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Sample records for advanced cooling techniques

  1. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  2. Advanced regenerative-cooling techniques for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.; Shoji, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A review of regenerative-cooling techniques applicable to advanced planned engine designs for space booster and orbit transportation systems has developed the status of the key elements of this cooling mode. This work is presented in terms of gas side, coolant side, wall conduction heat transfer, and chamber life fatigue margin considerations. Described are preliminary heat transfer and trade analyses performed using developed techniques combining channel wall construction with advanced, high-strength, high-thermal-conductivity materials (NARloy-Z or Zr-Cu alloys) in high heat flux regions, combined with lightweight steel tubular nozzle wall construction. Advanced cooling techniques such as oxygen cooling and dual-mode hydrocarbon/hydrogen fuel operation and their limitations are indicated for the regenerative cooling approach.

  3. Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

  4. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  5. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  6. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  7. Development of low-cost test techniques for advancing film cooling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soechting, F. O.; Landis, K. K.; Dobrowolski, R.

    1987-06-01

    A program for studying advanced film hole geometries that will provide improved film effectiveness levels relative to those reported in the literature is described. A planar wind tunnel was used to conduct flow visualization studies on different film hole shapes, followed by film effectiveness measurements. The most promising geometries were then tested in a two-dimensional cascade to define the film effectiveness distributions, while duplicating a turbine airfoil curvature, Mach number, and acceleration characteristics. The test techniques are assessed and typical results are presented. It was shown that smoke flow visualization is an excellent low-cost technique for observing film coolant-to-mainstream characteristics and that reusable liquid crystal sheets provide an accurate low-cost technique for measuring near-hole film effectiveness contours. Cascade airfoils constructed using specially developed precision fabrication techniques provided high-quality film effectiveness data.

  8. Development of heat transfer enhancement techniques for external cooling of an advanced reactor vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    Nucleate boiling is a well-recognized means for passively removing high heat loads (up to ˜106 W/m2) generated by a molten reactor core under severe accident conditions while maintaining relatively low reactor vessel temperature (<800 °C). With the upgrade and development of advanced power reactors, however, enhancing the nucleate boiling rate and its upper limit, Critical Heat Flux (CHF), becomes the key to the success of external passive cooling of reactor vessel undergoing core disrupture accidents. In the present study, two boiling heat transfer enhancement methods have been proposed, experimentally investigated and theoretically modelled. The first method involves the use of a suitable surface coating to enhance downward-facing boiling rate and CHF limit so as to substantially increase the possibility of reactor vessel surviving high thermal load attack. The second method involves the use of an enhanced vessel/insulation design to facilitate the process of steam venting through the annular channel formed between the reactor vessel and the insulation structure, which in turn would further enhance both the boiling rate and CHF limit. Among the various available surface coating techniques, metallic micro-porous layer surface coating has been identified as an appropriate coating material for use in External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) based on the overall consideration of enhanced performance, durability, the ease of manufacturing and application. Since no previous research work had explored the feasibility of applying such a metallic micro-porous layer surface coating on a large, downward facing and curved surface such as the bottom head of a reactor vessel, a series of characterization tests and experiments were performed in the present study to determine a suitable coating material composition and application method. Using the optimized metallic micro-porous surface coatings, quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were conducted in the Sub

  9. Advanced cooling techniques for high-pressure hydrocarbon-fueled engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The regenerative cooling limits (maximum chamber pressure) for 02/hydrocarbon gas generator and staged combustion cycle rocket engines over a thrust range of 89,000 N (20,000lbf) to 2,669,000 N (600,000 lbf) for a reusable life of 250 missions were defined. Maximum chamber pressure limits were first determined for the three propellant combinations (O2/CH4, O2/C3H8, and O2/RP-1 without a carbon layer (unenhanced designs). Chamber pressure cooling enhancement limits were then established for seven thermal barriers. The thermal barriers evaluated for these designs were: carbon layer, ceramic coating, graphite liner, film cooling, transpiration cooling, zoned combustion, and a combination of two of the above. All fluid barriers were assessed a 3 percent performance loss. Sensitivity studies were then conducted to determine the influence of cycle life and RP-1 decomposition temperature on chamber pressure limits. Chamber and nozzle design parameters are presented for the unenahanced and enhanced designs. The maximum regenerative cooled chamber pressure limits were attained with the O2/CH4 propellant combination. The O2/RP-1 designs relied on a carbon layer and liquid gas injection chamber contours, short chamber, to be competitive with the other two propellant combinations. This was attributed to the low decomposition temperature of RP-1.

  10. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Jorge

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available nondestructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burnup and cooling time of the fuel elements on-site at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal, the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements nondestructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed were used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results, it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however, in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator, a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  11. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  12. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective is to provide turbine-cooling technologies to meet Propulsion 21 goals related to engine fuel burn, emissions, safety, and reliability. Specifically, the GE Aviation (GEA) Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program seeks to develop advanced cooling and flow distribution methods for HP turbines, while achieving a substantial reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. Enhanced cooling techniques, such as fluidic devices, controlled-vortex cooling, and directed impingement jets, offer the opportunity to incorporate both active and passive schemes. Coolant heat transfer enhancement also can be achieved from advanced designs that incorporate multi-disciplinary optimization of external film and internal cooling passage geometry.

  13. Theory, technology, and technique of stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1993-10-01

    The theory and technological implementation of stochastic cooling is described. Theoretical and technological limitations are discussed. Data from existing stochastic cooling systems are shown to illustrate some useful techniques.

  14. Advance in MEIC cooling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong; Derbenev, Ya.; Douglas, D.; Hutton, A.; Kimber, A.; Li, R.; Nissen, E.; Tennant,; Zhang, H.

    2013-06-01

    Cooling of ion beams is essential for achieving a high luminosity for MEIC at Jefferson Lab. In this paper, we present the design concept of the electron cooling system for MEIC. In the design, two facilities are required for supporting a multi-staged cooling scheme; one is a 2 MeV DC cooler in the ion pre-booster; the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) ERL-circulator cooler in the collider ring. The simulation studies of beam dynamics in an ERL-circulator cooler are summarized and followed by a report on technology development for this cooler. We also discuss two proposed experiments for demonstrating high energy cooling with a bunched electron beam and the ERL-circulator cooler.

  15. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  16. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both. PMID:27043177

  17. An infrared technique for evaluating turbine airfoil cooling designs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, P.C.; Rhodes, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental approach is used to evaluate turbine airfoil cooling designs for advanced gas turbine engine applications by incorporating double-wall film-cooled design features into large-scale flat plate specimens. An infrared (IR) imaging system is used to make detailed, two-dimensional steady-state measurements of flat plate surface temperature with spatial resolution on the order of 0.4 mm. The technique employs a cooled zinc selenide window transparent to infrared radiation and calibrates the IR temperature readings to reference thermocouples embedded in each specimen, yielding a surface temperature measurement accuracy of {+-} 4 C. With minimal thermocouple installation required, the flat plate/IR approach is cost effective, essentially nonintrusive, and produces abundant results quickly. Design concepts can proceed from art to part to data in a manner consistent with aggressive development schedules. The infrared technique is demonstrated here by considering the effect of film hole injection angle for a staggered array of film cooling holes integrated with a highly effective internal cooling pattern. Heated free stream air and room temperature cooling air are used to produce a nominal temperature ratio of 2 over a range of blowing ratios from 0.7 to 1.5. Results were obtained at hole angles of 90 and 30 deg for two different hole spacings and are presented in terms of overall cooling effectiveness.

  18. Advanced Communication Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, Robert A.

    This document contains the proceedings of the workshop Advanced Communication Processing Techniques, held May 14 to 17, 1989, near Ruidoso, New Mexico. Sponsored by the Army Research Office (under Contract DAAL03-89-G-0016) and organized by the Communication Sciences Institute of the University of Southern California, the workshop had as its objective to determine those applications of intelligent/adaptive communication signal processing that have been realized and to define areas of future research. We at the Communication Sciences Institute believe that there are two emerging areas which deserve considerably more study in the near future: (1) Modulation characterization, i.e., the automation of modulation format recognition so that a receiver can reliably demodulate a signal without using a priori information concerning the signal's structure, and (2) the incorporation of adaptive coding into communication links and networks. (Encoders and decoders which can operate with a wide variety of codes exist, but the way to utilize and control them in links and networks is an issue). To support these two new interest areas, one must have both a knowledge of (3) the kinds of channels and environments in which the systems must operate, and of (4) the latest adaptive equalization techniques which might be employed in these efforts.

  19. Recent advances in cooled-semen technology.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Christine

    2008-09-01

    The majority of horse registries approve the use of artificial insemination, and horse breeding has widely taken benefit from the use of cooled-stored semen. New insights into cooled-semen technology open possibilities to reduce problems such as impaired semen quality after cooled-storage in individual stallions. The stallion itself has major impacts on quality and fertility of cooled-stored semen. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids improves semen quality in a variety of species, but only few studies on this topic exist in the horse. Proper semen collection and handling is the main key to the maintenance of semen quality during cooled-storage. Semen collection should be achieved by minimal sexual stimulation with a single mount; this results in high sperm concentration, low content of seminal plasma and minimal contamination with bacteria. Milk-based semen extenders are most popular for semen processing and storage. The development of more defined extenders containing only the beneficial milk ingredients has made extender quality more constant and reliable. Semen is often centrifuged to decrease the seminal plasma content. Centrifugation results in a recovery rate of only 75% of spermatozoa in the semen pellet. Recovery rates after centrifugation may be improved with use of a "cushion technique" allowing higher centrifugation force and duration. However, this is not routinely used in cooled-semen technology. After slow-cooling, semen-storage and shipping is best performed at 5 degrees C, maintaining semen motility, membrane integrity and DNA integrity for up to 40 h after collection. Shipping containers created from Styrofoam boxes provide maintenance of semen quality at low cost.

  20. Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Paul C. W.

    2004-01-01

    The research at Houston was focused on optimizing the design of superconducting magnets for advanced adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs), assessing the feasibility of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets in ADRs in the future, and developing techniques to deposit HTS thin and thick films on high strength, low thermal conductivity substrates for HTS magnet leads. Several approaches have been tested for the suggested superconducting magnets.

  1. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  2. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators. PMID:27484295

  3. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  4. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  5. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  6. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ``builds in`` the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ``process capability`` is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co{sup 60} gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe`s Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  7. Advanced qualification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winokur, P. S.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Fleetwood, D. M.

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML 'builds in' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish 'process capability' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  8. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ''builds in'' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structure-to-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ''process capability'' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-kev x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ''process capability'' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co[sup 60] gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SCC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  9. Advanced qualification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winokur, P. S.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Fleetwood, D. M.

    1994-06-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML 'builds in' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structure-to-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish 'process capability' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SCC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  10. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program is to develop intelligent control and distribution methods for turbine cooling, while achieving a reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. The program also will develop embedded sensor technologies and cooling system models for real-time engine diagnostics and health management. Both active and passive control strategies will be investigated that include the capability of intelligent modulation of flow quantities, pressures, and temperatures both within the supply system and at the turbine component level. Thermal management system concepts were studied, with a goal of reducing HPT blade cooling air supply temperature. An assessment will be made of the use of this air by the active clearance control system as well. Turbine component cooling designs incorporating advanced, high-effectiveness cooling features, will be evaluated. Turbine cooling flow control concepts will be studied at the cooling system level and the component level. Specific cooling features or sub-elements of an advanced HPT blade cooling design will be downselected for core fabrication and casting demonstrations.

  11. Techniques in Advanced Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    For ease of presentation, advanced grammar teaching techniques are briefly considered under the headings of structuralism (belief in the effectiveness of presenting grammar rules) and contextualism (belief in the maximum use by students of what they know in the target language). The structuralist's problem of establishing a syllabus is discussed…

  12. Advanced Cooling Technology, Inc. final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.S.

    1993-08-12

    Tasks performed to develop an improved version of Advanced Cooling Technology`s Evaporative Subcooling System are described. Work on pump stability, improved drainage mechanism, and the American Refrigeration Institute engineering performance tests is presented.

  13. High-pressure propulsion - advanced concepts for cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerman, Leonard

    The state-of-the-art liquid propellant cooled combustion chambers utilized in the space shuttle are third-generation designs which have evolved from a continuing demand for higher operating pressure and aircraft-type reusability. History has shown that major advances in cooling occur in approximately ten-year cycles, with each cycle providing a nominal 400% increase in operating pressure and/or a higher degree of reusability. The previous technologies include the first-generation double-wall steel jackets used in the 220 psi V-2 and Aerobee, and the second generation wire-wrapped double tapered tubular assemblies typical of the 800 psi Titan I, II, and III, and 1000 psi F-1 engines. The third-generation designs utilize milled slot, high thermal conductivity liners and electrodeposited nickel closures. The space shuttle main engine operating at 3200 psia is adequate for individual flights; however, the desired goal of 55 service-free missions has yet to be realized. Future single-stage-to-orbit propulsion concepts can benefit from a further increase in operating pressures to 6000 to 10,000 psi combined with engine reuse capabilities in excess of the 55 flight goals of the space shuttle. A fourth-generation approach will be required to attain these more ambitious goals. These new designs will require a combination of cooling processes, including regenerative and transpiration, combined with improved high-temperature materials and new fabrication techniques. The limitations of the third-generation designs, the impact of propellant/coolant selection, and the approaches for the coming fourth-generation cooling technologies are discussed.

  14. Post-exercise cooling techniques in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Barwood, Martin James; Davey, Sarah; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    Major sporting events are often held in hot and humid environmental conditions. Cooling techniques have been used to reduce the risk of heat illness following exercise. This study compared the efficacy of five cooling techniques, hand immersion (HI), whole body fanning (WBF), an air cooled garment (ACG), a liquid cooled garment (LCG) and a phase change garment (PCG), against a natural cooling control condition (CON) over two periods between and following exercise bouts in 31 degrees C, 70%RH air. Nine males [age 22 (3) years; height 1.80 (0.04) m; mass 69.80 (7.10) kg] exercised on a treadmill at a maximal sustainable work intensity until rectal temperature (T (re)) reached 38.5 degrees C following which they underwent a resting recovery (0-15 min; COOL 1). They then recommenced exercise until T (re) again reached 38.5 degrees C and then undertook 30 min of cooling with (0-15 min; COOL 2A), and without face fanning (15-30 min; COOL 2B). Based on mean body temperature changes (COOL 1), WBF was most effective in extracting heat: CON 99 W; WBF: 235 W; PCG: 141 W; HI: 162 W; ACG: 101 W; LCG: 49 W) as a consequence of evaporating more sweat. Therefore, WBF represents a cheap and practical means of post-exercise cooling in hot, humid conditions in a sporting setting.

  15. Alternative technique for laser cooling with superradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2011-01-15

    We present a theoretical scheme for laser cooling of rare-earth-doped solids with optical superradiance (SR), which is the coherent, sharply directed spontaneous emission of photons by a system of laser-excited rare-earth ions in the solid-state host (glass or crystal). We consider an Yb{sup +}-doped ZnF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF (ZBLAN) sample pumped at a wavelength 1015 nm, with a rectangular pulsed source with a power of {approx}433 W and a duration of 10 ns. The intensity of the SR is proportional to the square of the number of excited ions. This unique feature of SR permits an increase in the rate of the cooling process in comparison with the traditional laser cooling of the rare-earth-doped solids with anti-Stokes spontaneous incoherent radiation (fluorescence). This scheme overcomes the limitation of using only low phonon energy glasses for laser cooling.

  16. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool stars edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    ASTRAL is a project to create high-resolution, high-S/N UV (1150-3200 Å) atlases of bright stars utilizing {HST}/STIS. During Cycle 18 (2010-2011), eight cool star targets were observed, including key objects like Procyon and Betelgeuse, churning through 146 orbits in the process. The new spectral atlases are publically available through the project website. Data were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  17. Advances in wound debridement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Dead and devitalised tissue interferes with the process of wound healing. Debridement is a natural process that occurs in all wounds and is crucial to healing; it reduces the bacterial burden in a wound and promotes effective inflammatory responses that encourage the formation of healthy granulation tissue (Wolcott et al, 2009). Wound care should be part of holistic patient care. Recent advances in debridement techniques include: biosurgery, hydrosurgery, mechanical debridement, and ultrasound. Biosurgery and mechanical debridement can be practiced by nonspecialist nurses and can be provided in a patient's home, thus increasing the patient's access to debridement therapy and accelerating wound healing.

  18. Rapid cooling techniques in joggers experiencing heat strain.

    PubMed

    Clapp, A J; Bishop, P A; Muir, I; Walker, J L

    2001-06-01

    This study examined subjects that exercised on three occasions in a heated environment (WBGT = 39 degrees C] until they experienced heat strain. Since morbidity and mortality due to heat injury increase with the duration of elevated core temperature, it is important that techniques to lower core temperature be evaluated. Following three exercise sessions, subjects underwent each of three core cooling treatments in random order: 1) Torso immersion in cool water, 2) Hands and feet immersion in cool water, and 3) Sit-in-shade with a 1.5mph breeze provided. Subjects (n=5) consistently reached peak rectal temperatures of 38.8 (+/-0.1) degrees C following each exercise bout in the heated environment. Torso immersion produced a significantly (p<0.05) greater rate of decline in rectal temperature (0.25+/-0.10 degrees C/min) than the hands and feet immersion technique (0.16+/-0.05 degrees C/min) and the sit in the shade technique (0.11+/-0.04 degrees C/min). After only 10 minutes of cooling, the differences among cooling techniques were evident. Similar trends were observed for mean heart rate readings, albeit not significant (p>0.05). It was concluded that rectal temperatures can be reduced rapidly through the use of a cool water torso-immersion technique. PMID:11548915

  19. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Co-Investigators, ASTRAL

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 18 (2010-2011) Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet echelle spectra of bright stars utilizing the high-performance Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). In Cycle 18, ASTRAL focuses on eight iconic late-type objects -- all well-known bright stars with vaguely unpronounceable names like Procyon and Betelgeuse -- and will devote 146 HST orbits for the purpose. The objective is to record each of the targets with broad uninterrupted UV coverage (1150-3100 Angstroms) at the highest signal-to-noise and highest spectral resolution achievable within the available spacecraft time, and given a variety of observing constraints. The broad ultraviolet coverage will be achieved by splicing together echellegrams taken in multiple FUV and NUV prime echelle settings of STIS. The observing strategy was designed to maximize S/N, ensure accurate wavelength scales, and preserve the radiometric level of the UV spectral energy distribution. This is a progress report on the observational status of ASTRAL. Up-to-date information can be found at the project website:http://casa.colorado.edu/ ayres/ASTRAL/. Supported by grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by AURA for NASA.

  20. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading edge cooling using heat pipe, transpiration and film cooling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlin, James Michael

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes using a combination of liquid metal heat pipes and surface mass transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite difference based hypersonic leading edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading edge section. The hypersonic leading edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat pipe model. Two applications of the hypersonic leading edge cooling model were examined. An assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section exposed to a severe laminar, hypersonic aerodynamic surface heat flux was studied. A second application of the hypersonic leading edge cooling model was conducted on an assumed one-quarter inch nose diameter SCRAMJET engine inlet leading edge section exposed to both a transient laminar, hypersonic aerodynamic surface heat flux and a type 4 shock interference surface heat flux. The investigation led to the conclusion that cooling leading edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic flight environments using a combination of liquid metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appeared feasible.

  1. Simulation of the Effects of Cooling Techniques on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Vince; Fatuzzo, Marco

    Increases in the performance demands of turbo machinery has stimulated the development many new technologies over the last half century. With applications that spread beyond marine, aviation, and power generation, improvements in gas turbine technologies provide a vast impact. High temperatures within the combustion chamber of the gas turbine engine are known to cause an increase in thermal efficiency and power produced by the engine. However, since operating temperatures of these engines reach above 1000 K within the turbine section, the need for advances in material science and cooling techniques to produce functioning engines under these high thermal and dynamic stresses is crucial. As with all research and development, costs related to the production of prototypes can be reduced through the use of computational simulations. By making use of Ansys Simulation Software, the effects of turbine cooling techniques were analyzed. Simulation of the Effects of Cooling Techniques on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer.

  2. Advanced techniques of laser telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, S.; Gilardini, A.

    The relationships which govern a laser telemeter; noise sources; and measurement accuracy with pulsed and sinusoidal intensity modulation techniques are discussed. Developments in telemetry instrumention and optical detection are considered. Meteorological interferometers, geodimeters, and military telemeters are described. Propagation attenuation and signal to noise ratios are treated. It is shown that accuracy depends on the product of measurement time and received power. The frequency scanning technique of CW and long pulse telemetry; multifrequency techniques; pulse compression; and vernier technique are outlined.

  3. New Technique for Cryogenically Cooling Small Test Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.; Henderson, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat removal techniques to rapidly cool small test articles to Earth-Moon L2 temperatures of 77 K were accomplished through the use of liquid nitrogen (LN2). By maintaining a selected pressure range on the saturation curve, test articles were cooled below the LN2 boiling point at ambient pressure in less than 30 min. Difficulties in achieving test pressures while maintaining the temperature tolerance necessitated a modification to the original system to include a closed loop conductive cold plate and cryogenic shroud

  4. Splitting advancement genioplasty: a new genioplasty technique.

    PubMed

    Celik, M; Tuncer, S; Büyükçayir, I

    1999-08-01

    A new genioplasty technique has been described and performed on 16 patients since 1995. The technique has been developed to avoid some undesired results of the current osseous genioplasty techniques and to achieve a more natural appearance in advancement genioplasty. According to the authors' technique, a rectangular part of the outer table of the mentum is split away from the mandible, and is advanced and fixated to the mandible. This technique can be used for advancement cases but not for reduction genioplasty. This technique was performed on 16 patients with only minor complications, including one case of wound dehiscence, one hematoma, and one case of osteomyelitis, which was managed with systemic antibiotic therapy. Aesthetic results were found to be satisfactory according to an evaluation by the authors. When the results were evaluated using pre- and postoperative photos, lip position and projection of the mentum were found to be natural in shape appearance. During the late postoperative period, the new bone formation between the advanced segment and the mandible was demonstrated radiographically. Advantages of the technique include having more contact surfaces for bony healing, a natural position of the lower lip, more natural projection of the mentum, tridimensional movement of the mentum, and improvement in the soft tissue of the neck. The disadvantages of the technique are the potential risk of infection due to dead space from the advancement, manipulation problems during surgery, and possible mental nerve injury. Splitting advancement genioplasty was found to be a useful technique for advancement genioplasty. Splitting advancement genioplasty is a more physiological osteotomy technique than most of osseous genioplasty techniques. PMID:10454320

  5. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  6. Advanced Spectroscopy Technique for Biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan

    This chapter presents an overview of the applications of optical spectroscopy in biomedicine. We focus on the optical design aspects of advanced biomedical spectroscopy systems, Raman spectroscopy system in particular. Detailed components and system integration are provided. As examples, two real-time in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems, one for skin cancer detection and the other for endoscopic lung cancer detection, and an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy system for skin assessment are presented. The applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer diagnosis of the skin, lung, colon, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, breast, and cervix are summarized.

  7. Comparison of advanced cooling technologies efficiency depending on outside temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Hamanaka; Haihua Zhao; Phil Sharpe

    2009-09-01

    In some areas, water availability is a serious problem during the summer and could disrupt the normal operation of thermal power plants which needs large amount of water to operate. Moreover, when water quantities are sufficient, there can still be problem created by the waste heat rejected into the water which is regulated in order to limit the impact of thermal pollution on the environment. All these factors can lead to a decrease of electricity production during the summer and during peak hours, when electricity is the most needed. In order to deal with these problems, advanced cooling technologies have been developed and implemented to reduce water consumption and withdrawals but with an effect in the plant efficiency. This report aims at analyzing the efficiency of several cooling technologies with a fixed power plant design and so to produce a reference to be able to compare them.

  8. Advanced techniques in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Monson, J R

    1993-01-01

    Almost every abdominal organ is now amenable to laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic appendicectomy is a routine procedure which also permits identification of other conditions initially confused with an inflamed appendix. However, assessment of appendiceal inflammation is more difficult. Almost all colonic procedures can be performed laparoscopically, at least partly, though resection for colonic cancer is still controversial. For simple patch repair of perforated duodenal ulcers laparoscopy is ideal, and inguinal groin hernia can be repaired satisfactorily with a patch of synthetic mesh. Many upper abdominal procedures, however, still take more time than the open operations. These techniques reduce postoperative pain and the incidence of wound infections and allow a much earlier return to normal activity compared with open surgery. They have also brought new disciplines: surgeons must learn different hand-eye coordination, meticulous haemostasis is needed to maintain picture quality, and delivery of specimens may be problematic. The widespread introduction of laparoscopic techniques has emphasised the need for adequate training (operations that were straight-forward open procedures may require considerable laparoscopic expertise) and has raised questions about trainee surgeons acquiring adequate experience of open procedures. Images FIG 9 p1347-a p1347-b p1349-a p1350-a p1350-b PMID:8257893

  9. The cryogenic cooling program at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical program in cryogenic cooling of high-heat-load optics at the Advanced-Photon Source. A prototype liquid nitrogen pumping system has been procured. This pump provides a variable flow rate of 1 to 10 gpm of pressurized liquid nitrogen and is sized to handle up to 5 kW of optic heat load. Also, a high-vacuum, double-crystal monochromator testing tank has been fabricated. This system will be used to test cryogenic crystals at existing synchrotron sources. A finite element analysis has been performed for a cryogenically cooled Si crystal in the inclined geometry for Undulator A at 100 mA. The inclination angle was 80{degrees}. It was set to diffract from the (111) planes at the first harmonic energy of 4.2 keV. The maximum slope error in the diffraction plane was calculated to be about 1 {mu}rad with a peak temperature of 94 K. An analysis has also been performed for a cryogenically-cooled ``thin`` crystal oriented in the Bragg geometry which accepts 87% of the lst harmonic photons at 3.866 keV. The total absorbed power was 131 W at 100 mA current and the peak temperature was 124 K.

  10. Investigation of electroforming techniques. [fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Copper and nickel electroforming was examined for the purpose of establishing the necessary processes and procedures for repeatable, successful fabrication of the outer structures of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The selection of electrolytes for copper and nickel deposition is described. The development studies performed to refine and complete the processes necessary for successful chamber shell fabrication and the testing employed to verify the applicability of the processes and procedures to small scale hardware are described. Specifications were developed to afford a guideline for the electroforming of high quality outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners. Test results indicated repeatable mechanical properties could be produced in copper deposits from the copper sulfate electrolyte with periodic current reversal and in nickel deposits from the sulfamate solution. Use of inert, removable channel fillers and the conductivizing of such is described. Techniques (verified by test) which produce high integrity bonds to copper and copper alloy liners are discussed.

  11. Development and fabrication of an advanced liquid cooling garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leith, J. R.; Hixon, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The elastomeric film fin/tube concept which was developed is a composite of polyurethane film, fine expanded silver mesh, a serpentine pattern polyurethane transport tubing and an integral comfort liner, all bonded via adhesive application and vacuum-bagged for final cure. As demonstrated by thermal analysis, the composite garment material is capable of removing a 293 watt (1000 BTU/hr) metabolic load through a head and torso cooling area of .46 sq m (5 sq ft) with tube spacing of slightly under one inch. A total of 60 test elements, each .15m x .15m (6 in. x 6 in.) were fabricated in support of the liquid cooling garment concept development. In parallel with the fabrication of these elements a continuing series of laboratory tests to support the fabrication techniques was carried out. The elements and supporting tests are described.

  12. Experimental and CFD Analysis of Advanced Convective Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-06-27

    The objective of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). One of the primary design objectives is to assure that RCCS acts as an ultimate heat sink capable of maintaining thermal integrity of the fuel, vessel, and equipment within the reactor cavity for the entire spectrum of postulated accident scenarios. Since construction of full-scale experimental test facilities to study these phenomena is impractical, it is logical to expect that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations will play a key role in the RCCS design process. An important question then arises: To what extent are conventional CFD codes able to accurately capture the most important flow phenomena, and how can they be modified to improve their quantitative predictions? Researchers are working to tackle this problem in two ways. First, in the experimental phase, the research team plans to design and construct an innovative platform that will provide a standard test setting for validating CFD codes proposed for the RCCS design. This capability will significantly advance the state of knowledge in both liquid-cooled and gas-cooled (e.g., sodium fast reactor) reactor technology. This work will also extend flow measurements to micro-scale levels not obtainable in large-scale test facilities, thereby revealing previously undetectable phenomena that will complement the existing infrastructure. Second, in the computational phase of this work, numerical simulation of the flow and temperature profiles will be performed using advanced turbulence models to simulate the complex conditions of flows in critical zones of the cavity. These models will be validated and verified so that they can be implemented into commercially available CFD codes. Ultimately, the results of these validation studies can then be used to enable a more accurate design and safety evaluation of systems in actual nuclear power

  13. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    PubMed

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  14. Advanced sialoendoscopy techniques, rare findings, and complications.

    PubMed

    Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-12-01

    This article presents and discusses advanced minimally invasive sialoendoscopy and combined methods: endoscopy, endoscopic-assisted techniques, and external-lithotripsy combined procedures. It also presents rare situations and complications encountered during sialoendoscopic procedures. Sialoendoscopy is a relatively novel technique, which adds significant new dimensions to the surgeon's armamentarium for management of inflammatory salivary gland diseases. Because of the rapid development in minimally invasive surgical techniques, surgeons are capable of more facilely treating complicated inflammatory and obstructive conditions of the salivary glands.

  15. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  16. Development and fabrication of an advanced liquid cooling garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    A tube/fin concept liquid cooling garment head cooler was developed, fabricated and delivered to NASA-ARC. The head cooler was fabricated from polyurethane film which sandwiches the transport fluid tubing and a thermally conductive fin material. The head cooler garment is sewn to form a skull cap and covered with a comfort liner. In addition, two Neonate heating garments were fabricated and supplied to NASA for further finishing and use in medical tests. The resulting garment is flexible, elastic and conforms to the head comfortably. Tests on a tube/fin element of identical construction as the head cooler demonstrated good thermal effectiveness. Use of commercially available materials and development of relatively simple fabrication techniques give the potential for a low garment cost.

  17. Recent Advance in Thermoelectric Devices for Electronics Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng

    Thermal management of on-chip hot spot, with a heat flux of around 1000 W/cm2, has become one of the major challenges in the development of next-generation microprocessors. Solid state thermoelectric cooler (TEC) offers great promise for hot spot thermal management because of their compact structure, fast response, high reliability, localized cooling, and high flux removal capability. To date TEC has received great attentions in electronics cooling community as one of the potential hot spot cooling solutions. In this paper, recent development and application of hot spot cooling strategies based on micro thermoelectric technologies will be reviewed and discussed, three hot spot cooling concepts, including thinfilm thermoelectric cooling, mini-contact cooling, and semiconductor selfcooling in silicon substrate and germanium substrate will be discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of these on-chip cooling solutions for high flux hot spots will be evaluated.

  18. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  19. Advanced Cooling Technology, Inc. quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.S.

    1992-07-29

    Advanced Cooling Technology (ACT), Inc., will perform the following tasks in order to develop an improved, more reliable and more marketable version of their ACT Evaporative Subcooling System: (1) Develop a more stable pump by reducing vibration levels; (2) Design and develop a drainage mechanism that will protect the coil; (3) Apply for Underwriters laboratories approval and perform follow-up and coordination work to complete task to insure product is safe, within its intended applications; (4) Test invention's performance to demonstrate energy savings and long term resistance to scale and corrosion; (5) Contract with the American Refrigeration Institute to perform engineering tests under controlled laboratory conditions; (6) Organize data, and develop technical manual for helping purchasers determining energy savings and inventions merits, and (7) Perform a field test in a cooperative supermarket, where utility usage can be measured on a before and after basis. Tasks 1,2 are completed; task 3 was abandoned for reasons explained in the last quarterly progress report. Progress on tasks 4 and 5 is reported in this paper. (GHH)

  20. Advanced Cooling Technology, Inc. quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.S.

    1992-07-29

    Advanced Cooling Technology (ACT), Inc., will perform the following tasks in order to develop an improved, more reliable and more marketable version of their ACT Evaporative Subcooling System: (1) Develop a more stable pump by reducing vibration levels; (2) Design and develop a drainage mechanism that will protect the coil; (3) Apply for Underwriters laboratories approval and perform follow-up and coordination work to complete task to insure product is safe, within its intended applications; (4) Test invention`s performance to demonstrate energy savings and long term resistance to scale and corrosion; (5) Contract with the American Refrigeration Institute to perform engineering tests under controlled laboratory conditions; (6) Organize data, and develop technical manual for helping purchasers determining energy savings and inventions merits, and (7) Perform a field test in a cooperative supermarket, where utility usage can be measured on a before and after basis. Tasks 1,2 are completed; task 3 was abandoned for reasons explained in the last quarterly progress report. Progress on tasks 4 and 5 is reported in this paper. (GHH)

  1. Cryogenically cooled monochromators for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    The use of cryogenically cooled monochromators looks to be a very promising possibility for the Advanced Photon Source. This position has recently been bolstered by several experiments performed on beamlines at the ESRF and CHESS. At the ESRF, several crystal geometries have been tested that were designed for high power densities ({approx_gt}150 W/mm{sup 2}) and moderate total absorbed powers ({lt}200 W). These geometries have proven to be very successful at handling these power parameters with measured strains on the arc-second level. The experiments performed at CHESS were focused on high total power ({approx_gt}1000 W) but moderate power densities. As with the previously mentioned experiments, the crystals designed for this application performed superbly with no measurable broadening of the rocking curves on the arc-second level. These experiments will be summarized and, based on these results, the performance of cryogenic monochromators for the APS will be assessed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  3. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading-edge cooling using heat-pipe, transpiration and film-cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of cooling hypersonic-vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes was studied, using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipes and surface-mass-transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading-edge section. The hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat-pipe model. Then the existing heat-pipe model was modified by adding both transpiration and film-cooling options as new surface boundary conditions. The models used to predict the leading-edge surface heat-transfer reduction effects of the transpiration and film cooling were modifications of more-generalized, empirically based models obtained from the literature. It is concluded that cooling leading-edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic-flight environments using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appears feasible.

  4. Advanced decision aiding techniques applicable to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruchten, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    RADC has had an intensive program to show the feasibility of applying advanced technology to Air Force decision aiding situations. Some aspects of the program, such as Satellite Autonomy, are directly applicable to space systems. For example, RADC has shown the feasibility of decision aids that combine the advantages of laser disks and computer generated graphics; decision aids that interface object-oriented programs with expert systems; decision aids that solve path optimization problems; etc. Some of the key techniques that could be used in space applications are reviewed. Current applications are reviewed along with their advantages and disadvantages, and examples are given of possible space applications. The emphasis is to share RADC experience in decision aiding techniques.

  5. Advanced AE Techniques in Composite Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been successfully used to evaluate damage mechanisms in laboratory testing of composite coupons. An example is presented in which the initiation of transverse matrix cracking was monitored. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite specimens or structures, the effects of modal wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. To demonstrate these effects, measurements of the far field, peak amplitude attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels are discussed. These measurements demonstrated that the flexural mode attenuation is dominated by dispersion effects. Thus, it is significantly affected by the thickness of the composite plate. Furthermore, the flexural mode attenuation can be significantly larger than that of the extensional mode even though its peak amplitude consists of much lower frequency components.

  6. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  7. Advanced Bode Plot Techniques for Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, D. A.; Schulze, G. W.

    The Bode plot, displayed as either impedance or admittance versus frequency, is the most basic test used by ultrasonic transducer designers. With simplicity and ease-of-use, Bode plots are ideal for baseline comparisons such as spacing of parasitic modes or impedance, but quite often the subtleties that manifest as poor process control are hard to interpret or are nonexistence. In-process testing of transducers is time consuming for quantifying statistical aberrations, and assessments made indirectly via the workpiece are difficult. This research investigates the use of advanced Bode plot techniques to compare ultrasonic transducers with known "good" and known "bad" process performance, with the goal of a-priori process assessment. These advanced techniques expand from the basic constant voltage versus frequency sweep to include constant current and constant velocity interrogated locally on transducer or tool; they also include up and down directional frequency sweeps to quantify hysteresis effects like jumping and dropping phenomena. The investigation focuses solely on the common PZT8 piezoelectric material used with welding transducers for semiconductor wire bonding. Several metrics are investigated such as impedance, displacement/current gain, velocity/current gain, displacement/voltage gain and velocity/voltage gain. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, admittance loops, laser vibrometry and coupled-field finite element analysis.

  8. Advances in open-cycle solid desiccant cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R; Maclaine-cross, I

    1985-05-01

    Of the solar cooling options available open cycle solid desiccant cooling looks very promising. A brief review of the experimental and analytical efforts to date shows that within the last 10 years thermal performance has doubled. Research centers have been developed to explore new materials and geometry options and to improve and validate mathematical models that can be used by design engineers to develop new product lines. Typical results from the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Desiccant Cooling Research Program are shown. Innovative ideas for new cycles and spinoff benefits provide incentives to continue research in this promising field.

  9. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  10. Advanced Liquid-Cooling Garment Using Highly Thermally Conductive Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This design of the liquid-cooling garment for NASA spacesuits allows the suit to remove metabolic heat from the human body more effectively, thereby increasing comfort and performance while reducing system mass. The garment is also more flexible, with fewer restrictions on body motion, and more effectively transfers thermal energy from the crewmember s body to the external cooling unit. This improves the garment s performance in terms of the maximum environment temperature in which it can keep a crewmember comfortable. The garment uses flexible, highly thermally conductive sheet material (such as graphite), coupled with cooling water lines of improved thermal conductivity to transfer the thermal energy from the body to the liquid cooling lines more effectively. The conductive sheets can be layered differently, depending upon the heat loads, in order to provide flexibility, exceptional in-plane heat transfer, and good through-plane heat transfer. A metal foil, most likely aluminum, can be put between the graphite sheets and the external heat source/sink in order to both maximize through-plane heat transfer at the contact points, and to serve as a protection to the highly conductive sheets. Use of a wicking layer draws excess sweat away from the crewmember s skin and the use of an outer elastic fabric ensures good thermal contact of the highly conductive underlayers with the skin. This allows the current state of the art to be improved by having cooling lines that can be more widely spaced to improve suit flexibility and to reduce weight. Also, cooling liquid does not have to be as cold to achieve the same level of cooling. Specific areas on the human body can easily be targeted for greater or lesser cooling to match human physiology, a warmer external environment can be tolerated, and spatial uniformity of the cooling garment can be improved to reduce vasoconstriction limits. Elements of this innovation can be applied to other embodiments to provide effective heat

  11. Advances in nanodiagnostic techniques for microbial agents.

    PubMed

    Syed, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-15

    Infectious diseases account for millions of sufferings and deaths in both developing as well as developed countries with a substantial economic loss. Massive increase in world population and international travel has facilitated their spread from one part of the world to other areas, making them one of the most significant global health risks. Furthermore, detection of bioterrorism agents in water, food and environmental samples as well traveler's baggage is a great challenge of the time for security purpose. Prevention strategies against infectious agents demand rapid and accurate detection and identification of the causative agents with highest sensitivity which should be equally available in different parts of the globe. Similarly, rapid and early diagnosis of infectious diseases has always been indispensable for their prompt cure and management, which has stimulated scientists to develop highly sophisticated techniques over centuries and the efforts continue unabated. Conventional diagnostic techniques are time consuming, tedious, expensive, less sensitive, and unsuitable for field situations. Nanodiagnostic assays have been promising for early, sensitive, point-of-care and cost-effective detection of microbial agents. There has been an explosive research in this area of science in last two decades yielding highly fascinating results. This review highlights some of the advancements made in the field of nanotechnology based assays for microbial detection since 2005 along with providing the basic understanding. PMID:24012709

  12. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1992-03-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and an be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors ({approximately}3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed ({approximately}20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (>1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable ``smart`` CSA instrumentation in the next several years. 3 refs.

  13. Inverse lithography technique for advanced CMOS nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Alexandre; Tritchkov, Alexander; Entradas, Jorge; Yesilada, Emek

    2013-04-01

    Resolution Enhancement Techniques have continuously improved over the last decade, driven by the ever growing constraints of lithography process. Despite the large number of RET applied, some hotspot configurations remain challenging for advanced nodes due to aggressive design rules. Inverse Lithography Technique (ILT) is evaluated here as a substitute to the dense OPC baseline. Indeed ILT has been known for several years for its near-to-ideal mask quality, while also being potentially more time consuming in terms of OPC run and mask processing. We chose to evaluate Mentor Graphics' ILT engine "pxOPCTM" on both lines and via hotspot configurations. These hotspots were extracted from real 28nm test cases where the dense OPC solution is not satisfactory. For both layer types, the reference OPC consists of a dense OPC engine coupled to rule-based and/or model-based assist generation method. The same CM1 model is used for the reference and the ILT OPC. ILT quality improvement is presented through Optical Rule Check (ORC) results with various adequate detectors. Several mask manufacturing rule constraints (MRC) are considered for the ILT solution and their impact on process ability is checked after mask processing. A hybrid OPC approach allowing localized ILT usage is presented in order to optimize both quality and runtime. A real mask is prepared and fabricated with this method. Finally, results analyzed on silicon are presented to compare localized ILT to reference dense OPC.

  14. Indiana State University Graduates to Advanced Plastic Cooling Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more than many other industries, today's universities and colleges are beset by dramatically rising costs on every front. One of the areas where overhead can be contained or reduced is in the operation of the chilled water systems that support air conditioning throughout college campuses, specifically the cooling towers. Like many…

  15. Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) is currently underway at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features two new evaporative cooling systems, the Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (RVP SWME), and the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware, and like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crewmember and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crewmember and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and more flight like back-pressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. In addition to the RVP SWME, the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL), was developed for contingency crewmember cooling. The ACL is a completely redundant, independent cooling system that consists of a small evaporative cooler--the Mini Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), independent pump, independent feed-water assembly and independent Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The Mini-ME utilizes the same hollow fiber technology featured in the RVP SWME, but is only 25% of the size of RVP SWME, providing only the necessary crewmember cooling in a contingency situation. The ACL provides a number of benefits when compared with the current EMU PLSS contingency cooling technology; contingency crewmember cooling can be provided for a longer period of time, more contingency situations can be accounted for, no reliance on a Secondary Oxygen Vessel (SOV) for contingency cooling--thereby allowing a SOV reduction in size and pressure, and the ACL can be recharged-allowing the AEMU PLSS to be reused, even after a contingency event. The development of these evaporative cooling

  16. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  17. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Je-Chin; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  18. Advances in measuring techniques for turbine cooling test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.

    1972-01-01

    Surface temperature distribution measurements for turbine vanes and blades were obtained by measuring the infrared energy emitted by the airfoil. The IR distribution can be related to temperature distribution by suitable calibration methods and the data presented in the form of isotherm maps. Both IR photographic and real time electro-optical methods are being investigated. The methods can be adapted to rotating as well as stationary targets, and both methods can utilize computer processing. Pressure measurements on rotating components are made with a rotating system incorporating 10 miniature transducers. A mercury wetted slip ring assembly was used to supply excitation power and as a signal transfer device. The system was successfully tested up to speeds of 9000 rpm and is now being adapted to measure rotating blade airflow quantities in a spin rig and a research engine.

  19. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  20. Development of actively cooled panels for advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauber, Brett K.

    1998-01-01

    Development of actively cooled flowpath panels for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) propulsion system was a critical task in the development plan of the air vehicle system. This task encompassed development of design requirements and loads, and component design and testing. In the early 90's the effort focused on six cooled panel designs based in five different materials (NARloy-Z, Haynes 188, MoRe, IN909, C/C and C/SiC), each satisfying requirements in a different area of the propulsion flowpath. Eventually, three of these designs were fabricated and tested. For these tests, two primary facilities were used. The first was a radiant heating facility at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), and the second, a vitiated air heater at General Applied Science Laboratories (GASL) Inc. In these facilities, tests were run to validate thermal and mechanical models and to demonstrate coating durability and effectiveness. Additional tests to assess the damage tolerance of these designs were planned but never run. These tests ultimately exposed strengths and weaknesses in the designs and the analysis methods.

  1. Advances in procedural techniques--antegrade.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C

    2014-05-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the "hybrid' approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited "interventional" collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  2. Recent advances in convectively cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.; Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A hydrogen-cooled structure for a fixed-geometry, airframe-integrated scramjet is described. The thermal/structural problems, concepts, design features, and technological advances are applicable to a broad range of engines. Convectively cooled airframe structural concepts that have evolved from an extensive series of investigations, the technology developments that have led to these concepts, and the benefits that accrue from their use are discussed.

  3. Application of metallic nanoparticle suspensions in advanced cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Choi, S.U.S.

    1996-12-31

    In the development of energy-efficient heat transfer fluids that are required in many cooling applications, low thermal conductivity is a primary limitation. However, it is well known that at room temperature, metals in solid form have orders-of-magnitude higher thermal conductivities than those of fluids. Therefore, the thermal conductivities of fluids that contain suspended solid metallic particles are expected to be significantly enhanced over those of conventional heat transfer fluids. In fact, numerous theoretical and experimental studies of the effective thermal conductivity of dispersions that contain solid particles have been conducted since Maxwell`s theoretical was published more than 100 years ago. However, all of the studies on thermal conductivity of suspensions have been confined to millimeter- or micrometer-sized particles.

  4. Improving of the photovoltaic / thermal system performance using water cooling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussien, Hashim A.; Numan, Ali H.; Abdulmunem, Abdulmunem R.

    2015-04-01

    This work is devoted to improving the electrical efficiency by reducing the rate of thermal energy of a photovoltaic/thermal system (PV/T).This is achieved by design cooling technique which consists of a heat exchanger and water circulating pipes placed at PV module rear surface to solve the problem of the high heat stored inside the PV cells during the operation. An experimental rig is designed to investigate and evaluate PV module performance with the proposed cooling technique. This cooling technique is the first work in Iraq to dissipate the heat from PV module. The experimental results indicated that due to the heat loss by convection between water and the PV panel's upper surface, an increase of output power is achieved. It was found that without active cooling, the temperature of the PV module was high and solar cells could only achieve a conversion efficiency of about 8%. However, when the PV module was operated under active water cooling condition, the temperature was dropped from 76.8°C without cooling to 70.1°C with active cooling. This temperature dropping led to increase in the electrical efficiency of solar panel to 9.8% at optimum mass flow rate (0.2L/s) and thermal efficiency to (12.3%).

  5. Advances in cooled semen technologies: seminal plasma and semen extender.

    PubMed

    Rigby, S L; Brinsko, S P; Cochran, M; Blanchard, T L; Love, C C; Varner, D D

    2001-12-01

    This study evaluated motility and fertility of uncentrifuged and centrifuged equine semen following dilution in a skim milk-glucose extender with or without supplemental Tyrode's medium. In addition, the effect of seminal plasma addition to each extender was evaluated. For Experiment 1, motility of 48h cooled, stored spermatozoa was evaluated following eight dilution treatments: uncentrifuged and diluted 1:4 (v/v) in skim milk-glucose extender (EZ Mixin CSTJ; CST-1:4) or in CST supplemented 65:35 (v/v) with modified Tyrode's medium (KMT-1:4); uncentrifuged and diluted to 25x10(6) spermatozoa/ml in CST (CST-1:9) or in KMT (KMT-1:9); centrifuged and diluted in CST with 0% seminal plasma (CST-0) or 20% seminal plasma (CST-20) or centrifuged and diluted in KMT containing 0% seminal plasma (KMT-0) or in KMT containing 20% seminal plasma (KMT-20). Sperm motility parameters evaluated included percentage of total motile sperm (% TMOT), percentage of progressively motile sperm (% PMOT), curvilinear velocity (VCL) and straight-line velocity (VSL). Mean % PMOT was lower (P<0.05) for spermatozoa extended in CST-1:4 compared to CST-1:9, whereas, all motility parameters were reduced (P<0.05) in KMT-1:4 compared to KMT-1:9. Spermatozoa extended in CST-1:4 had greater % TMOT, % PMOT and VSL (P<0.05) than in KMT-1:4. Spermatozoa extended in CST-1:9 had greater (P<0.05) % PMOT than in KMT-1:9, however, VCL was greater (P<0.05) in KMT-1:9. Mean VCL and VSL were lower (P<0.05) for spermatozoa extended in CST-0 compared with CST-20, whereas, spermatozoa extended in KMT-0 had greater (P<0.05) % TMOT, % PMOT and VSL compared to spermatozoa extended in KMT-20. Mean % TMOT and % PMOT were greater (P<0.05) in CST-20 compared to KMT-20, however, KMT-0 increased (P<0.05) velocity measures (VCL and VSL) compared to CST-0. In Experiment 2, fertility of centrifuged spermatozoa diluted in either CST-20 or KMT-0 was similar (P>0.05). We conclude that modified Tyrode's medium was not detrimental to

  6. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  7. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

  8. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-12-31

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

  9. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  10. Technique for measuring cooling patterns in ion source grids by infrared scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Eubank, H.P.; Kugel, H.W.

    1980-02-01

    Many plasma sources designed for neutral beam injection heating of plasmas now employ copper beam acceleration grids which are water-cooled by small capillary tubes fed from one or more headers. To prevent thermally-induced warpage of these grids it is essential that one be able to detect inhomogeneities in the cooling. Due to the very strong thermal coupling between adjacent cooling lines and the concomitant rapid equilibration times, it is not practical to make such measurements in a direct manner with a contact thermometer. We have developed a technique whereby we send a burst of hot water through an initially cool grid, followed by a burst of cool water, and record the transient thermal behavior usng an infrared television camera. This technique, which would be useful for any system with cooling paths that are strongly coupled thermally, has been applied to a number of sources built for the PLT and PDX tokamaks, and has proven highly effective in locating cooling deficiencies and blocked capillary tubes.

  11. Multidirectional mobilities: Advanced measurement techniques and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, Lars Holger

    Today high noise-and-vibration comfort has become a quality sign of products in sectors such as the automotive industry, aircraft, components, households and manufacturing. Consequently, already in the design phase of products, tools are required to predict the final vibration and noise levels. These tools have to be applicable over a wide frequency range with sufficient accuracy. During recent decades a variety of tools have been developed such as transfer path analysis (TPA), input force estimation, substructuring, coupling by frequency response functions (FRF) and hybrid modelling. While these methods have a well-developed theoretical basis, their application combined with experimental data often suffers from a lack of information concerning rotational DOFs. In order to measure response in all 6 DOFs (including rotation), a sensor has been developed, whose special features are discussed in the thesis. This transducer simplifies the response measurements, although in practice the excitation of moments appears to be more difficult. Several excitation techniques have been developed to enable measurement of multidirectional mobilities. For rapid and simple measurement of the loaded mobility matrix, a MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) technique is used. The technique has been tested and validated on several structures of different complexity. A second technique for measuring the loaded 6-by-6 mobility matrix has been developed. This technique employs a model of the excitation set-up, and with this model the mobility matrix is determined from sequential measurements. Measurements on ``real'' structures show that both techniques give results of similar quality, and both are recommended for practical use. As a further step, a technique for measuring the unloaded mobilities is presented. It employs the measured loaded mobility matrix in order to calculate compensation forces and moments, which are later applied in order to compensate for the loading of the

  12. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  13. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M; Humphreys, Mitchell R

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  14. Techniques for obtaining detailed heat transfer coefficient measurements within gas turbine blade and vane cooling passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, R. J.; Jones, T. V.; Dunnne, S. T.

    1983-03-01

    Techniques developed jointly by Rolls-Royce Bristol and Oxford University for determining detailed heat transfer distributions inside turbine blade and vane cooling passages are reviewed. Use is made of a low temperature phase change paint to map the heat flux distributions within models of the cooling passages; the paints change from an opaque coating to a clear liquid at a well-defined melting point. In this way the surface temperature history of a model subjected to transient convective heating is recorded. The heat transfer coefficient distribution is deduced from this history using a transient conduction analysis within the model. Results are presented on detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions within a variety of cooling passages; and data obtained from a comprehensive study of a typical engine multipass cooling geometry are examined.

  15. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    PubMed

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  16. Advanced optical imaging techniques for neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy.

  17. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  18. Advanced ultrasonic techniques for local tumor hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lele, P P

    1989-05-01

    Scanned, intensity-modulated, focused ultrasound (SIMFU) presently is the modality of choice for localized, controlled heating of deep as well as superficial tumors noninvasively. With the present SIMFU system, it was possible to heat 88 per cent of deep tumors up to 12 cm in depth and 15 cm in diameter, to 43 degrees C in 3 to 4 minutes. The infiltrative tumor margins could be heated to the desired therapeutic temperature. The temperature outside the treatment field fell off sharply. Excellent objective responses were obtained without local or systemic toxicity. Multiinstitutional clinical trials of local hyperthermia by this promising technique are clearly warranted.

  19. Air pollution monitoring by advanced spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Hodgeson, J A; McClenny, W A; Hanst, P L

    1973-10-19

    The monitoring requirements related to air pollution are many and varied. The molecules of concern differ greatly in their chemical and physical properties, in the nature of their environment, and in their concentration ranges. Furthermore, the application may have specific requirements such as rapid response time, ultrasensitivity, multipollutant capability, or capability for remote measurements. For these reasons, no single spectroscopic technique appears to offer a panacea for all monitoring needs. Instead we have attempted to demonstrate in the above discussion that, regardless of the difficulty and complexity of the monitoring problems, spectroscopy offers many tools by which such problems may be solved.

  20. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  1. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  3. Laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation: a simplified dome advancement technique.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme C; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Link, Richard E; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-12-01

    Laparoscopic Boari flap reimplantation has been used to treat long distal ureteral strictures. This technique requires extensive bladder mobilization and complex intracorporeal suturing. This demonstrates a novel laparoscopic bladder dome advancement approach for ureteral reimplantation. This technique obviates the need for bladder pedicle dissection and simplifies the required suturing.

  4. Evaluation of Advanced Retrieval Techniques in an Experimental Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses subject searching problems in online library catalogs; explains advanced information retrieval (IR) techniques; and describes experiments conducted on a test collection database, CHESHIRE (California Hybrid Extended SMART for Hypertext and Information Retrieval Experimentation), which was created to evaluate IR techniques in online…

  5. Advanced Space Suit PLSS 2.0 Cooling Loop Evaluation and PLSS 2.5 Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Quinn, Greg; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice; Watts, Carly; Westheimer, David

    2016-01-01

    From 2012 to 2015 The NASA/JSC AdvSS (Advanced Space Suit) PLSS (Portable Life Support Subsystem) team, with support from UTC Aerospace Systems, performed the build-up, packaging and testing of PLSS 2.0. One aspect of that testing was the evaluation of the long-term health of the water cooling circuit and the interfacing components. Periodic and end-of-test water, residue and hardware analyses provided valuable information on the status of the water cooling circuit, and the approaches that would be necessary to enhance water cooling circuit health in the future. The evaluated data has been consolidated, interpreted and woven into an action plan for the maintenance of water cooling circuit health for the planned FY (fiscal year) 2016 through FY 2018 PLSS 2.5 testing. This paper provides an overview of the PLSS 2.0 water cooling circuit findings and the associated steps to be taken in that regard for the PLSS 2.5.

  6. Advanced Space Suit PLSS 2.0 Cooling Loop Evaluation and PLSS 2.5 Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Quinn, Greg; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice; Watts, Carly; Westheimer, Dave

    2016-01-01

    From 2012 to 2015 The NASA/JSC AdvSS (Advanced Space Suit) PLSS (Primary Life Support Subsystem) team, with support from UTC Aerospace Systems, performed the build-up, packaging and testing of PLSS 2.0. A key aspect of that testing was the evaluation of the long-term health of the water cooling circuit and the interfacing components. Intermittent and end-of-test water, residue and hardware analyses provided valuable information on the status of the water cooling circuit, and the approaches that would be necessary to enhance water cooling circuit health in the future. The evaluated data has been consolidated, interpreted and woven into an action plan for the maintenance of water cooling circuit health for the planned FY (fiscal year) 2016 through FY 2018 PLSS 2.5 testing. This paper provides an overview of the PLSS 2.0 water cooling circuit findings and the associated steps to be taken in that regard for the PLSS 2.5 testing.

  7. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  8. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  9. Bi-maxillary advancement surgery: Technique, indications and results.

    PubMed

    Olivi, Pierre; Garcia, Claude

    2014-06-01

    Esthetic analysis of the face in some patients presenting a dental Class II can reveal the need for maxillo-mandibular advancement surgery. In these cases, mandibular advancement alone would provide a result which was satisfactory from the occlusal viewpoint but esthetically displeasing. Using bi-maxillary advancement, the impact of nasal volume is reduced and the nasolabial relationship is corrected. The sub-mandibular length is increased, thus creating a better-defined cervico-mental angle. This treatment technique involving a prior mandibular procedure has the advantage of restoring patients' dental occlusion while optimizing their facial esthetics.

  10. Research of new packaging and cooling technique for high power fiber laser used pump coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Si, Xu; Lin, Ya-jun; Xu, Cheng-lin; Ma, Yun-liang; Xiao, Chun

    2015-10-01

    This article analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of a packaging structure for pump coupler, where common heat conduction material is used. In this study, the possibility of using new technology of thermal conductivity is discussed. We also proposes a solution that make the function and effect of package more uniform. A serial of experiments are done for research the cooling effect and the working reliability of the fiber combiners and couplers. Experiment proves that after improved method of package, the cooling speed increases significantly comparing the sample with old type of package technique. The technique discussed in this paper will make the high power fiber laser working long time with steady power output and high efficiency.

  11. A thermodynamic approach for advanced fuels of gas-cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéneau, C.; Chatain, S.; Gossé, S.; Rado, C.; Rapaud, O.; Lechelle, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Chatillon, C.

    2005-09-01

    For both high temperature reactor (HTR) and gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) systems, the high operating temperature in normal and accidental conditions necessitates the assessment of the thermodynamic data and associated phase diagrams for the complex system constituted of the fuel kernel, the inert materials and the fission products. A classical CALPHAD approach, coupling experiments and thermodynamic calculations, is proposed. Some examples of studies are presented leading with the CO and CO 2 gas formation during the chemical interaction of [UO 2± x/C] in the HTR particle, and the chemical compatibility of the couples [UN/SiC], [(U, Pu)N/SiC], [(U, Pu)N/TiN] for the GFR system. A project of constitution of a thermodynamic database for advanced fuels of gas-cooled reactors is proposed.

  12. The cryogenic cooling program in high-heat-load optics at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes some of the aspects of the cryogenic optics program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A liquid-nitrogen-cooled, high-vacuum, double crystal monochromator is being fabricated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A pumping system capable of delivering a variable flow rate of up to 10 gallons per minute of pressurized liquid nitrogen and removing 5 kilowatts of x-ray power is also being constructed. This specialized pumping system and monochromator will be used to test the viability of cryogenically cooled, high-heat-load synchrotron optics. It has been determined that heat transfer enhancement will be required for optics used with APS insertion devices. An analysis of a porous-matrix-enhanced monochromator crystal is presented. For the particular case investigated, a heat transfer enhancement factor of 5 to 6 was calculated.

  13. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  14. Advanced Marketing Core Curriculum. Test Items and Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.; And Others

    This document contains duties and tasks, multiple-choice test items, and other assessment techniques for Missouri's advanced marketing core curriculum. The core curriculum begins with a list of 13 suggested textbook resources. Next, nine duties with their associated tasks are given. Under each task appears one or more citations to appropriate…

  15. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) is a pebble fueled, liquid salt cooled, high temperature nuclear reactor design that can be used for electricity generation or other applications requiring the availability of heat at elevated temperatures. A stage in the design evolution of this plant requires the analysis of the plant during a variety of potential transients to understand the primary and safety cooling system response. This study focuses on the performance of the passive safety cooling system with a dual purpose, to assess the capacity to maintain the core at safe temperatures and to assist the design process of this system to achieve this objective. The analysis requires the use of complex computational tools for simulation and verification using analytical solutions and comparisons with experimental data. This investigation builds upon previous detailed design work for the PB-AHTR components, including the core, reactivity control mechanisms and the intermediate heat exchanger, developed in 2008. In addition the study of this reference plant design employs a wealth of auxiliary information including thermal-hydraulic physical phenomena correlations for multiple geometries and thermophysical properties for the constituents of the plant. Finally, the set of performance requirements and limitations imposed from physical constrains and safety considerations provide with a criteria and metrics for acceptability of the design. The passive safety cooling system concept is turned into a detailed design as a result from this study. A methodology for the design of air-cooled passive safety systems was developed and a transient analysis of the plant, evaluating a scrammed loss of forced cooling event was performed. Furthermore, a design optimization study of the passive safety system and an approach for the validation and verification of the analysis is presented. This study demonstrates that the resulting point design responds properly to the

  16. Thermodynamic formalism of minimum heat source temperature for driving advanced adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Koyama, Shigeru; Srinivasan, Kandadai; Ng, Kim Choon; Kashiwagi, Takao; Dutta, Pradip

    2007-09-01

    This letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the minimum driving heat source temperature of an advanced solid sorption cooling device, and it is validated with experimental data. This formalism has been developed from the rigor of the Boltzmann distribution function and the condensation approximation of adsorptive molecules. An interesting and useful finding has been established from this formalism that it is possible to construct a solid sorption refrigeration device that operates in a cycle transferring heat from a low temperature source to a heat sink with a driving heat source at a temperature close to but above ambient.

  17. Advanced liquid cooling in HCPVT systems to achieve higher energy efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, S.; Helmers, H.; Tiwari, M. K.; Escher, W.; Paredes, S.; Neves, P.; Poulikakos, D.; Wiesenfarth, M.; Bett, A. W.; Michel, B.

    2013-09-01

    The benefits of advanced thermal packaging are demonstrated through a receiver package consisting of a monolithic interconnected module (MIM) which is directly attached to a high performance microchannel heat sink. Those packages can be applied in high-concentration photovoltaic systems and the generated heat can be used in addition to the electrical power output (CPVT systems). Thus, the total energy efficiency of the system increases significantly. A detailed exergy analysis of the receiver power output underscores the advantages of the new cooling approach.

  18. a Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of AN Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D. A.; Allen, D. A.; Tyrrell, R. J.; Meese, T. C.; Huggon, A. P.; Whiley, G. S.; Mossop, J. R.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes calculations of neutron damage rates within the core restraint structures of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs). Using advanced features of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCBEND, and neutron source data from core follow calculations performed with the reactor physics code PANTHER, a detailed model of the reactor cores of two of British Energy's AGR power plants has been developed for this purpose. Because there are no relevant neutron fluence measurements directly supporting this assessment, results of benchmark comparisons and successful validation of MCBEND for Magnox reactors have been used to estimate systematic and random uncertainties on the predictions. In particular, it has been necessary to address the known under-prediction of lower energy fast neutron responses associated with the penetration of large thicknesses of graphite.

  19. Adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for uncertainty quantification of a gas cooled fast reactor transient

    SciTech Connect

    Perko, Z.; Gilli, L.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    Uncertainty quantification plays an increasingly important role in the nuclear community, especially with the rise of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies. Sensitivity analysis, surrogate models, Monte Carlo sampling and several other techniques can be used to propagate input uncertainties. In recent years however polynomial chaos expansion has become a popular alternative providing high accuracy at affordable computational cost. This paper presents such polynomial chaos (PC) methods using adaptive sparse grids and adaptive basis set construction, together with an application to a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor transient. Comparison is made between a new sparse grid algorithm and the traditionally used technique proposed by Gerstner. An adaptive basis construction method is also introduced and is proved to be advantageous both from an accuracy and a computational point of view. As a demonstration the uncertainty quantification of a 50% loss of flow transient in the GFR2400 Gas Cooled Fast Reactor design was performed using the CATHARE code system. The results are compared to direct Monte Carlo sampling and show the superior convergence and high accuracy of the polynomial chaos expansion. Since PC techniques are easy to implement, they can offer an attractive alternative to traditional techniques for the uncertainty quantification of large scale problems. (authors)

  20. Neutronics investigation of advanced self-cooled liquid blanket systems in the helical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Sagara, A.; Muroga, T.; Youssef, M. Z.

    2008-03-01

    Neutronics investigations have been conducted in the design activity of the helical-type reactor Force Free Helical Reactor (FFHR2) adopting Flibe-cooled and Li-cooled advanced liquid blanket systems. In this study, comprehensive investigations and geometry modifications related to the tritium breeding ratios (TBRs), neutron shielding performance and neutron wall loading on the first walls in FFHR2 have been performed by improving the three-dimensional (3D) neutronics calculation system developed for non-axisymmetric helical designs. The total TBRs obtained after modifying the blanket dimensions indicated that all the advanced blanket systems proposed for FFHR2 would achieve adequate tritium self-sufficiency by dimension adjustment and optimization of structures in the breeder layers. However, it appeared that the most important neutronics issue in the present helical blanket configuration was suppression of neutron streaming through the divertor pumping areas and reflection from support structures for protection of poloidal and helical coils. Evaluation of neutron wall loading on the first walls indicated that the peaking factor would be moderated as low as 1.2 by the toroidal and helical effect of the helical-shaped plasma distribution in the helical reactor.

  1. Advanced Refrigerant-Based Cooling Technologies for Information and Communication Infrastructure (ARCTIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Salamon, Todd

    2012-12-13

    efficiency and carbon footprint reduction for our nation's Information and Communications Technology (ICT) infrastructure. The specific objectives of the ARCTIC project focused in the following three areas: i) advanced research innovations that dramatically enhance the ability to deal with ever-increasing device heat densities and footprint reduction by bringing the liquid cooling much closer to the actual heat sources; ii) manufacturing optimization of key components; and iii) ensuring rapid market acceptance by reducing cost, thoroughly understanding system-level performance, and developing viable commercialization strategies. The project involved participants with expertise in all aspects of commercialization, including research & development, manufacturing, sales & marketing and end users. The team was lead by Alcatel-Lucent, and included subcontractors Modine and USHose.

  2. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  3. An Advanced Time Averaging Modelling Technique for Power Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuloski, Goce

    For stable and efficient performance of power converters, a good mathematical model is needed. This thesis presents a new modelling technique for DC/DC and DC/AC Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) converters. The new model is more accurate than the existing modelling techniques such as State Space Averaging (SSA) and Discrete Time Modelling. Unlike the SSA model, the new modelling technique, the Advanced Time Averaging Model (ATAM) includes the averaging dynamics of the converter's output. In addition to offering enhanced model accuracy, application of linearization techniques to the ATAM enables the use of conventional linear control design tools. A controller design application demonstrates that a controller designed based on the ATAM outperforms one designed using the ubiquitous SSA model. Unlike the SSA model, ATAM for DC/AC augments the system's dynamics with the dynamics needed for subcycle fundamental contribution (SFC) calculation. This allows for controller design that is based on an exact model.

  4. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high-quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  5. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  6. Advanced Morphological and Functional Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Agnifili, Luca; Mattei, Peter A.; Caulo, Massimo; Fasanella, Vincenzo; Navarra, Riccardo; Mastropasqua, Leonardo; Marchini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease that is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Recent data documented that glaucoma is not limited to the retinal ganglion cells but that it also extends to the posterior visual pathway. The diagnosis is based on the presence of signs of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and consistent functional visual field alterations. Unfortunately these functional alterations often become evident when a significant amount of the nerve fibers that compose the optic nerve has been irreversibly lost. Advanced morphological and functional magnetic resonance (MR) techniques (morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, arterial spin labeling, and functional connectivity) may provide a means for observing modifications induced by this fiber loss, within the optic nerve and the visual cortex, in an earlier stage. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if the use of these advanced MR techniques could offer the possibility of diagnosing glaucoma at an earlier stage than that currently possible. PMID:26167474

  7. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  8. Radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas: protective effect of local cooling techniques.

    PubMed

    Geranios, Angelos; Pikoulis, Emmanouil; Papalois, Apostolos; Kontos, Michael; Agrogiannis, George; Petrou, Athanasios; Pavlakis, Emmanuel; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2015-05-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the commonest malignant diseases today and the majority of patients are suitable for palliative treatment only. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used extensively for the treatment of solid organ tumors but little is known on the efficacy and safety of pancreatic ablation. To further investigate the safety of pancreatic RFA, 18 pigs had RFA of the pancreas, close to superior mesenteric vein and duodenum. Group A (nine animals) was protected with peripancreatic cool perfusion and Group B (nine animals) with portal vein (PV) intravenous injection of cool saline. Biochemical and histological evidence suggested lateral thermal injury of the duodenal wall and superior mesenteric vein and acute pancreatitis in most animals. However, clinically and at autopsy, Group B animals fared much better. PV thrombosis, hepatic abscess, duodenal perforation, ascites, and extensive pancreatic necrosis were observed in Group A but not in Group B. The present study suggests that PV cool saline perfusion can prevent major complications caused by pancreatic RFA and may be used in combination with other protective techniques in the clinical setting to reduce RFA-associated morbidity.

  9. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  10. Application of Energy Integration Techniques to the Design of Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie; Finn, Cory

    2000-01-01

    Exchanging heat between hot and cold streams within an advanced life support system can save energy. This savings will reduce the equivalent system mass (ESM) of the system. Different system configurations are examined under steady-state conditions for various percentages of food growth and waste treatment. The scenarios investigated represent possible design options for a Mars reference mission. Reference mission definitions are drawn from the ALSS Modeling and Analysis Reference Missions Document, which includes definitions for space station evolution, Mars landers, and a Mars base. For each scenario, streams requiring heating or cooling are identified and characterized by mass flow, supply and target temperatures and heat capacities. The Pinch Technique is applied to identify good matches for energy exchange between the hot and cold streams and to calculate the minimum external heating and cooling requirements for the system. For each pair of hot and cold streams that are matched, there will be a reduction in the amount of external heating and cooling required, and the original heating and cooling equipment will be replaced with a heat exchanger. The net cost savings can be either positive or negative for each stream pairing, and the priority for implementing each pairing can be ranked according to its potential cost savings. Using the Pinch technique, a complete system heat exchange network is developed and heat exchangers are sized to allow for calculation of ESM. The energy-integrated design typically has a lower total ESM than the original design with no energy integration. A comparison of ESM savings in each of the scenarios is made to direct future Pinch Analysis efforts.

  11. Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.

    SciTech Connect

    Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-01

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage

  12. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system.

  13. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  14. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  15. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly Renee; Fugate, Michael Lynn; Tobin, Stephen Joesph

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  16. Analysis and comparison of wall cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The relative performance of (1) counterflow film cooling, (2) parallel-flow film cooling, (3) convection cooling, (4) adiabatic film cooling, (5) transpiration cooling, and (6) full-coverage film cooling was investigated for heat loading conditions expected in future gas turbine engines. Assumed in the analysis were hot-gas conditions of 2200 K (3500 F) recovery temperature, 5 to 40 atmospheres total pressure, and 0.6 gas Mach number and a cooling air supply temperature of 811 K (1000 F). The first three cooling methods involve film cooling from slots. Counterflow and parallel flow describe the direction of convection cooling air along the inside surface of the wall relative to the main gas flow direction. The importance of utilizing the heat sink available in the coolant for convection cooling prior to film injection is illustrated.

  17. Natural Convection Cooling of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Hill, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    After fueling and prior to launch, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) will be stored for a period of time then moved to the launch pad for integration with the space probe and mounting on the launch vehicle. During this time, which could be as long as 3 years, the ASRG will operate continuously with heat rejected from the housing and fins. Typically, the generator will be cooled by forced convection using fans. During some of the ground operations, maintaining forced convection may add significant complexity, so allowing natural convection may simplify operations. A test was conducted on the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) to quantify temperatures and operating parameters with natural convection only and determine if the EU could be safely operated in such an environment. The results show that with natural convection cooling the ASRG EU Stirling convertor pressure vessel temperatures and other parameters had significant margins while the EU was operated for several days in this configuration. Additionally, an update is provided on ASRG EU testing at NASA Glenn Research Center, where the ASRG EU has operated for over 16,000 hr and underwent extensive testing.

  18. Technical basis for extending storage of the UK's advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hambley, D.I.

    2013-07-01

    The UK Nuclear Decommissioning Agency has recently declared a date for cessation of reprocessing of oxide fuel from the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). This will fundamentally change the management of AGR fuel: from short term storage followed by reprocessing to long term fuel storage followed, in all likelihood, by geological disposal. In terms of infrastructure, the UK has an existing, modern wet storage asset that can be adapted for centralised long term storage of dismantled AGR fuel under the required pond water chemistry. No AGR dry stores exist, although small quantities of fuel have been stored dry as part of experimental programmes in the past. These experimental programmes have shown concerns about corrosion rates.

  19. High Temperature Materials - The Challenge for Future Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2004-07-01

    Advanced gas cooled reactor systems for future combined cycle applications (electricity and process heat) are planned to operate at temperatures above 1000 deg. C. The reliable and safe operation of such plants requires materials that are able to carry loads at these temperatures in impure helium and under neutron irradiation. The most exposed components are the pressure vessel, reactor internals, gas turbine, pipes and valves. Considering the envisaged long operating time (6 years for replaceable components) life time assessments and extrapolation methods are necessary for the determination of damage evolution and long term behaviour of the reactor components. This paper gives a summary of candidate materials and possible approaches to life-time assessment. (author)

  20. The origins of bioethics: advances in resuscitations techniques.

    PubMed

    Niebroj, L

    2008-12-01

    During the last years there has been an increasing interest in meta-bioethical issues. This turn in the research focus is regarded as a sign of the maturation of bioethics as a distinct area of an academic inquiry. The role of historic-philosophical reflection is often emphasized. It should be noted that there is a rather common agreement that the future of bioethics lies in the critical reflection on its past, in particular, on the very origins of this discipline. Sharing Caplan's opinion, advances in medicine technologies, especially the introduction of respirators and artificial heart machines, is considered as one of the main issues that started bioethics. Using methods of historical as well as meta-ethical research, this article aims at describing the role of advances in resuscitation techniques in the emergence of bioethics and at exploring how bioethical reflection has been shaped by technological developments. A brief historical analysis permits to say that there is a close bond between the emergence of bioethics and the introduction of sophisticated resuscitation technologies into medical practice. The meta-ethical reflection reveals that advances in resuscitation techniques not only initiated bioethics in the second half of the 20(th) century but influenced its evolution by (i) posing a question of justice in health care, (ii) altering commonly accepted ontological notions of human corporeality, and (iii) reconsidering the very purpose of medicine.

  1. Indications and general techniques for lasers in advanced operative laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, J H

    1991-09-01

    Lasers are but one of the several energy delivery systems used by the operative laparoscopist in the performance of advanced operative laparoscopy. Safety is a key factor in the selection of a laser because the tissue damage produced by this instrument is absolutely predictable. The surgeon must be totally familiar with the chosen wavelength and its tissue reaction if this safety factor is to be realized. Other instruments complement the use of lasers in advanced operative laparoscopy, and without thorough knowledge of all available techniques and instruments, the operative laparoscopist will not achieve the full potential of this specialty. It is beyond the scope of this issue on gynecologic laser surgery to present all of the useful nonlaser techniques. Suffice it to say that we often use laser, loop ligature, sutures, hemoclips, bipolar electricity, hydrodissection, and endocoagulation during the course of a day in the operating room and sometimes during one case. As enthusiasm for advanced operative laparoscopy grows and endoscopic capability increases, more complicated and prolonged surgical feats are reported. Radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy have been performed by the laparoscopic route, and endoscopic management of ovarian tumors also has been reported. At this moment, these must be viewed as "show and tell" procedures unsupported by statistics to demonstrate any advantage (or disadvantage) when compared with conventional surgical methods. The time required of advanced operative laparoscopy for any given procedure is certainly an important factor. Prolonged operative and anesthesia time certainly can negate the supposed benefit of small incisions and minimally invasive surgery. What goes on inside the abdomen is certainly the most important part of advanced operative laparoscopy. Good surgeons must recognize their own limitations and the limitations of available technology. The operative laparoscopist must know when to quit and institute a

  2. Advanced aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced high performance vehicles, including Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) hypersonic flight vehicles, that are statically unstable, require higher bandwidth flight control systems to compensate for the instability resulting in interactions between the flight control system, the engine/propulsion dynamics, and the low frequency structural modes. Military specifications, such as MIL-F-9490D and MIL-F-87242, tend to limit treatment of structural modes to conventional gain stabilization techniques. The conventional gain stabilization techniques, however, introduce low frequency effective time delays which can be troublesome from a flying qualities standpoint. These time delays can be alleviated by appropriate blending of gain and phase stabilization techniques (referred to as Hybrid Phase Stabilization or HPS) for the low frequency structural modes. The potential of using HPS for compensating structural mode interaction was previously explored. It was shown that effective time delay was significantly reduced with the use of HPS; however, the HPS design was seen to have greater residual response than a conventional gain stablized design. Additional work performed to advance and refine the HPS design procedure, to further develop residual response metrics as a basis for alternative structural stability specifications, and to develop strategies for validating HPS design and specification concepts in manned simulation is presented. Stabilization design sensitivity to structural uncertainties and aircraft-centered requirements are also assessed.

  3. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  4. A 100 MWe advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R. N.

    2012-07-01

    An Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) was developed targeting a small electrical grid to be transportable to the plant site and operable for a long time without frequent refueling. The reactor power rating was strategically decided to be 100 MWe, and the core barrel diameter was limited to 3.0 m for transportability. The design parameters were determined by relaxing the peak fast fluence limit and bulk coolant outlet temperature to beyond irradiation experience assuming that advanced cladding and structural materials developed under US-DOE programs would be available when the AFR-100 is deployed. With a de-rated power density and U-Zr binary metallic fuel, the AFR-100 can maintain criticality for 30 years without refueling. The average discharge burnup of 101 MWd/kg is comparable to conventional design values, but the peak discharge fast fluence of {approx}6x10{sup 23} neutrons/cm{sup 2} is beyond the current irradiation experiences with HT-9 cladding. The evaluated reactivity coefficients provide sufficient negative feedbacks and the reactivity control systems provide sufficient shutdown margins. The integral reactivity parameters obtained from quasi-static reactivity balance analysis indicate that the AFR-100 meets the sufficient conditions for acceptable asymptotic core outlet temperature following postulated unprotected accidents. Additionally, the AFR-100 has sufficient thermal margins by grouping the fuel assemblies into eight orifice zones. (authors)

  5. Coal and Coal Constituent Studies by Advanced EMR Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Alex I. Smirnov; Mark J. Nilges; R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson

    1998-03-31

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. We have achieved substantial progress on upgrading the high field (HF) EMR (W-band, 95 GHz) spectrometers that are especially advantageous for such studies. Particularly, we have built a new second W-band instrument (Mark II) in addition to our Mark I. Briefly, Mark II features: (i) an Oxford custom-built 7 T superconducting magnet which is scannable from 0 to 7 T at up to 0.5 T/min; (ii) water-cooled coaxial solenoid with up to ±550 G scan under digital (15 bits resolution) computer control; (iii) custom-engineered precision feed-back circuit, which is used to drive this solenoid, is based on an Ultrastab 860R sensor that has linearity better than 5 ppm and resolution of 0.05 ppm; (iv) an Oxford CF 1200 cryostat for variable temperature studies from 1.8 to 340 K. During this grant period we have completed several key upgrades of both Mark I and II, particularly microwave bridge, W-band probehead, and computer interfaces. We utilize these improved instruments for HF EMR studies of spin-spin interaction and existence of different paramagnetic species in carbonaceous solids.

  6. Recent advances in UHV techniques for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Rao

    1995-01-01

    The ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) requirements for storage rings and accelerators, and the development of the science and technology of UHV for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices have been recently reviewed by N.B. Mistry and H.F. Dylla respectively. In this paper, the latest developments in the advancement of UHV techniques for the vacuum integrity of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and for successfully dealing with the synchrotron radiation related beam line vacuum problem encountered in the design of the SSC are reviewed: the review includes developments in extreme sensitivity He leak detection technique based on the dynamic adsorption and desorption of He, operation of ionization gauges at Lhe temperatures, metal sponges for the effective cryopumping of H{sup 2} and He to pressures better than 10{sup -14} torr, and low cost and high He sensitivity RGA's. The details of a new extreme sensitivity He leak detector system are also discussed here.

  7. Improved metastable de-excitation spectrometer using laser-cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Andrew; Roskoss, Alexander; Menard, Herve; Jacka, Marcus

    2005-05-15

    Details of a new approach for performing metastable de-excitation spectroscopy are given. A beam of metastable (2 {sup 3}S) helium atoms, produced in a hollow cathode dc discharge, is collimated and subsequently focused using Doppler cooling of the 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}-2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} transition at 1083 nm, forming an intense probe of up to 1x10{sup 12} atoms s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The large distance (2.5 m) between source and sample means that the beam is relatively free of UV photons and 2 {sup 1}S metastable atoms, removing the need for quench lamps and chopper wheels. As well as providing a clean high intensity source, the well defined nature of the beam is a necessary step towards using more sophisticated laser-cooling techniques with the ultimate aim of producing a metastable helium microscope. MDS and UPS spectra from Si(111) are shown.

  8. Identification and quantification of cooling water biofilms using fluorescent staining and ATP monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chalut, J.; Cairns, J.; Korkorian, N.

    1994-12-31

    Biofilm formation can create corrosion problems in industrial water systems. Control of biofilms is achieved most effectively when the mechanism of formation is understood. The use of traditional microbiological analyses such as plate counts and dipslides to analyze deposits provides insufficient information about viable cell content and their role in deposit formation. The ATP assay, a newer technology, is more useful but only measures total living biomass. In order to assess the potential for biofouling in cooling water systems, novel staining and monitoring techniques have been developed. Staining technology allows characterization and assessment of biofilm composition. This staining methodology is used to complement ATP analysis of field samples. Case histories are used to illustrate the benefits of this approach. Case histories included a textile manufacturing plant, an oil refinery, and a pulp and paper mill.

  9. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  10. Advanced bronchoscopic techniques in diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Sarcev, Tatjana; Stojanovic, Goran; Carapic, Vladimir; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Kesisis, Georgios; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-09-01

    The role of advanced brochoscopic diagnostic techniques in detection and staging of lung cancer has steeply increased in recent years. Bronchoscopic imaging techniques became widely available and easy to use. Technical improvement led to merging in technologies making autofluorescence or narrow band imaging incorporated into one bronchoscope. New tools, such as autofluorescence imagining (AFI), narrow band imaging (NBI) or fuji intelligent chromo endoscopy (FICE), found their place in respiratory endoscopy suites. Development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions. Linear EBUS proven to be complementary to mediastinoscopy. This technique is now available in almost all high volume centers performing bronchoscopy. Radial EBUS with mini-probes and guiding sheaths provides accurate diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions. Combining EBUS guided procedures with rapid on site cytology (ROSE) increases diagnostic yield even more. Electromagnetic navigation technology (EMN) is also widely used for diagnosis of peripheral lesions. Future development will certainly lead to new improvements in technology and creation of new sophisticated tools for research in respiratory endoscopy. Broncho-microscopy, alveoloscopy, optical coherence tomography are some of the new research techniques emerging for rapid technological development.

  11. Bonding techniques for the fabrication of internally cooled x-ray monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Smolenski, K.W.; Conolly, C.; Doing, P.; Kiang, B.; Shen, Q.

    1996-12-31

    At CHESS, 2,500 W total are absorbed by the first crystal of the double bounce monochromators located on the A2 and F2 wiggler beamlines. In order to dissipate this absorbed power and deliver the highest X-ray flux to an end station, the authors have explored the technique of internally cooling the silicon first crystals with water channels. This technique brings with it the need for reliable mechanical joints between the silicon diffracting surface and a glass or silicon water manifold. The joint must have structural strength to resist the internal water pressure and the cyclic heat load, be vacuum leak tight for operation in UHV, and not act as a source of residual strain in the crystal lattice of the diffracting surface. The authors have explored four bonding techniques which have been tested for their suitability to monochromator fabrication: direct silicon to silicon bonding, anodic glass to silicon bonding, a variety of ceramic and die attach adhesives (alumina, zirconia, silica/silver) and metallic diffusion bonding/brazing. In this paper, they characterize each method with respect to the requirements of structural integrity (bond tensile strength), residual strain (minimal effect on diffraction quality) and vacuum compatibility.

  12. An advanced Thermal-FSI approach to flow heating/cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badur, J.; Ziółkowski, P.; Zakrzewski, W.; Sławiński, D.; Kornet, S.; Kowalczyk, T.; Hernet, J.; Piotrowski, R.; Felincjancik, J.; Ziółkowski, P. J.

    2014-08-01

    Actually, two-way thermal-energy exchange between working fluid and solid material of a casing is a leading problem for modern - semi automatic - design techniques. Many questions should be solved, especially, the turbulent mode of thermal energy transport both in fluid and solid, should be re-examined and reformulated from the primary principles. In the present paper, a group of researchers from Energy Conversion Department of IMP PAN at Gdańsk, tries to summarise a last three-years efforts towards to mathematical modelling of advanced models of thermal energy transport. This extremely difficult problem in "thermal-FSI" ("Fluid Solid Interaction") means that the both for solid and fluid mathematical model of a surface layer should be self-equilibrated and self-concise. Taking these requirements into account, an advanced Reynolds-Stanton analogy has been discussed and implemented. Some numerical examples concerning of the benchmarks experiments and industrial applications have also been developed and presented.

  13. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  14. Techniques for developing approximate optimal advanced launch system guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Timothy S.; Speyer, Jason L.

    1991-01-01

    An extension to the authors' previous technique used to develop a real-time guidance scheme for the Advanced Launch System is presented. The approach is to construct an optimal guidance law based upon an asymptotic expansion associated with small physical parameters, epsilon. The trajectory of a rocket modeled as a point mass is considered with the flight restricted to an equatorial plane while reaching an orbital altitude at orbital injection speeds. The dynamics of this problem can be separated into primary effects due to thrust and gravitational forces, and perturbation effects which include the aerodynamic forces and the remaining inertial forces. An analytic solution to the reduced-order problem represented by the primary dynamics is possible. The Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman or dynamic programming equation is expanded in an asymptotic series where the zeroth-order term (epsilon = 0) can be obtained in closed form.

  15. Neurocysticercosis: evaluation with advanced magnetic resonance techniques and atypical forms.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Lázaro Luís Faria; Ferreira, Rafael Martins; da Rocha, Antônio José; Ferreira, Nelson Paes Diniz Fortes

    2005-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common helminthic infection of the central nervous system, but its diagnosis remains difficult. The purpose of this article is to perform a critical analysis of the literature and show our experience in the evaluation of NCC. We discuss the advanced MR technique applications such as diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging, spectroscopy, cisternography with FLAIR, and supplemental O2 and 3D-CISS. The typical manifestations of NCC are described; emphasis is given to the unusual presentations. The atypical forms of neurocysticercosis were divided into: intraventricular, subarachnoid, spinal, orbital, and intraparenchymatous. Special attention was also given to reactivation of previously calcified lesions and neurocysticercosis associated with mesial temporal sclerosis.

  16. COAL AND CHAR STUDIES BY ADVANCED EMR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson; Mark J. Nilges; Boris M. Odintsov; Alex I. Smirnov

    2001-04-30

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During the span of this grant, progress was made on construction and applications to coals and chars of two high frequency EMR systems particularly appropriate for such studies--48 GHz and 95 GHz electron magnetic resonance spectrometer, on new low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments to examine the interaction between water and the surfaces of suspended char particulates in slurries, and on a variety of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to measure characteristics of the water directly in contact with the surfaces and pore spaces of carbonaceous particulates.

  17. Advanced Fibre Bragg Grating and Microfibre Bragg Grating Fabrication Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kit Man

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have become a very important technology for communication systems and fibre optic sensing. Typically, FBGs are less than 10-mm long and are fabricated using fused silica uniform phase masks which become more expensive for longer length or non-uniform pitch. Generally, interference UV laser beams are employed to make long or complex FBGs, and this technique introduces critical precision and control issues. In this work, we demonstrate an advanced FBG fabrication system that enables the writing of long and complex gratings in optical fibres with virtually any apodisation profile, local phase and Bragg wavelength using a novel optical design in which the incident angles of two UV beams onto an optical fibre can be adjusted simultaneously by moving just one optical component, instead of two optics employed in earlier configurations, to vary the grating pitch. The key advantage of the grating fabrication system is that complex gratings can be fabricated by controlling the linear movements of two translation stages. In addition to the study of advanced grating fabrication technique, we also focus on the inscription of FBGs written in optical fibres with a cladding diameter of several ten's of microns. Fabrication of microfibres was investigated using a sophisticated tapering method. We also proposed a simple but practical technique to filter out the higher order modes reflected from the FBG written in microfibres via a linear taper region while the fundamental mode re-couples to the core. By using this technique, reflection from the microfibre Bragg grating (MFBG) can be effectively single mode, simplifying the demultiplexing and demodulation processes. MFBG exhibits high sensitivity to contact force and an MFBG-based force sensor was also constructed and tested to investigate their suitability for use as an invasive surgery device. Performance of the contact force sensor packaged in a conforming elastomer material compares favourably to one

  18. Multiple advanced surgical techniques to treat acquired seminal duct obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong-Tao; Yuan, Qian; Liu, Yu; Liu, Zeng-Qin; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Xiao, Ke-Feng; Yang, Jiang-Gen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of multiple advanced surgical treatments (i.e. microsurgery, laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic surgery) for acquired obstructive azoospermia. We analyzed the surgical outcomes of 51 patients with suspected acquired obstructive azoospermia consecutively who enrolled at our center between January 2009 and May 2013. Modified vasoepididymostomy, laparoscopically assisted vasovasostomy and transurethral incision of the ejaculatory duct with holmium laser were chosen and performed based on the different obstruction sites. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 22 months (range: 9 months to 52 months). Semen analyses were initiated at four postoperative weeks, followed by trimonthly (months 3, 6, 9 and 12) semen analyses, until no sperm was found at 12 months or until pregnancy was achieved. Patency was defined as >10,000 sperm ml−1 of semen. The obstruction sites, postoperative patency and natural pregnancy rate were recorded. Of 51 patients, 47 underwent bilateral or unilateral surgical reconstruction; the other four patients were unable to be treated with surgical reconstruction because of pelvic vas or intratesticular tubules obstruction. The reconstruction rate was 92.2% (47/51), and the patency rate and natural pregnancy rate were 89.4% (42/47) and 38.1% (16/42), respectively. No severe complications were observed. Using multiple advanced surgical techniques, more extensive range of seminal duct obstruction was accessible and correctable; thus, a favorable patency and pregnancy rate can be achieved. PMID:25337841

  19. A feasibility study to determine cooling time and burnup of ATR fuel using a nondestructive technique and three types of gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Nigg, D.W.

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this work was to perform a feasibility study and establish measurement techniques to determine the burnup of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuels at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Three different detectors of high purity germanium (HPGe), lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), and high pressure xenon (HPXe) in two detection system configurations of below and above the water pool were used in this study. The last two detectors were used for the first time in fuel burnup measurements. The results showed that a better quality spectra can be achieved with the above the water pool configuration. Both short and long cooling time fuels were investigated in order to determine which measurement technique, absolute or fission product ratio, is better suited in each scenario and also to establish what type of detector should be used in each case for the best burnup measurement. The burnup and cooling time calibrations were established using experimental absolute activities or isotopic ratios and ORIGEN burnup calculations. A method was developed to do burnup and cooling time calibrations using fission isotopes activities without the need to know the exact geometry. (authors)

  20. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  1. Distribution of film-cooling effectiveness on a turbine endwall measured using the ammonia and diazo technique

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, S.; Hodson, H.P.; Dawes, W.N.

    1996-10-01

    The distribution of adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness on the endwall of a large-scale low-speed linear turbine cascade has been measured using a new technique. This technique is based on an established surface-flow visualization technique, and makes use of the reaction between ammonia gas and a diazo surface coating. A new method of calibration has been developed to relate the result of the reaction to surface concentration of coolant. Using the analogy that exists between heat and mass transfer, the distribution of film-cooling effectiveness can then be determined. The complete representation of the film-cooling effectiveness distribution provided by the technique reveals the interaction between the coolant ejected from the endwall and the secondary flow in the turbine blade passage. Over- and undercooled regions on the endwall are identified, illustrating the need to take these interactions into account in the design process. Modifications to the cooling configuration examined in this paper are proposed as a result of the application of the ammonia and diazo technique.

  2. Vacuum cooling of meat products: current state-of-the-art research advances.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaohui; Drummond, Liana; Zhang, Zhihang; Sun, Da-Wen; Wang, Qijun

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum cooling (VC) is commonly applied for cooling of several foodstuffs, to provide exceptionally rapid cooling rates with low energy consumption and resulting in high-quality food products. However, for products such as meat and cooked meat products, the higher cooling loss of vacuum cooling compared with established methods still means lower yields, and important meat quality parameters can be negatively affected. Substantial efforts during the past ten years have aimed to improve the technology in order to offer the meat industry, especially the cooked meat industry, optimized production in terms of safety regulations and guidelines, as well as meat quality. This review presents and discusses recent VC developments directed to the cooked meat industry. The principles of VC, and the basis for improvements of this technology, are firstly discussed; future prospects for research and development in this area are later explored, particularly in relation to cooling of cooked meat and meat products.

  3. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean.; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Petty, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator - Baseline heat rejection technology for the Portable Life Support System of the Advanced EMU center dot Replaces sublimator in the current EMU center dot Contamination insensitive center dot Can work with Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator in Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to reject heat and reuse evaporated water The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is being developed to replace the sublimator for future generation spacesuits. Water in LCVG absorbs body heat while circulating center dot Warm water pumped through SWME center dot SWME evaporates water vapor, while maintaining liquid water - Cools water center dot Cooled water is then recirculated through LCVG. center dot LCVG water lost due to evaporation (cooling) is replaced from feedwater The Independent TCV Manifold reduces design complexity and manufacturing difficulty of the SWME End Cap. center dot The offset motor for the new BPV reduces the volume profile of the SWME by laying the motor flat on the End Cap alongside the TCV.

  4. Verification of the hygienic adequacy of beef carcass cooling processes by microbiological culture and the temperature-function integration technique.

    PubMed

    Jericho, K W; O'Laney, G; Kozub, G C

    1998-10-01

    To enhance food safety and keeping quality, beef carcasses are cooled immediately after leaving the slaughter floor. Within hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) systems, this cooling process needs to be monitored by the industry and verified by regulatory agencies. This study assessed the usefulness of the temperature-function integration technique (TFIT) for the verification of the hygienic adequacy of two cooling processes for beef carcasses at one abattoir. The cooling process passes carcasses through a spray cooler for at least 17 h and a holding cooler for at least 7 h. The TFIT is faster and cheaper than culture methods. For spray cooler 1, the Escherichia coli generations predicted by TFIT for carcass surfaces (pelvic and shank sites) were compared to estimated E. coli counts from 120 surface excision samples (rump, brisket, and sacrum; 5 by 5 by 0.2 cm) before and after cooling. Counts of aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli were decreased after spray cooler 1 (P < or = 0.001). The number of E. coli generations (with lag) at the pelvic site calculated by TFIT averaged 0.85 +/- 0.19 and 0.15 +/- 0.04 after emerging from spray coolers 1 and 2, respectively. The TFIT (with lag) was considered convenient and appropriate for the inspection service to verify HACCP systems for carcass cooling processes. PMID:9798153

  5. Unsteady High Turbulence Effects on Turbine Blade Film Cooling Heat Transfer Performance Using a Transient Liquid Crystal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Ekkad, S. V.; Du, H.; Teng, S.

    2000-01-01

    Unsteady wake effect, with and without trailing edge ejection, on detailed heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness distributions is presented for a downstream film-cooled gas turbine blade. Tests were performed on a five-blade linear cascade at an exit Reynolds number of 5.3 x 10(exp 5). Upstream unsteady wakes were simulated using a spoke-wheel type wake generator. Coolant blowing ratio was varied from 0.4 to 1.2; air and CO2 were used as coolants to simulate different density ratios. Surface heat transfer and film effectiveness distributions were obtained using a transient liquid crystal technique; coolant temperature profiles were determined with a cold wire technique. Results show that Nusselt numbers for a film cooled blade are much higher compared to a blade without film injection. Unsteady wake slightly enhances Nusselt numbers but significantly reduces film effectiveness versus no wake cases. Nusselt numbers increase only slic,htly but film cooling, effectiveness increases significantly with increasing, blowing ratio. Higher density coolant (CO2) provides higher effectiveness at higher blowing ratios (M = 1.2) whereas lower density coolant (Air) provides higher 0 effectiveness at lower blowing ratios (M = 0.8). Trailing edge ejection generally has more effect on film effectiveness than on the heat transfer, typically reducing film effectiveness and enhancing heat transfer. Similar data is also presented for a film cooled cylindrical leading edge model.

  6. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  7. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted. PMID:27483933

  8. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted.

  9. Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Christopher; Pavlish, John

    2013-09-30

    The University of North Dakota’s Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing a market-focused dry cooling technology that is intended to address the key shortcomings of conventional dry cooling technologies: high capital cost and degraded cooling performance during daytime temperature peaks. The unique aspect of desiccant dry cooling (DDC) is the use of a hygroscopic working fluid—a liquid desiccant—as a heat-transfer medium between a power plant’s steam condenser and the atmosphere. This configuration enables a number of beneficial features for large-scale heat dissipation to the atmosphere, without the consumptive use of cooling water. The overall goal of this project was to accurately define the performance and cost characteristics of DDC to determine if further development of the concept is warranted. A balanced approach of modeling grounded in applied experimentation was pursued to substantiate DDC-modeling efforts and outline the potential for this technology to cool full-scale power plants. The resulting analysis shows that DDC can be a lower-cost dry cooling alternative to an air-cooled condenser (ACC) and can even be competitive with conventional wet recirculating cooling under certain circumstances. This project has also highlighted the key technological steps that must be taken in order to transfer DDC into the marketplace. To address these issues and to offer an extended demonstration of DDC technology, a next-stage project should include the opportunity for outdoor ambient testing of a small DDC cooling cell. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Wyoming State Legislature under an award made through the Wyoming Clean Coal Technologies Research Program.

  10. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  11. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  12. Achieving miniature sensor systems via advanced packaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartup, David C.; Bobier, Kevin; Demmin, Jeffrey

    2005-05-01

    Demands for miniaturized networked sensors that can be deployed in large quantities dictate that the packages be small and cost effective. In order to accomplish these objectives, system developers generally apply advanced packaging techniques to proven systems. A partnership of Nova Engineering and Tessera begins with a baseline of Nova's Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) technology and utilizes Tessera's three-dimensional (3D) Chip-Scale Packaging (CSP), Multi-Chip Packaging (MCP), and System-in-Package (SIP) innovations to enable novel methods for fabricating compact, vertically integrated sensors utilizing digital, RF, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. These technologies, applied to a variety of sensors and integrated radio architectures, enable diverse multi-modal sensing networks with wireless communication capabilities. Sensors including imaging, accelerometers, acoustical, inertial measurement units, and gas and pressure sensors can be utilized. The greatest challenge to high density, multi-modal sensor networks is the ability to test each component prior to integration, commonly called Known Good Die (KGD) testing. In addition, the mix of multi-sourcing and high technology magnifies the challenge of testing at the die level. Utilizing Tessera proprietary CSP, MCP, and SIP interconnection methods enables fully testable, low profile stacking to create multi-modal sensor radios with high yield.

  13. Removing baseline flame's spectrum by using advanced recovering spectrum techniques.

    PubMed

    Arias, Luis; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Torres, Sergio

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a novel automated algorithm to estimate and remove the continuous baseline from measured flame spectra is proposed. The algorithm estimates the continuous background based on previous information obtained from a learning database of continuous flame spectra. Then, the discontinuous flame emission is calculated by subtracting the estimated continuous baseline from the measured spectrum. The key issue subtending the learning database is that the continuous flame emissions are predominant in the sooty regions, in absence of discontinuous radiation. The proposed algorithm was tested using natural gas and bio-oil flames spectra at different combustion conditions, and the goodness-of-fit coefficient (GFC) quality metric was used to quantify the performance in the estimation process. Additionally, the commonly used first derivative method (FDM) for baseline removing was applied to the same testing spectra in order to compare and to evaluate the proposed technique. The achieved results show that the proposed method is a very attractive tool for designing advanced combustion monitoring strategies of discontinuous emissions. PMID:22945158

  14. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  15. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  16. Hybrid inverse lithography techniques for advanced hierarchical memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangming; Hooker, Kevin; Irby, Dave; Zhang, Yunqiang; Ward, Brian; Cecil, Tom; Hall, Brett; Lee, Mindy; Kim, Dave; Lucas, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Traditional segment-based model-based OPC methods have been the mainstream mask layout optimization techniques in volume production for memory and embedded memory devices for many device generations. These techniques have been continually optimized over time to meet the ever increasing difficulties of memory and memory periphery patterning. There are a range of difficult issues for patterning embedded memories successfully. These difficulties include the need for a very high level of symmetry and consistency (both within memory cells themselves and between cells) due to circuit effects such as noise margin requirements in SRAMs. Memory cells and access structures consume a large percentage of area in embedded devices so there is a very high return from shrinking the cell area as much as possible. This aggressive scaling leads to very difficult resolution, 2D CD control and process window requirements. Additionally, the range of interactions between mask synthesis corrections of neighboring areas can extend well beyond the size of the memory cell, making it difficult to fully take advantage of the inherent designed cell hierarchy in mask pattern optimization. This is especially true for non-traditional (i.e., less dependent on geometric rule) OPC/RET methods such as inverse lithography techniques (ILT) which inherently have more model-based decisions in their optimizations. New inverse methods such as model-based SRAF placement and ILT are, however, well known to have considerable benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window, improve 2D CD control, and improve resolution in ultra-dense memory patterns. They also are known to reduce recipe complexity and provide native MRC compliant mask pattern solutions. Unfortunately, ILT is also known to be several times slower than traditional OPC methods due to the increased computational lithographic optimizations it performs. In this paper, we describe and present results for a methodology to

  17. Flat plate film cooling measurement using PSP and gas chromatograph techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.J.; Fox, M.

    1999-07-01

    The use of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to measure film cooling effectiveness is demonstrated in a high speed wind tunnel using a flat plate. To validate this technology, gas chromatography was used to measure film cooling effectiveness from the same plate. Four (4) blowing ratios 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 were tested using the two methods. The flow stream turbulence effect was not studied and the free stream turbulence intensity was fixed at 4.0%. The PSP was calibrated at various temperatures as well as at various pressures before testing. The test results on the flat plate indicate that the PSP method of measuring film cooling effectiveness is far superior than the traditional gas chromatography method. The better spatial resolution and two dimensionality of the pressure sensitive paint method offers a great potential for its application in film cooling measurements.

  18. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  19. Advanced Techniques for Simulating the Behavior of Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2009-12-01

    research is to simulate the look and behavior of sand, this work will go beyond simple particle collision. In particular, we can continue to use our parallel algorithms not only on single particles but on particle “clumps” that consist of multiple combined particles. Since sand is typically not spherical in nature, these particle “clumps” help to simulate the coarse nature of sand. In a simulation environment, multiple combined particles could be used to simulate the polygonal and granular nature of sand grains. Thus, a diversity of sand particles can be generated. The interaction between these particles can then be parallelized using GPU hardware. As such, this research will investigate different graphics and physics techniques and determine the tradeoffs in performance and visual quality for sand simulation. An enhanced sand model through the use of high performance computing and GPUs has great potential to impact research for both earth and space scientists. Interaction with JPL has provided an opportunity for us to refine our simulation techniques that can ultimately be used for their vehicle simulator. As an added benefit of this work, advancements in simulating sand can also benefit scientists here on earth, especially in regard to understanding landslides and debris flows.

  20. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  1. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  2. A comparison of cooling techniques in firefighters after a live burn evolution

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, Deanna; Suyama, Joe; Reis, Steven E; Morley, Julia L; Goss, Fredric L; Chen, Yi-Fan; Moore, Charity G; Hostler, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective We compared two active cooling devices to passive cooling in a moderate (≈22°C) temperature environment on heart rate (HR) and core temperature (Tc) recovery when applied to firefighters following 20 min. of fire suppression. Methods Firefighters (23 male, 2 female) performed 20 minutes of fire suppression at a live fire evolution. Immediately following the evolution, the subjects removed their thermal protective clothing and were randomized to receive forearm immersion (FI), ice water perfused cooling vest (CV) or passive (P) cooling in an air-conditioned medical trailer for 30 minutes. Heart rate and deep gastric temperature were monitored every five minutes during recovery. Results A single 20-minute bout of fire suppression resulted in near maximal HR (175±13 - P, 172±20 - FI, 177±12 beats•min−1 - CV) when compared to baseline (p < 0.001), a rapid and substantial rise in Tc (38.2±0.7 - P, 38.3±0.4 - FI, 38.3±0.3° - CV) compared to baseline (p < 0.001), and mass lost from sweating of nearly one kilogram. Cooling rates (°C/min) differed (p = 0.036) by device with FI (0.05±0.04) providing higher rates than P (0.03±0.02) or CV (0.03±0.04) although differences over 30 minutes were small and recovery of body temperature was incomplete in all groups. Conclusions During 30 min. of recovery following a 20-minute bout of fire suppression in a training academy setting, there is a slightly higher cooling rate for FI and no apparent benefit to CV when compared to P cooling in a moderate temperature environment. PMID:21294631

  3. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  4. Verification of passive cooling techniques in the Super-FRS beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, C. A.; Gellanki, J.; Najafi, M. A.; Moeini, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Kuiken, O. J.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Smit, H. A. J.; Timersma, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Super FRagment Separator (Super-FRS) at the FAIR facility will be the largest in-flight separator of heavy ions in the world. One of the essential steps in the separation procedure is to stop the unwanted ions with beam collimators. In one of the most common situations, the heavy ions are produced by a fission reaction of a primary 238U-beam (1.5 GeV/u) hitting a 12C target (2.5 g/cm2). In this situation, some of the produced ions are highly charged states of 238U. These ions can reach the collimators with energies of up to 1.3 GeV/u and a power of up to 500 W. Under these conditions, a cooling system is required to prevent damage to the collimators and to the corresponding electronics. Due to the highly radioactive environment, both the collimators and the cooling system must be suitable for robot handling. Therefore, an active cooling system is undesirable because of the increased possibility of malfunctioning and other complications. By using thermal simulations (performed with NX9 of Siemens PLM), the possibility of passive cooling is explored. The validity of these simulations is tested by independent comparison with other simulation programs and by experimental verification. The experimental verification is still under analysis, but preliminary results indicate that the explored passive cooling option provides sufficient temperature reduction.

  5. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  6. Recent advances in biosensor techniques for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K R

    2006-05-24

    Biosensors for environmental applications continue to show advances and improvements in areas such as sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity. In addition to detecting and measuring specific compounds or compound classes such as pesticides, hazardous industrial chemicals, toxic metals, and pathogenic bacteria, biosensors and bioanalytical assays have been designed to measure biological effects such as cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, biological oxygen demand, pathogenic bacteria, and endocrine disruption effects. This article is intended to discuss recent advances in the area of biosensors for environmental applications.

  7. Axisymmetric whole pin life modelling of advanced gas-cooled reactor nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, R.; Wenman, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Thermo-mechanical contributions to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) in advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) are modelled in the ABAQUS finite element (FE) code. User supplied sub-routines permit the modelling of the non-linear behaviour of AGR fuel through life. Through utilisation of ABAQUS's well-developed pre- and post-processing ability, the behaviour of the axially constrained steel clad fuel was modelled. The 2D axisymmetric model includes thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel with time and condition dependent material properties. Pellet cladding gap dynamics and thermal behaviour are also modelled. The model treats heat up as a fully coupled temperature-displacement study. Dwell time and direct power cycling was applied to model the impact of online refuelling, a key feature of the AGR. The model includes the visco-plastic behaviour of the fuel under the stress and irradiation conditions within an AGR core and a non-linear heat transfer model. A multiscale fission gas release model is applied to compute pin pressure; this model is coupled to the PCI gap model through an explicit fission gas inventory code. Whole pin, whole life, models are able to show the impact of the fuel on all segments of cladding including weld end caps and cladding pellet locking mechanisms (unique to AGR fuel). The development of this model in a commercial FE package shows that the development of a potentially verified and future-proof fuel performance code can be created and used. The usability of a FE based fuel performance code would be an enhancement over past codes. Pre- and post-processors have lowered the entry barrier for the development of a fuel performance model to permit the ability to model complicated systems. Typical runtimes for a 5 year axisymmetric model takes less than one hour on a single core workstation. The current model has implemented: Non-linear fuel thermal behaviour, including a complex description of heat flow in the fuel. Coupled with a variety of

  8. Finite element analysis of flowfield in the single hole film cooling technique.

    PubMed

    Bazdidi-Tehrani, F; Mahmoodi, A A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling is currently used in gas turbine hot sections, such as the combustor wall and the turbine blades, to prevent those sections from failing at elevated temperatures. In the single hole film cooling method, coolant air is injected from a hole into the mainstream and thus the flow is naturally three dimensional. In this paper, the Navier-Stokes and the energy equations are solved on a flat plate by the Finite Element Method (FEM) using brick elements. Algebraic equations are obtained by use of the Petrov-Galerkin method. The pressure term is removed from the momentum equations, by employing the Penalty method. The governing equations are transient and the flow is incompressible and turbulent. The model of turbulence in the near wall region is the wall function method, and in the fully turbulent region is the k-epsilon model. The system of the algebraic equations are solved by the Frontal method. The coolant injection angle and the blowing rate are among the parameters which are studied. In order to examine the present computer code, the results are compared with the Blasius (exact) solution and also with the empirical 1/7th power-law and good agreement is shown. Also, the optimum cooling performance is shown to be at 35 degree angle of coolant injection and the optimum blowing rate is 0.5. The film cooling effectiveness data, at the optimum conditions, is directly compared with the experimental results of Goldstein et al. and good agreement is demonstrated. PMID:11460653

  9. Advanced Millimeter-Wave Security Portal Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-04-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This paper details a number of techniques developed over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, as well as high frequency high bandwidth techniques. Implementation of some of these methods will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems.

  10. Advanced glazing and associated materials for solar and building applications: International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program Task 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Michael G.

    1992-11-01

    Following a program definition phase of 2 years, Task 18 of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating & Cooling program commenced a 5 year research phase in April 1992. Task 18 investigates a wide range of advanced glazing materials and glazing systems which include monolithic and granular aerogels, transparent insulation materials, chromogenic materials, evacuated glazings, low-emittance coatings, solar collector covers, angular selective transmittance thin films, holographic and light guide materials, and frame and edge seal technology. In addition to materials-centered research, Task 18 concentrates on measurement of key glazing properties such as total energy transmittance, U-value, and spectral directional optical properties, and through the use of building energy analysis software tools the identification of appropriate applications, control strategies, and energy and environmental benefits to be derived from advanced glazing products. Fifteen OECD countries are participating in Task 18 which is led by the United Kingdom.

  11. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  12. Bricklaying Curriculum: Advanced Bricklaying Techniques. Instructional Materials. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Raymond J.; Hendrix, Laborn J.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist bricklaying instructors in providing performance-based instruction in advanced bricklaying. Included in the first section of the guide are units on customized or architectural masonry units; glass block; sills, lintels, and copings; and control (expansion) joints. The next two units deal with cut,…

  13. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  14. Characteristic evaluation of cooling technique using liquid nitrogen and metal porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, Yusuke; Ito, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-29

    A remountable high-temperature superconducting magnet, whose segments can be mounted and demounted repeatedly, has been proposed for construction and maintenance of superconducting magnet and inner reactor components of a fusion reactor. One of the issues in this design is that the performance of the magnet deteriorates by a local temperature rise due to Joule heating in jointing regions. In order to prevent local temperature rise, a cooling system using a cryogenic coolant and metal porous media was proposed and experimental studies have been carried out using liquid nitrogen. In this study, flow and heat transfer characteristics of cooling system using subcooled liquid nitrogen and bronze particle sintered porous media are evaluated through experiments in which the inlet degree of subcooling and flow rate of the liquid nitrogen. The flow characteristics without heat input were coincided with Ergun’s equation expressing single-phase flow in porous materials. The obtained boiling curve was categorized into three conditions; convection region, nucleate boiling region and mixed region with nucleate and film boiling. Wall superheat did not increase drastically with porous media after departure from nucleate boiling point, which is different from a situation of usual boiling curve in a smooth tube. The fact is important characteristic to cooling superconducting magnet to avoid its quench. Heat transfer coefficient with bronze particle sintered porous media was at least twice larger than that without the porous media. It was also indicated qualitatively that departure from nucleate boiling point and heat transfer coefficient depends on degree of subcooling and mass flow rate. The quantitative evaluation of them and further discussion for the cooling system will be performed as future tasks.

  15. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry

    2009-11-20

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a 'cool' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool color prototype tiles and 24 cool color prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L* = 29) to 0.57 (light green; L* = 76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L* = 26) to 0.34 (light green; L* = 68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25.

  16. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  17. Electroextraction and electromembrane extraction: Advances in hyphenation to analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Oedit, Amar; Ramautar, Rawi; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electroextraction (EE) and electromembrane extraction (EME) are sample preparation techniques that both require an electric field that is applied over a liquid‐liquid system, which enables the migration of charged analytes. Furthermore, both techniques are often used to pre‐concentrate analytes prior to analysis. In this review an overview is provided of the body of literature spanning April 2012–November 2015 concerning EE and EME, focused on hyphenation to analytical techniques. First, the theoretical aspects of concentration enhancement in EE and EME are discussed to explain extraction recovery and enrichment factor. Next, overviews are provided of the techniques based on their hyphenation to LC, GC, CE, and direct detection. These overviews cover the compounds and matrices, experimental aspects (i.e. donor volume, acceptor volume, extraction time, extraction voltage, and separation time) and the analytical aspects (i.e. limit of detection, enrichment factor, and extraction recovery). Techniques that were either hyphenated online to analytical techniques or show high potential with respect to online hyphenation are highlighted. Finally, the potential future directions of EE and EME are discussed. PMID:26864699

  18. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  19. Advanced composite materials and subcooled liquid change-of-phase (COP) cooling for thermal management in advanced electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.E.; Ehlers, S.L.; Mudawar, I.

    1996-12-31

    High performance, high density airborne and spaceborne electronic systems (both DoD and commercial) are performance and reliability limited by materials and thermal management. There is a continual need to improve performance and reliability in high density systems and to reduce adverse effects induced by excessive weight, dissipated heat, and related environmental incompatibilities. The penalties effected by these limitations prevail from cradle-to-grave in the life of high performance airborne systems, beginning at the development stage, continuing through manufacturing and procurement, and throughout system life, ultimately raising the cost of ownership. The objective of this effort is to investigate the use of selected high specific property composites and change-of-phase (COP) (i.e., liquid to vapor) cooling (using non-CFC, perfluorohexane fluids) to combat these limitations. High density (e.g., 2 kw SEM-E configuration), miniaturized avionics are assumed. Material systems for enclosure and module packaging as well as COP mechanisms will be discussed at this time relative to a retrofit scenario, interfacing with existing aircraft environmental control systems (ECS) for coolant reconditioning.

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  1. The 1- to 4-K refrigeration techniques for cooling masers on a beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The status of technology is reported for various 1- to 4-K commercially available refrigeration systems capable of producing 1.5-K refrigeration to cool masers and superconducting cavity oscillators on the proposed beam waveguide antenna. The design requirements for the refrigeration system and the cryostat are presented. A continuously operating evaporation refrigerator that uses capillary tubing to provide a continuous, self-regulating flow of helium at approximately 1.5 K has been selected as the first refrigerator design for the beam waveguide antenna.

  2. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  3. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-29

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  4. Hypothetical air ingress scenarios in advanced modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Considering an extremely hypothetical scenario of complete cross duct failure and unlimited air supply into the reactor vessel of a modular high temperature gas cooled ractor, it is found that the potential air inflow remains limited due to the high friction pressure drop through the active core. All incoming air will be oxidized to CO and some local external burning would be temporarily possible in such a scenario. The accident would have to continue with unlimited air supply for hundreds of hours before the core structural integrity would be jeopardized.

  5. Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2014-03-01

    Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury.

  6. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  7. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  8. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  9. Advances in reduction techniques for tire contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    Some recent developments in reduction techniques, as applied to predicting the tire contact response and evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the different response quantities, are reviewed. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the contact response to variations in the geometric and material parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in geometric and material parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The elemental arrays are obtained by using a modified two-field, mixed variational principle. For the application of reduction techniques, the tire finite element model is partitioned into two regions. The first region consists of the nodes that are likely to come in contact with the pavement, and the second region includes all the remaining nodes. The reduction technique is used to significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in the second region. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by a numerical example of the frictionless contact response of the space shuttle nose-gear tire, inflated and pressed against a rigid flat surface. Also, the research topics which have high potential for enhancing the effectiveness of reduction techniques are outlined.

  10. Benefits of advanced software techniques for mission planning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasquet, A.; Parrod, Y.; Desaintvincent, A.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern spacecraft, and the stringent requirement for maximizing their mission return, call for a new generation of Mission Planning Systems (MPS). In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the Space Mission Planning and the benefits which can be expected from Artificial Intelligence techniques through examples of applications developed by Matra Marconi Space.

  11. Single Molecule Techniques for Advanced in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hollars, C W; Stubbs, L; Carlson, K; Lu, X; Wehri, E

    2003-02-03

    One of the most significant achievements of modern science is completion of the human genome sequence, completed in the year 2000. Despite this monumental accomplishment, researchers have only begun to understand the relationships between this three-billion-nucleotide genetic code and the regulation and control of gene and protein expression within each of the millions of different types of highly specialized cells. Several methodologies have been developed for the analysis of gene and protein expression in situ, yet despite these advancements, the pace of such analyses is extremely limited. Because information regarding the precise timing and location of gene expression is a crucial component in the discovery of new pharmacological agents for the treatment of disease, there is an enormous incentive to develop technologies that accelerate the analytical process. Here we report on the use of plasmon resonant particles as advanced probes for in situ hybridization. These probes are used for the detection of low levels of gene-probe response and demonstrate a detection method that enables precise, simultaneous localization within a cell of the points of expression of multiple genes or proteins in a single sample.

  12. Development of advanced low-temperature heat transfer fluids for district heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The feasibility of adding phase change materials (PCMs) and surfactants to the heat transfer fluids in district cooling systems was investigated. It increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. The thermal behavior of two potential PCMs, hexadecane and tetradecane paraffin wax, was experimentally evaluated. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. While test results for laboratory grade materials showed good agreement with data in the literature, both melting point and heat of fusion for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower than literaturevalues. PCM/water mixtures were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to determine heat transfer and flow resistance properties. When using PCMs in district cooling systems, clogging of frozen PCM particles isone of the major problems to be overcome. In the present project it is proposed to minimize or prevent clogging by the addition of an emulsifier. Effects of the emulsifier on the mixture of water and hexadecane(a PCM) were studied. As the amount of the emulsifier was increased, the size of the solid PCM particles became smaller. When the size of the particles was small enough, they did not stick together or stick to the cold surface of a heat exchanger. The amount of emulsifier to produce this condition was determined.

  13. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  14. Developments and advances concerning the hyperpolarisation technique SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the inherent sensitivity issue in NMR and MRI, hyperpolarisation techniques are used. Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) is a hyperpolarisation technique that utilises parahydrogen, a molecule that possesses a nuclear singlet state, as the source of polarisation. A metal complex is required to break the singlet order of parahydrogen and, by doing so, facilitates polarisation transfer to analyte molecules ligated to the same complex through the J-coupled network that exists. The increased signal intensities that the analyte molecules possess as a result of this process have led to investigations whereby their potential as MRI contrast agents has been probed and to understand the fundamental processes underpinning the polarisation transfer mechanism. As well as discussing literature relevant to both of these areas, the chemical structure of the complex, the physical constraints of the polarisation transfer process and the successes of implementing SABRE at low and high magnetic fields are discussed. PMID:26264565

  15. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  16. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  17. Technique for Configuring an Actively Cooled Thermal Shield in a Flight System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkfknecht, Peter; Mustafi, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    Broad area cooling shields are a mass-efficient alternative to conductively cooled thermal radiation shielding. The shield would actively intercept a large portion of incident thermal radiation and transport the heat away using cryogenic helium gas. The design concept consists of a conductive and conformable surface that maximizes heat transfer and formability. Broad Area Cooled (BAC) shields could potentially provide considerable mass savings for spaceflight applications by eliminating the need for a rigid thermal radiation shield for cryogen tanks. The BAC consists of a network of capillary tubes that are thermally connected to a conductive shield material. Chilled helium gas is circulated through the network and transports unwanted heat away from the cryogen tanks. The cryogenic helium gas is pumped and chilled simultaneously using a specialized pulse-tube cryocooler, which further improves the mass efficiency of the system. By reducing the thermal environment temperature from 300 to 100 K, the radiative heat load on a cryogen tank could be reduced by an order of magnitude. For a cryogenic liquid propellant scenario of oxygen and hydrogen, the boiloff of hydrogen would be significantly reduced and completely eliminated for oxygen. A major challenge in implementing this technology on large tanks is that the BAC system must be easily scalable from lab demonstrations to full-scale missions. Also, the BAC shield must be conformable to complex shapes like spheres without losing the ability to maintain constant temperature throughout. The initial design maximizes thermal conductivity between the capillary tube and the conductive radiation shielding by using thin, corrugated aluminum foil with the tube running transverse to the folds. This configuration has the added benefit of enabling the foil to stretch and contract longitudinally. This allows the BAC to conform to the complex curvature of a cryogen tank, which is key to its success. To demonstrate a BAC shield

  18. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  19. Recent advances in bioprinting techniques: approaches, applications and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jipeng; Chen, Mingjiao; Fan, Xianqun; Zhou, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting technology shows potential in tissue engineering for the fabrication of scaffolds, cells, tissues and organs reproducibly and with high accuracy. Bioprinting technologies are mainly divided into three categories, inkjet-based bioprinting, pressure-assisted bioprinting and laser-assisted bioprinting, based on their underlying printing principles. These various printing technologies have their advantages and limitations. Bioprinting utilizes biomaterials, cells or cell factors as a "bioink" to fabricate prospective tissue structures. Biomaterial parameters such as biocompatibility, cell viability and the cellular microenvironment strongly influence the printed product. Various printing technologies have been investigated, and great progress has been made in printing various types of tissue, including vasculature, heart, bone, cartilage, skin and liver. This review introduces basic principles and key aspects of some frequently used printing technologies. We focus on recent advances in three-dimensional printing applications, current challenges and future directions. PMID:27645770

  20. Development of processing techniques for advanced thermal protection materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.

    1994-01-01

    The effort, which was focused on the research and development of advanced materials for use in Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), has involved chemical and physical testing of refractory ceramic tiles, fabrics, threads and fibers. This testing has included determination of the optical properties, thermal shock resistance, high temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Materials have also been tested in the Arc Jet 2 x 9 Turbulent Duct Facility (TDF), the 1 atmosphere Radiant Heat Cycler, and the Mini-Wind Tunnel Facility (MWTF). A significant part of the effort hitherto has gone towards modifying and upgrading the test facilities so that meaningful tests can be carried out. Another important effort during this period has been the creation of a materials database. Computer systems administration and support have also been provided. These are described in greater detail below.

  1. Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; A Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the reduced volume prototype (RVP) spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware. Like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and a more flight-like backpressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. The development of these evaporative cooling systems will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  2. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion.

  3. Primary Energy Efficiency Analysis of Different Separate Sensible and Latent Cooling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Separate Sensible and Latent cooling (SSLC) has been discussed in open literature as means to improve air conditioning system efficiency. The main benefit of SSLC is that it enables heat source optimization for the different forms of loads, sensible vs. latent, and as such maximizes the cycle efficiency. In this paper I use a thermodynamic analysis tool in order to analyse the performance of various SSLC technologies including: multi-evaporators two stage compression system, vapour compression system with heat activated desiccant dehumidification, and integrated vapour compression with desiccant dehumidification. A primary coefficient of performance is defined and used to judge the performance of the different SSLC technologies at the design conditions. Results showed the trade-off in performance for different sensible heat factor and regeneration temperatures.

  4. The development of mathematical model for cool down technique in the LNG pipe-line system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaogi, Kenji; Takatani, Kouji; Kosugi, Sanai; Fukunaga, Takeshi

    1999-07-01

    An increase in demand for LNG as energy source can be expected since LNG is clean, in stable supply and produces low levels of carbon dioxide. Expansion of various LNG plants is planned. However, the optimal design of the LNG pipe-line systems has not yet been determined since the LNG transport phenomenon is not yet fully understood clearly. For example, in the LNG pipe-line system, large temperature gradients occur when the LNG transport starts. Therefore, although the necessity to cool down the pipe in order to minimize serious deformation is clear, the studies to understand it quantitatively have not been carried out. In this study, experiments on a commercial plant scale and a computer simulation, made up of structural analysis and two phase flow simulation were carried out to establish a prediction model of pipe deformation and to understand the phenomenon in the pipe.

  5. Cooling athletes before competition in the heat: comparison of techniques and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Quod, Marc J; Martin, David T; Laursen, Paul B

    2006-01-01

    With the general acceptance that high ambient temperature and humidity have a detrimental effect on performance, the topic of whole-body cooling and sport performance has received considerable attention from sport scientists, particularly in the lead up to the relatively hot Olympic games of 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and 2004 in Athens, Greece. This trend is likely to continue as athletes begin to prepare for what will likely be another hot Olympic games in 2008 in Beijing, China. To overcome the reduced exercise capacity associated with the heat, a number of precooling methods have been utilised to cool the body prior to exercise, with the greatest benefits likely associated with prolonged endurance-type exercise. An increase in heat storage capacity following a precooling manoeuvre has been suggested as the primary means of delaying fatigue during endurance exercise performance in the heat; the notion being that the increased heat storage capacity will allow an athlete to complete a greater amount of work before a critical body temperature is reached. However, the specific underlying mechanisms responsible for delaying fatigue during exercise in hot ambient conditions remains unclear. While significant research in this area has been completed in the laboratory setting, few studies utilise performance protocols, and even less address the practical and logistical issues associated with precooling an athlete prior to elite competition in the field. This review addresses evidence supporting the use of a precooling manoeuvre prior to endurance exercise, the potential underlying mechanisms responsible for improved endurance performance following precooling, and the practical issues associated with the use of precooling prior to competition for elite athletes. PMID:16869709

  6. Advanced CD-SEM metrology for qualification of DSA patterns using coordinated line epitaxy (COOL) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeshi; Konishi, Junko; Ikota, Masami; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Seino, Yuriko; Sato, Hironobu; Kasahara, Yusuke; Azuma, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) applying chemical epitaxy is one of the promising lithographic solutions for next generation semiconductor device manufacturing. Especially, DSA lithography using coordinated line epitaxy (COOL) process is obviously one of candidates which could be the first generation of DSA applying PS-b-PMMA block copolymer (BCP) for sub-15nm dense line patterning . DSA can enhance the pitch resolutions, and can mitigate CD errors to the values much smaller than those of the originally exposed guiding patterns. On the other hand, local line placement error often results in a worse value, with distinctive trends depending on the process conditions. To address this issue, we introduce an enhanced measurement technology of DSA line patterns with distinguishing their locations in order to evaluate nature of edge placement and roughness corresponding to individual pattern locations by using images of CD-SEM. Additionally correlations among edge roughness of each line and each space are evaluated and discussed. This method can visualize features of complicated roughness easily to control COOL process. As a result, we found the followings. (1) Line placement error and line placement roughness of DSA were slightly different each other depending on their relative position to the chemical guide patterns. (2) In middle frequency area of PSD (Power Spectral Density) analysis graphs, it was observed that shapes were sensitively changed by process conditions of chemical stripe guide size and anneals temperature. (3) Correlation coefficient analysis using PSD was able to clarify characteristics of latent defect corresponding to physical and chemical property of BCP materials.

  7. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  8. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers.

  9. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers. PMID:23674920

  10. The emerging role of advanced neuroimaging techniques for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Martha; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases are an increasingly encountered and frightening manifestation of systemic cancer. More effective therapeutic strategies for the primary tumor are resulting in longer patient survival on the one hand while on the other, better brain tumor detection has resulted from increased availability and development of more precise brain imaging methods. This review focuses on the emerging role of functional neuroimaging techniques; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET), in establishing diagnosis, for monitoring treatment response with an emphasis on new targeted as well as immunomodulatory therapies and for predicting prognosis in patients with brain metastases.

  11. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  12. Advanced techniques in reliability model representation and solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The current tendency of flight control system designs is towards increased integration of applications and increased distribution of computational elements. The reliability analysis of such systems is difficult because subsystem interactions are increasingly interdependent. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been working for several years to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques to address these problems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG) is a software tool that uses as input a graphical object-oriented block diagram of the system. RMG uses a failure-effects algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. The ASSURE software tool is a parallel processing program that uses the semi-Markov unreliability range evaluator (SURE) solution technique and the abstract semi-Markov specification interface to the SURE tool (ASSIST) modeling language. A failure modes-effects simulation is used by ASSURE. These tools were used to analyze a significant portion of a complex flight control system. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that distributed fault-tolerant system architectures can now be analyzed.

  13. Advanced terahertz techniques for quality control and counterfeit detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports our invented methods for detection of counterfeit electronic. These versatile techniques are also handy in quality control applications. Terahertz pulsed laser systems are capable of giving the material characteristics and thus make it possible to distinguish between the materials used in authentic components and their counterfeit clones. Components with material defects can also be distinguished in section in this manner. In this work different refractive indices and absorption coefficients were observed for counterfeit components compared to their authentic counterparts. Existence of unexpected ingredient materials was detected in counterfeit components by Fourier Transform analysis of the transmitted terahertz pulse. Thicknesses of different layers are obtainable by analyzing the reflected terahertz pulse. Existence of unexpected layers is also detectable in this manner. Recycled, sanded and blacktopped counterfeit electronic components were detected as a result of these analyses. Counterfeit ICs with die dislocations were detected by depicting the terahertz raster scanning data in a coordinate plane which gives terahertz images. In the same manner, raster scanning of the reflected pulse gives terahertz images of the surfaces of the components which were used to investigate contaminant materials and sanded points on the surfaces. The results of the later technique, reveals the recycled counterfeit components.

  14. Advanced microscopy techniques resolving complex precipitates in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikaly, W.; Soto, R.; Bano, X.; Issartel, C.; Rigaut, G.; Charaï, A.

    1999-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy as well as analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques such as high resolution, electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) and elemental mapping via a Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF) have been used to study complex precipitation in commercial dual phase steels microalloyed with titanium. Titanium nitrides, titanium carbosulfides, titanium carbonitrides and titanium carbides were characterized in this study. Both carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were used as sample preparation techniques. On both the microscopic and nanometric scales, it was found that a large amount of precipitation occurred heterogeneously on already existing inclusions/precipitates. CaS inclusions (1 to 2 μm), already present in liquid steel, acted as nucleation sites for TiN precipitating upon the steel's solidification. In addition, TiC nucleated on existing smaller TiN (around 30 to 50 nm). Despite the complexity of such alloys, the statistical analysis conducted on the non-equilibrium samples were found to be in rather good agreement with the theoretical equilibrium calculations. Heterogeneous precipitation must have played a role in bringing these results closer together.

  15. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  16. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Sherrell R; Gehin, Jess C; Holcomb, David Eugene; Carbajo, Juan J; Ilas, Dan; Cisneros, Anselmo T; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Corwin, William R; Wilson, Dane F; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Qualls, A L; Peretz, Fred J; Flanagan, George F; Clayton, Dwight A; Bradley, Eric Craig; Bell, Gary L; Hunn, John D; Pappano, Peter J; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  17. ORIGEN-ARP Cross-Section Libraries for Magnox, Advanced Gas-Cooled, and VVER Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, BD

    2004-03-10

    Cross-section libraries for the ORIGEN-ARP system were extended to include four non-U.S. reactor types: the Magnox reactor, the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor, the VVER-440, and the VVER-1000. Typical design and operational parameters for these four reactor types were determined by an examination of a variety of published information sources. Burnup simulation models of the reactors were then developed using the SAS2H sequence from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory SCALE code system. In turn, these models were used to prepare the burnup-dependent cross-section libraries suitable for use with ORIGEN-ARP. The reactor designs together with the development of the SAS2H models are described, and a small number of validation results using spent-fuel assay data are reported.

  18. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  19. Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

  20. Recent Advances in Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurement Techniques and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced instrument concepts and technologies for future spaceborne atmospheric radars, with an over-arching objective of making such instruments more capable in supporting future science needs and more cost effective. Two such examples are the Second-Generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) and the Nexrad-In-Space (NIS). PR-2 is a 14/35-GHz dual-frequency rain radar with a deployable 5-meter, wide-swath scanned membrane antenna, a dual-polarized/dual-frequency receiver, and a realtime digital signal processor. It is intended for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operations to provide greatly enhanced rainfall profile retrieval accuracy while consuming only a fraction of the mass of the current TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). NIS is designed to be a 35-GHz Geostationary Earth Orbiting (GEO) radar for providing hourly monitoring of the life cycle of hurricanes and tropical storms. It uses a 35-m, spherical, lightweight membrane antenna and Doppler processing to acquire 3-dimensional information on the intensity and vertical motion of hurricane rainfall.

  1. Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lovitt, Carrie J.; Shelper, Todd B.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2014-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are an integral part of drug discovery practices. However, modeling the complexity of cancer utilizing these cell lines on standard plastic substrata, does not accurately represent the tumor microenvironment. Research into developing advanced tumor cell culture models in a three-dimensional (3D) architecture that more prescisely characterizes the disease state have been undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. These 3D cell culture models are particularly beneficial for investigating mechanistic processes and drug resistance in tumor cells. In addition, a range of molecular mechanisms deconstructed by studying cancer cells in 3D models suggest that tumor cells cultured in two-dimensional monolayer conditions do not respond to cancer therapeutics/compounds in a similar manner. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of utilizing 3D cell culture models in drug discovery programs; however, it is evident that further research is required for the development of more complex models that incorporate the majority of the cellular and physical properties of a tumor. PMID:24887773

  2. Advanced coding techniques for few mode transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Okonkwo, Chigo; van Uden, Roy; Chen, Haoshuo; de Waardt, Huug; Koonen, Ton

    2015-01-26

    We experimentally verify the advantage of employing advanced coding schemes such as space-time coding and 4 dimensional modulation formats to enhance the transmission performance of a 3-mode transmission system. The performance gain of space-time block codes for extending the optical signal-to-noise ratio tolerance in multiple-input multiple-output optical coherent spatial division multiplexing transmission systems with respect to single-mode transmission performance are evaluated. By exploiting the spatial diversity that few-mode-fibers offer, with respect to single mode fiber back-to-back performance, significant OSNR gains of 3.2, 4.1, 4.9, and 6.8 dB at the hard-decision forward error correcting limit are demonstrated for DP-QPSK 8, 16 and 32 QAM, respectively. Furthermore, by employing 4D constellations, 6 × 28Gbaud 128 set partitioned quadrature amplitude modulation is shown to outperform conventional 8 QAM transmission performance, whilst carrying an additional 0.5 bit/symbol.

  3. Benefits of advanced working fluids for DHC (district heating and cooling) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-09-01

    DHC projects have positive economic and community development rewards. Today the US DHC industry has moved beyond a market consisting of institutional and military-base systems to community energy systems which cover the central business district and adjoining high density areas as well as communities that need revitalization and new development. One day DHC may be a national industry when DHC is married to electric utilities by recovering waste heat from nuclear or coal power plants (rather than wasting it causing thermal pollution) and supplying heat to customers through the DHC loop as is done in several European countries. These cogenerative DHC systems will make a significant impact on energy conservation and create the most reliable and efficient electric utility systems. The objectives of this paper, are to review the benefits and barriers of conventional DHC technology, introduce the concepts of advanced working fluids and consider the potential benefits of these advanced working fluids for DHC systems. 5 refs.

  4. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  5. Advanced Process Monitoring Techniques for Safeguarding Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peper, Shane M.

    2010-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-grade nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. For large throughput nuclear facilities, it is difficult to satisfy the IAEA safeguards accountancy goal for detection of abrupt diversion. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non destructive assay (NDA) process monitoring techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide an additional measure to nuclear material accountancy which would potentially result in a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for safeguards verification at such facilities. By monitoring process control measurements (e.g. flowrates, temperatures, or concentrations of reagents, products or wastes), abnormal plant operations can be detected. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including both the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor and a spectroscopy-based monitoring system, to potentially reduce the time and resource burden associated with current techniques. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major cold flowsheet chemicals using UV-Vis, Near IR and Raman spectroscopy. This paper will provide an overview of our methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technologies.

  6. Rotational modulation in IUE spectra of cool dwarf chromospheres. I - Data analysis and period search techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Altner, B.; Endal, A. S.

    1991-01-01

    Time-sequenced IUE spectra of a number of a bright F-K dwarfs have been used to investigate rotational modulation in several important chromospheric and transition emission lines. Stellingwerf's phase dispersion minimization (PDM) technique forms the basis of this time-series analysis of these sparsely sampled, irregularly spaced observational sequences, which consist of no more than 13 spectra in any one season. In such highly sample-limited time series, the resultant PDM spectrum is greatly complicated by overlapping alias orders which invariably produce strong interference effects, but the deliberately irregular sampling has proven of value in the development of techniques to identify the intrinsic stellar flux modulation period. Two stars are selected to illustrate these new techniques in detail.

  7. Rotational modulation in IUE spectra of cool dwarf chromospheres: Data analysis and period search techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altner, B.; Endal, A. S.; Hallam, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    The IUE spectra of bright F-K dwarfs were used to investigate rotational modulation in chromospheric and transition region emission lines, with Stellingwerf's phase dispersion minimization (PDM) technique as the basis of time series analysis. Sampling-related aliases are found to dominate the PDM spectra in these sparsely sampled, irregularly spaced time series. The star chosen to illustrate the techniques is epsilon Eridani, a young, chromospherically active K2 dwarf. Strong indications of a rotation period close to 2.8 days in epsilon Eridani from 2 seasons of observations, with evidence for the persistence in longitude of the active area(s) over several hundred rotation cycles are found.

  8. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Technique for in Situ Analysis of Supersaturation in Cooling Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Shang; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-06-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is used as a novel in situ strategy for analyzing the supersaturation profile during cooling crystallization. The main concept is based on preventing any solid mass loading on the QCM sensor by modifying the sensor surface. As a result, the QCM responses only depend on the solution concentration changes during the crystallization. The proposed strategy is confirmed on the basis of an analysis of sulfamerazine (SMZ) crystallization. When the QCM sensor is modified using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol (AUT), crystal formation on the sensor is completely prevented due to a repulsive interaction between the -NH2 functional groups of the AUT and SMZ crystals. Thus, the QCM responses reflect only the property changes in the solution phase during the crystallization. The supersaturation in the solution is then estimated on the basis of the difference in the frequency shifts between the SMZ solution and a blank solution. The accuracy of the in situ QCM analysis of supersaturation is confirmed using an off-line gravimetric method. PMID:27161190

  9. Silicon and germanium crystallization techniques for advanced device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaocheng

    Three-dimensional architectures are believed to be one of the possible approaches to reduce interconnect delay in integrated circuits. Metal-induced crystallization (MIC) can produce reasonably high-quality Si crystals with low-temperature processing, enabling the monolithic integration of multilevel devices and circuits. A two-step MIC process was developed to make single-crystal Si pillars on insulator by forming a single-grain NiSi2 template in the first step and crystallizing the amorphous Si by NiSi2-mediated solid-phase epitaxy (SPE) in the second step. A transmission electron microscopy study clearly showed the quality improvement over the traditional MIC process. Another crystallization technique developed is rapid melt growth (RMG) for the fabrication of Ge crystals and Ge-on-insulator (GeOI) substrates. Ge is an important semiconductor with high carrier mobility and excellent optoelectronic properties. GeOI substrates are particularly desired to achieve high device performances and to solve the process problems traditionally associated with bulk Ge wafers. High-quality Ge crystals and GeOI structures were grown on Si substrates using the novel rapid melt growth technique that integrates the key elements in Czochralski growth---seeding, melting, epitaxy and defect necking. Growth velocity and nucleation rate were calculated to determine the RMG process window. Self-aligned microcrucibles were created to hold the Ge liquid during the RMG annealing. Material characterization showed a very low defect density in the RMG GeOI structures. The Ge films are relaxed, with their orientations controlled by the Si substrates. P-channel MOSFETs and p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated with the GeOI substrates. The device properties are comparable to those obtained with bulk Ge wafers, indicating that the RMG GeOI substrates are well suited for device fabrication. A new theory, growth-induced barrier lowering (GIBL), is proposed to understand the defect generation in

  10. Recent advances in actively cooled high-power laser diode bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, Nels P.; Roh, S. D.; Grasso, Daniel M.; Kane, Thomas J.

    2007-02-01

    In order to meet the ever increasing demands of many high power laser diode customers, Nuvonyx has worked to improve a number of key metrics of the diode laser package. The most often challenged specifications are power per bar, efficiency, and reliability in both hard pulse and constant current mode. In response to these requests, Nuvonyx has worked to offer commercial component devices in excess of 100 and 150 watts per bar package in multiple wavelengths. The packages are routinely combined to form single stacks that generate greater than 3.5 kilowatts each and two-dimensional arrays which produce light in excess of 10 kilowatts. These parts all demonstrate predicted lifetimes in excess of 10,000 hours. The micro-channel cooled heat sink has also been improved by closer matching the coefficient of thermal expansion of the cooler to the laser diode bar, which allows for harder solders such as gold-tin to be employed. All of this work has helped to meet the specifications of the most demanding laser diode customers.

  11. Development of advanced low-temperature heat transfer fluids for district heating and cooling, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.I.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    The feasibility of adding phase change materials (PCMS) and surfactants to the heat transfer fluids in district cooling systems was investigated. It increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. The thermal behavior of two potential PCMS, hexadecane and tetradecane paraffin wax, was experimentally evaluated. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. While test results for laboratory grade materials showed good agreement with data in the literature, both melting point and heat of fusion for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower than literature values. PCM/water mixtures were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to determine heat transfer and flow resistance properties. For 10% and 25% PCM/water slurries, the heat transfer enhancement was found to be approximately 18 and 30 percent above the value for water, respectively. Within the turbulent region, there is only a minor pumping penalty from the addition of up to 25% PCM to the water. Research is continuing on these fluids in order to determine their behavior in large-size loops and to arrive at optimum formulations.

  12. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

  13. Advanced Manufacturing Techniques Demonstrated for Fabricating Developmental Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Engineering Development Division has been working in support of innovative gas turbine engine systems under development by Glenn's Combustion Branch. These one-of-a-kind components require operation under extreme conditions. High-temperature ceramics were chosen for fabrication was because of the hostile operating environment. During the designing process, it became apparent that traditional machining techniques would not be adequate to produce the small, intricate features for the conceptual design, which was to be produced by stacking over a dozen thin layers with many small features that would then be aligned and bonded together into a one-piece unit. Instead of using traditional machining, we produced computer models in Pro/ENGINEER (Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), Needham, MA) to the specifications of the research engineer. The computer models were exported in stereolithography standard (STL) format and used to produce full-size rapid prototype polymer models. These semi-opaque plastic models were used for visualization and design verification. The computer models also were exported in International Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) format and sent to Glenn's Thermal/Fluids Design & Analysis Branch and Applied Structural Mechanics Branch for profiling heat transfer and mechanical strength analysis.

  14. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  15. Advances in Current Rating Techniques for Flexible Printed Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Twist Capsule Assemblies are power transfer devices commonly used in spacecraft mechanisms that require electrical signals to be passed across a rotating interface. Flexible printed circuits (flex tapes, see Figure 2) are used to carry the electrical signals in these devices. Determining the current rating for a given trace (conductor) size can be challenging. Because of the thermal conditions present in this environment the most appropriate approach is to assume that the only means by which heat is removed from the trace is thru the conductor itself, so that when the flex tape is long the temperature rise in the trace can be extreme. While this technique represents a worst-case thermal situation that yields conservative current ratings, this conservatism may lead to overly cautious designs when not all traces are used at their full rated capacity. A better understanding of how individual traces behave when they are not all in use is the goal of this research. In the testing done in support of this paper, a representative flex tape used for a flight Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) application was tested by energizing individual traces (conductors in the tape) in a vacuum chamber and the temperatures of the tape measured using both fine-gauge thermocouples and infrared thermographic imaging. We find that traditional derating schemes used for bundles of wires do not apply for the configuration tested. We also determine that single active traces located in the center of a flex tape operate at lower temperatures than those on the outside edges.

  16. Recent advances in techniques for tsetse-fly control*

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, K. J. R.

    1967-01-01

    With the advent of modern persistent insecticides, it has become possible to utilize some of the knowledge that has accumulated on the ecology and bionomics of Glossina and to devise more effective techniques for the control and eventual extermination of these species. The present article, based on experience of the tsetse fly problem in Northern Nigeria, points out that the disadvantages of control techniques—heavy expenditure of money and manpower and undue damage to the biosystem—can now largely be overcome by basing the application of insecticides on knowledge of the habits of the particular species of Glossina in a particular environment. Two factors are essential to the success of a control project: the proper selection of sites for spraying (the concept of restricted application) and the degree of persistence of the insecticide used. Reinfestation from within or outside the project area must also be taken into account. These and other aspects are discussed in relation to experience gained from a successful extermination project carried out in the Sudan vegetation zone and from present control activities in the Northern Guinea vegetation zone. PMID:5301739

  17. Advanced pattern-matching techniques for autonomous acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, P. M.; Westover, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    The key objective of this effort is the development of pattern-matching algorithms which can impart autonomous acquisition capability to precision-guided munitions such as Copperhead and Hellfire. Autonomous acquisition through pattern matching holds the promise of eliminating laser designation and enhancing fire power by multiple target prioritization. The pattern-matching approach being developed under this program is based on a symbolic pattern-matching framework, which is suited for the autonomous acquisition scenario. It is based on matching a symbolic representation derived from the two images, and it can accommodate the stringent pattern-matchine criteria established by the scenario: enormous differences in the scene perspective, aspect and range between the two sensors, differences in sensor characteristics and illumination, and scene changes such as target motion and obscuration from one view point ot the other. This report contains a description of an efficient branch-and-bound technique for symbolic pattern matching. Also presented are the results of applying a simulation of the algorithm to pairs of FLIR images of military vehicles in cluttered environments as well as pairs of images from different sensors (FLIR and silicon TV). The computational requirements are analyzed toward real-time implementation, and avenues of future work are recommended.

  18. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  19. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  20. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss "small-group apprenticeships (SGAs)" as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments…

  1. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Discusses small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method for introducing cell culture techniques to high school participants. Teaches cell culture practices and introduces advance imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Clarifies and illuminates the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships. (Author/KHR)

  2. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.; Stebbins, J. P.; Smith, A. W.; Pullen, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method for the prediction of propellant-material compatibility for periods of time up to ten years is presented. Advanced sensitive measurement techniques used in the prediction method are described. These include: neutron activation analysis, radioactive tracer technique, and atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite tube furnace sampler. The results of laboratory tests performed to verify the prediction method are presented.

  3. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  4. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  5. Nanostructured Hypoeutectic Fe-B Alloy Prepared by a Self-propagating High Temperature Synthesis Combining a Rapid Cooling Technique

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We have successfully synthesized bulk nanostructured Fe94.3B5.7 alloy using the one-step approach of a self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) combining a rapid cooling technique. This method is convenient, low in cost, and capable of being scaled up for processing the bulk nanostructured materials. The solidification microstructure is composed of a relatively coarse, uniformly distributed dendriteto a nanostructured eutectic matrix with α-Fe(B) and t-Fe2B phases. The fine eutectic structure is disorganized, and the precipitation Fe2B is found in the α-Fe(B) phase of the eutectic. The dendrite phase has the t-Fe2B structure rather than α-Fe(B) in the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy, because the growth velocity of t-Fe2B is faster than that of the α-Fe with the deeply super-cooling degree. The coercivity (Hc) and saturation magnetization (Ms) values of the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy are 11 A/m and 1.74T, respectively. Moreover, the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy yields at 1430 MPa and fractures at 1710 MPa with a large ductility of 19.8% at compressive test. PMID:20596402

  6. A comparison of Flux transfer events' motion determined by deHoffmann-Teller technique with the Cooling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silveira, M. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Gonzalez, W.; Koga, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are considered as a result of transient magnetic reconnection and are often observed in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetopause. The FTEs are responsible for transfer of mass, energy and momentum between solar wind and magnetosphere. According to FTE generation models and in situ observations, FTEs are formed in the subsolar region when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is southward while for northward IMF they should be formed in the polar cap regions. In the present study it is analyzed 58 FTE events observed by the THEMIS spacecraft. First of all, the deHoffmann-Teller technique is employed to determine the local FTE velocity and direction. Then, these parameters (velocity and direction) are compared with those predicted by the Cooling model which has largely been employed to estimate the motion of reconnected flux tubes over a modeled magnetopause under specific solar wind conditions. The calculated deHoffmann-Teller velocity and direction indicate that FTEs observed at the flanks of magnetosphere (|YGSM|≥10 Re) move antisunward and dawn/duskward. For intermediate longitudes (|YGSM|<10 Re) a combination of dusk/dawnward and southward motions is found for the present study. The comparison between the calculated FTEs' velocity/direction and those predicted by the Cooling model presents a good agreement. It is also found that 12 FTE events were observed in the equatorial region during northward IMF.

  7. [Our experience with the treatment of high perianal fistulas with the mucosal flap advancement technique].

    PubMed

    Marino, Giuseppe; Greco, Ettore; Gasparrini, Marcello; Romanzi, Aldo; Ottaviani, Maurizio; Nasi, Stefano; Pasquini, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the treatment of high transphincteric anal fistulas with the mucosal flap advancement technique. This technique, though by no means easy to perform, allows fistulas to be treated in a single surgical session in comparison to the technique in which setone is used or to the less well known transposition techniques, given the same long-term results in terms of continence and recurrence rate. After a brief overview of the problem, from the points of view of both aetiopathogenesis and classification, the principal surgical treatment techniques are described, presenting the results and complications observed in the authors' own case series. PMID:15038659

  8. A History of Dosimetry for the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Simon; Thornton, Dean

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a summary of the methods used in the first ˜40 years of AGR neutron dosimetry and nuclear heating calculations, and the influence of the earlier Magnox reactor dosimetry programme. While the current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo methods are extremely powerful they still require very careful consideration of the quality of the input data, nuclear data validation and variance reduction techniques; in particular, this paper examines the difficulties in assuring the adequate convergence of calculations when Monte Carlo acceleration is applied in the presence of significant streaming paths through attenuating or scattering media.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

    2006-09-01

    INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT

  10. Reliability assessment of thrust chamber cooling concepts using probabilistic analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1993-01-01

    The reliability of OFHC (Oxygen Free High Conductivity) copper and NARloy-Z thrust chambers is assessed by applying probabilistic structural analysis techniques to incorporate design parameter variability and uncertainty. Thrust chambers specifically evaluated are the cylindrical test fixtures employed in a plug-nozzle configuration at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Direct sampling Monte Carlo simulations based on a simplified life prediction methodology established probability densities of firing cycles to structural failure. Simulated cyclic lives demonstrated modest agreement to experiment. Similarly, regions of high structural failure probability were determined using a limit state approach employing calculated cumulative distribution functions for effective stress response and an assumed material strength distribution. A probability of failure of 0.012 was calculated at the center of the coolant channel hot-gas-side wall for an OFHC milled channel. Structural response was found to be sensitive to the uncertainties in the thrust chamber thermal environment and the material's thermal expansion coefficient.

  11. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  12. Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Wilson, Dane F; Forsberg, Charles W

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

  13. Advances in high-resolution imaging – techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques. PMID:22685332

  14. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 2: Advanced techniques. The linear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is presented for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the linear satellite channel. The underlying principle used is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum-likelihood decision rule. The application of the performance prediction tools, e.g., channel cutoff rate and bit error probability transfer function bounds to these modulation/demodulation techniques.

  15. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  16. POC-Scale Testing of an Advanced Fine Coal Dewatering Equipment/Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Karekh, B K; Tao, D; Groppo, J G

    1998-08-28

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 mm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy's program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 45 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 - March 31, 1998.

  17. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 3: Advanced techniques. The nonlinear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the nonlinear satellite channel is presented. The underlying principle used throughout is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum likelihood decision rule and aproximations to it. The bit error probability transfer function bounds developed in great detail in Part 4 is applied to these modulation/demodulation techniques. The effects of the various degrees of receiver mismatch are considered both theoretically and by numerous illustrative examples.

  18. Analyses of the reflector tank, cold source, and beam tube cooling for ANS reactor. [Advanced Neutron Source (ANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Marland, S. )

    1992-07-01

    This report describes my work as an intern with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in the summer of 1991. I was assigned to the Reactor Technology Engineering Department, working on the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). My first project was to select and analyze sealing systems for the top of the diverter/reflector tank. This involved investigating various metal seals and calculating the forces necessary to maintain an adequate seal. The force calculations led to an analysis of several bolt patterns and lockring concepts that could be used to maintain a seal on the vessel. Another project involved some pressure vessel stress calculations and the calculation of the center of gravity for the cold source assembly. I also completed some sketches of possible cooling channel patterns for the inner vessel of the cold source. In addition, I worked on some thermal design analyses for the reflector tank and beam tubes, including heat transfer calculations and assisting in Patran and Pthermal analyses. To supplement the ANS work, I worked on other projects. I completed some stress/deflection analyses on several different beams. These analyses were done with the aid of CAASE, a beam-analysis software package. An additional project involved bending analysis on a carbon removal system. This study was done to find the deflection of a complex-shaped beam when loaded with a full waste can.

  19. Laminated turbine vane design and fabrication. [utilizing film cooling as a cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A turbine vane and associated endwalls designed for advanced gas turbine engine conditions are described. The vane design combines the methods of convection cooling and selective areas of full coverage film cooling. The film cooling technique is utilized on the leading edge, pressure side, and endwall regions. The turbine vane involves the fabrication of airfoils from a stack of laminates with cooling passages photoetched on the surface. Cold flow calibration tests, a thermal analysis, and a stress analysis were performed on the turbine vanes.

  20. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  1. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-04-28

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application.

  2. Softform for facial rejuvenation: historical review, operative techniques, and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Miller, P J; Levine, J; Ahn, M S; Maas, C S; Constantinides, M

    2000-01-01

    The deep nasolabial fold and other facial furrows and wrinkles have challenged the facial plastic surgeon. A variety of techniques have been used in the past to correct these troublesome defects. Advances in the last five years in new materials and design have created a subcutaneous implant that has excellent properties. This article reviews the development and use of Softform facial implant.

  3. Traditional Materials and Techniques Used as Instructional Devices in an Advanced Business Spanish Conversation Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivieso, Jorge

    Spanish language training at the Thunderbird Graduate School of International Management is discussed, focusing on the instructional materials and classroom techniques used in advanced Spanish conversation classes. While traditional materials (dialogues, dictation, literature, mass media, video- and audiotapes) and learning activities (recitation,…

  4. Recognizing and Managing Complexity: Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts and Techniques Using the Zebra Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, John; Zhang, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced programming can be a challenge, especially when the students are pursuing different majors with diverse analytical and problem-solving capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of using a particular problem as a vehicle for imparting a broad set of programming concepts and problem-solving techniques. We…

  5. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  6. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  7. Development of a technique to evaluate the performance of cooling headers and its applications in POSCO plate mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Pil-Jong

    2016-03-01

    Hundreds of thousands of liquid jet nozzles are widely used in controling cooling equipment to accelerate the cooling of hot plates. The holes of these nozzles become clogged or the hole size becomes smaller as foreign substances like grease, scrap, and mud containing cooling water are flushed through. In this case, cooling water sprays abnormally through the partially clogged or restricted nozzle. This causes inhomogeneous cooling of hot plates. The objective of this study is to develop an evaluation system of cooling headers including nozzles. This paper presents the method to evaluate the conditions of spraying nozzles. The sensor developed in this research measures the liquid column of spraying nozzles using differential pressure between the inside sensor block and ambient air. In addition, the results of a field test in a real, large factory are introduced in this paper.

  8. Mandate a Man to Fish?: Technological advance in cooling systems at U.S. thermal electric plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peredo-Alvarez, Victor M.; Bellas, Allen S.; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney J.; Lange, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Steam-based electrical generating plants use large quantities of water for cooling. The potential environmental impacts of water cooling systems have resulted in their inclusion in the Clean Water Act's (CWA) Sections 316(a), related to thermal discharges and 316(b), related to cooling water intake. The CWA mandates a technological standard for water cooling systems. This analysis examines how the performance-adjusted rates of thermal emissions and water withdrawals for cooling units have changed over their vintage and how these rates of change were impacted by imposition of the CWA. Results show that the rate of progress increased for cooling systems installed after the CWA whilethere was no progress previous to it.

  9. Detection and Sizing of Fatigue Cracks in Steel Welds with Advanced Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, E. I.; Mohr, W. C.; Lozev, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Butt-welded specimens were fatigued to produce cracks in the weld heat-affected zone. Advanced eddy current (AEC) techniques were used to detect and size the cracks through a coating. AEC results were compared with magnetic particle and phased-array ultrasonic techniques. Validation through destructive crack measurements was also conducted. Factors such as geometry, surface treatment, and crack tightness interfered with depth sizing. AEC inspection techniques have the potential of providing more accurate and complete sizing flaw data for manufacturing and in-service inspections.

  10. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  11. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The search for advanced measurement techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants was conducted in several parts. A comprehensive survey of the existing measurement and testing technology for determining material-propellant interactions was performed. Selections were made from those existing techniques which were determined could meet or be made to meet the requirements. Areas of refinement or changes were recommended for improvement of others. Investigations were also performed to determine the feasibility and advantages of developing and using new techniques to achieve significant improvements over existing ones. The most interesting demonstration was that of the new technique, the volatile metal chelate analysis. Rivaling the neutron activation analysis in terms of sensitivity and specificity, the volatile metal chelate technique was fully demonstrated.

  12. Temperature and pressure measurement techniques for an advanced turbine test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.; Cochran, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, high-temperature turbine test facility constructed for use in turbine cooling research is described. Several recently developed temperature and pressure measuring techniques are used in this facility. The measurement techniques, their status, previous applications and some results are discussed. Noncontact surface temperature measurements are made by optical methods. Radiation pyrometry principles combined with photoelectric scanning are used for rotating components and infrared photography for stationary components. Contact (direct) temperature and pressure measurements on rotating components are expected to be handled with an 80 channel rotary data package which mounts on and rotates with the turbine shaft at speeds up to 17,500 rpm. The data channels are time-division multiplexed and converted to digital words in the data package. A rotary transformer couples power and digital data to and from the shaft.

  13. Nondestructive Characterization by Advanced Synchrotron Light Techniques: Spectromicroscopy and Coherent Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Margaritondo, Giorgio; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho

    2008-01-01

    The advanced characteristics of synchrotron light has led in recent years to the development of a series of new experimental techniques to investigate chemical and physical properties on a microscopic scale. Although originally developed for materials science and biomedical research, such techniques find increasing applications in other domains – and could be quite useful for the study and conservation of cultural heritage. Specifically, they can nondestructively provide detailed chemical composition information that can be useful for the identification of specimens, for the discovery of historical links based on the sources of chemical raw materials and on chemical processes, for the analysis of damage, their causes and remedies and for many other issues. Likewise, morphological and structural information on a microscopic scale is useful for the identification, study and preservation of many different cultural and historical specimens. We concentrate here on two classes of techniques: in the first case, photoemission spectromicroscopy. This is the result of the advanced evolution of photoemission techniques like ESCA (Electron Microscopy for Chemical Analysis). By combining high lateral resolution to spectroscopy, photoemission spectromicroscopy can deliver fine chemical information on a microscopic scale in a nondestructive fashion. The second class of techniques exploits the high lateral coherence of modern synchrotron sources, a byproduct of the quest for high brightness or brilliance. We will see that such techniques now push radiology into the submicron scale and the submillisecond time domain. Furthermore, they can be implemented in a tomographic mode, increasing the information and becoming potentially quite useful for the analysis of cultural heritage specimens.

  14. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  15. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  16. Dual nozzle aerodynamic and cooling analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical models to predict performance and operating characteristics of dual nozzle concepts were developed and improved. Aerodynamic models are available to define flow characteristics and bleed requirements for both the dual throat and dual expander concepts. Advanced analytical techniques were utilized to provide quantitative estimates of the bleed flow, boundary layer, and shock effects within dual nozzle engines. Thermal analyses were performed to define cooling requirements for baseline configurations, and special studies of unique dual nozzle cooling problems defined feasible means of achieving adequate cooling.

  17. Advances in the surface modification techniques of bone-related implants for last 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Lee, In-Seop

    2014-01-01

    At the time of implanting bone-related implants into human body, a variety of biological responses to the material surface occur with respect to surface chemistry and physical state. The commonly used biomaterials (e.g. titanium and its alloy, Co–Cr alloy, stainless steel, polyetheretherketone, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and various calcium phosphates) have many drawbacks such as lack of biocompatibility and improper mechanical properties. As surface modification is very promising technology to overcome such problems, a variety of surface modification techniques have been being investigated. This review paper covers recent advances in surface modification techniques of bone-related materials including physicochemical coating, radiation grafting, plasma surface engineering, ion beam processing and surface patterning techniques. The contents are organized with different types of techniques to applicable materials, and typical examples are also described. PMID:26816626

  18. Advanced semiconductor diagnosis by multidimensional electron-beam-induced current technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yuan, X; Sekiguchi, T

    2008-01-01

    We present advanced semiconductor diagnosis by using electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. By varying the parameters such as temperature, accelerating voltage (V(acc)), bias voltage, and stressing time, it is possible to extend EBIC application from conventional defect characterization to advanced device diagnosis. As an electron beam can excite a certain volume even beneath the surface passive layer, EBIC can be effectively employed to diagnose complicated devices with hybrid structure. Three topics were selected to demonstrate EBIC applications. First, the recombination activities of grain boundaries and their interaction with Fe impurity in photovoltaic multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) are clarified by temperature-dependent EBIC. Second, the detection of dislocations between strained-Si and SiGe virtual substrate are shown to overcome the limitation of depletion region. Third, the observation of leakage sites in high-k gate dielectric is demonstrated for the characterization of advanced hybrid device structures.

  19. Recent advancements in nanoelectrodes and nanopipettes used in combined scanning electrochemical microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Kranz, Christine

    2014-01-21

    In recent years, major developments in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) have significantly broadened the application range of this electroanalytical technique from high-resolution electrochemical imaging via nanoscale probes to large scale mapping using arrays of microelectrodes. A major driving force in advancing the SECM methodology is based on developing more sophisticated probes beyond conventional micro-disc electrodes usually based on noble metals or carbon microwires. This critical review focuses on the design and development of advanced electrochemical probes particularly enabling combinations of SECM with other analytical measurement techniques to provide information beyond exclusively measuring electrochemical sample properties. Consequently, this critical review will focus on recent progress and new developments towards multifunctional imaging.

  20. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 pm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean-coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from July 1 - September 30, 1997.

  1. The investigation of advanced remote sensing techniques for the measurement of aerosol characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Becher, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques and inversion methods for the measurement of characteristics of aerosol and gaseous species in the atmosphere were investigated. Of particular interest were the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, such as their size distribution, number concentration, and complex refractive index, and the vertical distribution of these properties on a local as well as global scale. Remote sensing techniques for monitoring of tropospheric aerosols were developed as well as satellite monitoring of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Computer programs were developed for solving multiple scattering and radiative transfer problems, as well as inversion/retrieval problems. A necessary aspect of these efforts was to develop models of aerosol properties.

  2. Advanced digital modulation: Communication techniques and monolithic GaAs technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Oliver, J. D., Jr.; Kot, R. C.; Richards, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Communications theory and practice are merged with state-of-the-art technology in IC fabrication, especially monolithic GaAs technology, to examine the general feasibility of a number of advanced technology digital transmission systems. Satellite-channel models with (1) superior throughput, perhaps 2 Gbps; (2) attractive weight and cost; and (3) high RF power and spectrum efficiency are discussed. Transmission techniques possessing reasonably simple architectures capable of monolithic fabrication at high speeds were surveyed. This included a review of amplitude/phase shift keying (APSK) techniques and the continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) methods, of which MSK represents the simplest case.

  3. Combined preputial advancement and phallopexy as a revision technique for treating paraphimosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Wasik, S M; Wallace, A M

    2014-11-01

    A 7-year-old neutered male Jack Russell terrier-cross was presented for signs of recurrent paraphimosis, despite previous surgical enlargement of the preputial ostium. Revision surgery was performed using a combination of preputial advancement and phallopexy, which resulted in complete and permanent coverage of the glans penis by the prepuce, and at 1 year postoperatively, no recurrence of paraphimosis had been observed. The combined techniques allow preservation of the normal penile anatomy, are relatively simple to perform and provide a cosmetic result. We recommend this combination for the treatment of paraphimosis in the dog, particularly when other techniques have failed. PMID:25348145

  4. Development of advanced electron holographic techniques and application to industrial materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2013-06-01

    The development of a transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission gun paved the way for electron holography to be put to practical use in various fields. In this paper, we review three advanced electron holography techniques: on-line real-time electron holography, three-dimensional (3D) tomographic holography and phase-shifting electron holography, which are becoming important techniques for materials science and device engineering. We also describe some applications of electron holography to the analysis of industrial materials and devices: GaAs compound semiconductors, solid oxide fuel cells and all-solid-state lithium ion batteries.

  5. An example of requirements for Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system using structured techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclees, Robert E.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are presented for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system generated using structured techniques. The requirements definition starts from initially performing a mission analysis to identify the high level control system requirements and functions necessary to satisfy the mission flight. The result of the study is an example set of control system requirements partially represented using a derivative of Yourdon's structured techniques. Also provided is a research focus for studying structured design methodologies and in particular design-for-validation philosophies.

  6. Study of advanced techniques for determining the long term performance of components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The application of existing and new technology to the problem of determining the long-term performance capability of liquid rocket propulsion feed systems is discussed. The long term performance of metal to metal valve seats in a liquid propellant fuel system is stressed. The approaches taken in conducting the analysis are: (1) advancing the technology of characterizing components through the development of new or more sensitive techniques and (2) improving the understanding of the physical of degradation.

  7. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains

  8. Integrating Organic Matter Structure with Ecosystem Function using Advanced Analytical Chemistry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Microorganisms are the primary transformers of organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The structure of organic matter controls its bioavailability and researchers have long sought to link the chemical characteristics of the organic matter pool to its lability. To date this effort has been primarily attempted using low resolution descriptive characteristics (e.g. organic matter content, carbon to nitrogen ratio, aromaticity, etc .). However, recent progress in linking these two important ecosystem components has been advanced using advanced high resolution tools (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy (MS)-based techniques). A series of experiments will be presented that highlight the application of high resolution techniques in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with the focus on how these data explicitly provide the foundation for integrating organic matter structure into our concept of ecosystem function. The talk will highlight results from a series of experiments including: an MS-based metabolomics and fluorescence excitation emission matrix approach evaluating seasonal and vegetation based changes in dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition from arctic soils; Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and MS metabolomics analysis of DOM from three lakes in an alpine watershed; and the transformation of 13C labeled glucose track with NMR during a rewetting experiment from Colorado grassland soils. These data will be synthesized to illustrate how the application of advanced analytical techniques provides novel insight into our understanding of organic matter processing in a wide range of ecosystems.

  9. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.; Rawls, P.

    1995-11-01

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. As the contract title suggests, the main focus of the program is on proof-of-concept testing of a dewatering technique for a fine clean coal product. The coal industry is reluctant to use the advanced fine coal recovery technology due to the non-availability of an economical dewatering process. in fact, in a recent survey conducted by U.S. DOE and Battelle, dewatering of fine clean coal was identified as the number one priority for the coal industry. This project will attempt to demonstrate an efficient and economic fine clean coal slurry dewatering process.

  10. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  11. Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, Michael; Cleveland, Paul; Durand, Dale; Klavins, Andy; Muheim, Daniella; Paine, Christopher; Petach, Mike; Tenerelli, Domenick; Tolomeo, Jason; Walyus, Keith

    2007-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program funded an effort to develop a system cooling technology, which is applicable to all future infrared, sub-millimeter and millimeter cryogenic space telescopes. In particular, this technology is necessary for the proposed large space telescope Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) mission. This technology will also enhance the performance and lower the risk and cost for other cryogenic missions. The new paradigm for cooling to low temperatures will involve passive cooling using lightweight deployable membranes that serve both as sunshields and V-groove radiators, in combination with active cooling using mechanical coolers operating down to 4 K. The Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes (LST) mission planned to develop and demonstrate a multi-layered sunshield, which is actively cooled by a multi-stage mechanical cryocooler, and further the models and analyses critical to scaling to future missions. The outer four layers of the sunshield cool passively by radiation, while the innermost layer is actively cooled to enable the sunshield to decrease the incident solar irradiance by a factor of more than one million. The cryocooler cools the inner layer of the sunshield to 20 K, and provides cooling to 6 K at a telescope mounting plate. The technology readiness level (TRL) of 7 will be achieved by the active cooling technology following the technology validation flight in Low Earth Orbit. In accordance with the New Millennium charter, tests and modeling are tightly integrated to advance the technology and the flight design for "ST-class" missions. Commercial off-the-shelf engineering analysis products are used to develop validated modeling capabilities to allow the techniques and results from LST to apply to a wide variety of future missions. The LST mission plans to "rewrite the book" on cryo-thermal testing and modeling techniques, and validate modeling techniques to scale to future space telescopes such as SAFIR.

  12. Effect of Water-Alcohol Injection and Maximum Economy Spark Advance on Knock-Limited Performance and Fuel Economy of a Large Air-Cooled Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinicke, Orville H.; Vandeman, Jack E.

    1945-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of a coolant solution of 25 percent ethyl alcohol, 25 percent methyl alcohol, and 50 percent water by volume and maximum-economy spark advance on knock-limited performance and fuel economy of a large air-cooled cylinder. The knock-limited performance of the cylinder at engine speeds of 2100 and 2500 rpm was determined for coolant-fuel ratios of 0.0, 0.2, and 0.4. The effect of water-alcohol injection on fuel economy was determined in constant charge-air flow tests. The tests were conducted at a spark advance of 20 deg B.T.C. and maximum-economy spark advance.

  13. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  14. Technical analysis of a river basin-based model of advanced power plant cooling technologies for mitigating water management challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, Ashlynn S.; Clayton, Mary E.; Webber, Michael E.

    2011-07-01

    Thermoelectric power plants require large volumes of water for cooling, which can introduce drought vulnerability and compete with other water needs. Alternative cooling technologies, such as cooling towers and hybrid wet-dry or dry cooling, present opportunities to reduce water diversions. This case study uses a custom, geographically resolved river basin-based model for eleven river basins in the state of Texas (the Brazos and San Jacinto-Brazos, Colorado and Colorado-Brazos, Cypress, Neches, Nueces, Red, Sabine, San Jacinto, and Trinity River basins), focusing on the Brazos River basin, to analyze water availability during drought. We utilized two existing water availability models for our analysis: (1) the full execution of water rights—a scenario where each water rights holder diverts the full permitted volume with zero return flow, and (2) current conditions—a scenario reflecting actual diversions with associated return flows. Our model results show that switching the cooling technologies at power plants in the eleven analyzed river basins to less water-intensive alternative designs can potentially reduce annual water diversions by 247-703 million m3—enough water for 1.3-3.6 million people annually. We consider these results in a geographic context using geographic information system tools and then analyze volume reliability, which is a policymaker's metric that indicates the percentage of total demand actually supplied over a given period. This geographic and volume reliability analysis serves as a measure of drought susceptibility in response to changes in thermoelectric cooling technologies. While these water diversion savings do not alleviate all reliability concerns, the additional streamflow from the use of dry cooling alleviates drought concerns for some municipal water rights holders and might also be sufficient to uphold instream flow requirements for important bays and estuaries on the Texas Gulf coast.

  15. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  16. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  17. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  18. Advanced spatio-temporal filtering techniques for photogrammetric image sequence analysis in civil engineering material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper shows advanced spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal filtering techniques which may be used to reduce noise effects in photogrammetric image sequence analysis tasks and tools. As a practical example, the techniques are validated in a photogrammetric spatio-temporal crack detection and analysis tool applied in load tests in civil engineering material testing. The load test technique is based on monocular image sequences of a test object under varying load conditions. The first image of a sequence is defined as a reference image under zero load, wherein interest points are determined and connected in a triangular irregular network structure. For each epoch, these triangles are compared to the reference image triangles to search for deformations. The result of the feature point tracking and triangle comparison process is a spatio-temporally resolved strain value field, wherein cracks can be detected, located and measured via local discrepancies. The strains can be visualized as a color-coded map. In order to improve the measuring system and to reduce noise, the strain values of each triangle must be treated in a filtering process. The paper shows the results of various filter techniques in the spatial and in the temporal domain as well as spatio-temporal filtering techniques applied to these data. The best results were obtained by a bilateral filter in the spatial domain and by a spatio-temporal EOF (empirical orthogonal function) filtering technique.

  19. Review of recent advances in analytical techniques for the determination of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Maura; Li, Qiang; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Methods and advances for monitoring neurotransmitters in vivo or for tissue analysis of neurotransmitters over the last five years are reviewed. The review is organized primarily by neurotransmitter type. Transmitter and related compounds may be monitored by either in vivo sampling coupled to analytical methods or implanted sensors. Sampling is primarily performed using microdialysis, but low-flow push-pull perfusion may offer advantages of spatial resolution while minimizing the tissue disruption associated with higher flow rates. Analytical techniques coupled to these sampling methods include liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, enzyme assays, sensors, and mass spectrometry. Methods for the detection of amino acid, monoamine, neuropeptide, acetylcholine, nucleoside, and soluable gas neurotransmitters have been developed and improved upon. Advances in the speed and sensitivity of these methods have enabled improvements in temporal resolution and increased the number of compounds detectable. Similar advances have enabled improved detection at tissue samples, with a substantial emphasis on single cell and other small samples. Sensors provide excellent temporal and spatial resolution for in vivo monitoring. Advances in application to catecholamines, indoleamines, and amino acids have been prominent. Improvements in stability, sensitivity, and selectivity of the sensors have been of paramount interest. PMID:19800472

  20. Evidence for regional cooling, frontal advances, and East Greenland Ice Sheet changes during the demise of the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvalı, Nil; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Kleiven, Helga (Kikki) F.; Galaasen, Eirik V.; Morley, Audrey; Rosenthal, Yair

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution lithic and sea surface climate records are used to portray the progression of North Atlantic climate, hydrography, and Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) activity through the peak of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e into the last glacial inception. We use Eirik Drift sediment core MD03-2664 (57°26.34‧N, 48°36.35‧W), recovered south of Greenland, strategically located to monitor fluctuations in GIS extent and iceberg calving events. Our results show that a significant amount of ice-rafted debris (IRD) was present during the early MIS 5e, until gradually tapering off by 122 kyr BP due to a diminishing GIS. Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the northern subpolar gyre reached peak values early in MIS 5e coinciding with peak insolation. Regional cooling leading to the demise of the last interglacial started prior to the end of the MIS 5e benthic δ18O plateau, at approximately 119 kyr BP, as summer insolation waned. This gradual cooling trend is interrupted by an abrupt and brief cooling episode at ∼117 kyr BP. Increased IRD abundance during the 117 kyr BP cooling event suggests that regional ice sheet growth occurred prior to the end of the MIS 5e benthic δ18O plateau, and the major glacial inception. SSTs south of Greenland followed a two-step cooling during the glacial inception similar to the pattern observed across much of the North Atlantic and Europe. Benthic δ18O increases in parallel, suggesting that this two-step cooling is linked to a two-phased intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  1. Investigation of Advanced Counterrotation Blade Configuration Concepts for High Speed Turboprop Systems. Task 8: Cooling Flow/heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Topp, David A.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this task was to validate the ADPAC code for heat transfer calculations. To accomplish this goal, the ADPAC code was modified to allow for a Cartesian coordinate system capability and to add boundary conditions to handle spanwise periodicity and transpiration boundaries. The primary validation case was the film cooled C3X vane. The cooling hole modeling included both a porous region and grid in each discrete hold. Predictions for these models as well as smooth wall compared well with the experimental data.

  2. New Generation of High Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging Technique for Advanced Material Characterization: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maev, R. Gr.

    The role of non-destructive material characterization and NDT is changing at a rapid rate, continuing to evolve alongside the dramatic development of novel techniques based on the principles of high-resolution imaging. The modern use of advanced optical, thermal, ultrasonic, laser-ultrasound, acoustic emission, vibration, electro-magnetic, and X-ray techniques, etc., as well as refined measurement and signal/data processing devices, allows for continuous generation of on-line information. As a result real-time process monitoring can be achieved, leading to the more effective and efficient control of numerous processes, greatly improving manufacturing as a whole. Indeed, concurrent quality inspection has become an attainable reality. With the advent of new materials for use in various structures, joints, and parts, however, innovative applications of modern NDT imaging techniques are necessary to monitor as many stages of manufacturing as possible. Simply put, intelligent advance manufacturing is impossible without actively integrating modern non-destructive evaluation into the production system.

  3. Application of Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques to Study Quantum Dots and Bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, Nataliia

    In recent years, there has been an increase in research towards micro- and nanoscale devices as they have proliferated into diverse areas of scientific exploration. Many of the general fields of study that have greatly affected the advancement of these devices includes the investigation of their properties. The sensitivity of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows detecting charges up to the single electron value in quantum dots in ambient conditions, the measurement of steric forces on the surface of the human cell brush, determination of cell mechanics, magnetic forces, and other important properties. Utilizing AFM methods, the fast screening of quantum dot efficiency and the differences between cancer, normal (healthy) and precancer (immortalized) human cells has been investigated. The current research using AFM techniques can help to identify biophysical differences of cancer cells to advance our understanding of the resistance of the cells against the existing medicine.

  4. Impact of advanced microstructural characterization techniques on modeling and analysis of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of radiation-induced alterations of dimensional and mechanical properties has been shown to be a direct and often predictable consequence of radiation-induced microstructural changes. Recent advances in understanding of the nature and role of each microstructural component in determining the property of interest has led to a reappraisal of the type and priority of data needed for further model development. This paper presents an overview of the types of modeling and analysis activities in progress, the insights that prompted these activities, and specific examples of successful and ongoing efforts. A review is presented of some problem areas that in the authors' opinion are not yet receiving sufficient attention and which may benefit from the application of advanced techniques of microstructural characterization. Guidelines based on experience gained in previous studies are also provided for acquisition of data in a form most applicable to modeling needs.

  5. Extrusion based rapid prototyping technique: an advanced platform for tissue engineering scaffold fabrication.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M Enamul; Chuan, Y Leng; Pashby, Ian

    2012-02-01

    Advances in scaffold design and fabrication technology have brought the tissue engineering field stepping into a new era. Conventional techniques used to develop scaffolds inherit limitations, such as lack of control over the pore morphology and architecture as well as reproducibility. Rapid prototyping (RP) technology, a layer-by-layer additive approach offers a unique opportunity to build complex 3D architectures overcoming those limitations that could ultimately be tailored to cater for patient-specific applications. Using RP methods, researchers have been able to customize scaffolds to mimic the biomechanical properties (in terms of structural integrity, strength, and microenvironment) of the organ or tissue to be repaired/replaced quite closely. This article provides intensive description on various extrusion based scaffold fabrication techniques and review their potential utility for TE applications. The extrusion-based technique extrudes the molten polymer as a thin filament through a nozzle onto a platform layer-by-layer and thus building 3D scaffold. The technique allows full control over pore architecture and dimension in the x- and y- planes. However, the pore height in z-direction is predetermined by the extruding nozzle diameter rather than the technique itself. This review attempts to assess the current state and future prospects of this technology.

  6. Advanced techniques and technology for efficient data storage, access, and transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Robert F.; Miller, Warner

    1991-01-01

    Advanced techniques for efficiently representing most forms of data are being implemented in practical hardware and software form through the joint efforts of three NASA centers. These techniques adapt to local statistical variations to continually provide near optimum code efficiency when representing data without error. Demonstrated in several earlier space applications, these techniques are the basis of initial NASA data compression standards specifications. Since the techniques clearly apply to most NASA science data, NASA invested in the development of both hardware and software implementations for general use. This investment includes high-speed single-chip very large scale integration (VLSI) coding and decoding modules as well as machine-transferrable software routines. The hardware chips were tested in the laboratory at data rates as high as 700 Mbits/s. A coding module's definition includes a predictive preprocessing stage and a powerful adaptive coding stage. The function of the preprocessor is to optimally process incoming data into a standard form data source that the second stage can handle.The built-in preprocessor of the VLSI coder chips is ideal for high-speed sampled data applications such as imaging and high-quality audio, but additionally, the second stage adaptive coder can be used separately with any source that can be externally preprocessed into the 'standard form'. This generic functionality assures that the applicability of these techniques and their recent high-speed implementations should be equally broad outside of NASA.

  7. Techniques for measurement of the thermal expansion of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques available to measure small thermal displacements in flat laminates and structural tubular elements of advanced composite materials are described. Emphasis is placed on laser interferometry and the laser interferometric dilatometer system used at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. Thermal expansion data are presented for graphite-fiber reinforced 6061 and 2024 aluminum laminates and for graphite fiber reinforced AZ91 C and QH21 A magnesium laminates before and after processing to minimize or eliminate thermal strain hysteresis. Data are also presented on the effects of reinforcement volume content on thermal expansion of silicon-carbide whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum.

  8. Measuring the microbiome: perspectives on advances in DNA-based techniques for exploring microbial life

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, John; Gilbert, Jack A.; Moore, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in ‘microbiome studies’: molecular, statistical and graphical techniques to explore and quantify how microbial organisms affect our environments and ourselves given recent increases in sequencing technology. Microbiome studies are moving beyond mere inventories of specific ecosystems to quantifications of community diversity and descriptions of their ecological function. We review the last 24 months of progress in this sort of research, and anticipate where the next 2 years will take us. We hope that bioinformaticians will find this a helpful springboard for new collaborations with microbiologists. PMID:22308073

  9. Advanced techniques in IR thermography as a tool for the pest management professional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jon L.

    2006-04-01

    Within the past five years, the Pest Management industry has become aware that IR thermography can aid in the detection of pest infestations and locate other conditions that are within the purview of the industry. This paper will review the applications that can be utilized by the pest management professional and discuss the advanced techniques that may be required in conjunction with thermal imaging to locate insect and other pest infestations, moisture within structures, the verification of data and the special challenges associated with the inspection process.

  10. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  11. Arthroscopically assisted Sauvé-Kapandji procedure: an advanced technique for distal radioulnar joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Riccardo; Khanchandani, Prakash; Da Rin, Ferdinando; Borelli, Pierpaolo P; Mathoulin, Christophe; Atzei, Andrea

    2008-12-01

    Osteoarthritis of distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) leads to chronic wrist pain, weakness of grip strength, and limitation of motion, all of which affect the quality of life of the patient. Over the years, several procedures have been used for the treatment of this condition; however, this condition still remains a therapeutic challenge for the hand surgeons. Many procedures such as Darrach procedure, Bower procedure, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure, and ulnar head replacement have been used. Despite many advances in wrist arthroscopy, arthroscopy has not been used for the treatment of arthritis of the DRUJ. We describe a novel technique of arthroscopically assisted Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for the arthritis of the DRUJ. The advantages of this technique are its less invasive nature, preservation of the extensor retinaculum, more anatomical position of the DRUJ, faster rehabilitation, and a better cosmesis.

  12. A comparison of conventional and advanced ultrasonic inspection techniques in the characterization of TMC materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Mark R.; Handley, Scott M.; Miller, James G.; Reighard, Mark K.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained with a conventional ultrasonic inspection technique as well as those obtained with more advanced ultrasonic NDE methods in the characterization of an 8-ply quasi-isotropic titanium matrix composite (TMC) specimen are presented. Images obtained from a conventional ultrasonic inspection of TMC material are compared with those obtained using more sophisticated ultrasonic inspection methods. It is suggested that the latter techniques are able to provide quantitative images of TMC material. They are able to reveal the same potential defect indications while simultaneously providing more quantitative information concerning the material's inherent properties. Band-limited signal loss and slope-of-attenuation images provide quantitative data on the inherent material characteristics and defects in TMC.

  13. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering. PMID:27640372

  14. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering.

  15. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  16. Recent Advances and New Techniques in Visualization of Ultra-short Relativistic Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-05

    Ultrashort electron bunches with rms length of {approx} 1 femtosecond (fs) can be used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses in FELs that may open up many new regimes in ultrafast sciences. It is also envisioned that ultrashort electron bunches may excite {approx}TeV/m wake fields for plasma wake field acceleration and high field physics studies. Recent success of using 20 pC electron beam to drive an x-ray FEL at LCLS has stimulated world-wide interests in using low charge beam (1 {approx} 20 pC) to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses (0.1 fs {approx} 10 fs) in FELs. Accurate measurement of the length (preferably the temporal profile) of the ultrashort electron bunch is essential for understanding the physics associated with the bunch compression and transportation. However, the shorter and shorter electron bunch greatly challenges the present beam diagnostic methods. In this paper we review the recent advances in the measurement of ultra-short electron bunches. We will focus on several techniques and their variants that provide the state-of-the-art temporal resolution. Methods to further improve the resolution of these techniques and the promise to break the 1 fs time barrier is discussed. We review recent advances in the measurement of ultrashort relativistic electron bunches. We will focus on several techniques and their variants that are capable of breaking the femtosecond time barrier in measurements of ultrashort bunches. Techniques for measuring beam longitudinal phase space as well as the x-ray pulse shape in an x-ray FEL are also discussed.

  17. Recent advances in molecular techniques to study microbial communities in food-associated matrices and processes.

    PubMed

    Justé, A; Thomma, B P H J; Lievens, B

    2008-09-01

    In the last two decades major changes have occurred in how microbial ecologists study microbial communities. Limitations associated with traditional culture-based methods have pushed for the development of culture-independent techniques, which are primarily based on the analysis of nucleic acids. These methods are now increasingly applied in food microbiology as well. This review presents an overview of current community profiling techniques with their (potential) applications in food and food-related ecosystems. We critically assessed both the power and limitations of these techniques and present recent advances in the field of food microbiology attained by their application. It is unlikely that a single approach will be universally applicable for analyzing microbial communities in unknown matrices. However, when screening samples for well-defined species or functions, techniques such as DNA arrays and real-time PCR have the potential to overtake current culture-based methods. Most importantly, molecular methods will allow us to surpass our current culturing limitations, thus revealing the extent and importance of the 'non-culturable' microbial flora that occurs in food matrices and production.

  18. Advanced techniques for array processing. Final report, 1 Mar 89-30 Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, B.

    1991-05-30

    Array processing technology is expected to be a key element in communication systems designed for the crowded and hostile environment of the future battlefield. While advanced array processing techniques have been under development for some time, their practical use has been very limited. This project addressed some of the issues which need to be resolved for a successful transition of these promising techniques from theory into practice. The main problem which was studied was that of finding the directions of multiple co-channel transmitters from measurements collected by an antenna array. Two key issues related to high-resolution direction finding were addressed: effects of system calibration errors, and effects of correlation between the received signals due to multipath propagation. A number of useful theoretical performance analysis results were derived, and computationally efficient direction estimation algorithms were developed. These results include: self-calibration techniques for antenna arrays, sensitivity analysis for high-resolution direction finding, extensions of the root-MUSIC algorithm to arbitrary arrays and to arrays with polarization diversity, and new techniques for direction finding in the presence of multipath based on array interpolation. (Author)

  19. Advancement of an Infra-Red Technique for Whole-Field Concentration Measurements in Fluidized Beds

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Jose A.; de Nooijer, Niek C. A.; Gallucci, Fausto; van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    For a better understanding and description of the mass transport phenomena in dense multiphase gas-solids systems such as fluidized bed reactors, detailed and quantitative experimental data on the concentration profiles is required, which demands advanced non-invasive concentration monitoring techniques with a high spatial and temporal resolution. A novel technique based on the selective detection of a gas component in a gas mixture using infra-red properties has been further developed. The first stage development was carried out using a very small sapphire reactor and CO2 as tracer gas. Although the measuring principle was demonstrated, the real application was hindered by the small reactor dimensions related to the high costs and difficult handling of large sapphire plates. In this study, a new system has been developed, that allows working at much larger scales and yet with higher resolution. In the new system, propane is used as tracer gas and quartz as reactor material. In this study, a thorough optimization and calibration of the technique is presented which is subsequently applied for whole-field measurements with high temporal resolution. The developed technique allows the use of a relatively inexpensive configuration for the measurement of detailed concentration fields and can be applied to a large variety of important chemical engineering topics. PMID:26927127

  20. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors. PMID:12587031

  1. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dirk, Brennan S.; Van Nynatten, Logan R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM) have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle. PMID:27775563

  2. Management of metastatic malignant thymoma with advanced radiation and chemotherapy techniques: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2015-02-25

    Malignant thymomas are rare epithelial neoplasms of the anterior superior mediastinum that are typically invasive in nature and have a higher risk of relapse that may ultimately lead to death. Here we report a case of an advanced malignant thymoma that was successfully treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection and subsequently with advanced and novel radiation therapy techniques. A 65-year-old male was diagnosed with a stage IV malignant thymoma with multiple metastatic lesions involving the left peripheral lung and pericardium. Initial neoadjuvant chemotherapy with a cisplatin-based regimen resulted in a partial response allowing the inoperable tumor to become operable. Following surgical resection of the residual disease, the tumor recurred within a year. The patient then underwent a course of targeted three-dimensional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Five years after radiation therapy, the localized soft tissue thickening at the left upper lung anterior pleural space had resolved. Seven years after radiation therapy the tumor mass had completely resolved. No recurrences were seen and the patient is well even 8 years after IMRT/IGRT with a favorable outcome. Chemotherapy with targeted three-dimensional IMRT/IGRT should be considered the primary modality for the management of advanced malignant thymoma patients.

  3. The influence of cooling on the advance of lava flows: insights from analogue experiments on the feedbacks between flow dynamics and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2012-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and the eruptive mass flux. These two parameters are not known a priori during an eruption and a key question is how to evaluate them in near real-time (rather than afterwards.) There is no generic macroscopic model for the rheology of an advancing lava flow, and analogue modelling is a precious tool to empirically estimate the rheology of a complex flow. We investigate through laboratory experiments the simultaneous spreading and cooling of horizontal currents fed at constant rate from a point source. The materials used are silicone oil (isoviscous), and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) wax injected in liquid state and solidiying during its advance. In the isoviscous case, the temperature field is a passive tracer of the flow dynamics, whereas in the PEG experiments there is a feedback between the cooling of the flow and its effective rheology. We focus on the evolution of the current area and of the surface thermal structure, imaged with an infrared camera, to assess how the thermal structure can be related to the flow rate. The flow advance is continuous in the viscous case, and follows the predictions of Huppert (1982); in that case the surface temperature become steady after a transient time and the radiated heat flux is shown to be proportional to the input rate. For the PEG experiments, the spreading occurs through an alternation of stagnation and overflow phases, with a mean spreading rate decreasing as the experiment goes on. As in the case of lava flows, these experiments can exhibit a compound flow field, solid levees, thermal erosion, liquid overflows and channelization. A key observation is that the effective rheology of the solifying PEG material depends on the input flow rate, with high input rates yielding a rheology closer to the

  4. Advanced MRI Techniques in the Evaluation of Complex Cystic Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Popli, Manju Bala; Gupta, Pranav; Arse, Devraj; Kumar, Pawan; Kaur, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research work was to evaluate complex cystic breast lesions by advanced MRI techniques and correlating imaging with histologic findings. METHODS AND MATERIALS In a cross-sectional design from September 2013 to August 2015, 50 patients having sonographically detected complex cystic lesions of the breast were included in the study. Morphological characteristics were assessed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI along with diffusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy were used to further classify lesions into benign and malignant categories. All the findings were correlated with histopathology. RESULTS Of the 50 complex cystic lesions, 32 proved to be benign and 18 were malignant on histopathology. MRI features of heterogeneous enhancement on CE-MRI (13/18), Type III kinetic curve (13/18), reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (18/18), and tall choline peak (17/18) were strong predictors of malignancy. Thirteen of the 18 lesions showed a combination of Type III curve, reduced apparent diffusion coefficient value, and tall choline peak. CONCLUSIONS Advanced MRI techniques like dynamic imaging, diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR spectroscopy provide a high level of diagnostic confidence in the characterization of complex cystic breast lesion, thus allowing early diagnosis and significantly reducing patient morbidity and mortality. From our study, lesions showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement, Type III kinetic curve, diffusion restriction, and tall choline peak were significantly associated with malignant complex cystic lesions of the breast. PMID:27330299

  5. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities for in situ and in operando GISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed. PMID:25610632

  6. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T; Cabre, Philippe; Marignier, Romain; Tedder, Thomas; van Pelt, Danielle; Broadley, Simon; Chitnis, Tanuja; Wingerchuk, Dean; Pandit, Lekha; Leite, Maria Isabel; Apiwattanakul, Metha; Kleiter, Ingo; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Han, May; Hellwig, Kerstin; van Herle, Katja; John, Gareth; Hooper, D Craig; Nakashima, Ichiro; Sato, Douglas; Yeaman, Michael R; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott; Stüve, Olaf; Aktas, Orhan; Smith, Terry J; Jacob, Anu; O'Connor, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease.

  7. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A.; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C.; Tenembaum, Silvia N.; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T.

    2016-01-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  8. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore » soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  9. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  10. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T; Cabre, Philippe; Marignier, Romain; Tedder, Thomas; van Pelt, Danielle; Broadley, Simon; Chitnis, Tanuja; Wingerchuk, Dean; Pandit, Lekha; Leite, Maria Isabel; Apiwattanakul, Metha; Kleiter, Ingo; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Han, May; Hellwig, Kerstin; van Herle, Katja; John, Gareth; Hooper, D Craig; Nakashima, Ichiro; Sato, Douglas; Yeaman, Michael R; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott; Stüve, Olaf; Aktas, Orhan; Smith, Terry J; Jacob, Anu; O'Connor, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  11. Development of Advanced Nuclide Separation and Recovery Methods using Ion-Exchanhge Techniques in Nuclear Backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi

    The development of compact separation and recovery methods using selective ion-exchange techniques is very important for the reprocessing and high-level liquid wastes (HLLWs) treatment in the nuclear backend field. The selective nuclide separation techniques are effective for the volume reduction of wastes and the utilization of valuable nuclides, and expected for the construction of advanced nuclear fuel cycle system and the rationalization of waste treatment. In order to accomplish the selective nuclide separation, the design and synthesis of novel adsorbents are essential for the development of compact and precise separation processes. The present paper deals with the preparation of highly functional and selective hybrid microcapsules enclosing nano-adsorbents in the alginate gel polymer matrices by sol-gel methods, their characterization and the clarification of selective adsorption properties by batch and column methods. The selective separation of Cs, Pd and Re in real HLLW was further accomplished by using novel microcapsules, and an advanced nuclide separation system was proposed by the combination of selective processes using microcapsules.

  12. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  13. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  14. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  15. Liquid-metal-cooled, curved-crystal monochromator for Advanced Photon Source bending-magnet beamline 1-BM

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, S.; Rodricks, B.; Assoufid, L.; Beno, M.A.; Knapp, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe a horizontally focusing curved-crystal monochromator that invokes a 4-point bending scheme and a liquid-metal cooling bath. The device has been designed for dispersive diffraction and spectroscopy in the 5--20 keV range, with a predicted focal spot size of {le} 100 {micro}m. To minimize thermal distortions and thermal equilibration time, the 355 x 32 x 0.8 mm crystal will be nearly half submerged in a bath of Ga-In-Sn-Zn alloy. The liquid metal thermally couples the crystal to the water-cooled Cu frame, while permitting the required crystal bending. Calculated thermal profiles and anticipated focusing properties are discussed.

  16. Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

    2012-08-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

  17. Covering Materials Incorporating Radiation-Preventing Techniques to Meet Greenhouse Cooling Challenges in Arid Regions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Al-Helal, Ibrahim M.; Alzahrani, Saeed M.; Alsadon, Abdullah A.; Ali, Ilias M.; Elleithy, Rabeh M.

    2012-01-01

    Cooling greenhouses is essential to provide a suitable environment for plant growth in arid regions characterized by brackish water resources. However, using conventional cooling methods are facing many challenges. Filtering out near infra-red radiation (NIR) at the greenhouse cover can significantly reduce the heating load and can solve the overheating problem of the greenhouse air. This paper is to review (i) the problems of using conventional cooling methods and (ii) the advantages of greenhouse covers that incorporate NIR reflectors. This survey focuses on how the cover type affects the transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), the reflectance or absorptance of NIR and the greenhouse air temperature. NIR-reflecting plastic films seem to be the most suitable, low cost and simple cover for greenhouses under arid conditions. Therefore, this review discusses how various additives should be incorporated in plastic film to increase its mechanical properties, durability and ability to stand up to extremely harsh weather. Presently, NIR-reflecting covers are able to reduce greenhouse air temperature by no more than 5°C. This reduction is not enough in regions where the ambient temperature may exceed 45°C in summer. There is a need to develop improved NIR-reflecting plastic film covers. PMID:22629223

  18. Design and analysis of the internally cooled silicon mirrors and benders for wiggler sources at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schildkamp, W.; Jaski, Y.; Tonnessen, T.; Douglas, G.

    1996-09-01

    When silicon single crystal mirrors are bent to cylindrical figures of typically 6 km bending radius, the moments needed are very small and easy to disturb by cooling attachments to the sides of the mirror. Hence, we decided to abandon the conventional concept of cooling plates attached to the sides of the mirrors and instead have chosen to use internal water channels. We present here the design of mirrors with cooling channels near the neutral axis of the silicon beam that have a rather thick {open_quote}{open_quote}hot wall.{close_quote}{close_quote} The results of this analytical work are nonintuitive, regarding the stresses produced by wiggler heating. The design path chosen minimizes figure errors due to coolant pressure variations and residual stresses from machining and bonding of multiple layers of silicon. The geometry of the water channels avoids water-to-vacuum seals and uses the mirror bender as the coolant manifold. Engineering efforts, which reduce the bending stresses at bender-to-silicon interface by a factor of five, will be presented. The complete mirror bender and motion control mechanics will be shown. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

    2015-05-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

  20. Utilization of advanced calibration techniques in stochastic rock fall analysis of quarry slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preh, Alexander; Ahmadabadi, Morteza; Kolenprat, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    In order to study rock fall dynamics, a research project was conducted by the Vienna University of Technology and the Austrian Central Labour Inspectorate (Federal Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and Consumer Protection). A part of this project included 277 full-scale drop tests at three different quarries in Austria and recording key parameters of the rock fall trajectories. The tests involved a total of 277 boulders ranging from 0.18 to 1.8 m in diameter and from 0.009 to 8.1 Mg in mass. The geology of these sites included strong rock belonging to igneous, metamorphic and volcanic types. In this paper the results of the tests are used for calibration and validation a new stochastic computer model. It is demonstrated that the error of the model (i.e. the difference between observed and simulated results) has a lognormal distribution. Selecting two parameters, advanced calibration techniques including Markov Chain Monte Carlo Technique, Maximum Likelihood and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) are utilized to minimize the error. Validation of the model based on the cross validation technique reveals that in general, reasonable stochastic approximations of the rock fall trajectories are obtained in all dimensions, including runout, bounce heights and velocities. The approximations are compared to the measured data in terms of median, 95% and maximum values. The results of the comparisons indicate that approximate first-order predictions, using a single set of input parameters, are possible and can be used to aid practical hazard and risk assessment.

  1. Visualizing epigenetics: current advances and advantages in HDAC PET imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Schroeder, F A; Hooker, J M

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal gene regulation as a consequence of flawed epigenetic mechanisms may be central to the initiation and persistence of many human diseases. However, the association of epigenetic dysfunction with disease and the development of therapeutic agents for treatment are slow. Developing new methodologies used to visualize chromatin-modifying enzymes and their function in the human brain would be valuable for the diagnosis of brain disorders and drug discovery. We provide an overview of current invasive and noninvasive techniques for measuring expression and functions of chromatin-modifying enzymes in the brain, emphasizing tools applicable to histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes as a leading example. The majority of current techniques are invasive and difficult to translate to what is happening within a human brain in vivo. However, recent progress in molecular imaging provides new, noninvasive ways to visualize epigenetics in the human brain. Neuroimaging tool development presents a unique set of challenges in order to identify and validate CNS radiotracers for HDACs and other histone-modifying enzymes. We summarize advances in the effort to image HDACs and HDAC inhibitory effects in the brain using positron emission tomography (PET) and highlight generalizable techniques that can be adapted to investigate other specific components of epigenetic machinery. Translational tools like neuroimaging by PET and magnetic resonance imaging provide the best way to link our current understanding of epigenetic changes with in vivo function in normal and diseased brains. These tools will be a critical addition to ex vivo methods to evaluate - and intervene - in CNS dysfunction.

  2. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V. Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1–20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ∼0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  3. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  4. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, G. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1-20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ˜0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  5. Towards the Measurement of the Electric-Dipole Moment of Radioactive Francium using Laser-Cooling and Trapping Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    An experiment to search for the electron electric dipole moment using francium is planned to test the new physics beyond the standard model. The optical lattice trapping of the francium that is produced through the nuclear fusion reaction at high heat may allow for a precise measurement of the electric dipole moment. The magneto-optical trapping of the francium is required as a precooling treatment. The factory of laser-cooled francium atoms has been developed for the magneto-optical trap. Currently, the apparatus that is able to trap a few atoms is constructed to identify the resonant frequency of francium.

  6. Planning and scheduling the Hubble Space Telescope: Practical application of advanced techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Glenn E.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a major astronomical facility that was launched in April, 1990. In late 1993, the first of several planned servicing missions refurbished the telescope, including corrections for a manufacturing flaw in the primary mirror. Orbiting above the distorting effects of the Earth's atmosphere, the HST provides an unrivaled combination of sensitivity, spectral coverage and angular resolution. The HST is arguably the most complex scientific observatory ever constructed and effective use of this valuable resource required novel approaches to astronomical observation and the development of advanced software systems including techniques to represent scheduling preferences and constraints, a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) based scheduler and a rule based planning system. This paper presents a discussion of these systems and the lessons learned from operational experience.

  7. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques. PMID:25566219

  8. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Campbell, Stuart I; Delaire, Olivier A; Doucet, Mathieu; Goswami, Monojoy; Hagen, Mark E; Lynch, Vickie E; Proffen, Thomas E; Ren, Shelly; Savici, Andrei T; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  9. Recent advances in molecular medicine techniques for the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    França, R F O; da Silva, C C; De Paula, S O

    2013-06-01

    In recent years we have observed great advances in our ability to combat infectious diseases. Through the development of novel genetic methodologies, including a better understanding of pathogen biology, pathogenic mechanisms, advances in vaccine development, designing new therapeutic drugs, and optimization of diagnostic tools, significant infectious diseases are now better controlled. Here, we briefly describe recent reports in the literature concentrating on infectious disease control. The focus of this review is to describe the molecular methods widely used in the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases with regard to the innovation of molecular techniques. Since the list of pathogenic microorganisms is extensive, we emphasize some of the major human infectious diseases (AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, rotavirus, herpes virus, viral hepatitis, and dengue fever). As a consequence of these developments, infectious diseases will be more accurately and effectively treated; safe and effective vaccines are being developed and rapid detection of infectious agents now permits countermeasures to avoid potential outbreaks and epidemics. But, despite considerable progress, infectious diseases remain a strong challenge to human survival. PMID:23339016

  10. Recent advances in molecular medicine techniques for the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    França, R F O; da Silva, C C; De Paula, S O

    2013-06-01

    In recent years we have observed great advances in our ability to combat infectious diseases. Through the development of novel genetic methodologies, including a better understanding of pathogen biology, pathogenic mechanisms, advances in vaccine development, designing new therapeutic drugs, and optimization of diagnostic tools, significant infectious diseases are now better controlled. Here, we briefly describe recent reports in the literature concentrating on infectious disease control. The focus of this review is to describe the molecular methods widely used in the diagnosis, prevention, and control of infectious diseases with regard to the innovation of molecular techniques. Since the list of pathogenic microorganisms is extensive, we emphasize some of the major human infectious diseases (AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, rotavirus, herpes virus, viral hepatitis, and dengue fever). As a consequence of these developments, infectious diseases will be more accurately and effectively treated; safe and effective vaccines are being developed and rapid detection of infectious agents now permits countermeasures to avoid potential outbreaks and epidemics. But, despite considerable progress, infectious diseases remain a strong challenge to human survival.

  11. Recent advances on techniques and theories of feedforward networks with supervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Klasa, Stan

    1992-07-01

    The rediscovery and popularization of the back propagation training technique for multilayer perceptrons as well as the invention of the Boltzmann Machine learning algorithm has given a new boost to the study of supervised learning networks. In recent years, besides the widely spread applications and the various further improvements of the classical back propagation technique, many new supervised learning models, techniques as well as theories, have also been proposed in a vast number of publications. This paper tries to give a rather systematical review on the recent advances on supervised learning techniques and theories for static feedforward networks. We summarize a great number of developments into four aspects: (1) Various improvements and variants made on the classical back propagation techniques for multilayer (static) perceptron nets, for speeding up training, avoiding local minima, increasing the generalization ability, as well as for many other interesting purposes. (2) A number of other learning methods for training multilayer (static) perceptron, such as derivative estimation by perturbation, direct weight update by perturbation, genetic algorithms, recursive least square estimate and extended Kalman filter, linear programming, the policy of fixing one layer while updating another, constructing networks by converting decision tree classifiers, and others. (3) Various other feedforward models which are also able to implement function approximation, probability density estimation and classification, including various models of basis function expansion (e.g., radial basis functions, restricted coulomb energy, multivariate adaptive regression splines, trigonometric and polynomial bases, projection pursuit, basis function tree, and may others), and several other supervised learning models. (4) Models with complex structures, e.g., modular architecture, hierarchy architecture, and others. (5) A number of theoretical issues involving the universal

  12. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and

  13. Beyond Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerling, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    Roofs always have been a major focus for building energy-conservation measures. The emphasis traditionally has been on beefing up insulation. More recently, advances in roofing materials technology and analytical techniques have found new ways to fine-tune the energy performance of roofing to reduce not only operating costs, but also environmental…

  14. Advanced Modeling Techniques to Study Anthropogenic Influences on Atmospheric Chemical Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Rohit

    1997-01-01

    This research work is a collaborative effort between research groups at MCNC and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The overall objective of this research is to improve the level of understanding of the processes that determine the budgets of chemically and radiatively active compounds in the atmosphere through development and application of advanced methods for calculating the chemical change in atmospheric models. The research performed during the second year of this project focused on four major aspects: (1) The continued development and refinement of multiscale modeling techniques to address the issue of the disparate scales of the physico-chemical processes that govern the fate of atmospheric pollutants; (2) Development and application of analysis methods utilizing process and mass balance techniques to increase the interpretive powers of atmospheric models and to aid in complementary analysis of model predictions and observations; (3) Development of meteorological and emission inputs for initial application of the chemistry/transport model over the north Atlantic region; and, (4) The continued development and implementation of a totally new adaptive chemistry representation that changes the details of what is represented as the underlying conditions change.

  15. Advancing the frontiers in nanocatalysis, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion by innovations of surface techniques.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Frei, Heinz; Park, Jeong Y

    2009-11-25

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ("green chemistry") and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  16. Pilot-scale investigation of drinking water ultrafiltration membrane fouling rates using advanced data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Peldszus, Sigrid; Peiris, Ramila H; Ruhl, Aki S; Mehrez, Renata; Jekel, Martin; Legge, Raymond L; Huck, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    A pilot-scale investigation of the performance of biofiltration as a pre-treatment to ultrafiltration for drinking water treatment was conducted between 2008 and 2010. The objective of this study was to further understand the fouling behaviour of ultrafiltration at pilot scale and assess the utility of different foulant monitoring tools. Various fractions of natural organic matter (NOM) and colloidal/particulate matter of raw water, biofilter effluents, and membrane permeate were characterized by employing two advanced NOM characterization techniques: liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (FEEM) combined with principal component analysis (PCA). A framework of fouling rate quantification and classification was also developed and utilized in this study. In cases such as the present one where raw water quality and therefore fouling potential vary substantially, such classification can be considered essential for proper data interpretation. The individual and combined contributions of various NOM fractions and colloidal/particulate matter to hydraulically reversible and irreversible fouling were investigated using various multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Protein-like substances and biopolymers were identified as major contributors to both reversible and irreversible fouling, whereas colloidal/particulate matter can alleviate the extent of irreversible fouling. Humic-like substances contributed little to either reversible or irreversible fouling at low level fouling rates. The complementary nature of FEEM-PCA and LC-OCD for assessing the fouling potential of complex water matrices was also illustrated by this pilot-scale study.

  17. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-03-31

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system.

  18. Investigation to advance prediction techniques of the low-speed aerodynamics of V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.; Strash, D.; Nathman, J.; Dvorak, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program, VSAERO, has been applied to a number of V/STOL configurations with a view to advancing prediction techniques for the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics. The program couples a low-order panel method with surface streamline calculation and integral boundary layer procedures. The panel method--which uses piecewise constant source and doublet panels-includes an iterative procedure for wake shape and models boundary layer displacement effect using the source transpiration technique. Certain improvements to a basic vortex tube jet model were installed in the code prior to evaluation. Very promising results were obtained for surface pressures near a jet issuing at 90 deg from a flat plate. A solid core model was used in the initial part of the jet with a simple entrainment model. Preliminary representation of the downstream separation zone significantly improve the correlation. The program accurately predicted the pressure distribution inside the inlet on the Grumman 698-411 design at a range of flight conditions. Furthermore, coupled viscous/potential flow calculations gave very close correlation with experimentally determined operational boundaries dictated by the onset of separation inside the inlet. Experimentally observed degradation of these operational boundaries between nacelle-alone tests and tests on the full configuration were also indicated by the calculation. Application of the program to the General Dynamics STOL fighter design were equally encouraging. Very close agreement was observed between experiment and calculation for the effects of power on pressure distribution, lift and lift curve slope.

  19. Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.; Frei, H.; Park, J.Y.

    2009-07-23

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ('green chemistry') and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  20. Procedural guidance using advance imaging techniques for percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Quaife, Robert A; Salcedo, Ernesto E; Carroll, John D

    2014-02-01

    The complexity of structural heart disease interventions such as edge-to edge mitral valve repair requires integration of multiple highly technical imaging modalities. Real time imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography is a relatively new technique that first, allows clear volumetric imaging of target structures such as the mitral valve for both pre-procedural diagnosis and planning in patients with degenerative or functional mitral valve regurgitation. Secondly it provides intra-procedural, real-time panoramic volumetric 3D view of structural heart disease targets that facilitates eye-hand coordination while manipulating devices within the heart. X-ray fluoroscopy and RT 3D TEE images are used in combination to display specific targets and movement of catheter based technologies in 3D space. This integration requires at least two different image display monitors and mentally fusing the individual datasets by the operator. Combined display technology such as this, allow rotation and orientation of both dataset perspectives necessary to define targets and guidance of structural disease device procedures. The inherently easy concept of direct visual feedback and eye-hand coordination allows safe and efficient completion of MitraClip procedures. This technology is now merged into a single structural heart disease guidance mode called EchoNavigator(TM) (Philips Medical Imaging Andover, MA). These advanced imaging techniques have revolutionized the field of structural heart disease interventions and this experience is exemplified by a cooperative imaging approach used for guidance of edge-to-edge mitral valve repair procedures.

  1. Space shuttle/food system. Volume 2, Appendix C: Food cooling techniques analysis. Appendix D: Package and stowage: Alternate concepts analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The relative penalties associated with various techniques for providing an onboard cold environment for storage of perishable food items, and for the development of packaging and vehicle stowage parameters were investigated in terms of the overall food system design analysis of space shuttle. The degrees of capability for maintaining both a 40 F to 45 F refrigerated temperature and a 0 F and 20 F frozen environment were assessed for the following cooling techniques: (1) phase change (heat sink) concept; (2) thermoelectric concept; (3) vapor cycle concept; and (4) expendable ammonia concept. The parameters considered in the analysis were weight, volume, and spacecraft power restrictions. Data were also produced for packaging and vehicle stowage parameters which are compatible with vehicle weight and volume specifications. Certain assumptions were made for food packaging sizes based on previously generated space shuttle menus. The results of the study are shown, along with the range of meal choices considered.

  2. EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose

  3. Support of NASA ADR/ Cross-Enterprise NRA Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10K to 50mK, Development of a Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical heat switches are used in conjunction with sorption refrigerators, adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators and for other cryogenic tasks including the pre-cooling cryogenic systems. They use a mechanical actuator which closes Au plated Cu jaws on an Au plated Cu bar. The thermal conductance in the closed position is essentially independent of the area of the jaws and proportional to the force applied. It varies linearly with T. It is approximately 10mW/K for 200 N at 1.5K. In some applications, the heat switch can be driven from outside the cryostat by a rotating rod and a screw. Such heat switches are available commercially from several sources. In other applications, including systems for space, it is desirable to drive the switch using a cold linear motor, or solenoid. Superconducting windings are used at temperatures s 4.2K to minimize power dissipation, but are not appropriate for pre-cooling a system at higher temperatures. This project was intended to improve the design of solenoid activated mechanical heat switches and to provide such switches as required to support the development of Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10 K to 50 mK at GSFC. By the time funding began in 5/1/01, the immediate need for mechanical heat switches at GSFC had subsided but, at the same time, the opportunity had arisen to improve the design of mechanical heat switching by incorporating a "latching solenoid". In this device, the solenoid current is required only for changing the state of the switch and not during the whole time that the switch is closed.

  4. PREFACE: 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiong

    2014-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2013) which took place on 16-21 May 2013 at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The workshop series brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 120 participants from all over the world. 18 invited speakers presented key topics on the universe in computer, Computing in Earth Sciences, multivariate data analysis, automated computation in Quantum Field Theory as well as computing and data analysis challenges in many fields. Over 70 other talks and posters presented state-of-the-art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. The round table discussions on open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration stimulate us to think over the issue in the respective areas. ACAT 2013 was generously sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NFSC), Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA (BNL), Peking University (PKU), Theoretical Physics Cernter for Science facilities of CAS (TPCSF-CAS) and Sugon. We would like to thank all the participants for their scientific contributions and for the en- thusiastic participation in all its activities of the workshop. Further information on ACAT 2013 can be found at http://acat2013.ihep.ac.cn. Professor Jianxiong Wang Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science Details of committees and sponsors are available in the PDF

  5. Recent Advances in Stable Isotope Techniques for N2O Source Partitioning in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggs, E.; Mair, L.; Mahmood, S.

    2007-12-01

    The use of 13C, 15N and 18O enables us to overcome uncertainties associated with soil C and N processes and to assess the links between species diversity and ecosystem function. Recent advances in stable isotope techniques enable determination of process rates, and are fundamental for examining interactions between C and N cycles. Here we will introduce the 15N-, 18O- and 13C-enrichment techniques we have developed to distinguish between different N2O-producing processes in situ in soils, presenting selected results, and will critically assess their potential, alone and in combination with molecular techniques, to help address key research questions for soil biogeochemistry and microbial ecology. We have developed 15N- 18O-enrichment techniques to distinguish between, and to quantify, N2O production during ammonia oxidation, nitrifier denitrification and denitrification. This provides a great advantage over natural abundance approaches as it enables quantification of N2O from each microbial source, which can be coupled with quantification of N2 production, and used to examine interactions between different processes and cycles. These approaches have also provided new insights into the N cycle and how it interacts with the C cycle. For example, we now know that ammonia oxidising bacteria significantly contribute to N2O emissions from soils, both via the traditionally accepted ammonia oxidation pathway, and also via denitrification (nitrifier denitrification) which can proceed even under aerobic conditions. We are also linking emissions from each source to diversity and activity of relevant microbial functional groups, for example through the development and application of a specific nirK primer for the nitrite reductase in ammonia oxidising bacteria. Recently, isotopomers have been proposed as an alternative for source partitioning N2O at natural abundance levels, and offers the potential to investigate N2O production from nitrate ammonification, and overcomes the

  6. Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling and Water Recovery in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Young Cho; Alexander Fridman

    2009-04-02

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop technologies to reduce freshwater consumption in a cooling tower of coal-based power plant so that one could significantly reduce the need of make-up water. The specific goal was to develop a scale prevention technology based an integrated system of physical water treatment (PWT) and a novel filtration method so that one could reduce the need for the water blowdown, which accounts approximately 30% of water loss in a cooling tower. The present study investigated if a pulsed spark discharge in water could be used to remove deposits from the filter membrane. The test setup included a circulating water loop and a pulsed power system. The present experiments used artificially hardened water with hardness of 1,000 mg/L of CaCO{sub 3} made from a mixture of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in order to produce calcium carbonate deposits on the filter membrane. Spark discharge in water was found to produce strong shockwaves in water, and the efficiency of the spark discharge in cleaning filter surface was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop across the filter over time. Results showed that the pressure drop could be reduced to the value corresponding to the initial clean state and after that the filter could be maintained at the initial state almost indefinitely, confirming the validity of the present concept of pulsed spark discharge in water to clean dirty filter. The present study also investigated the effect of a plasma-assisted self-cleaning filter on the performance of physical water treatment (PWT) solenoid coil for the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. The self-cleaning filter utilized shockwaves produced by pulse-spark discharges in water to continuously remove scale deposits from the surface of the filter, thus keeping the pressure drop across the filter at a relatively low value. Artificial hard water was used in the

  7. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers, task 1. [evaluation of filler materials for regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Schmid, T. E.; Hecht, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Filler materials proposed for use in the sputter fabrication regeneratively cooled thrust chambers were evaluated. Low melting castable alloys, CERROBEND. CERROCAST, and CERROTRU, slurry applied SERMETEL 481 and flame-sprayed aluminum were investigated as filler materials. Sputter deposition from a cylindrical cathode inverted magnestron was used to apply an OFHC copper closeout layer to filled OFHC copper ribbed-wall cylindrical substrates. The sputtered closeout layer structure was evaluated with respect to filler material contamination, predeposition machining and finishing operations, and deposition parameters. The application of aluminum by flame-spraying resulted in excessiver filler porosity. Though the outgassing from this porosity was found to be detrimental to the closeout layer structure, bond strengths in excess of 10,500 psi were achieved. Removal of the aluminum from the grooves was readily accomplished by leaching in a 7.0 molar solution of sodium hydroxide at 353 K. Of the other filler materials evaluated, CERROTRU was found to be the most suitable material with respect to completely filling the ribbed-wall cylinders and vacuum system compatibility. However, bond contamination resulted in low closeout layer bond strength with the CERROTRU filler. CERROBEND, CERROCAST, and SERMETEL 481 were found to be unacceptable as filler materials.

  8. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  9. Craniospinal Irradiation Techniques: A Dosimetric Comparison of Proton Beams With Standard and Advanced Photon Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Dae Woong; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Byung Kiu; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques for craniospinal irradiation in cancer in children. Methods and Materials: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), tomotherapy (TOMO), and proton beam treatment (PBT) in the scattering mode was planned for each of 10 patients at our institution. Dosimetric benefits and organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risks were based on comparisons of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and on the application of organ equivalent doses (OEDs), respectively. Results: When we analyzed the organ-at-risk volumes that received 30%, 60%, and 90% of the prescribed dose (PD), we found that PBT was superior to TOMO and 3D-CRT. On average, the doses delivered by PBT to the esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, pancreas, and kidney were 19.4 Gy, 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 2.5 Gy, 0.2 Gy, and 2.2 Gy for the PD of 36 Gy, respectively, which were significantly lower than the doses delivered by TOMO (22.9 Gy, 4.5 Gy, 6.1 Gy, 4.0 Gy, 13.3 Gy, and 4.9 Gy, respectively) and 3D-CRT (34.6 Gy, 3.6 Gy, 8.0 Gy, 4.6 Gy, 22.9 Gy, and 4.3 Gy, respectively). Although the average doses delivered by PBT to the chest and abdomen were significantly lower than those of 3D-CRT or TOMO, these differences were reduced in the head-and-neck region. OED calculations showed that the risk of secondary cancers in organs such as the stomach, lungs, thyroid, and pancreas was much higher when 3D-CRT or TOMO was used than when PBT was used. Conclusions: Compared with photon techniques, PBT showed improvements in most dosimetric parameters for CSI patients, with lower OEDs to organs at risk.

  10. Advances in turbulent mixing techniques to study microsecond protein folding reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Sagar V.; Chan, Alexander; Graceffa, Rita; Nobrega, R. Paul; Matthews, C. Robert; Irving, Thomas C.; Perot, Blair; Bilsel, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational advances in the protein folding arena have shown that the readout of the one-dimensional sequence information into three-dimensional structure begins within the first few microseconds of folding. The initiation of refolding reactions has been achieved by several means, including temperature jumps, flash photolysis, pressure jumps and rapid mixing methods. One of the most commonly used means of initiating refolding of chemically-denatured proteins is by turbulent flow mixing with refolding dilution buffer, where greater than 99% mixing efficiency has been achieved within 10’s of microseconds. Successful interfacing of turbulent flow mixers with complementary detection methods, including time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy (trFL), Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Circular Dichroism (CD), Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), Hydrogen Exchange (HX) followed by Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), and Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy (FTIR), has made this technique very attractive for monitoring various aspects of structure formation during folding. Although continuous-flow (CF) mixing devices interfaced with trFL detection have a dead time of only 30 µs, burst-phases have been detected in this time scale during folding of peptides and of large proteins (e.g., CheY and TIM barrels). Furthermore, a major limitation of CF mixing technique has been the requirement of large quantities of sample. In this brief communication, we will discuss the recent flurry of activity in micromachining and microfluidics, guided by computational simulations, that are likely to lead to dramatic improvements in time resolution and sample consumption for CF mixers over the next few years. PMID:23868289

  11. Analysis of deformation patterns through advanced DINSAR techniques in Istanbul megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balik Sanli, F.; Calò, F.; Abdikan, S.; Pepe, A.; Gorum, T.

    2014-09-01

    As result of the Turkey's economic growth and heavy migration processes from rural areas, Istanbul has experienced a high urbanization rate, with severe impacts on the environment in terms of natural resources pressure, land-cover changes and uncontrolled sprawl. As a consequence, the city became extremely vulnerable to natural and man-made hazards, inducing ground deformation phenomena that threaten buildings and infrastructures and often cause significant socio-economic losses. Therefore, the detection and monitoring of such deformation patterns is of primary importance for hazard and risk assessment as well as for the design and implementation of effective mitigation strategies. Aim of this work is to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of deformations affecting the Istanbul metropolitan area, by exploiting advanced Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques. In particular, we apply the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach to a dataset of 43 TerraSAR-X images acquired, between November 2010 and June 2012, along descending orbits with an 11-day revisit time and a 3 m × 3 m spatial resolution. The SBAS processing allowed us to remotely detect and monitor subsidence patterns over all the urban area as well as to provide detailed information at the scale of the single building. Such SBAS measurements, effectively integrated with ground-based monitoring data and thematic maps, allows to explore the relationship between the detected deformation phenomena and urbanization, contributing to improve the urban planning and management.

  12. Advanced real-time dynamic scene generation techniques for improved performance and fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark H.; Buford, James A.; Mayhall, Anthony J.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in real-time synthetic scene generation for Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) improve both performance and fidelity. Modeling ground target scenarios requires tradeoffs because of limited texture memory for imagery and limited main memory for elevation data. High- resolution insets have been used in the past to provide better fidelity in specific areas, such as in the neighborhood of a target. Improvements for ground scenarios include smooth transitions for high-resolution insets to reduce high spatial frequency artifacts at the borders of the inset regions and dynamic terrain paging to support large area databases. Transport lag through the scene generation system, including sensor emulation and interface components, has been dealt with in the past through the use of sub-window extraction from oversize scenes. This compensates for spatial effects of transport lag but not temporal effects. A new system has been developed and used successfully to compensate for a flashing coded beacon in the scene. Other techniques have been developed to synchronize the scene generator with the seeker under test (SUT) and to model atmospheric effects, sensor optic and electronics, and angular emissivity attenuation.

  13. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  14. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter; Frazin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012

  15. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012. PMID:26347393

  16. Classification of human colonic tissues using FTIR spectra and advanced statistical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwielly, A.; Argov, S.; Salman, A.; Bogomolny, E.; Mordechai, S.

    2010-04-01

    One of the major public health hazards is colon cancer. There is a great necessity to develop new methods for early detection of cancer. If colon cancer is detected and treated early, cure rate of more than 90% can be achieved. In this study we used FTIR microscopy (MSP), which has shown a good potential in the last 20 years in the fields of medical diagnostic and early detection of abnormal tissues. Large database of FTIR microscopic spectra was acquired from 230 human colonic biopsies. Five different subgroups were included in our database, normal and cancer tissues as well as three stages of benign colonic polyps, namely, mild, moderate and severe polyps which are precursors of carcinoma. In this study we applied advanced mathematical and statistical techniques including principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), on human colonic FTIR spectra in order to differentiate among the mentioned subgroups' tissues. Good classification accuracy between normal, polyps and cancer groups was achieved with approximately 85% success rate. Our results showed that there is a great potential of developing FTIR-micro spectroscopy as a simple, reagent-free viable tool for early detection of colon cancer in particular the early stages of premalignancy among the benign colonic polyps.

  17. Characterization techniques for the high-brightness particle beams of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) user facility in the hard x-ray regime (10--100 keV). The design objectives for the 7-GeV storage ring include a positron beam natural emittance of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m-rad at an average current of 100 mA. Proposed methods for measuring the transverse and longitudinal profiles will be described. Additionally, a research and development effort using an rf gun as a low-emittance source of electrons for injection into the 200- to 650-MeV linac subsystem is underway. This latter system is projected to produce electron beams with a normalized, rms emittance of {approximately}2 {pi} mm-mrad at peak currents of near one hundred amps. This interesting characterization problem will also be briefly discussed. The combination of both source types within one laboratory facility will stimulate the development of diagnostic techniques in these parameter spaces.

  18. Is cooling still cool?

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ashwin; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Botha, John

    2015-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH), where patients are cooled to between 32°C and 36°C for a period of 12-24 hours and then gradually rewarmed, may reduce the risk of ischemic injury to cerebral tissue following a period of insufficient blood flow. This strategy of TH could improve mortality and neurological function in patients who have experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA). The necessity of TH in OOHCA was challenged in late 2013 by a fascinating and potentially practice changing publication, which found that targeting a temperature of 36°C had similar outcomes to cooling patients to 33°C. This article reviews the current literature and summarizes the uncertainties and questions raised when considering cooling of patients at risk of hypoxic brain injury. Irrespective of whether TH or targeted temperature management is deployed in patients at risk of hypoxic brain injury, it would seem that avoiding hyperpyrexia is important and that a more rigorous approach to neurological evaluation is mandated. PMID:25423577

  19. Electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.

    2004-10-01

    The brief review of the most significant and interesting achievements in electron cooling method, which took place during last two years, is presented. The description of the electron cooling facilities-storage rings and traps being in operation or under development-is given. The applications of the electron cooling method are considered. The following modern fields of the method development are discussed: crystalline beam formation, expansion into middle and high energy electron cooling (the Fermilab Recycler Electron Cooler, the BNL cooler-recuperator, cooling with circulating electron beam, the GSI project), electron cooling in traps, antihydrogen generation, electron cooling of positrons (the LEPTA project).

  20. Importance of combining convection with film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  1. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  2. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  3. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  4. Body cooling after death.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, L A; Tikuisis, P; Livingstone, S; Limmer, R

    1980-09-01

    In the analyses of cases of death in cold air environments, it is often of interest to determine the time required for the body of the individual to cool to ambient temperature. Usually such determinations have been based on Newton's law of cooling. This paper describes a case history in which this technique was experimentally tested and consequently abandoned in favour of a more complex biophysical model which more accurately described the thermo-physical events inherent in body cooling. This model is recommended for determination of the times required for various body parts to cool to ambient environmental temperatures.

  5. The use of scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Young, Annie; Arif, Azra

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is a common and distressing side effect of cancer therapy and is one of the major unmet challenges in cancer management. Scalp cooling can prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss in some cancer patients with solid tumours receiving certain chemotherapy regimens. Recent evidence indicates that this technique does not increase the risk of scalp metastasis. A reduction in post-chemotherapy infusion duration of scalp cooling and the advancement in cool cap technology may assist clinicians in promoting scalp cooling to cancer patients. This article discusses recent research, scalp cooling guidelines, products available and implications for nurses and their organisations in providing scalp cooling. It also considers recent advancements in identifying genes associated with chemotherapy-induced hair loss and international research collaborations including a registry and a 'chemotherapy-induced hair loss action group'--all striving to improve the patient experience of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

  6. APPLICATION OF ADVANCED IN VITRO TECHNIQUES TO MEASURE, UNDERSTAND AND PREDICT THE KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a research program in metabolism that involves numerous collaborators across EPA as well as other federal and academic labs. A primary goal is to develop and apply advanced in vitro techniques to measure, understand and predict the kinetics and mechanisms of xen...

  7. Advanced fuels modeling: Evaluating the steady-state performance of carbide fuel in helium-cooled reactors using FRAPCON 3.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Luther, Jr.

    Uranium carbide (UC) has long been considered a potential alternative to uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel, especially in the context of Gen IV gas-cooled reactors. It has shown promise because of its high uranium density, good irradiation stability, and especially high thermal conductivity. Despite its many benefits, UC is known to swell at a rate twice that of UO2. However, the swelling phenomenon is not well understood, and we are limited to a weak empirical understanding of the swelling mechanism. One suggested cladding for UC is silicon carbide (SiC), a ceramic that demonstrates a number of desirable properties. Among them are an increased corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength, and irradiation stability. However, with increased temperatures, SiC exhibits an extremely brittle nature. The brittle behavior of SiC is not fully understood and thus it is unknown how SiC would respond to the added stress of a swelling UC fuel. To better understand the interaction between these advanced materials, each has been implemented into FRAPCON, the preferred fuel performance code of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); additionally, the material properties for a helium coolant have been incorporated. The implementation of UC within FRAPCON required the development of material models that described not only the thermophysical properties of UC, such as thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, but also models for the swelling, densification, and fission gas release associated with the fuel's irradiation behavior. This research is intended to supplement ongoing analysis of the performance and behavior of uranium carbide and silicon carbide in a helium-cooled reactor.

  8. Landslide detection and long-term monitoring in urban area by means of advanced interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Liguori, Vincenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    This work aims at illustrating the potential of advanced interferometric techniques for detection and long-term monitoring of landslide ground deformations at local scale. Space-born InSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been successfully exploited in recent years to measure ground deformations associated to processes with slow kinematics, such as landslides, tectonic motions, subsidence or volcanic activity, thanks to both the standard single-interferogram approach (centimeter accuracy) and advanced time-series analyses of long temporal radar satellite data stacks (millimeter accuracy), such as Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) techniques. In order to get a complete overview and an in-depth knowledge of an investigated landslide, InSAR satellite measures can support conventional in situ data. This methodology allows studying the spatial pattern and the temporal evolution of ground deformations, improving the spatial coverage and overcoming issues related to installation of ground-based instrumentation and data acquisition in unstable areas. Here we describe the application of the above-mentioned methodology on the test area of Agrigento, Sicily (Italy), affected by hydrogeological risk. The town is located in Southern Sicily, at edge of the Apennine-Maghrebian thrust belt, on the Plio-Pleistocene and Miocene sediments of the Gela Nappe. Ground instabilities affect the urban area and involve the infrastructures of its NW side, such as the Cathedral, the Seminary and many private buildings. An integration between InSAR analyses and conventional field investigations (e.g. structural damages and fractures surveys) was therefore carried out, to support Regional Civil Protection authorities for emergency management and risk mitigation. The results of InSAR analysis highlighted a general stability of the whole urban area between 1992 and 2007. However, very high deformation rates (up to 10-12 mm/y) were identified in 1992-2000 in the W slope of the

  9. Application of remote sensing techniques for monitoring the thermal pollution of cooling-water discharge from nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuqun; Shi, Ping; Mao, Qingwen

    2003-08-01

    This article introduces a practical method to investigate thermal pollution in coastal water from satellite data. The intensity and distribution areas of thermal pollution by the heated effluent discharge from the nuclear power plant on Daya Bay, southern China were investigated by using Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) thermal band data from 1994 to 2001. A local algorithm was developed, based on sea-truth data of water surface temperature measured when the satellite passed over the study area. The local algorithm was then applied to estimate water temperature from TM data. It shows that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means to quantitatively monitor the intensity of thermal pollution and to retrieve a very detailed distribution pattern of thermal pollution in coastal waters. The remotely-sensed results of the thermal pollution can be used for environmental management of coastal waters.

  10. Liner cooling research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Waldo A.

    1987-01-01

    Described are recently completed and current advanced liner research applicable to advanced small gas turbine engines. Research relating to the evolution of fuel efficient small gas turbine engines capable of meeting future commercial and military aviation needs is currently under way at NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this research, a reverse-flow combustor geometry was maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated and compared to a baseline combustor. The performance of the combustors featuring counterflow film-cooled (CFFC) panels, transpiration cooled liner walls (TRANS), and compliant metal/ceramic (CMC) walls was obtained over a range of simulated flight conditions of a 16:1 pressure ratio gas turbine engine and fuel/air ratios up to 0.034. All the combustors featured an identical fuel injection system, identical geometric configuration outline, and similar designed internal aerothermodynamics.

  11. Direct Frequency Comb Laser Cooling and Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayich, A. M.; Long, X.; Campbell, W. C.

    2016-10-01

    Ultracold atoms, produced by laser cooling and trapping, have led to recent advances in quantum information, quantum chemistry, and quantum sensors. A lack of ultraviolet narrow-band lasers precludes laser cooling of prevalent atoms such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Broadband pulsed lasers can produce high power in the ultraviolet, and we demonstrate that the entire spectrum of an optical frequency comb can cool atoms when used to drive a narrow two-photon transition. This multiphoton optical force is also used to make a magneto-optical trap. These techniques may provide a route to ultracold samples of nature's most abundant building blocks for studies of pure-state chemistry and precision measurement.

  12. [Recent advances of anastomosis techniques of esophagojejunostomy after laparoscopic totally gastrectomy in gastric tumor].

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Ke, Chongwei

    2015-05-01

    The esophageal jejunum anastomosis of the digestive tract reconstruction techniques in laparoscopic total gastrectomy includes two categories: circular stapler anastomosis techniques and linear stapler anastomosis techniques. Circular stapler anastomosis techniques include manual anastomosis method, purse string instrument method, Hiki improved special anvil anastomosis technique, the transorally inserted anvil(OrVil(TM)) and reverse puncture device technique. Linear stapler anastomosis techniques include side to side anastomosis technique and Overlap side to side anastomosis technique. Esophageal jejunum anastomosis technique has a wide selection of different technologies with different strengths and the corresponding limitations. This article will introduce research progress of laparoscopic total gastrectomy esophagus jejunum anastomosis from both sides of the development of anastomosis technology and the selection of anastomosis technology.

  13. Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Schalkoff, Robert J.

    1999-06-01

    This research is intended to advance the technology of semi-autonomous teleoperated robotics as applied to Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) tasks. Specifically, research leading to a prototype dual-manipulator mobile work cell is underway. This cell is supported and enhanced by computer vision, virtual reality and advanced robotics technology.

  14. Advanced remote sensing techniques for forestry applications: an application case in Sarawak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezry, Edmond; Yakam-Simen, Francis; Romeijn, Paul P.; Supit, Iwan; Demargne, Louis

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper reports the operational implementation of new techniques for the exploitation of remote sensing data (SAR and optical) in the framework of forestry applications. In particular, we present a new technique for standing timber volume estimation. This technique is based on remote sensing knowledge (SAR and optical synergy) and forestry knowledge (forest structure models), proved fairly accurate. To illustrate the application of these techniques, an operational commercial case study regarding forest concessions in Sarawak is presented. Validation of this technique by comparison of the remote sensing results and the database of the customer has shown that this technique is fairly accurate.

  15. An advanced technique for speciation of organic nitrogen in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, S.; Robinson, J.; Hays, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    threshold as water-soluble free AA, with an average concentration of 22 ± 9 ng m-3 (N=13). Following microwave-assisted gas phase hydrolysis, the total AA concentration in the forest environment increased significantly (70 ± 35 ng m-3) and additional compounds (methionine, isoleucine) were detected above the reporting threshold. The ability to quantify AA in aerosol samples without derivatization reduces time consuming preparation procedures while providing the advancement of selective mass determination that eliminates potential interferences associated with traditional fluorescence detection. This step forward in precise mass determination with the use of internal standardization, improves the confidence of compound identification. With the increasing focus on WSOC (including ON) characterization in the atmospheric science community, native detection by LC-MS (Q-TOF) will play a central role in determining the most direct approach to quantify an increasing fraction of the co-extracted polar organic compounds. Method application for further characterization of atmospheric ON will be discussed. Reference: Samy, S., Robinson, J., and M.D. Hays. "An Advanced LC-MS (Q-TOF) Technique for the Detection of Amino Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols", Analytical Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2011, DOI: 10.1007/s00216-011-5238-2

  16. Techniques Optimized for Reducing Instabilities in Advanced Nickel-Base Superalloys for Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Locci, Ivan E.; Garg, anita; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2002-01-01

    is a three-phase constituent composed of TCP and stringers of gamma phase in a matrix of gamma prime. An incoherent grain boundary separates the SRZ from the gammagamma prime microstructure of the superalloy. The SRZ is believed to form as a result of local chemistry changes in the superalloy due to the application of the diffusion aluminide bondcoat. Locally high surface stresses also appear to promote the formation of the SRZ. Thus, techniques that change the local alloy chemistry or reduce surface stresses have been examined for their effectiveness in reducing SRZ. These SRZ-reduction steps are performed on the test specimen or the turbine blade before the bondcoat is applied. Stressrelief heat treatments developed at NASA Glenn have been demonstrated to reduce significantly the amount of SRZ that develops during subsequent high-temperature exposures. Stress-relief heat treatments reduce surface stresses by recrystallizing a thin surface layer of the superalloy. However, in alloys with very high propensities to form SRZ, stress relief heat treatments alone do not eliminate SRZ entirely. Thus, techniques that modify the local chemistry under the bondcoat have been emphasized and optimized successfully at Glenn. One such technique is carburization, which changes the local chemistry by forming submicron carbides near the surface of the superalloy. Detailed characterizations have demonstrated that the depth and uniform distribution of these carbides are enhanced when a stress relief treatment and an appropriate surface preparation are employed in advance of the carburization treatment. Even in alloys that have the propensity to develop a continuous SRZ layer beneath the diffusion zone, the SRZ has been completely eliminated or reduced to low, manageable levels when this combination of techniques is utilized. Now that the techniques to mitigate SRZ have been established at Glenn, TCP phase formation is being emphasized in ongoing work under the UEET Program. The

  17. A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jasbir Gill

    2010-08-30

    Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica

  18. Investigation of Advanced Dose Verification Techniques for External Beam Radiation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuni, Ganiyu Adeniyi

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have been introduced in radiation therapy to achieve highly conformal dose distributions around the tumour while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. These techniques have increased the need for comprehensive quality assurance tests, to verify that customized patient treatment plans are accurately delivered during treatment. in vivo dose verification, performed during treatment delivery, confirms that the actual dose delivered is the same as the prescribed dose, helping to reduce treatment delivery errors. in vivo measurements may be accomplished using entrance or exit detectors. The objective of this project is to investigate a novel entrance detector designed for in vivo dose verification. This thesis is separated into three main investigations, focusing on a prototype entrance transmission detector (TRD) developed by IBA Dosimetry, Germany. First contaminant electrons generated by the TRD in a 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. This study demonstrates that modification of the contaminant electron model in the treatment planning system is required for accurate patient dose calculation in buildup regions when using the device. Second, the ability of the TRD to accurately measure dose from IMRT and VMAT was investigated by characterising the spatial resolution of the device. This was accomplished by measuring the point spread function with further validation provided by MC simulation. Comparisons of measured and calculated doses show that the spatial resolution of the TRD allows for measurement of clinical IMRT fields within acceptable tolerance. Finally, a new general research tool was developed to perform MC simulations for VMAT and IMRT treatments, simultaneously tracking dose deposition in both the patient CT geometry and an arbitrary planar detector system, generalized to handle either entrance or exit orientations. It was

  19. Advanced imaging techniques II: using a compound microscope for photographing point-mount specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital imaging technology has revolutionized the practice photographing insects for scientific study. Herein described are lighting and mounting techniques designed for imaging micro Hymenoptera. Techniques described here are applicable to all small insects, as well as other invertebrates. The ke...

  20. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  1. Beyond whole-body imaging: advanced imaging techniques of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Barnwell, James; Raptis, Constantine A; McConathy, Jonathan E; Laforest, Richard; Siegel, Barry A; Woodard, Pamela K; Fowler, Kathryn

    2015-02-01

    PET/MRI is a hybrid imaging modality that is gaining clinical interest with the first Food and Drug Administration-approved simultaneous imaging system recently added to the clinical armamentarium. Several advanced PET/MRI applications, such as high-resolution anatomic imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, motion correction, and cardiac imaging, show great potential for clinical use. The purpose of this article is to highlight several advanced PET/MRI applications through case examples and review of the current literature.

  2. The investigation of advanced remote sensing, radiative transfer and inversion techniques for the measurement of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Adarsh; Wang, Pi-Huan

    1985-01-01

    The research program is documented for developing space and ground-based remote sensing techniques performed during the period from December 15, 1977 to March 15, 1985. The program involved the application of sophisticated radiative transfer codes and inversion methods to various advanced remote sensing concepts for determining atmospheric constituents, particularly aerosols. It covers detailed discussions of the solar aureole technique for monitoring columnar aerosol size distribution, and the multispectral limb scattered radiance and limb attenuated radiance (solar occultation) techniques, as well as the upwelling scattered solar radiance method for determining the aerosol and gaseous characteristics. In addition, analytical models of aerosol size distribution and simulation studies of the limb solar aureole radiance technique and the variability of ozone at high altitudes during satellite sunrise/sunset events are also described in detail.

  3. Removal of Lattice Imperfections that Impact the Optical Quality of Ti:Sapphire using Advanced Magnetorheological Finishing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bayramian, A J; Davis, P J; Ebbers, C A; Wolfe, J E; Caird, J A; Barty, C J

    2008-02-26

    Advanced magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques have been applied to Ti:sapphire crystals to compensate for sub-millimeter lattice distortions that occur during the crystal growing process. Precise optical corrections are made by imprinting topographical structure onto the crystal surfaces to cancel out the effects of the lattice distortion in the transmitted wavefront. This novel technique significantly improves the optical quality for crystals of this type and sets the stage for increasing the availability of high-quality large-aperture sapphire and Ti:sapphire optics in critical applications.

  4. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-04-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OAR's, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OAR's DVH's as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment.

  5. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-01-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OAR’s, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OAR’s DVH’s as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment. PMID:23776314

  6. [Advancement of colloidal gold chromatographic technique in screening of ochratoxin A].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-lu; Wang, Yu-ting; Kong, Wei-jun; Yang, Mei-hua; Zhao, Ming; Ou-Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic secondary metabolite mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, existing in a variety of foodstuffs and Chinese medicines. OTA is difficult to be detected in practice because of the characteristics such as trace amounts, toxicity, existing in complex matrices. In the numerous detection technologies, colloidal gold chromatographic techniques are highly sensitive, specific, cost-effective and user-friendly, and are being used increasingly for OTA screening. Recently, with the development of aptamer technology and its application in chromatographic technique, a newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique has been developed. This review elaborates the structures and principles of both traditional and newly colloidal gold chromatographic techniques, focuses on newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique, summarizes and compares their use in rapid detection of OTA. Finally, in order to provide a reference for better research of related work, the development trends of this novel technique are prospected.

  7. Adaptations of advanced safety and reliability techniques to petroleum and other industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purser, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    The underlying philosophy of the general approach to failure reduction and control is presented. Safety and reliability management techniques developed in the industries which have participated in the U.S. space and defense programs are described along with adaptations to nonaerospace activities. The examples given illustrate the scope of applicability of these techniques. It is indicated that any activity treated as a 'system' is a potential user of aerospace safety and reliability management techniques.

  8. Euromech 260: Advanced non-intrusive experimental techniques in fluid and plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The following topics are discussed: coherent anti-Stokes and elastic Rayleigh scattering; elastic scattering and non linear dynamics; fluorescence; molecular tracking techniques and particle image velocimetry.

  9. Quantitative Study of Elasticity of Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor with Alternated Cooling and Heating Treatment based on ARFI Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Wei, Cong; Shen, E.; Ying, Tao; Hu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging technique is used to quantitatively evaluate the elasticity of rabbit VX2 liver tumor with alternated cooling and heating treatment (ACHT). ACHT was performed on fifteen VX2 liver tumor models established in fifteen male New Zealand white rabbits with open tumor plant. ARFI was performed on day 0, 1, 7 and 14 after ACHT and shear wave velocity (SWV) in ARFI was recorded to evaluate the elasticity of the treated area. The SWV value of the lesion on day 0, 1, 7 and 14 was 2.33 ± 0.19 m/s, 3.09 ± 0.40 m/s, 2.64 ± 0.37 m/s and 2.26 ± 0.24 m/s, respectively, indicating the treated areas get stiffer on day 1 and then get softer gradually by day. All the difference between adjacent time points was statistically significant. The SWV value of different parts on day 7 approved that the hardness of the treated area is heterogenous: the treated area in the center >the peripheral strip-shaped area >normal liver tissues, consistent with pathological changes. Meanwhile, ARFI combined with conventional US imaging can qualitatively and quantitatively exam the healing process of rabbit VX2 liver tumor after ACHT, and corresponds well to the pathological results. PMID:27381362

  10. Advanced imaging techniques for the study of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Busch, Wolfgang; Spalding, Edgar P; Benfey, Philip N

    2014-05-01

    A variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of plant growth and development from living plants. Multi-level data, from macroscopic to molecular, and from weeks to seconds, can be acquired. Furthermore, advances in parallelized and automated image acquisition enable the throughput to capture images from large populations of plants under specific growth conditions. Image-processing capabilities allow for 3D or 4D reconstruction of image data and automated quantification of biological features. These advances facilitate the integration of imaging data with genome-wide molecular data to enable systems-level modeling.

  11. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, Sergei M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  12. The Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) Decommissioning Project A Close Out Report for WAGR Decommissioning Campaigns 1 to 10 - 12474

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, Chris

    2012-07-01

    The reactor core of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) has been dismantled as part of an ongoing decommissioning project. The WAGR operated until 1981 as a development reactor for the British Commercial Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (CAGR) power programme. Decommissioning began in 1982 with the removal of fuel from the reactor core which was completed in 1983. Subsequently, a significant amount of engineering work was carried out, including removal of equipment external to the reactor and initial manual dismantling operations at the top of the reactor, in preparation for the removal of the reactor core itself. Modification of the facility structure and construction of the waste packaging plant served to provide a waste route for the reactor components. The reactor core was dismantled on a 'top-down' basis in a series of 'campaigns' related to discrete reactor components. This report describes the facility, the modifications undertaken to facilitate its decommissioning and the strategies employed to recognise the successful decommissioning of the reactor. Early decommissioning tasks at the top of the reactor were undertaken manually but the main of the decommissioning tasks were carried remotely, with deployment systems comprising of little more than crane like devices, intelligently interfaced into the existing structure. The tooling deployed from the 3 tonne capacity (3te) hoist consisted either purely mechanical devices or those being electrically controlled from a 'push-button' panel positioned at the operator control stations, there was no degree of autonomy in the 3te hoist or any of the tools deployed from it. Whilst the ATC was able to provide some tele-robotic capabilities these were very limited and required a good degree of driver input which due to the operating philosophy at WAGR was not utilised. The WAGR box proved a successful waste package, adaptable through the use of waste box furniture specific to the waste-forms generated throughout

  13. Advanced karst hydrological and contaminant monitoring techniques for real-time and high resolution applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In telogenetic and soil-mantled karst aquifers, the movement of autogenic recharge through the epikarstic zone and into the regional aquifer can be a complex process and have implications for flooding, groundwater contamination, and other difficult to capture processes. Recent advances in instrument...

  14. Advance Appropriations: A Needless and Confusing Education Budget Technique. Federal Education Budget Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This report argues that advance appropriations serve no functional purpose for schools, but they create a loss of transparency, comparability, and simplicity in federal education budgeting. It allocates spending before future budgets have been established. The approach was originally used to skirt spending limits and budget procedures in place…

  15. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  16. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGES

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  17. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    PubMed

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized. PMID:27519021

  18. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    PubMed

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  19. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  20. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal–semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto–Peltier and Nernst–Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  1. Recent advances in electronic nose techniques for monitoring of fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Hang; Chen, Quansheng; Mei, Congli; Liu, Guohai

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fermentation process is often sensitive to even slight changes of conditions that may result in unacceptable end-product quality. Thus, the monitoring of the process is critical for discovering unfavorable deviations as early as possible and taking the appropriate measures. However, the use of traditional analytical techniques is often time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this sense, the most effective way of developing rapid, accurate and relatively economical method for quality assurance in microbial fermentation process is the use of novel chemical sensor systems. Electronic nose techniques have particular advantages in non-invasive monitoring of microbial fermentation process. Therefore, in this review, we present an overview of the most important contributions dealing with the quality control in microbial fermentation process using the electronic nose techniques. After a brief description of the fundamentals of the sensor techniques, some examples of potential applications of electronic nose techniques monitoring are provided, including the implementation of control strategies and the combination with other monitoring tools (i.e. sensor fusion). Finally, on the basis of the review, the electronic nose techniques are critically commented, and its strengths and weaknesses being highlighted. In addition, on the basis of the observed trends, we also propose the technical challenges and future outlook for the electronic nose techniques.

  2. Time-frequency and advanced frequency estimation techniques for the investigation of bat echolocation calls.

    PubMed

    Kopsinis, Yannis; Aboutanios, Elias; Waters, Dean A; McLaughlin, Steve

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, techniques for time-frequency analysis and investigation of bat echolocation calls are studied. Particularly, enhanced resolution techniques are developed and/or used in this specific context for the first time. When compared to traditional time-frequency representation methods, the proposed techniques are more capable of showing previously unseen features in the structure of bat echolocation calls. It should be emphasized that although the study is focused on bat echolocation recordings, the results are more general and applicable to many other types of signal. PMID:20136233

  3. Advanced techniques for noise source identification on a large generator unit

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.D. ); Yang, S.J. )

    1993-03-01

    Power station acoustic noise assessment, which has experienced increased environmental awareness and subsequently more stringent legislation for a number of years, has received and added stimulus due to the recent advent of powerful measurement and analysis techniques including sound intensity and coherence. These experimental techniques are explained and results, for a generator unit, illustrate their value in providing a unique, correlated insight into noise problems. This includes noise quantification, full explanation of site sound pressure level in terms of the various influences and major noise source identification. These techniques are widely applicable and an invaluable aid to any industrial noise problem.

  4. Time-frequency and advanced frequency estimation techniques for the investigation of bat echolocation calls.

    PubMed

    Kopsinis, Yannis; Aboutanios, Elias; Waters, Dean A; McLaughlin, Steve

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, techniques for time-frequency analysis and investigation of bat echolocation calls are studied. Particularly, enhanced resolution techniques are developed and/or used in this specific context for the first time. When compared to traditional time-frequency representation methods, the proposed techniques are more capable of showing previously unseen features in the structure of bat echolocation calls. It should be emphasized that although the study is focused on bat echolocation recordings, the results are more general and applicable to many other types of signal.

  5. Nde of Advanced Automotive Composite Materials that Apply Ultrasound Infrared Thermography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Hyun; Park, Soo-Keun; Kim, Jae-Yeol

    The infrared thermographic nondestructive inspection technique is a quality inspection and stability assessment method used to diagnose the physical characteristics and defects by detecting the infrared ray radiated from the object without destructing it. Recently, the nondestructive inspection and assessment that use the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique are widely adopted in diverse areas. The ultrasound-infrared thermography technique uses the phenomenon that the ultrasound wave incidence to an object with cracks or defects on its mating surface generates local heat on the surface. The car industry increasingly uses composite materials for their lightweight, strength, and environmental resistance. In this study, the car piston passed through the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique for nondestructive testing, among the composite material car parts. This study also examined the effects of the frequency and power to optimize the nondestructive inspection.

  6. Recent advances in freeze-fracture electron microscopy: the replica immunolabeling technique

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopy is a technique for examining the ultrastructure of rapidly frozen biological samples by transmission electron microscopy. Of a range of approaches to freeze-fracture cytochemistry that have been developed and tried, the most successful is the technique termed freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL). In this technique, samples are frozen, fractured and replicated with platinum-carbon as in standard freeze fracture, and then carefully treated with sodium dodecylsulphate to remove all the biological material except a fine layer of molecules attached to the replica itself. Immunogold labeling of these molecules permits their distribution to be seen superimposed upon high resolution planar views of membrane structure. Examples of how this technique has contributed to our understanding of lipid droplet biogenesis and function are discussed. PMID:18385807

  7. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  8. Assessment of recent advances in measurement techniques for atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, Christoph; Emmenegger, Lukas; Firdaus, Mohd; Hatakka, Juha; Heimann, Martin; Kozlova, Elena; Spain, T. Gerard; Steinbacher, Martin; van der Schoot, Marcel V.; Buchmann, Brigitte

    2016-09-01

    Until recently, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) measurements were made almost exclusively using nondispersive infrared (NDIR) absorption and gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC/FID) techniques, respectively. Recently, commercially available instruments based on spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have become more widely available and affordable. This resulted in a widespread use of these techniques at many measurement stations. This paper is focused on the comparison between a CRDS "travelling instrument" that has been used during performance audits within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) with instruments incorporating other, more traditional techniques for measuring CO2 and CH4 (NDIR and GC/FID). We demonstrate that CRDS instruments and likely other spectroscopic techniques are suitable for WMO/GAW stations and allow a smooth continuation of historic CO2 and CH4 time series. Moreover, the analysis of the audit results indicates that the spectroscopic techniques have a number of advantages over the traditional methods which will lead to the improved accuracy of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 measurements.

  9. An overview on in situ micronization technique - An emerging novel concept in advanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vandana, K R; Prasanna Raju, Y; Harini Chowdary, V; Sushma, M; Vijay Kumar, N

    2014-09-01

    The use of drug powders containing micronized drug particles has been increasing in several pharmaceutical dosage forms to overcome the dissolution and bioavailability problems. Most of the newly developed drugs are poorly water soluble which limits dissolution rate and bioavailability. The dissolution rate can be enhanced by micronization of the drug particles. The properties of the micronized drug substance such as particle size, size distribution, shape, surface properties, and agglomeration behaviour and powder flow are affected by the type of micronization technique used. Mechanical communition, spray drying and supercritical fluid (SCF) technology are the most commonly employed techniques for production of micronized drug particles but the characteristics of the resulting drug product cannot be controlled using these techniques. Hence, a newer technique called in situ micronization is developed in order to overcome the limitations associated with the other techniques. This review summarizes the existing knowledge on in situ micronization techniques. The properties of the resulting drug substance obtained by in situ micronization were also compared.

  10. An overview on in situ micronization technique – An emerging novel concept in advanced drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, K.R.; Prasanna Raju, Y.; Harini Chowdary, V.; Sushma, M.; Vijay Kumar, N.

    2013-01-01

    The use of drug powders containing micronized drug particles has been increasing in several pharmaceutical dosage forms to overcome the dissolution and bioavailability problems. Most of the newly developed drugs are poorly water soluble which limits dissolution rate and bioavailability. The dissolution rate can be enhanced by micronization of the drug particles. The properties of the micronized drug substance such as particle size, size distribution, shape, surface properties, and agglomeration behaviour and powder flow are affected by the type of micronization technique used. Mechanical communition, spray drying and supercritical fluid (SCF) technology are the most commonly employed techniques for production of micronized drug particles but the characteristics of the resulting drug product cannot be controlled using these techniques. Hence, a newer technique called in situ micronization is developed in order to overcome the limitations associated with the other techniques. This review summarizes the existing knowledge on in situ micronization techniques. The properties of the resulting drug substance obtained by in situ micronization were also compared. PMID:25161371

  11. Three case reports of the metabolic and electroencephalographic changes during advanced Buddhist meditation techniques.

    PubMed

    Benson, H; Malhotra, M S; Goldman, R F; Jacobs, G D; Hopkins, P J

    1990-01-01

    To examine the extent to which advanced meditative practices might alter body metabolism and the electroencephalogram (EEG), we investigated three Tibetan Buddhist monks living in the Rumtek monastery in Sikkim, India. In a study carried out in February 1988, we found that during the practice of several different meditative practices, resting metabolism (VO2) could be both raised (up to 61%) and lowered (down to 64%). The reduction from rest is the largest ever reported. On the EEG, marked asymmetry in alpha and beta activity between the hemispheres and increased beta activity were present. From these three case reports, we conclude that advanced meditative practices may yield different alterations in metabolism (there are also forms of meditation that increase metabolism) and that the decreases in metabolism can be striking.

  12. External Magnetic Field Reduction Techniques for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Geng, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Linear alternators coupled to high efficiency Stirling engines are strong candidates for thermal-to-electric power conversion in space. However, the magnetic field emissions, both AC and DC, of these permanent magnet excited alternators can interfere with sensitive instrumentation onboard a spacecraft. Effective methods to mitigate the AC and DC electromagnetic interference (EMI) from solenoidal type linear alternators (like that used in the Advanced Stirling Convertor) have been developed for potential use in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator. The methods developed avoid the complexity and extra mass inherent in data extraction from multiple sensors or the use of shielding. This paper discusses these methods, and also provides experimental data obtained during breadboard testing of both AC and DC external magnetic field devices.

  13. Application of formal optimization techniques in thermal/structural design of a heat-pipe-cooled panel for a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear mathematical programming methods are used to design a radiantly cooled and heat-pipe-cooled panel for a Mach 6.7 transport. The cooled portion of the panel is a hybrid heat-pipe/actively cooled design which uses heat pipes to transport the absorbed heat to the ends of the panel where it is removed by active cooling. The panels are optimized for minimum mass and to satisfy a set of heat-pipe, structural, geometric, and minimum-gage constraints. Two panel concepts are investigated: cylindrical heat pipes embedded in a honeycomb core and an integrated design which uses a web-core heat-pipe sandwich concept. The latter was lighter and resulted in a design which was less than 10 percent heavier than an all actively cooled concept. The heat-pipe concept, however, is redundant and can sustain a single-point failure, whereas the actively cooled concept cannot. An additional study was performed to determine the optimum number of coolant manifolds per panel for a minimum-mass design.

  14. POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    X.H. Wang; J. Wiseman; D.J. Sung; D. McLean; William Peters; Jim Mullins; John Hugh; G. Evans; Vince Hamilton; Kenneth Robinette; Tim Krim; Michael Fleet

    1999-08-01

    Dewatering of ultra-fine (minus 150 {micro}m) coal slurry to less than 20% moisture is difficult using the conventional dewatering techniques. The main objective of the project was to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions and surfactants in combination for the dewatering of ultra-fine clean-coal slurries using various dewatering techniques on a proof-of-concept (POC) scale of 0.5 to 2 tons per hour. The addition of conventional reagents and the application of coal surface modification technique were evaluated using vacuum filtration, hyperbaric (pressure) filtration, ceramic plate filtration and screen-bowl centrifuge techniques. The laboratory and pilot-scale dewatering studies were conducted using the fine-size, clean-coal slurry produced in the column flotation circuit at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, St. Charles, VA. The pilot-scale studies were conducted at the Mayflower preparation plant in St. Charles, VA. The program consisted of nine tasks, namely, Task 1--Project Work Planning, Task 2--Laboratory Testing, Task 3--Engineering Design, Task 4--Procurement and Fabrication, Task 5--Installation and Shakedown, Task 6--System Operation, Task 7--Process Evaluation, Task 8--Equipment Removal, and Task 9--Reporting.

  15. Comparison of advanced optical imaging techniques with current otolaryngology diagnostics for improved middle ear assessment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Spillman, Darold R.; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otolaryngologists utilize a variety of diagnostic techniques to assess middle ear health. Tympanometry, audiometry, and otoacoustic emissions examine the mobility of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and ossicles using ear canal pressure and auditory tone delivery and detection. Laser Doppler vibrometry provides non-contact vibrational measurement, and acoustic reflectometry is used to assess middle ear effusion using sonar. These technologies and techniques have advanced the field beyond the use of the standard otoscope, a simple tissue magnifier, yet the need for direct visualization of middle ear disease for superior detection, assessment, and management remains. In this study, we evaluated the use of portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pneumatic low-coherence interferometry (LCI) systems with handheld probe delivery to standard tympanometry, audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, laser Doppler vibrometry, and acoustic reflectometry. Comparison of these advanced optical imaging techniques and current diagnostics was conducted with a case study subject with a history of unilateral eardrum trauma. OCT and pneumatic LCI provide novel dynamic spatiotemporal structural data of the middle ear, such as the thickness of the eardrum and quantitative detection of underlying disease pathology, which could allow for more accurate diagnosis and more appropriate management than currently possible.

  16. Advanced Endovascular Approaches in the Management of Challenging Proximal Aortic Neck Anatomy: Traditional Endografts and the Snorkel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Quatromoni, Jon G.; Orlova, Ksenia; Foley, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular technology, and access to this technology, have significantly changed the field of vascular surgery. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), in which endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has replaced the traditional open surgical approach in patients with suitable anatomy. However, approximately one-third of patients presenting with AAAs are deemed ineligible for standard EVAR because of anatomic constraints, the majority of which involve the proximal aneurysmal neck. To overcome these challenges, a bevy of endovascular approaches have been developed to either enhance stent graft fixation at the proximal neck or extend the proximal landing zone to allow adequate apposition to the aortic wall and thus aneurysm exclusion. This article is composed of two sections that together address new endovascular approaches for treating aortic aneurysms with difficult proximal neck anatomy. The first section will explore advancements in the traditional EVAR approach for hostile neck anatomy that maximize the use of the native proximal landing zone; the second section will discuss a technique that was developed to extend the native proximal landing zone and maintain perfusion to vital aortic branches using common, off-the-shelf components: the snorkel technique. While the techniques presented differ in terms of approach, the available clinical data, albeit limited, support the notion that they may both have roles in the treatment algorithm for patients with challenging proximal neck anatomy. PMID:26327748

  17. Advanced Endovascular Approaches in the Management of Challenging Proximal Aortic Neck Anatomy: Traditional Endografts and the Snorkel Technique.

    PubMed

    Quatromoni, Jon G; Orlova, Ksenia; Foley, Paul J

    2015-09-01

    Advances in endovascular technology, and access to this technology, have significantly changed the field of vascular surgery. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), in which endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has replaced the traditional open surgical approach in patients with suitable anatomy. However, approximately one-third of patients presenting with AAAs are deemed ineligible for standard EVAR because of anatomic constraints, the majority of which involve the proximal aneurysmal neck. To overcome these challenges, a bevy of endovascular approaches have been developed to either enhance stent graft fixation at the proximal neck or extend the proximal landing zone to allow adequate apposition to the aortic wall and thus aneurysm exclusion. This article is composed of two sections that together address new endovascular approaches for treating aortic aneurysms with difficult proximal neck anatomy. The first section will explore advancements in the traditional EVAR approach for hostile neck anatomy that maximize the use of the native proximal landing zone; the second section will discuss a technique that was developed to extend the native proximal landing zone and maintain perfusion to vital aortic branches using common, off-the-shelf components: the snorkel technique. While the techniques presented differ in terms of approach, the available clinical data, albeit limited, support the notion that they may both have roles in the treatment algorithm for patients with challenging proximal neck anatomy.

  18. A numerical technique for calculation of the noise of high-speed propellers with advanced blade geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystrom, P. A.; Farassat, F.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical technique and computer program were developed for the prediction of the noise of propellers with advanced geometry. The blade upper and lower surfaces are described by a curvilinear coordinate system, which was also used to divide the blade surfaces into panels. Two different acoustic formulations in the time domain were used to improve the speed and efficiency of the noise calculations: an acoustic formualtion with the Doppler factor singularity for panels moving at subsonic speeds and the collapsing sphere formulation for panels moving at transonic or supersonic speeds. This second formulation involves a sphere which is centered at the observer position and whose radius decreases at the speed of sound. The acoustic equation consisted of integrals over the curve of intersection for both the sphere and the panels on the blade. Algorithms used in some parts of the computer program are discussed. Comparisons with measured acoustic data for two model high speed propellers with advanced geometry are also presented.

  19. Cooling arrangement for a tapered turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-07-27

    A cooling arrangement (11) for a highly tapered gas turbine blade (10). The cooling arrangement (11) includes a pair of parallel triple-pass serpentine cooling circuits (80,82) formed in an inner radial portion (50) of the blade, and a respective pair of single radial channel cooling circuits (84,86) formed in an outer radial portion (52) of the blade (10), with each single radial channel receiving the cooling fluid discharged from a respective one of the triple-pass serpentine cooling circuit. The cooling arrangement advantageously provides a higher degree of cooling to the most highly stressed radially inner portion of the blade, while providing a lower degree of cooling to the less highly stressed radially outer portion of the blade. The cooling arrangement can be implemented with known casting techniques, thereby facilitating its use on highly tapered, highly twisted Row 4 industrial gas turbine blades that could not be cooled with prior art cooling arrangements.

  20. Advanced Analytical Techniques for the Measurement of Nanomaterials in Food and Agricultural Samples: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Nanotechnology offers substantial prospects for the development of state-of-the-art products and applications for agriculture, water treatment, and food industry. Profuse use of nanoproducts will bring potential benefits to farmers, the food industry, and consumers, equally. However, after end-user applications, these products and residues will find their way into the environment. Therefore, discharged nanomaterials (NMs) need to be identified and quantified to determine their ecotoxicity and the levels of exposure. Detection and characterization of NMs and their residues in the environment, particularly in food and agricultural products, have been limited, as no single technique or method is suitable to identify and quantify NMs. In this review, we have discussed the available literature concerning detection, characterization, and measurement techniques for NMs in food and agricultural matrices, which include chromatography, flow field fractionation, electron microscopy, light scattering, and autofluorescence techniques, among others. PMID:23483065

  1. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  2. Advanced analysis technique for the evaluation of linear alternators and linear motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Jeffrey C.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the mathematical analysis of linear alternator and linear motor devices and designs is described, and an example of its use is included. The technique seeks to surpass other methods of analysis by including more rigorous treatment of phenomena normally omitted or coarsely approximated such as eddy braking, non-linear material properties, and power losses generated within structures surrounding the device. The technique is broadly applicable to linear alternators and linear motors involving iron yoke structures and moving permanent magnets. The technique involves the application of Amperian current equivalents to the modeling of the moving permanent magnet components within a finite element formulation. The resulting steady state and transient mode field solutions can simultaneously account for the moving and static field sources within and around the device.

  3. Advanced atomic force microscopy techniques for characterizing the properties of cellulosic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan Bradley

    The measurement of nanomechanical properties is of great interest to science and industry. Key to progress in this area is the development of new techniques and analysis methods to identify, measure, and quantify these properties. In this dissertation, new data analysis methods and experimental techniques for measuring nanomechanical properties with the atomic force microscope (AFM) are considered. These techniques are then applied to the study of cellulose nanoparticles, an abundant, plant derived nanomaterial. Quantifying uncertainty is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nano-engineered materials and products. However, rigorous uncertainty quantification is rarely applied for material property measurements with the AFM. A framework is presented to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. This method is demonstrated by quantifying uncertainty in force displacement AFM based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of tunicate cellulose nanocrystals. Next, a more comprehensive study of different types of cellulose nanoparticles is undertaken with contact resonance (CR) AFM. CR-AFM is a dynamic AFM technique that exploits the resonance frequency of the AFM cantilever while it is permanent contact with the sample surface to predict nanomechanical properties. This technique offers improved measurement sensitivity over static AFM methods for some material systems. The effects of cellulose source material and processing technique on the properties of cellulose nanoparticles are compared. Finally, dynamic AFM cantilever vibration shapes are studied. Many AFM modes exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in permanent contact with a sample to extract local material properties. A common challenge to these modes is that they assume a certain shape of cantilever vibration, which is not accessible in

  4. Image enhancement and advanced information extraction techniques for ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Nalepka, R. F.; Sarno, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. It was demonstrated and concluded that: (1) the atmosphere has significant effects on ERTS MSS data which can seriously degrade recognition performance; (2) the application of selected signature extension techniques serve to reduce the deleterious effects of both the atmosphere and changing ground conditions on recognition performance; and (3) a proportion estimation algorithm for overcoming problems in acreage estimation accuracy resulting from the coarse spatial resolution of the ERTS MSS, was able to significantly improve acreage estimation accuracy over that achievable by conventional techniques, especially for high contrast targets such as lakes and ponds.

  5. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  6. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  7. Advanced microprocessor based power protection system using artificial neural network techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Kalam, A.; Zayegh, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an intelligent embedded microprocessor based system for fault classification in power system protection system using advanced 32-bit microprocessor technology. The paper demonstrates the development of protective relay to provide overcurrent protection schemes for fault detection. It also describes a method for power fault classification in three-phase system based on the use of neural network technology. The proposed design is implemented and tested on a single line three phase power system in power laboratory. Both the hardware and software development are described in detail.

  8. Recent Advances in Nanobiotechnology and High-Throughput Molecular Techniques for Systems Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Ahn, Eun Hyun; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based tools are beginning to emerge as promising platforms for quantitative high-throughput analysis of live cells and tissues. Despite unprecedented progress made over the last decade, a challenge still lies in integrating emerging nanotechnology-based tools into macroscopic biomedical apparatuses for practical purposes in biomedical sciences. In this review, we discuss the recent advances and limitations in the analysis and control of mechanical, biochemical, fluidic, and optical interactions in the interface areas of nanotechnology-based materials and living cells in both in vitro and in vivo settings. PMID:24258011

  9. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  10. Principles and techniques in the design of ADMS+. [advanced data-base management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nick; Kang, Hyunchul

    1986-01-01

    'ADMS+/-' is an advanced data base management system whose architecture integrates the ADSM+ mainframe data base system with a large number of work station data base systems, designated ADMS-; no communications exist between these work stations. The use of this system radically decreases the response time of locally processed queries, since the work station runs in a single-user mode, and no dynamic security checking is required for the downloaded portion of the data base. The deferred update strategy used reduces overhead due to update synchronization in message traffic.

  11. Precision bone and muscle loss measurements by advanced, multiple projection DEXA (AMPDXA) techniques for spaceflight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, H. K. Jr; Beck, T. J.; Feldmesser, H. S.; Magee, T. C.; Spisz, T. S.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced, multiple projection, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (AMPDXA) scanner system is under development. The AMPDXA is designed to make precision bone and muscle loss measurements necessary to determine the deleterious effects of microgravity on astronauts as well as develop countermeasures to stem their bone and muscle loss. To date, a full size test system has been developed to verify principles and the results of computer simulations. Results indicate that accurate predictions of bone mechanical properties can be determined from as few as three projections, while more projections are needed for a complete, three-dimensional reconstruction. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Compliant Metal Enhanced Convection Cooled Reverse-Flow Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paskin, Marc D.; Acosta, Waldo A.

    1994-01-01

    A joint Army/NASA program was conducted to design, fabricate, and test an advanced, reverse-flow, small gas turbine combustor using a compliant metal enhanced (CME) convection wall cooling concept. The objectives of this effort were to develop a design method (basic design data base and analysis) for the CME cooling technique and tben demonstrate its application to an advanced cycle, small, reverse-flow combustor with 3000 F (1922 K) burner outlet temperature (BOT). The CME concept offers significant improvements in wall cooling effectiveness resulting in a large reduction in cooling air requirements. Therefore, more air is available for control of burner outlet temperature pattern in addition to the benefit of improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and smoke levels. Rig test results demonstrated the benefits and viability of the CME concept meeting or exceeding the aerothermal performance and liner wall temperature characteristics of similar lower temperature-rise combustors, achieving 0.15 pattern factor at 3000 F (1922 K) BOT, while utilizing approximately 80 percent less cooling air than conventional, film-cooled combustion systems.

  13. Advanced retrieval method in satellite remote sensing atmosphere: the technique of computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Xun, Yulong

    1998-08-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a modern medical diagnostic technique in which x-ray transmission measurements at numerous angles through the human body are processed by computer to produce cross-sectional pictures of the body. This technique also has found applications in such diverse fields as materials testing, astronomy, microscopy, image processing and oceanography.In this paper, a modification of this technique, using emitted IR or microwave radiation instead of transmitted x-ray radiation, can be applied to satellite radiance measurements taken along the orbital track at various angles. The channels of IR sensors for the CT retrieval are selected from HITRAN Database, and analyzed by Eigen-value analysis. We discuss in detail the effect retrieval result of CT technique form projection-angle. Finally, using the balloon sounding data, the result of CT are compared with the result of conventional method. Because the advantage over conventional remote sensing methods is the additional information acquired by viewing a given point in the atmosphere at several angles as well as several frequencies. The results show that the temperature profiles by CT retrieval are better than the conventional method.

  14. Using Essential Oils to Teach Advanced-Level Organic Chemistry Separation Techniques and Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bott, Tina M.; Wan, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    Students sometimes have difficulty grasping the importance of when and how basic distillation techniques, column chromatography, TLC, and basic spectroscopy (IR and NMR) can be used to identify unknown compounds within a mixture. This two-part experiment uses mixtures of pleasant-smelling, readily available terpenoid compounds as unknowns to…

  15. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

    2001-08-23

    Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

  16. Advanced SuperDARN meteor wind observations based on raw time series analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, M.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Holdsworth, D. A.; Lester, M.

    2009-04-01

    The meteor observation technique based on SuperDARN raw time series analysis has been upgraded. This technique extracts meteor information as biproducts and does not degrade the quality of normal SuperDARN operations. In the upgrade the radar operating system (RADOPS) has been modified so that it can oversample every 15 km during the normal operations, which have a range resolution of 45 km. As an alternative method for better range determination a frequency domain interferometry (FDI) capability was also coded in RADOPS, where the operating radio frequency can be changed every pulse sequence. Test observations were conducted using the CUTLASS Iceland East and Finland radars, where oversampling and FDI operation (two frequencies separated by 3 kHz) were simultaneously carried out. Meteor ranges obtained in both ranging techniques agreed very well. The ranges were then combined with the interferometer data to estimate meteor echo reflection heights. Although there were still some ambiguities in the arrival angles of echoes because of the rather long antenna spacing of the interferometers, the heights and arrival angles of most of meteor echoes were more accurately determined than previously. Wind velocities were successfully estimated over the height range of 84 to 110 km. The FDI technique developed here can be further applied to the common SuperDARN operation, and study of fine horizontal structures of F region plasma irregularities is expected in the future.

  17. Advance development of a technique for characterizing the thermomechanical properties of thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillham, J. K.; Stadnicki, S. J.; Hazony, Y.

    1974-01-01

    The torsional braid experiment has been interfaced with a centralized hierarchical computing system for data acquisition and data processing. Such a system, when matched by the appropriate upgrading of the monitoring techniques, provides high resolution thermomechanical spectra of rigidity and damping, and their derivatives with respect to temperature.

  18. Transplant related ocular surface disorders: Advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation after ocular complications secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Erin D; Mahomed, Faheem; Hans, Amneet K; Dalal, Jignesh D

    2016-05-01

    HSCT has been linked to the development of an assortment of ocular surface complications with the potential to lead to permanent visual impairment if left untreated or if not treated early in the course of disease. Strategies for therapy include maintenance of lubrication and tear preservation, prevention of evaporation, decreasing inflammation, and providing epithelial support. The ultimate aim of treatment is to prevent permanent ocular sequelae through prompt ophthalmology consultation and the use of advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation. We describe several rehabilitation options of ocular surface complications occurring secondarily during the post-HSCT course.

  19. Application of advanced signal processing techniques to the rectification and registration of spaceborne imagery. [technology transfer, data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, R. H.; Rifman, S. S.; Simon, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of an ERTS/MSS image processing system responsive to the needs of the user community is discussed. An overview of the TRW ERTS/MSS processor is presented, followed by a more detailed discussion of image processing functions satisfied by the system. The particular functions chosen for discussion are evolved from advanced signal processing techniques rooted in the areas of communication and control. These examples show how classical aerospace technology can be transferred to solve the more contemporary problems confronting the users of spaceborne imagery.

  20. Joint IAMAS/IAHS Symposium J1 on Global Monitoring and Advanced Observing Techniques in the Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohring, G.; Aoki, T.; Halpern D.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; Charlock, T.; Joseph, J.; Labitzke, K.; Raschke, E.; Smith, W.

    1994-01-01

    Seventy papers were presented at the two-and-a-half-day Symposium on Global Monitoring and Advanced Observing Techniques in the Atmosphere and Hydrosphere. The symposium was jointly organized by the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences (IAMAS) and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). Global observing systems are receiving increased attention in connection with such problems as monitoring global climate change. The symposium included papers on observational requirements; measurement methodologies; descriptions of available datasets; results of analysis of observational data; plans for future observing systems, including the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); and the programs and plans of the space agencies.

  1. Advances in iterative non-uniformity correction techniques for infrared scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; LaVeigne, Joe; Prewarski, Marcus; Nehring, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Santa Barbara Infrared (SBIR) is continually developing improved methods for non-uniformity correction (NUC) of its Infrared Scene Projectors (IRSPs) as part of its comprehensive efforts to achieve the best possible projector performance. The most recent step forward, Advanced Iterative NUC (AI-NUC), improves upon previous NUC approaches in several ways. The key to NUC performance is achieving the most accurate possible input drive-to-radiance output mapping for each emitter pixel. This requires many highly-accurate radiance measurements of emitter output, as well as sophisticated manipulation of the resulting data set. AI-NUC expands the available radiance data set to include all measurements made of emitter output at any point. In addition, it allows the user to efficiently manage that data for use in the construction of a new NUC table that is generated from an improved fit of the emitter response curve. Not only does this improve the overall NUC by offering more statistics for interpolation than previous approaches, it also simplifies the removal of erroneous data from the set so that it does not propagate into the correction tables. AI-NUC is implemented by SBIR's IRWindows4 automated test software as part its advanced turnkey IRSP product (the Calibration Radiometry System or CRS), which incorporates all necessary measurement, calibration and NUC table generation capabilities. By employing AI-NUC on the CRS, SBIR has demonstrated the best uniformity results on resistive emitter arrays to date.

  2. A standard data set for performance analysis of advanced IR image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, A. Robert; Adomeit, Uwe; Chevalier, Philippe; Landeau, Stéphane; Bijl, Piet; Champagnat, Frédéric; Dijk, Judith; Göhler, Benjamin; Landini, Stefano; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Smith, Leslie N.

    2012-06-01

    Modern IR cameras are increasingly equipped with built-in advanced (often non-linear) image and signal processing algorithms (like fusion, super-resolution, dynamic range compression etc.) which can tremendously influence performance characteristics. Traditional approaches to range performance modeling are of limited use for these types of equipment. Several groups have tried to overcome this problem by producing a variety of imagery to assess the impact of advanced signal and image processing. Mostly, this data was taken from classified targets and/ or using classified imager and is thus not suitable for comparison studies between different groups from government, industry and universities. To ameliorate this situation, NATO SET-140 has undertaken a systematic measurement campaign at the DGA technical proving ground in Angers, France, to produce an openly distributable data set suitable for the assessment of fusion, super-resolution, local contrast enhancement, dynamic range compression and image-based NUC algorithm performance. The imagery was recorded for different target / background settings, camera and/or object movements and temperature contrasts. MWIR, LWIR and Dual-band cameras were used for recording and were also thoroughly characterized in the lab. We present a selection of the data set together with examples of their use in the assessment of super-resolution and contrast enhancement algorithms.

  3. Analysis of leading edge and trailing edge cover glass samples before and after treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotaling, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    Two samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment M0003-4 were analyzed for molecular and particulate contamination prior to and following treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques (CO2 gas/solid jet spray and oxygen ion beam). The pre- and post-cleaning measurements and analyses are presented. The jet spray removed particulates in seconds. The low energy reactive oxygen ion beam removed 5,000 A of photo polymerized organic hydrocarbon contamination in less than 1 hour. Spectroscopic analytical techniques were applied to the analysis of cleaning efficiency including: Fourier transform infrared, Auger, x ray photoemissions, energy dispersive x ray, and ultraviolet/visible. The results of this work suggest that the contamination studied here was due to spacecraft self-contamination enhanced by atomic oxygen plasma dynamics and solar UV radiation. These results also suggest the efficacy for the jet spray and ion beam contamination control technologies for spacecraft optical surfaces.

  4. Development of a real-time aeroperformance analysis technique for the X-29A advanced technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Hicks, J. W.; Alexander, R. I.

    1988-01-01

    The X-29A advanced technology demonstrator has shown the practicality and advantages of the capability to compute and display, in real time, aeroperformance flight results. This capability includes the calculation of the in-flight measured drag polar, lift curve, and aircraft specific excess power. From these elements many other types of aeroperformance measurements can be computed and analyzed. The technique can be used to give an immediate postmaneuver assessment of data quality and maneuver technique, thus increasing the productivity of a flight program. A key element of this new method was the concurrent development of a real-time in-flight net thrust algorithm, based on the simplified gross thrust method. This net thrust algorithm allows for the direct calculation of total aircraft drag.

  5. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging techniques applied to brain development and animal models of perinatal injury.

    PubMed

    van de Looij, Yohan; Dean, Justin M; Gunn, Alistair J; Hüppi, Petra S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in the field of brain development and perinatal brain injury. Due to technical progress the magnetic field strength (B0) of MR systems has continuously increased, favoring (1)H-MRS with quantification of up to 18 metabolites in the brain and short echo time (TE) MRI sequences including phase and susceptibility imaging. For longer TE techniques including diffusion imaging modalities, the benefits of higher B0 have not been clearly established. Nevertheless, progress has also been made in new advanced diffusion models that have been developed to enhance the accuracy and specificity of the derived diffusion parameters. In this review, we will describe the latest developments in MRS and MRI techniques, including high-field (1)H-MRS, phase and susceptibility imaging, and diffusion imaging, and discuss their application in the study of cerebral development and perinatal brain injury.

  6. Advanced Materials and Fabrication Techniques for the Orion Attitude Control Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Holmes, Richard; O'Dell, John; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy

    2013-01-01

    Rhenium, with its high melting temperature, excellent elevated temperature properties, and lack of a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), is ideally suited for the hot gas components of the ACM (Attitude Control Motor), and other high-temperature applications. However, the high cost of rhenium makes fabricating these components using conventional fabrication techniques prohibitive. Therefore, near-net-shape forming techniques were investigated for producing cost-effective rhenium and rhenium alloy components for the ACM and other propulsion applications. During this investigation, electrochemical forming (EL-Form ) techniques were evaluated for producing the hot gas components. The investigation focused on demonstrating that EL-Form processing techniques could be used to produce the ACM flow distributor. Once the EL-Form processing techniques were established, a representative rhenium flow distributor was fabricated, and samples were harvested for material properties testing at both room and elevated temperatures. As a lower cost and lighter weight alternative to an all-rhenium component, rhenium- coated graphite and carbon-carbon were also evaluated. The rhenium-coated components were thermal-cycle tested to verify that they could withstand the expected thermal loads during service. High-temperature electroforming is based on electrochemical deposition of compact layers of metals onto a mandrel of the desired shape. Mandrels used for electro-deposition of near-net shaped parts are generally fabricated from high-density graphite. The graphite mandrel is easily machined and does not react with the molten electrolyte. For near-net shape components, the inner surface of the electroformed part replicates the polished graphite mandrel. During processing, the mandrel itself becomes the cathode, and scrap or refined refractory metal is the anode. Refractory metal atoms from the anode material are ionized in the molten electrolytic solution, and are deposited

  7. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly progress report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-10-01

    The advanced fine-coal cleaning techniques such as column flotation, recovers a low-ash ultra-fine size clean-coal product. However, economical dewatering of the clean coal product to less than 20 percent moisture using conventional technology is difficult. This research program objective is to evaluate a novel coal surface modification technique developed at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research in conjunction with conventional and advanced dewatering technique at a pilot scale. The study which is in progress is being conducted at the Powell Mountain Coal Company`s Mayflower preparation plant located in St. Charles, VA. During this quarter laboratory dewatering studies were conducted using a 4-in diameter laboratory chemical centrifuge. The baseline data provided a filter cake with about 32% moisture. Addition of 0.3 kg/t of a cationic surfactant lowered the moisture to 29%. Addition of anionic and non-ionic surfactant was not effective in reducing the filter cake moisture content. In the pilot scale studies, a comparison was conducted between the high pressure and vacuum dewatering techniques. The base line data with high pressure and vacuum filtration provided filter cakes with 23.6% and 27.8% moisture, respectively. Addition of 20 g/t of cationic flocculent provided 21% filter cake moisture using the high pressure filter. A 15% moisture filter cake was obtained using 1.5 kg/t of non-ionic surfactant. Vacuum filter provided about 23% to 25% moisture product with additional reagents. The high pressure filter processed about 3 to 4 times more solids compared to vacuum filter.

  8. Development of nanomaterial-enabled advanced oxidation techniques for treatment of organic micropollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulton, Rebekah Lynn

    Increasing demand for limited fresh water resources necessitates that alternative water sources be developed. Nonpotable reuse of treated wastewater represents one such alternative. However, the ubiquitous presence of organic micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in wastewater effluents limits use of this resource. Numerous investigations have examined PPCP fate during wastewater treatment, focusing on their removal during conventional and advanced treatment processes. Analysis of influent and effluent data from published studies reveals that at best 1-log10 concentration unit of PPCP removal can generally be achieved with conventional treatment. In contrast, plants employing advanced treatment methods, particularly ozonation and/or membranes, remove most PPCPs often to levels below analytical detection limits. However, membrane treatment is cost prohibitive for many facilities, and ozone treatment can be very selective. Ozone-recalcitrant compounds require the use of Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs), which utilize highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (*OH) to target resistant pollutants. Due to cost and energy use concerns associated with current AOPs, alternatives such as catalytic ozonation are under investigation. Catalytic ozonation uses substrates such as activated carbon to promote *OH formation during ozonation. Here, we show that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) represent another viable substrate, promoting *OH formation during ozonation to levels exceeding activated carbon and equivalent to conventional ozone-based AOPs. Via a series of batch reactions, we observ a strong correlation between *OH formation and MWCNT surface oxygen concentrations. Results suggest that deprotonated carboxyl groups on the CNT surface are integral to their reactivity toward ozone and corresponding *OH formation. From a practical standpoint, we show that industrial grade MWCNTs exhibit similar *OH production as their research

  9. Recent advancements in sensing techniques based on functional materials for organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2015-08-15

    The use of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) for pest control in agriculture has caused serious environmental problems throughout the world. OPs are highly toxic with the potential to cause neurological disorders in humans. As the application of OPs has greatly increased in various agriculture activities, it has become imperative to accurately monitor their concentration levels for the protection of ecological systems and food supplies. Although there are many conventional methods available for the detection of OPs, the development of portable sensors is necessary to facilitate routine analysis with more convenience. Some of these potent alternative techniques based on functional materials include fluorescence nanomaterials based sensors, molecular imprinted (MIP) sensors, electrochemical sensors, and biosensors. This review explores the basic features of these sensing approaches through evaluation of their performance. The discussion is extended further to describe the challenges and opportunities for these unique sensing techniques.

  10. POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    B.K. PAREKH; D. TAO; J.G. GROPPO

    1998-02-03

    The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the UKCAER will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean-coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high-sulfur and low-sulfur clean coal. The Mayflower Plant processes coals from five different seams, thus the dewatering studies results could be generalized for most of the bituminous coals.

  11. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  12. Advanced techniques for free-space optical quantum cryptography over water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alexander D.; Christensen, Bradley; Kwiat, Paul G.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) over water (e.g., ship to ship) may be limited by ship motion and atmospheric effects, such as mode distortion and beam wander due to turbulence. We report on a technique which reduces noise by excluding spatial modes which are less likely to contain QKD signal photons and experimentally demonstrate an improvement in QKD key generation rates in various noise and turbulence regimes.

  13. Advanced computational techniques for incompressible/compressible fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod

    2005-07-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems are of great importance to many fields of engineering and pose tremendous challenges to numerical analyst. This thesis addresses some of the hurdles faced for both 2D and 3D real life time-dependent FSI problems with particular emphasis on parachute systems. The techniques developed here would help improve the design of parachutes and are of direct relevance to several other FSI problems. The fluid system is solved using the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) finite element formulation for the Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible and compressible flows. The structural dynamics solver is based on a total Lagrangian finite element formulation. Newton-Raphson method is employed to linearize the otherwise nonlinear system resulting from the fluid and structure formulations. The fluid and structural systems are solved in decoupled fashion at each nonlinear iteration. While rigorous coupling methods are desirable for FSI simulations, the decoupled solution techniques provide sufficient convergence in the time-dependent problems considered here. In this thesis, common problems in the FSI simulations of parachutes are discussed and possible remedies for a few of them are presented. Further, the effects of the porosity model on the aerodynamic forces of round parachutes are analyzed. Techniques for solving compressible FSI problems are also discussed. Subsequently, a better stabilization technique is proposed to efficiently capture and accurately predict the shocks in supersonic flows. The numerical examples simulated here require high performance computing. Therefore, numerical tools using distributed memory supercomputers with message passing interface (MPI) libraries were developed.

  14. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We now have two suites of well-characterized microporous materials including oxides (zeolites and silica gel) and activated carbons from our industrial partner, Air Products in Allentown, PA. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  15. New radiation techniques for treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Silvano, G

    2006-03-01

    Local control is a main step to cure NSCLC because at least 30-40% of patients die for local or regional progression of their disease. Surgery is still the more efficient approach to increase survival but radiation therapy is the only treatment that can cure patients with T1-T2 lesions if they are not suitable for surgery or refuse it. However, doses higher than 60-66 Gy must be given to improve tumor control but doses to the organs at risk (OAR) are the main limit to deliver more than 70 Gy to the planning treatment volume (PTV). The optimal solution would be to 'paint' the dose to the PTV avoiding as possible OARs, but this ballistic precision was not possible till some years ago because of both technology and respiratory movement control. In last ten years many new techniques have been made available for treating NSCLC with radiation more accurately. Some techniques like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), Stereotactic Radiotherapy can be carried out also with a traditional linear accelerator (LINAC) updated with the new software and hardware, using or not radiopaque markers inside the tumor. On the other hand, a new generation of machines like Cyberknife or Tomotherapy have been especially projected to optimize stereotactic technique and IMRT, respectively, and respiratory gating systems are now disposable from several manufactures. PMID:16608978

  16. VCM-OFDM technique for advanced space communications system with high spectral efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jionghui; Zhou, Qing; Xiong, Weiming; Zhang, Ying; Yao, Chen

    2016-11-01

    The development of precise scientific payloads brings higher demand on the efficiency of space communications system to transmit the increasing volume of scientific data. Aiming to this issue, Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is chosen for its inherent capability of high-rate data transmission. Further, considering the dynamic link condition due to satellite orbital motion, we propose a new technique which combines Variable Coding Modulation (VCM) with OFDM to enhance the communication link spectral efficiency with required transmission reliability. With VCM-OFDM technique, the channel coding and modulation mode can be variable with time according to the link conditions, in order to fit the link budget curve and maintain a relatively fixed link margin. Hence, link resource waste can be reduced and throughput can be remarkably improved. Considering that OFDM-based systems are sensitive to Doppler shifts/spread, the coding and modulation mode (CODMOD) selection should be optimized subject to this scenario. This paper introduces the architecture of near-earth space data transmission system based on VCM-OFDM technique. The Doppler influence is analyzed through simulation and the CODMOD selection algorithm is discussed. The results prove the high performance on spectral efficiency enhancement of VCM-OFDM by comparison with several existing alternative methods.

  17. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1993-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), and SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS (Earth Observation SystemData/Information System) prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  18. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the preterm brain: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Tao, Joshua D; Neil, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Brain development and brain injury in preterm infants are areas of active research. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive tool applicable to both animal models and human infants, provides a wealth of information on this process by bridging the gap between histology (available from animal studies) and developmental outcome (available from clinical studies). Moreover, MRI also offers information regarding diagnosis and prognosis in the clinical setting. Recent advances in MR methods - diffusion tensor imaging, volumetric segmentation, surface based analysis, functional MRI, and quantitative metrics - further increase the sophistication of information available regarding both brain structure and function. In this review, we discuss the basics of these newer methods as well as their application to the study of premature infants.

  19. Methods for Quantification of Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Environmental Media: Current Techniques and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Collender, Philip A; Kirby, Amy E; Addiss, David G; Freeman, Matthew C; Remais, Justin V

    2015-12-01

    Limiting the environmental transmission of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), which infect 1.5 billion people worldwide, will require sensitive, reliable, and cost-effective methods to detect and quantify STHs in the environment. We review the state-of-the-art of STH quantification in soil, biosolids, water, produce, and vegetation with regard to four major methodological issues: environmental sampling; recovery of STHs from environmental matrices; quantification of recovered STHs; and viability assessment of STH ova. We conclude that methods for sampling and recovering STHs require substantial advances to provide reliable measurements for STH control. Recent innovations in the use of automated image identification and developments in molecular genetic assays offer considerable promise for improving quantification and viability assessment.

  20. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed. PMID:27119268