direct connection to both a 56Gbps...compute  cluster  purchased  with  the  DURIP  funds  consists  of  22   Dell  R620  compute  nodes,  each  with  two  8

  18. The SIMs Meet ESL Incorporating Authentic Computer Simulation Games into the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Megan; Hegelheimer, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Despite their motivational appeal to learners, innovative and technologically advanced computer simulation games targeting native English speakers frequently remain beyond the competence of ESL learners as independent didactic tools. Guided by Chapelle's (2001) criteria for determining CALL task appropriateness, this paper illustrates how the…

  19. Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

  20. Simulation of reliability in multiserver computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkevičius, Saulius

    2012-11-01

    The performance in terms of reliability of computer multiserver networks motivates this paper. The probability limit theorem is derived on the extreme queue length in open multiserver queueing networks in heavy traffic and applied to a reliability model for multiserver computer networks where we relate the time of failure of a multiserver computer network to the system parameters.

  1. Computation of the tip vortex flowfield for advanced aircraft propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Tommy M.; Dejong, Frederick J.; Levy, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    The tip vortex flowfield plays a significant role in the performance of advanced aircraft propellers. The flowfield in the tip region is complex, three-dimensional and viscous with large secondary velocities. An analysis is presented using an approximate set of equations which contains the physics required by the tip vortex flowfield, but which does not require the resources of the full Navier-Stokes equations. A computer code was developed to predict the tip vortex flowfield of advanced aircraft propellers. A grid generation package was developed to allow specification of a variety of advanced aircraft propeller shapes. Calculations of the tip vortex generation on an SR3 type blade at high Reynolds numbers were made using this code and a parametric study was performed to show the effect of tip thickness on tip vortex intensity. In addition, calculations of the tip vortex generation on a NACA 0012 type blade were made, including the flowfield downstream of the blade trailing edge. Comparison of flowfield calculations with experimental data from an F4 blade was made. A user's manual was also prepared for the computer code (NASA CR-182178).

  2. Advanced Computational Methods for Thermal Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tencer, John; Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Larsen, Marvin E.; Hogan, Roy E.

    2016-10-01

    Participating media radiation (PMR) in weapon safety calculations for abnormal thermal environments are too costly to do routinely. This cost may be s ubstantially reduced by applying reduced order modeling (ROM) techniques. The application of ROM to PMR is a new and unique approach for this class of problems. This approach was investigated by the authors and shown to provide significant reductions in the computational expense associated with typical PMR simulations. Once this technology is migrated into production heat transfer analysis codes this capability will enable the routine use of PMR heat transfer in higher - fidelity simulations of weapon resp onse in fire environments.

  3. Computer simulator for a mobile telephone system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.; Ziegler, C.

    1983-01-01

    A software simulator to help NASA in the design of the LMSS was developed. The simulator will be used to study the characteristics of implementation requirements of the LMSS's configuration with specifications as outlined by NASA.

  4. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  5. How Effective Is Instructional Support for Learning with Computer Simulations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhardt, Marc; Urhahne, Detlef; Conrad, Olaf; Harms, Ute

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effects of two different instructional interventions as support for scientific discovery learning using computer simulations. In two well-known categories of difficulty, data interpretation and self-regulation, instructional interventions for learning with computer simulations on the topic "ecosystem water" were developed…

  6. New Pedagogies on Teaching Science with Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Samia

    2011-01-01

    Teaching science with computer simulations is a complex undertaking. This case study examines how an experienced science teacher taught chemistry using computer simulations and the impact of his teaching on his students. Classroom observations over 3 semesters, teacher interviews, and student surveys were collected. The data was analyzed for (1)…

  7. Computer Simulation (Microcultures): An Effective Model for Multicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jorge O.

    This paper presents a rationale for using high-fidelity computer simulation in planning for and implementing effective multicultural education strategies. Using computer simulation, educators can begin to understand and plan for the concept of cultural sensitivity in delivering instruction. The model promises to emphasize teachers' understanding…

  8. Evaluation of Computer Simulations for Teaching Apparel Merchandising Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Laura D.; Sisler, Grovalynn

    1988-01-01

    The study developed and evaluated computer simulations for teaching apparel merchandising concepts. Evaluation results indicated that teaching method (computer simulation versus case study) does not significantly affect cognitive learning. Student attitudes varied, however, according to topic (profitable merchandising analysis versus retailing…

  9. The Role of Computer Simulations in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. R.; Pollard, D.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses role of computer simulation in complementing and extending conventional components of undergraduate engineering education process in United Kingdom universities and polytechnics. Aspects of computer-based learning are reviewed (laboratory simulation, lecture and tutorial support, inservice teacher education) with reference to programs in…

  10. Computers for real time flight simulation: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, G. A.; Karplus, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    An extensive computer market survey was made to determine those available systems suitable for current and future flight simulation studies at Ames Research Center. The primary requirement is for the computation of relatively high frequency content (5 Hz) math models representing powered lift flight vehicles. The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) was used as a benchmark vehicle for computation comparison studies. The general nature of helicopter simulations and a description of the benchmark model are presented, and some of the sources of simulation difficulties are examined. A description of various applicable computer architectures is presented, along with detailed discussions of leading candidate systems and comparisons between them.

  11. Cogeneration computer model assessment: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, L.

    1983-01-01

    Cogeneration computer simulation models to recommend the most desirable models or their components for use by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) in evaluating potential cogeneration projects was assessed. Existing cogeneration modeling capabilities are described, preferred models are identified, and an approach to the development of a code which will best satisfy SCE requirements is recommended. Five models (CELCAP, COGEN 2, CPA, DEUS, and OASIS) are recommended for further consideration.

  12. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  13. Performance Analysis of Cloud Computing Architectures Using Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, John C.; Golomb, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing offers the economic benefit of on-demand resource allocation to meet changing enterprise computing needs. However, the flexibility of cloud computing is disadvantaged when compared to traditional hosting in providing predictable application and service performance. Cloud computing relies on resource scheduling in a virtualized network-centric server environment, which makes static performance analysis infeasible. We developed a discrete event simulation model to evaluate the overall effectiveness of organizations in executing their workflow in traditional and cloud computing architectures. The two part model framework characterizes both the demand using a probability distribution for each type of service request as well as enterprise computing resource constraints. Our simulations provide quantitative analysis to design and provision computing architectures that maximize overall mission effectiveness. We share our analysis of key resource constraints in cloud computing architectures and findings on the appropriateness of cloud computing in various applications.

  14. Computational fluid dynamic study on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treated with maxillomandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Chih; Hsiao, Hung-Da; Lee, Lung-Cheng; Yao, Chih-Min; Chen, Ning-Hung; Wang, Chau-Jan; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2009-03-01

    Maxillomandibular advancement is one of the treatments available for obstructive sleep apnea. The influence of this surgery on the upper airway and its mechanism are not fully understood. The present research simulates the flow fields of narrowed upper airways of 2 patients with obstructive sleep apnea treated with maxillomandibular advancement. The geometry of the upper airway was reconstructed from computed tomographic images taken before and after surgery. The consequent three-dimensional surface model was rendered for measurement and computational fluid dynamics simulation. Patients showed clinical improvement 6 months after surgery. The cross-sectional area of the narrowest part of the upper airway was increased in all dimensions. The simulated results showed a less constricted upper airway, with less velocity change and a decreased pressure gradient across the whole conduit during passage of air. Less breathing effort is therefore expected to achieve equivalent ventilation with the postoperative airway. This study demonstrates the possibility of computational fluid dynamics in providing information for understanding the pathogenesis of OSA and the effects of its treatment.

  15. Advanced Methodology for Simulation of Complex Flows Using Structured Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David

    1995-01-01

    Detailed simulations of viscous flows in complicated geometries pose a significant challenge to current capabilities of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). To enable routine application of CFD to this class of problems, advanced methodologies are required that employ (a) automated grid generation, (b) adaptivity, (c) accurate discretizations and efficient solvers, and (d) advanced software techniques. Each of these ingredients contributes to increased accuracy, efficiency (in terms of human effort and computer time), and/or reliability of CFD software. In the long run, methodologies employing structured grid systems will remain a viable choice for routine simulation of flows in complex geometries only if genuinely automatic grid generation techniques for structured grids can be developed and if adaptivity is employed more routinely. More research in both these areas is urgently needed.

  16. Recent Advances in Computed Tomographic Technology: Cardiopulmonary Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Azadeh; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Murugan, Venkatesh; Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2017-03-01

    Cardiothoracic diseases result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Chest computed tomography (CT) has been an imaging modality of choice for assessing a host of chest diseases, and technologic advances have enabled the emergence of coronary CT angiography as a robust noninvasive test for cardiac imaging. Technologic developments in CT have also enabled the application of dual-energy CT scanning for assessing pulmonary vascular and neoplastic processes. Concerns over increasing radiation dose from CT scanning are being addressed with introduction of more dose-efficient wide-area detector arrays and iterative reconstruction techniques. This review article discusses the technologic innovations in CT and their effect on cardiothoracic applications.

  17. Coarse-grained computer simulation of dynamics in thylakoid membranes: methods and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna R.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained simulation is a powerful and well-established suite of computational methods for studying structure and dynamics in nanoscale biophysical systems. As our understanding of the plant photosynthetic apparatus has become increasingly nuanced, opportunities have arisen for coarse-grained simulation to complement experiment by testing hypotheses and making predictions. Here, we give an overview of best practices in coarse-grained simulation, with a focus on techniques and results that are applicable to the plant thylakoid membrane–protein system. We also discuss current research topics for which coarse-grained simulation has the potential to play a key role in advancing the field. PMID:24478781

  18. Efficient solid state NMR powder simulations using SMP and MPP parallel computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jørgen Holm; Farnan, Ian

    2003-04-01

    Methods for parallel simulation of solid state NMR powder spectra are presented for both shared and distributed memory parallel supercomputers. For shared memory architectures the performance of simulation programs implementing the OpenMP application programming interface is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the design of correct and efficient shared memory parallel programs is difficult as the performance depends on data locality and cache memory effects. The distributed memory parallel programming model is examined for simulation programs using the MPI message passing interface. The results reveal that both shared and distributed memory parallel computation are very efficient with an almost perfect application speedup and may be applied to the most advanced powder simulations.

  19. Case Studies in Computer Adaptive Test Design through Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eignor, Daniel R.; And Others

    The extensive computer simulation work done in developing the computer adaptive versions of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Board General Test and the College Board Admissions Testing Program (ATP) Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is described in this report. Both the GRE General and SAT computer adaptive tests (CATs), which are fixed length…

  20. Direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL)

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, C.C.; Owen, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) is presented which overcomes the traditional disadvantages of simulations executed on a digital computer. The incorporation of parallel processing allows the mapping of simulations into a digital computer to be done in the same inherently parallel manner as they are currently mapped onto an analog computer. The direct-execution format maximizes the efficiency of the executed code since the need for a high level language compiler is eliminated. Resolution is greatly increased over that which is available with an analog computer without the sacrifice in execution speed normally expected with digitial computer simulations. Although this report covers all aspects of the new architecture, key emphasis is placed on the processing element configuration and the microprogramming of the ACLS constructs. The execution times for all ACLS constructs are computed using a model of a processing element based on the AMD 29000 CPU and the AMD 29027 FPU. The increase in execution speed provided by parallel processing is exemplified by comparing the derived execution times of two ACSL programs with the execution times for the same programs executed on a similar sequential architecture.

  1. A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Chester C.; Owen, Jeffrey E.

    1988-01-01

    A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) is presented which overcomes the traditional disadvantages of simulations executed on a digital computer. The incorporation of parallel processing allows the mapping of simulations into a digital computer to be done in the same inherently parallel manner as they are currently mapped onto an analog computer. The direct-execution format maximizes the efficiency of the executed code since the need for a high level language compiler is eliminated. Resolution is greatly increased over that which is available with an analog computer without the sacrifice in execution speed normally expected with digitial computer simulations. Although this report covers all aspects of the new architecture, key emphasis is placed on the processing element configuration and the microprogramming of the ACLS constructs. The execution times for all ACLS constructs are computed using a model of a processing element based on the AMD 29000 CPU and the AMD 29027 FPU. The increase in execution speed provided by parallel processing is exemplified by comparing the derived execution times of two ACSL programs with the execution times for the same programs executed on a similar sequential architecture.

  2. Computational Efforts in Support of Advanced Coal Research

    SciTech Connect

    Suljo Linic

    2006-08-17

    The focus in this project was to employ first principles computational methods to study the underlying molecular elementary processes that govern hydrogen diffusion through Pd membranes as well as the elementary processes that govern the CO- and S-poisoning of these membranes. Our computational methodology integrated a multiscale hierarchical modeling approach, wherein a molecular understanding of the interactions between various species is gained from ab-initio quantum chemical Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, while a mesoscopic statistical mechanical model like Kinetic Monte Carlo is employed to predict the key macroscopic membrane properties such as permeability. The key developments are: (1) We have coupled systematically the ab initio calculations with Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to model hydrogen diffusion through the Pd based-membranes. The predicted tracer diffusivity of hydrogen atoms through the bulk of Pd lattice from KMC simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments. (2) The KMC simulations of dissociative adsorption of H{sub 2} over Pd(111) surface indicates that for thin membranes (less than 10{micro} thick), the diffusion of hydrogen from surface to the first subsurface layer is rate limiting. (3) Sulfur poisons the Pd surface by altering the electronic structure of the Pd atoms in the vicinity of the S atom. The KMC simulations indicate that increasing sulfur coverage drastically reduces the hydrogen coverage on the Pd surface and hence the driving force for diffusion through the membrane.

  3. Interactive Electronic Circuit Simulation on Small Computer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    this is the most effective way of completing a computer-aided engineering design cycle. Compar- isons of the interactive versus batch simulation...run on almost any computer system with few if any modifications. Also included are the four benchmark test circuits which were used in many of the...the ensuing FORTRAN version. 2.2 Circuit Simulation Using BIAS-D (BASIC Version) Any circuit-simulation program can be di- vided into three

  4. Computational methods of the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Parker, F.R.; Berthier, J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Schmuck, P.; Goutagny, L.; Ichikawa, S.; Ninokata, H.; Luck, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    To more accurately treat severe accidents in fast reactors, a program has been set up to investigate new computational models and approaches. The product of this effort is a computer code, the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM). This paper describes some of the basic features of the numerical algorithm used in AFDM. Aspects receiving particular emphasis are the fractional-step method of time integration, the semi-implicit pressure iteration, the virtual mass inertial terms, the use of three velocity fields, higher order differencing, convection of interfacial area with source and sink terms, multicomponent diffusion processes in heat and mass transfer, the SESAME equation of state, and vectorized programming. A calculated comparison with an isothermal tetralin/ammonia experiment is performed. We conclude that significant improvements are possible in reliably calculating the progression of severe accidents with further development.

  5. Computer simulation of the scaled power bipolar SHF transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelayev, V. V.; Efremov, V. A.; Snitovsky, Yu. P.

    2007-04-01

    New advanced technology for creation of the npn power silicon bipolar SHF transistor structure is proposed. Preferences of the advanced technology in comparison with standard technology are demonstrated. Simulation of both technology flows was performed with emphasis on scaling of the discussed device structure.

  6. Implications of advanced collision operators for gyrokinetic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we explore both the potential improvements and pitfalls that arise when using advanced collision models in gyrokinetic simulations of plasma microinstabilities. Comparisons are made between the simple-but-standard electron Lorentz operator and specific variations of the advanced Sugama operator. The Sugama operator describes multi-species collisions including energy diffusion, momentum and energy conservation terms, and is valid for arbitrary wavelength. We report scans over collision frequency for both low and high {k}θ {ρ }s modes, with relevance for multiscale simulations that couple ion and electron scale physics. The influence of the ion–ion collision terms—not retained in the electron Lorentz model—on the damping of zonal flows is also explored. Collision frequency scans for linear and nonlinear simulations of ion-temperature-gradient instabilities including impurity ions are presented. Finally, implications for modeling turbulence in the highly collisional edge are discussed.

  7. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  8. Advances on modelling of ITER scenarios: physics and computational challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2011-12-01

    Methods and tools for design and modelling of tokamak operation scenarios are discussed with particular application to ITER advanced scenarios. Simulations of hybrid and steady-state scenarios performed with the integrated tokamak modelling suite of codes CRONOS are presented. The advantages of a possible steady-state scenario based on cyclic operations, alternating phases of positive and negative loop voltage, with no magnetic flux consumption on average, are discussed. For regimes in which current alignment is an issue, a general method for scenario design is presented, based on the characteristics of the poloidal current density profile.

  9. Creating Science Simulations through Computational Thinking Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basawapatna, Ashok Ram

    2012-01-01

    Computational thinking aims to outline fundamental skills from computer science that everyone should learn. As currently defined, with help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), these skills include problem formulation, logically organizing data, automating solutions through algorithmic thinking, and representing data through abstraction.…

  10. Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) Laboratory: Simulation Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayat, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The simulation process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the CEM Laboratory. The Simulation Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their engineering personnel in simulation planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the simulation process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, facility interfaces, and inputs necessary to define scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  11. A Review of Computer Simulations in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Elizabeth Gates; Kendall, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    Computer simulations can provide guided practice for a variety of situations that pre-service teachers would not frequently experience during their teacher education studies. Pre-service teachers can use simulations to turn the knowledge they have gained in their coursework into real experience. Teacher simulation training has come a long way over…

  12. Computer Simulations as an Integral Part of Intermediate Macroeconomics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millerd, Frank W.; Robertson, Alastair R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the development of two interactive computer simulations which were fully integrated with other course materials. The simulations illustrate the effects of various real and monetary "demand shocks" on aggregate income, interest rates, and components of spending and economic output. Includes an evaluation of the simulations'…

  13. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  14. Genetic crossing vs cloning by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.

    1997-06-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna`s bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  15. Spatial Learning and Computer Simulations in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Robb; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Interactive simulations are entering mainstream science education. Their effects on cognition and learning are often framed by the legacy of information processing, which emphasized amodal problem solving and conceptual organization. In contrast, this paper reviews simulations from the vantage of research on perception and spatial learning,…

  16. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Henry; Ma, Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47× speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed. This work was presented in part at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Philadelphia, PA.

  17. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Henry; Ma, Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47× speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed.

  18. Computer formulations of aircraft models for simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Recent developments in formula manipulation compilers and the design of several symbol manipulation languages, enable computers to be used for symbolic mathematical computation. A computer system and language that can be used to perform symbolic manipulations in an interactive mode are used to formulate a mathematical model of an aeronautical system. The example demonstrates that once the procedure is established, the formulation and modification of models for simulation studies can be reduced to a series of routine computer operations.

  19. Radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation using cloud computing technology.

    PubMed

    Poole, C M; Cornelius, I; Trapp, J V; Langton, C M

    2012-12-01

    Cloud computing allows for vast computational resources to be leveraged quickly and easily in bursts as and when required. Here we describe a technique that allows for Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculations to be performed using GEANT4 and executed in the cloud, with relative simulation cost and completion time evaluated as a function of machine count. As expected, simulation completion time decreases as 1/n for n parallel machines, and relative simulation cost is found to be optimal where n is a factor of the total simulation time in hours. Using the technique, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of cloud computing as a solution for rapid Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation without the need for dedicated local computer hardware as a proof of principal.

  20. Methodology of modeling and measuring computer architectures for plasma simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. P. T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction to plasma simulation using computers and the difficulties on currently available computers is given. Through the use of an analyzing and measuring methodology - SARA, the control flow and data flow of a particle simulation model REM2-1/2D are exemplified. After recursive refinements the total execution time may be greatly shortened and a fully parallel data flow can be obtained. From this data flow, a matched computer architecture or organization could be configured to achieve the computation bound of an application problem. A sequential type simulation model, an array/pipeline type simulation model, and a fully parallel simulation model of a code REM2-1/2D are proposed and analyzed. This methodology can be applied to other application problems which have implicitly parallel nature.

  1. Computer-Based Simulation for Man-Computer System Design,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    simulations to Investigate huwan factors and crew size (2). The experiment design was a three- problem posed by man omputer interactions in proposed ...hesrighat of t the reflected in iess flying ties, fewer Instances of high Lto are carfger The lD haud tlo desilt itr wihthe speed chis,* and hence, reduced

  2. In-silico simulations of advanced drug delivery systems: what will the future offer?

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Juergen

    2013-09-15

    This commentary enlarges on some of the topics addressed in the Position Paper "Towards more effective advanced drug delivery systems" by Crommelin and Florence (2013). Inter alia, the role of mathematical modeling and computer-assisted device design is briefly addressed in the Position Paper. This emerging and particularly promising field is considered in more depth in this commentary. In fact, in-silico simulations have become of fundamental importance in numerous scientific and related domains, allowing for a better understanding of various phenomena and for facilitated device design. The development of novel prototypes of space shuttles, nuclear power plants and automobiles are just a few examples. In-silico simulations are nowadays also well established in the field of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) and have become an integral part of the discovery and development process of novel drug products. Since Takeru Higuchi published his seminal equation in 1961 the use of mathematical models for the analysis and optimization of drug delivery systems in vitro has also become more and more popular. However, applying in-silico simulations for facilitated optimization of advanced drug delivery systems is not yet common practice. One of the reasons is the gap between in vitro and in vivo (PK/PD) simulations. In the future it can be expected that this gap will be closed and that computer assisted device design will play a central role in the research on, and development of advanced drug delivery systems.

  3. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Subcommittee (ASCAC) Report: Top Ten Exascale Research Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Robert; Ang, James; Bergman, Keren; Borkar, Shekhar; Carlson, William; Carrington, Laura; Chiu, George; Colwell, Robert; Dally, William; Dongarra, Jack; Geist, Al; Haring, Rud; Hittinger, Jeffrey; Hoisie, Adolfy; Klein, Dean Micron; Kogge, Peter; Lethin, Richard; Sarkar, Vivek; Schreiber, Robert; Shalf, John; Sterling, Thomas; Stevens, Rick; Bashor, Jon; Brightwell, Ron; Coteus, Paul; Debenedictus, Erik; Hiller, Jon; Kim, K. H.; Langston, Harper; Murphy, Richard Micron; Webster, Clayton; Wild, Stefan; Grider, Gary; Ross, Rob; Leyffer, Sven; Laros III, James

    2014-02-10

    Exascale computing systems are essential for the scientific fields that will transform the 21st century global economy, including energy, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and materials science. Progress in these fields is predicated on the ability to perform advanced scientific and engineering simulations, and analyze the deluge of data. On July 29, 2013, ASCAC was charged by Patricia Dehmer, the Acting Director of the Office of Science, to assemble a subcommittee to provide advice on exascale computing. This subcommittee was directed to return a list of no more than ten technical approaches (hardware and software) that will enable the development of a system that achieves the Department's goals for exascale computing. Numerous reports over the past few years have documented the technical challenges and the non¬-viability of simply scaling existing computer designs to reach exascale. The technical challenges revolve around energy consumption, memory performance, resilience, extreme concurrency, and big data. Drawing from these reports and more recent experience, this ASCAC subcommittee has identified the top ten computing technology advancements that are critical to making a capable, economically viable, exascale system.

  4. High Fidelity Simulation of a Computer Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Jasim; Chan, William; Chaderjian, Neal; Pandya, Shishir

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Columbia supercomputer and the mesh technology used to test the adequacy of the fluid and cooling of a computer room. A technical description of the Columbia supercomputer is also presented along with its performance capability.

  5. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Zumao Chen; Mike Maguire; Adel Sarofim; Changguan Yang; Hong-Shig Shim

    2004-01-28

    This is the thirteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a Virtual Engineering-based framework for simulating the performance of Advanced Power Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on all aspects of the project. Software development efforts have focused on a preliminary detailed software design for the enhanced framework. Given the complexity of the individual software tools from each team (i.e., Reaction Engineering International, Carnegie Mellon University, Iowa State University), a robust, extensible design is required for the success of the project. In addition to achieving a preliminary software design, significant progress has been made on several development tasks for the program. These include: (1) the enhancement of the controller user interface to support detachment from the Computational Engine and support for multiple computer platforms, (2) modification of the Iowa State University interface-to-kernel communication mechanisms to meet the requirements of the new software design, (3) decoupling of the Carnegie Mellon University computational models from their parent IECM (Integrated Environmental Control Model) user interface for integration with the new framework and (4) development of a new CORBA-based model interfacing specification. A benchmarking exercise to compare process and CFD based models for entrained flow gasifiers was completed. A summary of our work on intrinsic kinetics for modeling coal gasification has been completed. Plans for implementing soot and tar models into our entrained flow gasifier models are outlined. Plans for implementing a model for mercury capture based on conventional capture technology, but applied to an IGCC system, are outlined.

  6. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  8. Some theoretical issues on computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Reidys, C.M.

    1998-02-01

    The subject of this paper is the development of mathematical foundations for a theory of simulation. Sequentially updated cellular automata (sCA) over arbitrary graphs are employed as a paradigmatic framework. In the development of the theory, the authors focus on the properties of causal dependencies among local mappings in a simulation. The main object of and study is the mapping between a graph representing the dependencies among entities of a simulation and a representing the equivalence classes of systems obtained by all possible updates.

  9. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel; Berzins, Martin; Pennington, Robert; Sarkar, Vivek; Taylor, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    On November 19, 2014, the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged with reviewing the Department of Energy’s conceptual design for the Exascale Computing Initiative (ECI). In particular, this included assessing whether there are significant gaps in the ECI plan or areas that need to be given priority or extra management attention. Given the breadth and depth of previous reviews of the technical challenges inherent in exascale system design and deployment, the subcommittee focused its assessment on organizational and management issues, considering technical issues only as they informed organizational or management priorities and structures. This report presents the observations and recommendations of the subcommittee.

  10. Computer simulation results of attitude estimation of earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kou, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    Computer simulation results of attitude estimation of Earth-orbiting satellites (including Space Telescope) subjected to environmental disturbances and noises are presented. Decomposed linear recursive filter and Kalman filter were used as estimation tools. Six programs were developed for this simulation, and all were written in the basic language and were run on HP 9830A and HP 9866A computers. Simulation results show that a decomposed linear recursive filter is accurate in estimation and fast in response time. Furthermore, for higher order systems, this filter has computational advantages (i.e., less integration errors and roundoff errors) over a Kalman filter.

  11. Computer Simulation Performed for Columbia Project Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Jasim

    2005-01-01

    This demo shows a high-fidelity simulation of the air flow in the main computer room housing the Columbia (10,024 intel titanium processors) system. The simulation asseses the performance of the cooling system and identified deficiencies, and recommended modifications to eliminate them. It used two in house software packages on NAS supercomputers: Chimera Grid tools to generate a geometric model of the computer room, OVERFLOW-2 code for fluid and thermal simulation. This state-of-the-art technology can be easily extended to provide a general capability for air flow analyses on any modern computer room. Columbia_CFD_black.tiff

  12. Implementation of a blade element UH-60 helicopter simulation on a parallel computer architecture in real-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxon, Bruce C.; Green, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-performance platform for development of real-time helicopter flight simulations based on a simulation development and analysis platform combining a parallel simulation development and analysis environment with a scalable multiprocessor computer system is described. Simulation functional decomposition is covered, including the sequencing and data dependency of simulation modules and simulation functional mapping to multiple processors. The multiprocessor-based implementation of a blade-element simulation of the UH-60 helicopter is presented, and a prototype developed for a TC2000 computer is generalized in order to arrive at a portable multiprocessor software architecture. It is pointed out that the proposed approach coupled with a pilot's station creates a setting in which simulation engineers, computer scientists, and pilots can work together in the design and evaluation of advanced real-time helicopter simulations.

  13. Super-computer simulation for galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yipeng

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations are widely used in the studies of galaxy formation. Here we briefly review their important role in the galaxy formation research, their relations with analytical models, and their limitations as well. Then a progress report is given about our collaboration with a group in the University of Tokyo, including the simulation samples we have obtained, some of the results we have published, and the joint projects which are in progress.

  14. Computer simulation of water reclamation processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Hightower, T. M.; Flynn, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    The development of detailed simulation models of water reclamation processors based on the ASPEN PLUS simulation program is discussed. Individual models have been developed for vapor compression distillation, vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal, and supercritical water oxidation. These models are used for predicting the process behavior. Particular attention is given to methodology which is used to complete this work, and the insights which are gained by this type of model development.

  15. NASA Trapezoidal Wing Computations Including Transition and Advanced Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing is computed with several turbulence models by using grids from the first High Lift Prediction Workshop in an effort to advance understanding of computational fluid dynamics modeling for this type of flowfield. Transition is accounted for in many of the computations. In particular, a recently-developed 4-equation transition model is utilized and works well overall. Accounting for transition tends to increase lift and decrease moment, which improves the agreement with experiment. Upper surface flap separation is reduced, and agreement with experimental surface pressures and velocity profiles is improved. The predicted shape of wakes from upstream elements is strongly influenced by grid resolution in regions above the main and flap elements. Turbulence model enhancements to account for rotation and curvature have the general effect of increasing lift and improving the resolution of the wing tip vortex as it convects downstream. However, none of the models improve the prediction of surface pressures near the wing tip, where more grid resolution is needed.

  16. Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Ng, Brenda; Eslick, John

    2014-01-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

  17. Integration of Advanced Simulation and Visualization for Manufacturing Process Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chenn; Wang, Jichao; Tang, Guangwu; Moreland, John; Fu, Dong; Wu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The integration of simulation and visualization can provide a cost-effective tool for process optimization, design, scale-up and troubleshooting. The Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation (CIVS) at Purdue University Northwest has developed methodologies for such integration with applications in various manufacturing processes. The methodologies have proven to be useful for virtual design and virtual training to provide solutions addressing issues on energy, environment, productivity, safety, and quality in steel and other industries. In collaboration with its industrial partnerships, CIVS has provided solutions to companies, saving over US38 million. CIVS is currently working with the steel industry to establish an industry-led Steel Manufacturing Simulation and Visualization Consortium through the support of National Institute of Standards and Technology AMTech Planning Grant. The consortium focuses on supporting development and implementation of simulation and visualization technologies to advance steel manufacturing across the value chain.

  18. Simulation Neurotechnologies for Advancing Brain Research: Parallelizing Large Networks in NEURON.

    PubMed

    Lytton, William W; Seidenstein, Alexandra H; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; McDougal, Robert A; Schürmann, Felix; Hines, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    Large multiscale neuronal network simulations are of increasing value as more big data are gathered about brain wiring and organization under the auspices of a current major research initiative, such as Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies. The development of these models requires new simulation technologies. We describe here the current use of the NEURON simulator with message passing interface (MPI) for simulation in the domain of moderately large networks on commonly available high-performance computers (HPCs). We discuss the basic layout of such simulations, including the methods of simulation setup, the run-time spike-passing paradigm, and postsimulation data storage and data management approaches. Using the Neuroscience Gateway, a portal for computational neuroscience that provides access to large HPCs, we benchmark simulations of neuronal networks of different sizes (500-100,000 cells), and using different numbers of nodes (1-256). We compare three types of networks, composed of either Izhikevich integrate-and-fire neurons (I&F), single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) cells, or a hybrid network with half of each. Results show simulation run time increased approximately linearly with network size and decreased almost linearly with the number of nodes. Networks with I&F neurons were faster than HH networks, although differences were small since all tested cells were point neurons with a single compartment.

  19. Biocellion: accelerating computer simulation of multicellular biological system models

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seunghwa; Kahan, Simon; McDermott, Jason; Flann, Nicholas; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological system behaviors are often the outcome of complex interactions among a large number of cells and their biotic and abiotic environment. Computational biologists attempt to understand, predict and manipulate biological system behavior through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Discrete agent-based modeling (in combination with high-resolution grids to model the extracellular environment) is a popular approach for building biological system models. However, the computational complexity of this approach forces computational biologists to resort to coarser resolution approaches to simulate large biological systems. High-performance parallel computers have the potential to address the computing challenge, but writing efficient software for parallel computers is difficult and time-consuming. Results: We have developed Biocellion, a high-performance software framework, to solve this computing challenge using parallel computers. To support a wide range of multicellular biological system models, Biocellion asks users to provide their model specifics by filling the function body of pre-defined model routines. Using Biocellion, modelers without parallel computing expertise can efficiently exploit parallel computers with less effort than writing sequential programs from scratch. We simulate cell sorting, microbial patterning and a bacterial system in soil aggregate as case studies. Availability and implementation: Biocellion runs on x86 compatible systems with the 64 bit Linux operating system and is freely available for academic use. Visit http://biocellion.com for additional information. Contact: seunghwa.kang@pnnl.gov PMID:25064572

  20. Computer simulation of current voltage response of electrocatalytic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Piotr; Jasinski, Grzegorz; Chachulski, Bogdan; Nowakowski, Antoni

    2003-09-01

    In the present paper, results of computer simulation of cyclic voltammetry applied to electrocatalytic solid state sensor are presented. The computer software developed by D.Gosser is based on explicit finite difference method. The software is devoted for the simulation of cyclic voltammetry experiments in liquid electrochemistry. However the software is based on general electrochemical rules and may be used for simulation of experiments in solid state electrochemistry. The electrocatalytic sensor does not have a reference electrode and therefore it is necessary to employ virtual reference electrode into the model of the sensor. Data obtained from simulation are similar to measurement one what confirms correctness of assumed sensing mechanism.

  1. Two inviscid computational simulations of separated flow about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Two inviscid computational simulations of separated flow about airfoils are described. The basic computational method is the line relaxation finite-difference method. Viscous separation is approximated with inviscid free-streamline separation. The point of separation is specified, and the pressure in the separation region is calculated. In the first simulation, the empiricism of constant pressure in the separation region is employed. This empiricism is easier to implement with the present method than with singularity methods. In the second simulation, acoustic theory is used to determine the pressure in the separation region. The results of both simulations are compared with experiment.

  2. Icing simulation: A survey of computer models and experimental facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the current methods for simulation of the response of an aircraft or aircraft subsystem to an icing encounter is presented. The topics discussed include a computer code modeling of aircraft icing and performance degradation, an evaluation of experimental facility simulation capabilities, and ice protection system evaluation tests in simulated icing conditions. Current research focussed on upgrading simulation fidelity of both experimental and computational methods is discussed. The need for increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice accretion, ice shedding, and iced airfoil aerodynamics is examined.

  3. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for

  4. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  5. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interaction with Extended MHD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; Abla, Gheni; D'Azevedo, Ed F; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, R; Breslau, Joshua; Chance, M.; Chen, J.; Choi, M.; Elwasif, Wael R; Foley, S.; Fu, GuoYong; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Jenkins, T; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott; Ku, Long-Poe; Lynch, Vickie E; McCune, Douglas; Ramos, J.; Schissel, D.; Schnack,; Wright, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: 1) recent improvements to the IPS, 2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, 3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamk discharges using IPS facilities, and 4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  6. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interactions with Extended MHD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, Randall B; Breslau, Joshua; Elwasif, Wael R; Foley, S.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott E; Ku, Long-Poe; McCune, Douglas; Ramos, J.; Schissel, David P; Schnack, Dalton D

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: (1) recent improvements to the IPS, (2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, (3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamak discharges using IPS facilities, and (4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  7. Computer simulator for a mobile telephone system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    A software simulator was developed to assist NASA in the design of the land mobile satellite service. Structured programming techniques were used by developing the algorithm using an ALCOL-like pseudo language and then encoding the algorithm into FORTRAN 4. The basic input data to the system is a sine wave signal although future plans call for actual sampled voice as the input signal. The simulator is capable of studying all the possible combinations of types and modes of calls through the use of five communication scenarios: single hop systems; double hop, signal gateway system; double hop, double gateway system; mobile to wireline system; and wireline to mobile system. The transmitter, fading channel, and interference source simulation are also discussed.

  8. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  9. An Exercise in Biometrical Genetics Based on a Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an exercise in biometrical genetics based on the noninteractive use of a computer simulation of a wheat hydridization program. Advantages of using the material in this way are also discussed. (Author/JN)

  10. Tutorial: Parallel Computing of Simulation Models for Risk Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Allison C; Staid, Andrea; Gao, Michael; Guikema, Seth D

    2016-10-01

    Simulation models are widely used in risk analysis to study the effects of uncertainties on outcomes of interest in complex problems. Often, these models are computationally complex and time consuming to run. This latter point may be at odds with time-sensitive evaluations or may limit the number of parameters that are considered. In this article, we give an introductory tutorial focused on parallelizing simulation code to better leverage modern computing hardware, enabling risk analysts to better utilize simulation-based methods for quantifying uncertainty in practice. This article is aimed primarily at risk analysts who use simulation methods but do not yet utilize parallelization to decrease the computational burden of these models. The discussion is focused on conceptual aspects of embarrassingly parallel computer code and software considerations. Two complementary examples are shown using the languages MATLAB and R. A brief discussion of hardware considerations is located in the Appendix.

  11. MINEXP, A Computer-Simulated Mineral Exploration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This computer simulation is designed to put students into a realistic decision making situation in mineral exploration. This program can be used with different exploration situations such as ore deposits, petroleum, ground water, etc. (MR)

  12. A Computing Cluster for Numerical Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-23

    34Contact and Friction for Cloth Animation", SIGGRAPH 2002, ACM TOG 21, 594-603 (2002). "* [BHTF] Bao, Z., Hong, J.-M., Teran , J. and Fedkiw, R...Simulation of Large Bodies of Water by Coupling Two and Three Dimensional Techniques", SIGGRAPH 2006, ACM TOG 25, 805-811 (2006). "* [ITF] Irving, G., Teran ...O’Brien (2006) "* [TSBNLF] Teran , J., Sifakis, E., Blemker, S., Ng Thow Hing, V., Lau, C. and Fedkiw, R., "Creating and Simulating Skeletal Muscle from the

  13. Computational Simulation of Explosively Generated Pulsed Power Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION OF EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED PULSED POWER DEVICES THESIS Mollie C. Drumm, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENY-13-M-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENY-13-M-11 COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION OF EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED PULSED POWER DEVICES THESIS Presented to the...OF EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED PULSED POWER DEVICES Mollie C. Drumm, BS Captain, USAF Approved: Dr. Robert B. Greendyke (Chairman) Date Capt. David Liu

  14. Computer Simulations of Canada’s RADARSAT2 GMTI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010837 TITLE: Computer Simulations of Canada’s RADARSAT2 GMTI...ADPO10842 UNCLASSIFIED 45-1 Computer Simulations of Canada’s RADARSAT2 GMTI Shen Chiu and Chuck Livingstone Space Systems and Technology Section, Defence...Associates Ltd. 13800 Commerce Parkway, Richmond, B.C., Canada V6V 2J3 Abstract The detection probability and the estimation accuracy Canada’s RADARSAT2

  15. GATE Monte Carlo simulation in a cloud computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowedder, Blake Austin

    The GEANT4-based GATE is a unique and powerful Monte Carlo (MC) platform, which provides a single code library allowing the simulation of specific medical physics applications, e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, radiotherapy, and hadron therapy. However, this rigorous yet flexible platform is used only sparingly in the clinic due to its lengthy calculation time. By accessing the powerful computational resources of a cloud computing environment, GATE's runtime can be significantly reduced to clinically feasible levels without the sizable investment of a local high performance cluster. This study investigated a reliable and efficient execution of GATE MC simulations using a commercial cloud computing services. Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud was used to launch several nodes equipped with GATE. Job data was initially broken up on the local computer, then uploaded to the worker nodes on the cloud. The results were automatically downloaded and aggregated on the local computer for display and analysis. Five simulations were repeated for every cluster size between 1 and 20 nodes. Ultimately, increasing cluster size resulted in a decrease in calculation time that could be expressed with an inverse power model. Comparing the benchmark results to the published values and error margins indicated that the simulation results were not affected by the cluster size and thus that integrity of a calculation is preserved in a cloud computing environment. The runtime of a 53 minute long simulation was decreased to 3.11 minutes when run on a 20-node cluster. The ability to improve the speed of simulation suggests that fast MC simulations are viable for imaging and radiotherapy applications. With high power computing continuing to lower in price and accessibility, implementing Monte Carlo techniques with cloud computing for clinical applications will continue to become more attractive.

  16. High performance parallel computers for science: New developments at the Fermilab advanced computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Edel, M.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.

    1988-08-01

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing highly cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 MFlops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Advanced information processing system: Inter-computer communication services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Masotto, Tom; Sims, J. Terry; Whittredge, Roy; Alger, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to document the functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Inter-Computer Communications Services (ICCS) of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS). An introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS and to present an overview of the ICCS. An overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a brief description of the AIPS software is given. The guarantees of the ICCS are provided, and the ICCS is described as a seven-layered International Standards Organization (ISO) Model. The ICCS functional requirements, functional design, and detailed specifications as well as each layer of the ICCS are also described. A summary of results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  18. Understanding Islamist political violence through computational social simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Jennifer H; Mackerrow, Edward P; Patelli, Paolo G; Eberhardt, Ariane; Stradling, Seth G

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the process that enables political violence is of great value in reducing the future demand for and support of violent opposition groups. Methods are needed that allow alternative scenarios and counterfactuals to be scientifically researched. Computational social simulation shows promise in developing 'computer experiments' that would be unfeasible or unethical in the real world. Additionally, the process of modeling and simulation reveals and challenges assumptions that may not be noted in theories, exposes areas where data is not available, and provides a rigorous, repeatable, and transparent framework for analyzing the complex dynamics of political violence. This paper demonstrates the computational modeling process using two simulation techniques: system dynamics and agent-based modeling. The benefits and drawbacks of both techniques are discussed. In developing these social simulations, we discovered that the social science concepts and theories needed to accurately simulate the associated psychological and social phenomena were lacking.

  19. Computer simulation of gamma-ray spectra from semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Jim C.; Olschner, Fred; Shah, Kanai S.

    1992-12-01

    Traditionally, researchers developing improved gamma ray detectors have used analytical techniques or, rarely, computer simulations to predict the performance of new detectors. However, with the advent of inexpensive personal computers, it is now possible for virtually all detector researchers to perform some form of numerical computation to predict detector performance. Although general purpose code systems for semiconductor detector performance do not yet exist, it is possible to perform many useful calculations using commercially available, general purpose numerical software packages (such as `spreadsheet' programs intended for business use). With a knowledge of the rudimentary mechanics of detector simulation most researchers, including those with no programming skills, can effectively use numerical simulation methods to predict gamma ray detector performance. In this paper we discuss the details of the numerical simulation of gamma ray detectors with the hope of communicating the simplicity and effectiveness of these methods. In particular, we discuss the steps involved in simulating the pulse height spectrum produced by a semiconductor detector.

  20. Computer Simulation of Classic Studies in Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Drake R.

    This paper describes DATASIM, a comprehensive software package which generates simulated data for actual or hypothetical research designs. DATASIM is primarily intended for use in statistics and research methods courses, where it is used to generate "individualized" datasets for students to analyze, and later to correct their answers.…

  1. Bodies Falling with Air Resistance: Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Floyd

    1982-01-01

    Two models are presented. The first assumes that air resistance is proportional to the velocity of the falling body. The second assumes that air resistance is proportional to the square of the velocity. A program written in BASIC that simulates the second model is presented. (MP)

  2. The Forward Observer Personal Computer Simulator (FOPCSIM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Environment (DVTE) (CD-ROM). Produced by Andy Jackson through the Combat Visual Information Center, Marine Corps Base, Quantico, Virginia. 19 Dylan ...part of VIRTE’s forward observer training simulation. 20 LCDR Dylan Schmorrow (USN), Virtual...load the conversion data. There are software applications available to rapidly generate terrain from satellite images such as the Evans and

  3. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  4. Simulation, computing, information, and future warfare

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1993-07-01

    To fully exploit the capabilities that will become possible through the integration of all of these advances, a laboratory has to have a strong, fundamental position in each of them. To foresee the new capabilities possible, it is necessary to be able to think quantitatively and creatively all the way from the technologies for precision to the unthinkable to nuclear deterrence in an amorphous world. By a combination of foresight and luck, Los Almos has such a combination, and is committed to remain on the forefront of the technologies that define the competitive advantage of the US military and the industries that stand behind it.

  5. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  6. Launch Site Computer Simulation and its Application to Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sham, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of computer simulation, the Lockheed developed STS Processing Model, and the application of computer simulation to a wide range of processes. The STS Processing Model is an icon driven model that uses commercial off the shelf software and a Macintosh personal computer. While it usually takes one year to process and launch 8 space shuttles, with the STS Processing Model this process is computer simulated in about 5 minutes. Facilities, orbiters, or ground support equipment can be added or deleted and the impact on launch rate, facility utilization, or other factors measured as desired. This same computer simulation technology can be used to simulate manufacturing, engineering, commercial, or business processes. The technology does not require an 'army' of software engineers to develop and operate, but instead can be used by the layman with only a minimal amount of training. Instead of making changes to a process and realizing the results after the fact, with computer simulation, changes can be made and processes perfected before they are implemented.

  7. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  8. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations on SIMD computer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Burmester, C.P.; Gronsky, R.; Wille, L.T.

    1992-03-01

    Algorithmic considerations regarding the implementation of various materials science applications of the Monte Carlo technique to single instruction multiple data (SMM) computer architectures are presented. In particular, implementation of the Ising model with nearest, next nearest, and long range screened Coulomb interactions on the SIMD architecture MasPar MP-1 (DEC mpp-12000) series of massively parallel computers is demonstrated. Methods of code development which optimize processor array use and minimize inter-processor communication are presented including lattice partitioning and the use of processor array spanning tree structures for data reduction. Both geometric and algorithmic parallel approaches are utilized. Benchmarks in terms of Monte Carlo updates per second for the MasPar architecture are presented and compared to values reported in the literature from comparable studies on other architectures.

  10. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  11. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science: Annual Report October 1998 through September 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. ARC has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, ARC is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA ARC and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to

  12. COFLO: A Computer Aid for Teaching Ecological Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le vow, Roy B.

    A computer-assisted course was designed to provide students with an understanding of modeling and simulation techniques in quantitiative ecology. It deals with continuous systems and has two segments. One develops mathematical and computer tools, beginning with abstract systems and their relation to physical systems. Modeling principles are next…

  13. Application Of Computer Simulation To The Entertainment Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelman, Phillip S.

    1983-10-01

    Images generated by computer have started to appear in feature films (TRON, Star Trek II), in television commercials and in animated films. Of particular interest is the use of computer generated imagery which simulates the images which a real camera might have made if the imaged objects had been real.

  14. Use of Computer Simulations in Microbial and Molecular Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes five computer programs: four simulations of genetic and physical mapping experiments and one interactive learning program on the genetic coding mechanism. The programs were originally written in BASIC for the VAX-11/750 V.3. mainframe computer and have been translated into Applesoft BASIC for Apple IIe microcomputers. (JN)

  15. Evaluation of a Computer Simulation in a Therapeutics Case Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkade, Raenel E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A computer program was used to simulate a case presentation in pharmacotherapeutics. Students (n=24) used their knowledge of the disease (glaucoma) and various topical agents on the computer program's formulary to "treat" the patient. Comparison of results with a control group found the method as effective as traditional case…

  16. Cardiovascular Physiology Teaching: Computer Simulations vs. Animal Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samsel, Richard W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    At the introductory level, the computer provides an effective alternative to using animals for laboratory teaching. Computer software can simulate the operation of multiple organ systems. Advantages of software include alteration of variables that are not easily changed in vivo, repeated interventions, and cost-effective hands-on student access.…

  17. Teaching Macroeconomics with a Computer Simulation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolbear, F. Trenery, Jr.

    The study of macroeconomics--the determination and control of aggregative variables such as gross national product, unemployment and inflation--may be facilitated by the use of a computer simulation policy game. An aggregative model of the economy was constructed and programed for a computer and (hypothetical) historical data were generated. The…

  18. Coached, Interactive Computer Simulations: A New Technology for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    This paper provides an overview of a prototype simulation-centered intelligent computer-based training (CBT) system--implemented using expert system technology--which provides: (1) an environment in which trainees can learn and practice complex skills; (2) a computer-based coach or mentor to critique performance, suggest improvements, and provide…

  19. Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation Issues on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; White, Jeffery A.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of physical models for gas chemistry and turbulence from the structured grid codes LAURA and VULCAN into the unstructured grid code FUN3D is described. A directionally Symmetric, Total Variation Diminishing (STVD) algorithm and an entropy fix (eigenvalue limiter) keyed to local cell Reynolds number are introduced to improve solution quality for hypersonic aeroheating applications. A simple grid-adaptation procedure is incorporated within the flow solver. Simulations of flow over an ellipsoid (perfect gas, inviscid), Shuttle Orbiter (viscous, chemical nonequilibrium) and comparisons to the structured grid solvers LAURA (cylinder, Shuttle Orbiter) and VULCAN (flat plate) are presented to show current capabilities. The quality of heating in 3D stagnation regions is very sensitive to algorithm options in general, high aspect ratio tetrahedral elements complicate the simulation of high Reynolds number, viscous flow as compared to locally structured meshes aligned with the flow.

  20. Phase diagram of silica from computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco; Grande, Tor; Poole, Peter H.

    2004-12-01

    We evaluate the phase diagram of the “BKS” potential [van Beest, Kramer, and van Santen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)], a model of silica widely used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We conduct MD simulations of the liquid, and three crystals ( β -quartz, coesite, and stishovite) over wide ranges of temperature and density, and evaluate the total Gibbs free energy of each phase. The phase boundaries are determined by the intersection of these free energy surfaces. Not unexpectedly for a classical pair potential, our results reveal quantitative discrepancies between the locations of the BKS and real silica phase boundaries. At the same time, we find that the topology of the real phase diagram is reproduced, confirming that the BKS model provides a satisfactory qualitative description of a silicalike material. We also compare the phase boundaries with the locations of liquid-state thermodynamic anomalies identified in previous studies of the BKS model.

  1. Computer simulation of surface and film processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A molecular dynamics technique based upon Lennard-Jones type pair interactions is used to investigate time-dependent as well as equilibrium properties. The case study deals with systems containing Si and O atoms. In this case a more involved potential energy function (PEF) is employed and the system is simulated via a Monte-Carlo procedure. This furnishes the equilibrium properties of the system at its interfaces and surfaces as well as in the bulk.

  2. A Computer Simulation of Braitenberg Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    and that have the ability to adapt their behavior , using a learning algorithm developed by Teuvo Kohonen. The vehicle designer is free to select...learning algorithm, adapting behavior to improve food finding-performance. The initial evaluations failed to provide convincing proof that the simple...m m m | m | l | m i Preface The purpose of this effort was to simulate simple, biological learning behavior using an artificial neural network to

  3. Computer Simulation of Shipboard Electrical Distribution Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    variable. If used properly, the Euler Backward method for integrating differential equations approaches the same solution. Fast modes can also be...synchronous machines as well as other elements of a power network. EMTP handles stiff systems by using the Euler Backward method for integration. In general...simulations - 29 - however, there are three methods that work well. The f’irst is the Euler Forward method which is considered an explicit technique since it

  4. Computational Simulation of High Energy Density Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-30

    flow. NumerEx used MACH2 to simulate the flow using compressible, inviscid hydrodynamics with the SESAME equations of state . The depth of the...Figure 1 shows the liner state versus the radius of a collapsing 10 cm tall lithium liner driven by an RLC circuit model of Shiva Star. This work...the coaxial gun section, and Figure 4 shows the physical state of the plasma just prior to pinch. Figure 5 shows neutron yield reaching 1014 in this

  5. Computer simulation of a geomagnetic substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, J. G.; Brecht, S. H.; Huba, J. D.; Fedder, J. A.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    A global two-dimensional simulation of a substormlike process occurring in earth's magnetosphere is presented. The results are consistent with an empirical substorm model - the neutral-line model. Specifically, the introduction of a southward interplanetary magnetic field forms an open magnetosphere. Subsequently, a substorm neutral line forms at about 15 earth radii or closer in the magnetotail, and plasma sheet thinning and plasma acceleration occur. Eventually the substorm neutral line moves tailward toward its presubstorm position.

  6. On the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony; Yau, Christopher; Giles, Michael B.; Doucet, Arnaud; Holmes, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a case-study on the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods. Graphics cards, containing multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are self-contained parallel computational devices that can be housed in conventional desktop and laptop computers and can be thought of as prototypes of the next generation of many-core processors. For certain classes of population-based Monte Carlo algorithms they offer massively parallel simulation, with the added advantage over conventional distributed multi-core processors that they are cheap, easily accessible, easy to maintain, easy to code, dedicated local devices with low power consumption. On a canonical set of stochastic simulation examples including population-based Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and Sequential Monte Carlo methods, we nd speedups from 35 to 500 fold over conventional single-threaded computer code. Our findings suggest that GPUs have the potential to facilitate the growth of statistical modelling into complex data rich domains through the availability of cheap and accessible many-core computation. We believe the speedup we observe should motivate wider use of parallelizable simulation methods and greater methodological attention to their design. PMID:22003276

  7. On the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony; Yau, Christopher; Giles, Michael B; Doucet, Arnaud; Holmes, Christopher C

    2010-12-01

    We present a case-study on the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods. Graphics cards, containing multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are self-contained parallel computational devices that can be housed in conventional desktop and laptop computers and can be thought of as prototypes of the next generation of many-core processors. For certain classes of population-based Monte Carlo algorithms they offer massively parallel simulation, with the added advantage over conventional distributed multi-core processors that they are cheap, easily accessible, easy to maintain, easy to code, dedicated local devices with low power consumption. On a canonical set of stochastic simulation examples including population-based Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and Sequential Monte Carlo methods, we nd speedups from 35 to 500 fold over conventional single-threaded computer code. Our findings suggest that GPUs have the potential to facilitate the growth of statistical modelling into complex data rich domains through the availability of cheap and accessible many-core computation. We believe the speedup we observe should motivate wider use of parallelizable simulation methods and greater methodological attention to their design.

  8. Using advanced computer vision algorithms on small mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, G.; Birchmore, F.; Biagtan Pacis, E.; Everett, H. R.

    2006-05-01

    The Technology Transfer project employs a spiral development process to enhance the functionality and autonomy of mobile robot systems in the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) Robotic Systems Pool by converging existing component technologies onto a transition platform for optimization. An example of this approach is the implementation of advanced computer vision algorithms on small mobile robots. We demonstrate the implementation and testing of the following two algorithms useful on mobile robots: 1) object classification using a boosted Cascade of classifiers trained with the Adaboost training algorithm, and 2) human presence detection from a moving platform. Object classification is performed with an Adaboost training system developed at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Computer Vision Lab. This classification algorithm has been used to successfully detect the license plates of automobiles in motion in real-time. While working towards a solution to increase the robustness of this system to perform generic object recognition, this paper demonstrates an extension to this application by detecting soda cans in a cluttered indoor environment. The human presence detection from a moving platform system uses a data fusion algorithm which combines results from a scanning laser and a thermal imager. The system is able to detect the presence of humans while both the humans and the robot are moving simultaneously. In both systems, the two aforementioned algorithms were implemented on embedded hardware and optimized for use in real-time. Test results are shown for a variety of environments.

  9. Advances in the computational study of language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brent, M R

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a tutorial introduction to computational studies of how children learn their native languages. Its aim is to make recent advances accessible to the broader research community, and to place them in the context of current theoretical issues. The first section locates computational studies and behavioral studies within a common theoretical framework. The next two sections review two papers that appear in this volume: one on learning the meanings of words and one or learning the sounds of words. The following section highlights an idea which emerges independently in these two papers and which I have dubbed autonomous bootstrapping. Classical bootstrapping hypotheses propose that children begin to get a toc-hold in a particular linguistic domain, such as syntax, by exploiting information from another domain, such as semantics. Autonomous bootstrapping complements the cross-domain acquisition strategies of classical bootstrapping with strategies that apply within a single domain. Autonomous bootstrapping strategies work by representing partial and/or uncertain linguistic knowledge and using it to analyze the input. The next two sections review two more more contributions to this special issue: one on learning word meanings via selectional preferences and one on algorithms for setting grammatical parameters. The final section suggests directions for future research.

  10. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  11. Effectiveness of an Endodontic Diagnosis Computer Simulation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Ashraf F.; Burleson, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    Effectiveness of a computer simulation to teach endodontic diagnosis was assessed using three groups (n=34,32,24) of dental students. All were lectured on diagnosis, pathology, and radiographic interpretation. One group then used the simulation, another had a seminar on the same material, and the third group had no further instruction. Results…

  12. The Design, Development, and Evaluation of an Evaluative Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Lisa R.

    This paper discusses evaluation design considerations for a computer based evaluation simulation developed at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Cardiology to assess the diagnostic skills of primary care physicians and medical students. The simulation developed allows for the assessment of diagnostic skills of physicians in the…

  13. Computer Simulation of Incomplete-Data Interpretation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Douglas Frederick

    1987-01-01

    Described is a computer simulation that was used to help general education students enrolled in a large introductory geology course. The purpose of the simulation is to learn to interpret incomplete data. Students design a plan to collect bathymetric data for an area of the ocean. Procedures used by the students and instructor are included.…

  14. Investigating the Effectiveness of Computer Simulations for Chemistry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; Milne, Catherine; Homer, Bruce D.; Schwartz, Ruth N.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Jordan, Trace; Verkuilen, Jay; Ng, Florrie; Wang, Yan; Barrientos, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Are well-designed computer simulations an effective tool to support student understanding of complex concepts in chemistry when integrated into high school science classrooms? We investigated scaling up the use of a sequence of simulations of kinetic molecular theory and associated topics of diffusion, gas laws, and phase change, which we designed…

  15. Computer Simulation of Laboratory Experiments: An Unrealized Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magin, D. J.; Reizes, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the use of computer simulation for laboratory experiments in undergraduate engineering education focuses on work at the University of New South Wales in the instructional design and software development of a package simulating a heat exchange device. The importance of integrating theory, design, and experimentation is also discussed.…

  16. Design Model for Learner-Centered, Computer-Based Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Chandra L.; Duffy, Thomas M.

    This paper presents a model for designing computer-based simulation environments within a constructivist framework for the K-12 school setting. The following primary criteria for the development of simulations are proposed: (1) the problem needs to be authentic; (2) the cognitive demand in learning should be authentic; (3) scaffolding supports a…

  17. Computer Simulation of the Population Growth (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe) Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Michael; Hillier, Douglas

    1981-01-01

    Describes a computer program (available from authors) developed to simulate "Growth of a Population (Yeast) Experiment." Students actively revise the counting techniques with realistically simulated haemocytometer or eye-piece grid and are reminded of the necessary dilution technique. Program can be modified to introduce such variables…

  18. Simulation of Robot Kinematics Using Interactive Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leu, M. C.; Mahajan, R.

    1984-01-01

    Development of a robot simulation program based on geometric transformation softwares available in most computer graphics systems and program features are described. The program can be extended to simulate robots coordinating with external devices (such as tools, fixtures, conveyors) using geometric transformations to describe the…

  19. Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lixing; Shirey, Don; Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Sharma, Chandan; Lawrie, Linda; Strand, Rick; Pedersen, Curt; Fisher, Dan; Lee, Edwin; Witte, Mike; Glazer, Jason; Barnaby, Chip

    2011-09-30

    EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly

  20. Advanced simulation study on bunch gap transient effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Akai, Kazunori

    2016-06-01

    Bunch phase shift along the train due to a bunch gap transient is a concern in high-current colliders. In KEKB operation, the measured phase shift along the train agreed well with a simulation and a simple analytical form in most part of the train. However, a rapid phase change was observed at the leading part of the train, which was not predicted by the simulation or by the analytical form. In order to understand the cause of this observation, we have developed an advanced simulation, which treats the transient loading in each of the cavities of the three-cavity system of the accelerator resonantly coupled with energy storage (ARES) instead of the equivalent single cavities used in the previous simulation, operating in the accelerating mode. In this paper, we show that the new simulation reproduces the observation, and clarify that the rapid phase change at the leading part of the train is caused by a transient loading in the three-cavity system of ARES. KEKB is being upgraded to SuperKEKB, which is aiming at 40 times higher luminosity than KEKB. The gap transient in SuperKEKB is investigated using the new simulation, and the result shows that the rapid phase change at the leading part of the train is much larger due to higher beam currents. We will also present measures to mitigate possible luminosity reduction or beam performance deterioration due to the rapid phase change caused by the gap transient.