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Sample records for advanced copper alloys

  1. Oxidation-Reduction Resistance of Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.; Humphrey, D. L.; Setlock, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to oxidation and blanching is a key issue for advanced copper alloys under development for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Candidate alloys, including dispersion-strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb, solution-strengthened Cu-Ag-Zr, and ODS Cu-Al2O3, are being evaluated for oxidation resistance by static TGA exposures in low-p(O2) and cyclic oxidation in air, and by cyclic oxidation-reduction exposures (using air for oxidation and CO/CO2 or H2/Ar for reduction) to simulate expected service environments. The test protocol and results are presented.

  2. Protection of Advanced Copper Alloys With Lean Cu-Cr Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced copper alloys are used as liners of rocket thrusters and nozzle ramps to ensure dissipation of the high thermal load generated during launch, and Cr-lean coatings are preferred for the protection of these liners from the aggressive ambient environment. It is shown that adequate protection can be achieved with thin Cu-Cr coatings containing as little as 17 percent Cr.

  3. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  4. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  5. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 2: NASA 1.1, Glidcop, and sputtered copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for five advance copper-base alloys: Sputtered Zr-Cu as received, sputtered Zr-Cu heat-treated, Glidcop AL-10, and NASA alloys 1-1A and 1-1B. Tensile tests were performed in argon at 538 C using an axial strain rate of 0.002/sec. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength data are reported along with reduction in area values. Axial strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were performed in argon at 538C using an axial strain rate of 0.002/sec to define the fatigue life over the range from 100 to 3000 cycles for the five materials studied. It was found that the fatigue characteristics of the NASA 1-1A and NASA 1-1B compositions are identical and represent fatique life values which are much greater than those for the other materials tested. The effect of temperature on NASA 1-1B alloy at a strain rate of 0.002/sec was evaluated along with the effect of strain rates of 0.0004 and 0.01/sec at 538 C. Hold-time data are reported for the NASA 1-1B alloy at 538 C using 5 minute hold periods in tension only and compression only at two different strain range values. Hold periods in tension were much more detrimental than hold periods in compression.

  6. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  7. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  8. Comparison of the Fatigue Behavior of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Ellis, David

    2006-01-01

    This presentation is about the development of advanced copper alloys with high thermal conductivity, good creep strength, and adequate fatigue strength for rocket engine applications. It also focuses on the commercial availability of the advanced alloy-GRCop-84 developed at NASA-GRC. The presentation's conclusions are that GRCop-84 has equivalent or better isothermal fatigue lives compared to other commercially available copper alloys, that GRCop-84 can be fabricated in various forms with minimal change in the fatigue lives, that it is equivalent in sothermal, fatigue to AMZIRC at moderate temperatures, and that Narloy-Z is equivalent in fatigue capabilities to GRCop-84 at 400C and below.

  9. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  10. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 1: Narloy Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for Narloy Z, a centrifugally cast, copper-base alloy. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature in air and in argon at 482, 538 and 593 C using an axial strain rate of .002/sec to the -1 power. In addition tensile tests were performed at 538 C in an evaluation of tensile properties at strain rates of .004 and .01/sec to the -1 power. Ultimate and yield strength values of about 315 and 200 MN/sq m respectively were recorded at room temperature and these decreased to about 120 and 105 respectively as the temperature was increased to 593 C. Reduction in area values were recorded in the range from 40 to 50% with some indication of a minimum ductility point at 538 C.

  11. Selecting copper and copper alloys; Part 2: Cast products

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, D.T. ); Kundig, K.J.A. , Randolph, NJ )

    1994-06-01

    This article provides an introduction to the properties, characteristics, and applications of cast coppers and copper alloys. An overview of alloy families is presented since it is impractical to describe all 130 standard grades in detail. However, additional technical information is readily available from the Copper Development Assn. Inc. (CDA) and the resources listed in the references and bibliography at the end of the article. Copper casting alloys are primarily selected for either their corrosion resistance, or their combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The materials also feature good castability, high machinability, and, compared with other corrosion-resistant alloys, reasonable cost. Additional benefits include biofouling resistance--important in marine applications--and a spectrum of attractive colors. Many of the alloys also have favorable tribological properties, which explains their widespread use for sleeve bearings, wear plates, gears, and other wear-prone components.

  12. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  13. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-12-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  14. Thermotransport in liquid aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A thermotransport study was made on a series of liquid aluminum-copper alloys which contained from trace amounts to 33 weight percent copper. The samples in the form of narrow capillaries were held in known temperature gradient of thermotransport apparatus until the stationary state was reached. The samples were analyzed for the concentration of copper along the length. Copper was observed to migrate to the colder regions in all the samples. The heat of transport, Q*, was determined for each composition from a plot of concentration of copper versus reciprocal absolute temperature. The value of Q* is the highest at trace amounts of copper (4850 cal/gm-atom), but decreases with increasing concentration of copper and levels off to 2550 cal/gm-atom at about 25 weight percent copper. The results are explained on the basis of electron-solute interaction and a gas model of diffusion.

  15. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  16. Utilization of Copper Alloys for Marine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, Andrew

    Utilization of copper alloy components in systems deployed in marine environment presents potential improvements by reducing maintenance costs, prolonging service life, and increasing reliability. However, integration of these materials faces technological challenges, which are discussed and addressed in this work, including characterization of material performance in seawater environment, hydrodynamics of copper alloy components, and design procedures for systems with copper alloys. To characterize the hydrodynamic behavior of copper alloy nets, mesh geometry of the major types of copper nets currently used in the marine aquaculture are analyzed and formulae for the solidity and strand length are proposed. Experimental studies of drag forces on copper alloy net panels are described. Based on these studies, empirical values for normal drag coefficients are proposed for various types of copper netting. These findings are compared to the previously published data on polymer nets. It is shown that copper nets exhibit significantly lower resistance to normal currents, which corresponds to lower values of normal drag coefficient. The seawater performance (corrosion and biofouling) of copper alloys is studied through the field trials of tensioned and untensioned specimens in a one-year deployment in the North Atlantic Ocean. The corrosion behavior is characterized by weight loss, optical microscopy, and SEM/EDX analyses. The biofouling performance is quantified in terms of the biomass accumulation. To estimate the effects of stray electrical currents on the seawater corrosion measurements, a low cost three-axis stray electric current monitoring device is designed and tested both in the lab and in the 30-day field deployment. The system consists of a remotely operated PC with a set of pseudo-electrodes and a digital compass. The collected data is processed to determine magnitudes of AC and DC components of electric field and dominant AC frequencies. Mechanical behavior of

  17. Powder-Derived High-Conductivity Coatings for Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2003-01-01

    Makers of high-thermal-flux engines prefer copper alloys as combustion chamber liners, owing to a need to maximize heat dissipation. Since engine environments are strongly oxidizing in nature and copper alloys generally have inadequate resistance to oxidation, the liners need coatings for thermal and environmental protection; however, coatings must be chosen with great care in order to avoid significant impairment of thermal conductivity. Powder-derived chromia- and alumina- forming alloys are being studied under NASA's programs for advanced reusable launch vehicles to succeed the space shuttle fleet. NiCrAlY and Cu-Cr compositions optimized for high thermal conductivity have been tested for static and cyclic oxidation, and for susceptibility to blanching - a mode of degradation arising from oxidation-reduction cycling. The results indicate that the decision to coat the liners or not, and which coating/composition to use, depends strongly on the specific oxidative degradation mode that prevails under service conditions.

  18. Nanostructured Alloys as an Alternative to Copper-Beryllium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-19

    2014 Presented by Jonathan McCrea Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Advanced Materials Integran Technologies...requirements for current and future copper-beryllium alloy needs/ applications ● Demonstrate with three distinct product forms :  1) Bulk material for

  19. Applicability of copper alloys for DEMO high heat flux components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2016-02-01

    The current state of knowledge of the mechanical and thermal properties of high-strength, high conductivity Cu alloys relevant for fusion energy high heat flux applications is reviewed, including effects of thermomechanical and joining processes and neutron irradiation on precipitation- or dispersion-strengthened CuCrZr, Cu-Al2O3, CuNiBe, CuNiSiCr and CuCrNb (GRCop-84). The prospects for designing improved versions of wrought copper alloys and for utilizing advanced fabrication processes such as additive manufacturing based on electron beam and laser consolidation methods are discussed. The importance of developing improved structural materials design criteria is also noted.

  20. Ductile superconducting copper-base alloys.

    PubMed

    Tsuei, C C

    1973-04-06

    A new class of ductile superconductors has been prepared by casting and appropriate heat treatments. These alloys superconduct between 4 degrees and 18 degrees K and contain at least 90 atom percent copper and a superconducting phase such as Nb(3)Sn or niobium. They can be processed into wires by conventional metallurgical techniques.

  1. Zirconium modified nickel-copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved material for use in a catalytic reactor which reduces nitrogen oxide from internal combustion engines is in the form of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-copper alloy. This material has a nominal composition of Ni-30 Cu-0.2 Zr and is characterized by improved high temperature mechanical properties.

  2. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  3. Tantalum-copper alloy and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1983-06-01

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  4. Tantalum-copper alloy and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1984-11-06

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  5. Electrochemical nucleation and growth of copper and copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wenbo

    This dissertation aims to contribute to a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical processes occurring in electrochemical nucleation and growth. To this end, the effects of various anions (chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-) and sulfamate (NH2SO 3-)) on the electrochemical kinetics and the mechanism of copper reduction, as well as on the microstructure of the resulting films, were studied. On the basis of this work, the deposition of copper alloys (Cu-Ag with positive heat of mixing, Cu-Au with negative heat of mixing) was investigated with the main objective to achieve an insight on the role of solid state thermodynamics on the electrocrystallization process. Chloride ions cause two competing effects: at low chloride concentration the formation of an adsorbed chloride layer introduces an additional reaction pathway, resulting in an overall depolarization of the reduction process with no significant change of the Tafel slope. At high chloride concentration, complexation phenomena induce a cathodic polarization of the deposition process and a decrease in the Tafel slope. Chlorides cause a decrease in the density and an increased size of copper nuclei. Sulfamate depolarizes copper reduction the most and results in the largest nucleus density. Chloride promotes the faceting, and dendritic growth of copper deposits along <110> direction by introducing interfacial anisotropy. Addition of Ag in the solution or in the electrode substrate enhances copper deposition and results in an additional reduction peak. Codeposition of Cu-Ag increases nucleus density and decreases nucleus size. Such enhancement of copper deposition, the increase in nucleus density and the decrease in nucleus size by Ag could be due to the continued formation of a surface alloy of Cu-Ag and the fast interface dynamics of Ag deposition. Cu can be underpotentially codeposited in the Cu-Au alloy. Homogeneous solid solutions are grown under conditions of underpotential deposition of Cu, while

  6. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  7. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  8. Machining of low percentage beryllium copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermeyer, J. G.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne beryllium sampling during machining of low percentage beryllium-copper alloys shows that normal dry machining creates 45.2 microgram/cu m of airborne beryllium in the casting operators breathing zone and 2.3 microgram/cu m in an adjacent machine working area. A small vacuum system placed over the tool effectively removes airborne beryllium in the breathing zone sample to 0.2 microgram/cu m.

  9. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  10. Polystyrene films as barrier layers for corrosion protection of copper and copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Románszki, Loránd; Datsenko, Iaryna; May, Zoltán; Telegdi, Judit; Nyikos, Lajos; Sand, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Dip-coated polystyrene layers of sub-micrometre thickness (85-500nm) have been applied on copper and copper alloys (aluminium brass, copper-nickel 70/30), as well as on stainless steel 304, and produced an effective barrier against corrosion and adhesion of corrosion-relevant microorganisms. According to the dynamic wettability measurements, the coatings exhibited high advancing (103°), receding (79°) and equilibrium (87°) contact angles, low contact angle hysteresis (6°) and surface free energy (31mJ/m(2)). The corrosion rate of copper-nickel 70/30 alloy samples in 3.5% NaCl was as low as 3.2μm/a (44% of that of the uncoated samples), and in artificial seawater was only 0.9μm/a (29% of that of the uncoated samples). Cell adhesion was studied by fluorescence microscopy, using monoculture of Desulfovibrio alaskensis. The coatings not only decreased the corrosion rate but also markedly reduced the number of bacterial cells adhered to the coated surfaces. The PS coating on copper gave the best result, 2×10(3)cells/cm(2) (1% of that of the uncoated control).

  11. Environmental Durability of Coated GRCop-84 Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Robinson, C.; Barrett, C.; Humphrey, D.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as liners in combustor chambers and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. As a result, protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The oxidation behavior of several new coating alloys has been evaluated. GRCop-84 specimens were coated with several copper and nickel-based coatings, where the coatings were deposited by either vacuum plasma spraying or cold spraying techniques. Coated and uncoated specimens were thermally cycled in a furnace at different temperatures in order to evaluate the performance of the coatings. Additional studies were conducted in a high pressure burner rig using a hydrocarbon fuel and subjected to a high heat flux hydrogen-oxygen combustion flame in NASA s Quick Access Rocket Exhaust (QARE) rig. The performance of these coatings are discussed.

  12. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  13. Comparison of the Oxidation Rates of Some New Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper alloys were studied for oxidation resistance and mechanisms between 550 and 700 C, in reduced-oxygen environments expected in rocket engines, and their oxidation behaviors compared to that of pure copper. They included two dispersion-strengthened alloys (precipitation-strengthened and oxide-dispersion strengthened, respectively) and one solution-strengthened alloy. In all cases the main reaction was oxidation of Cu into Cu2O and CuO. The dispersion-strengthened alloys were superior to both Cu and the solution-strengthened alloy in oxidation resistance. However, factors retarding oxidation rates seemed to be different for the two dispersion-strengthened alloys.

  14. Performance of a beryllium copper nonmagnetic drill collar alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlevey, F.

    1984-09-01

    Laboratory characterization and field testing show the advantages of beryllium copper Alloy 25 for use in non-magnetic drill collars, stabilizers, and subs. Beryllium copper is resistant to stress corrosion cracking failures at elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved chloride solutions. The alloy is more resistant than stainless steel to galling failure in threaded joints.

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking Control Plans. 3. Copper Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    binary copper-zinc alloys (brasses). ..... . ..... mm iiili m md d~ i i . -1 2 AMMONIACAL SCC A principal environment causing SCC in copper alloys...although not the only one, is generally believed to involve ammoniacal compounds. SCC in the copper/ammoniacl- system has often been termed "season...any possible confusion the term " ammoniacal SCC" will be used here instead, though even so it should be understood that the word " ammoniacal " is a

  16. Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface.

  17. Explosive compact-coating of tungsten–copper alloy to a copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Wang, Xiaohong; Miao, Yusong

    2017-03-01

    This study proposed a new method for coating tungsten–copper alloy to copper surface. First, the tungsten–copper alloy powder was pre-compacted to the copper surface. Then, the powder in the hydrogen atmosphere was sintered, and the pre-compacted powder was compacted by explosive compact-coating. Finally, diffusion sintering was conducted to improve the density of the coating layer. The theoretical density of the coating reached 99.3%. Microstructure characteristics indicated that tungsten and copper powders were well mixed. Tungsten particles were larger than copper particles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fracture surface analysis was different from the traditional fracture of metals. Coating and substrate joint surfaces, which were analyzed by SEM, indicated that the tungsten–copper alloy was sintered on the copper surface. The hardness of the coating layer was 197.6–245.2 HV, and the hardness of the substrate was approximately 55 HV.

  18. Effect of fission neutron irradiation on the tensile and electrical properties of copper and copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the properties of several copper alloys following fission reactor irradiation at ITER-relevant temperatures of 80 to 200{degrees}C. This study provides some of the data needed for the ITER research and development Task T213. These low temperature irradiations caused significant radiation hardening and a dramatic decrease in the work hardening ability of copper and copper alloys. The uniform elongation was higher at 200{degree}C compared to 100{degree}C, but still remained below 1% for most of the copper alloys.

  19. Oxidation Behavior of GRCop-84 Copper Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's goal of safe, affordable space transportation calls for increased reliability and lifetimes of launch vehicles, and significant reductions of launch costs. The areas targeted for enhanced performance in the next generation of reusable launch vehicles include combustion chambers and nozzle ramps; therefore, the search is on for suitable liner materials for these components. GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb), an advanced copper alloy developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in conjunction with Case Western Reserve University, is a candidate. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine is another copper alloy, NARloy-Z (Cu-3Ag-0.1Zr). It provides a benchmark against which to compare the properties of candidate successors. The thermomechanical properties of GRCop-84 have been shown to be superior, and its physical properties comparable, to those of NARloy-Z. However, environmental durability issues control longevity in this application: because copper oxide scales are not highly protective, most copper alloys are quickly consumed in oxygen environments at elevated temperatures. In consequence, NARloy-Z and most other copper alloys are prone to blanching, a degradation process that occurs through cycles of oxidation-reduction as the oxide is repeatedly formed and removed because of microscale fluctuations in the oxygen-hydrogen fuel systems of rocket engines. The Space Shuttle Main Engine lining typically degraded by blanching-induced hot spots that lead to surface roughening, pore formation, and coolant leakage. Therefore, resistance to oxidation and blanching are key requirements for second-generation reusable launch vehicle liners. The rocket engine ambient includes H2 (fuel) and H2O (combustion product) and is, hence, under reduced oxygen partial pressures. Accordingly, our studies were expanded to include oxygen partial pressures as low as 322 parts per million (ppm) at the temperatures likely to be experienced in service. A comparison of 10-hr weight gains of

  20. Stress Relaxation of High-Copper Amalgam Alloys,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-10

    Unlimited ~~~ 17. DISTRIBUTION STA ~~EMENT (of th. ab.traci .nt. r.d In Block 20. i di f ferent from Report) 1$. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES IS. KEY WORDS...Contlnu• on r.v.,a. aid. SI n.c...ay aid Id.ntlfy by block niaib. r) Amalgam alloys; high—copper amalgam alloys; viscoelastic properties and stress...relaxation. 20. ABSTRACT (Ge.~~~j . ai r, ,.,.. .i~~ II ne.ma y d Sd.nsSfr by block n~~~)5 tress relaxation of sevenhigh— copper dental amalgam alloys was

  1. Alloyed Copper Chalcogenide Nanoplatelets via Partial Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide–sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide–sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide–sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide–sulfide (Cu2–xSeyS1–y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2–xSeyS1–y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV–vis–NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps. PMID:25050455

  2. Alloyed copper chalcogenide nanoplatelets via partial cation exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; George, Chandramohan; Genovese, Alessandro; Prato, Mirko; Casu, Alberto; Ayyappan, S; Scarpellini, Alice; Manna, Liberato

    2014-08-26

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide-sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide-sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide-sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide-sulfide (Cu2-xSeyS1-y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2-xSeyS1-y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV-vis-NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps.

  3. Copper alloys for high heat flux structure applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1994-09-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of copper alloys are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high heat flux structural applications in fusion reactors. High heat flux structural materials must possess a combination of high thermal conductivity and high mechanical strength. The three most promising copper alloys at the present time are oxide dispersion-strengthened copper (Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and two precipitation-hardened copper alloys (Cu-Cr-Zr and Cu-Ni-Be). These three alloys are capable of room temperature yield strengths >400 MPa and thermal conductivities up to 350 W/m-K. All of these alloys require extensive cold working to achieve their optimum strength. Precipitation-hardened copper alloys such Cu-Cr-Zr are susceptible to softening due to precipitate overaging and recrystallization during brazing, whereas the dislocation structure in Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} remains stabilized during typical high temperature brazing cycles. All three alloys exhibit good resistance to irradiation-induced softening and void swelling at temperatures below 300{degrees}C. The precipitation-strengthened allows typically soften during neutron irradiation at temperatures above about 300{degrees}C and therefore should only be considered for applications operating at temperatures <300{degrees}C. Dispersion-strengthened copper may be used up to temperatures in excess of 500{degrees}C. Based on the available data, dispersion-strengthened copper (Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is considered to be the best candidate for high heat flux structural applications.

  4. Volatility from copper and tungsten alloys for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Piet, S.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Accident scenarios for fusion power plants present the potential for release and transport of activated constituents volatilized from first wall and structural materials. The extent of possible mobilization and transport of these activated species, many of which are oxidation driven'', is being addressed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report presents experimental measurements of volatilization from a copper alloy in air and steam and from a tungsten alloy in air. The major elements released included zinc from the copper alloy and rhenium and tungsten from the tungsten alloy. Volatilization rates of several constituents of these alloys over temperatures ranging from 400 to 1200{degree}C are presented. These values represent release rates recommended for use in accident assessment calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Fatigue behavior of copper and selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leedy, K.D.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of standard and subsize specimens was examined for five copper alloys: OFHC Cu, two CuNiBe alloys, a CuCrZr alloy, and a Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy. Fatigue tests were run in strain control to failure. In addition to establishing failure lives, the stress amplitudes were monitored as a function of numbers of accrued cycles. The results indicate that the alloys with high initial yield strengths provide the best fatigue response over the range of failure lives examined in the present study: N{sub f} = 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6}. In fact, the fatigue performance of the best alloys is dominated by the elastic portion of the strain range, as would be expected from the correlation of performance with yield properties. The alumina strengthened alloy and the two CuNiBe alloys show the best overall performance of the group examined here.

  6. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  7. Performance of a beryllium copper nonmagnetic drill collar alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlevey, F.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory characterization and extensive field service show the advantages of beryllium copper Brush Alloy 25 for use in nonmagnetic drill collars (NMDC)'s, stabilizers, and subs. Beryllium copper is resistant to stress-corrosion-cracking (SCC) failures at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of H/sub 2/S and dissolved chloride solutions. The alloy is more resistant than stainless steel to galling failure in threaded joints. Its magnetic permeability is lower than stainless steel and is unaffected by service conditions.

  8. Survey of physical property data for several alloys. [Nitronic 33; copper C10400; copper C17510

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Williams, R.K.

    1985-08-01

    This report summarizes an examination of physical property data available in the literature for six alloys of potential interest to the Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment in the Fusion Energy Program. The properties of thermal expansion, density, specific heat, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity were compiled for six alloys: Nitronic 33, a low-nickel, high manganese stainless steel; nickel-base Inconnel Alloys 625, 718, and X-750; and copper alloys C10400 and C17510. The temperatures of interest were 4-500 K for the Nitronic 33 and the Inconels, and 250-400 K for the copper alloys. Where data were lacking, estimates were made based on theory or comparisons with similar materials.

  9. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  10. Viscoelastic Behavior of High-Copper Dental Amalgam Alloys,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-24

    Apprv.-. . - 17. DISTRIWUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered in Block 20, If dliffern Item Roiport) • . y-",.-,D T IC 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES...MAUG 1 3 1980 A * 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on recerse aide if necea2wry and Identify by block number) ? i Amalgam alloys; high-copper amalgam alloys...viscoelastic properties andstress relaxation. C 2 LJJ 20. ABSTRACT (Con"nue on reverse side , f #ncoary and Identify by block numbe) Stress relaxation of

  11. Isotropic copper-invar alloys for microelectronics packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Rand Duprez

    The recent trend in microelectronics packaging toward surface mounted devices (SMD) has created a need for new types of materials that possess low thermal expansion and high electrical and thermal conductivity. Laminates that combine the high thermal and electrical conductivity of copper with the low thermal expansion of Invar, know as CuInvarCu or CIC, are widely use as core constraining materials in printed wire boards where SMDs are to be employed. CIC is highly anisotropic, and there are potential problems resulting from its anisotropy. An isotropic CuInvar alloy would be of great interest for a variety of applications. In suitable Cu-Fe-Ni alloys, a copper-rich solid solution equilibrates with an Invar-rich solid solution; casting such alloys invariably produces Invar-rich dendrites in a copper-rich solid solution. Casting followed by suitable heat treatments can produce two-phase alloys that combine the properties of copper and Invar. The overall composition controls the relative fractions of Invar and copper and the resulting trade-off between low thermal expansivity and electrical conductivity. Measured thermal expansivities (CTE) of CuInvar alloys follow very closely a linear rule of mixing. Electrical conductivities of as-cast specimens are quite poor due to iron and nickel contamination. Theoretical phase diagrams indicate that nearly pure copper equilibrates with an Invar-rich phase at temperatures below, roughly, 500°C. However, equilibrium compositions have been shown to take extremely, long to form, due to the very sluggish kinetics in the system. Long-term annealing was shown to improve conductivity significantly, but much greater improvements are needed to make CuInvar viable as an electrical conductive material.

  12. Inactivation of norovirus on dry copper alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Warnes, Sarah L; Keevil, C William

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) determined that Cu(II) and especially Cu(I) ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked), which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen.

  13. Inactivation of Norovirus on Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, Sarah L.; Keevil, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) determined that Cu(II) and especially Cu(I) ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked), which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen. PMID:24040380

  14. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  15. Copper-Silicon-Magnesium Alloys for Latent Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. Two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  16. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  17. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  18. The Influence of Marine Microfouling on the Corrosion Behaviour of Passive Materials and Copper Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-02

    PASSIVE MATERIALS AND COPPER ALLOYS Brenda J. Littlea, Jason S. Lee b and Richard I. Rayc aNaval Research Laboratory, Code 7303, 228-688-5494, blittle...not mean that the copper - based alloys are immune to microbial colonization and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). It does mean, however...that only those organisms with a high tolerance for copper are likely to have a substantial effect. Most of the reported cases of MIC of copper alloys

  19. Corrosion of dental copper, nickel, and gold alloys in artificial saliva and saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B I; Lemons, J E; Hao, S Q

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the tarnish and corrosion of three commercial copper alloys, three experimental copper alloys, two nickel alloys, and one high-gold alloy by exposing the specimens for four weeks to artificial saliva and saline solutions. Half of the specimens were brushed, and the solutions were changed regularly. The copper-based and the beryllium-containing nickel alloys exhibited significant surface alterations after exposure to either solution. The potential of elevated release of ions to the oral cavity and to the target organs by some of the investigated alloys should be considered if dental usage of these alloys is to be extended.

  20. The measurement of the stacking fault energy in copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of hydrogen solubility and the hydrogen embrittlement of high strength, high performance face centered cubic alloys to the stacking fault energy of the alloys was investigated. The stacking fault energy is inversely related to the distance between the two partial dislocations which are formed by the dissociation of a perfect dislocation. The two partial dislocations define a stacking fault in the crystal which offers a region for hydrogen segregation. The distance between the partial dislocations is measured by weak beam, dark field transmission electron microscopy. The stacking fault energy is calculated. Pure copper, pure nickel and copper-nickel single crystals are used to determine the stacking fault energy.

  1. Studies on copper alloys containing chromium on the copper side phase diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, T.

    1984-01-01

    Specimens were prepared from vacuum melted alloys of high purity vacuum melted copper and electrolytic chromium. The liquidus and eutectic point were determined by thermal analysis. The eutectic temperature is 1974.8 F and its composition is 1.28 wt% of chromium. The determination of solid solubility of chromium in copper was made by microscopic observation and electrical resistivity measurement. The solubility of chromium in solid copper is 0.6 wt% at 1050 F, 0.4 wt% at 1000 F, 0.25 wt% at 950 F, 0.17 wt% at 900 F, and 0.30 wt% at 840 F.

  2. Characteristics of alumina particles in dispersion-strengthened copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-hui; Li, Xiao-xian

    2014-11-01

    Two types of alumina dispersion-strengthened copper (ADSC) alloys were fabricated by a novel in-situ reactive synthesis (IRS) and a traditional internal oxidation (IO) process. The features of alumina dispersoids in these ADSC alloys were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that nano-sized γ-Al2O3 particles of approximately 10 nm in diameter are homogeneously distributed in the IRS-ADSC composites. Meanwhile, larger-sized, mixed crystal structure alumina with rod-shaped morphology is embedded in the IO-ADSC alloy. The IRS-ADSC composites can obtain better mechanical and physical properties than the IO-ADSC composites; the tensile strength of the IRS-ADSC alloy can reach 570 MPa at room temperature, its electrical conductivity is 85% IACS, and the Rockwell hardness can reach 86 HRB.

  3. Investigation on a Roman copper alloy artefact from Pompeii (Italy).

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Pietro; Baraldi, Cecilia; Ferrari, Giorgia; Foca, Giorgia; Marchetti, Andrea; Tassi, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    A selection of samples, obtained from a particular copper-alloy domestic artefact of Roman style from Pompeii, has been analysed by using different techniques (IR, Raman, SEM-EDX, FAAS), in order to investigate the chemical nature and composition of the metals utilised for such manufacturing pieces. The surface analysis of the bright red metallic microfragments conducted by different analytical techniques, emphasises the presence of pure unalloyed copper and confirms the absence of other metallic species on the upper layers. On the contrary, the mapping analysis of the section of the laminar metal of the investigated sample shows a consistent enrichment in tin content. Finally, destructive analysis by FAAS confirms that the artefact looks like a bronze metal alloy, with a medium Sn content of about 6.5%.

  4. Friction and wear of titanium alloys and copper alloys sliding against titanium 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy in air at 430 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the friction and wear characteristics of aluminum bronzes and copper-tin, titanium-tin, and copper-silver alloys sliding against a titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Hemispherically tipped riders of aluminum bronze and the titanium and copper alloys were run against Ti-6Al-4V disks in air at 430 C. The sliding velocity was 13 cm/sec, and the load was 250 g. Results revealed that high tin content titanium and copper alloys underwent significantly less wear and galling than commonly used aluminum bronzes. Also friction force was less erratic than with the aluminum bronzes.

  5. Development of Advanced Alloys using Fullerenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J.; Wasz, M.; O'Brien, J.; Callahan, D. L.; Barrera, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Development of advanced alloys using fullerenes is currently underway to produce materials for use in the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). These materials will be directed toward commercial usages as they are continually developed. Fullerenes (of which the most common is C(sub 60)) are lightweight, nanometer size, hollow molecules of carbon which can be dispersed in conventional alloy systems to enhance strength and reduce weight. In this research, fullerene interaction with aluminum is investigated and a fullerene-reinforced aluminum alloy is being developed for possible use on the EMU. The samples were manufactured using standard commercial approaches including powder metallurgy and casting. Alloys have been processed having 1.3, 4.0 and 8.0 volume fractions of fullerenes. It has been observed that fullerene dispersion is related to the processing approach and that they are stable for the processing conditions used in this research. Emphasis will be given to differential thermal analysis and wavelength dispersive analysis of the processed alloys. These two techniques are particularly useful in determining the condition of the fullerenes during and after processing. Some discussion will be given as to electrical properties of fullerene-reinforced materials. Although the aluminum and other advanced alloys with fullerenes are being developed for NASA and the EMU, the properties of these materials will be of interest for commercial applications where specific Dual-Use will be given.

  6. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19, isolated from copper alloy coins.

    PubMed

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lin, Yanbing; Hao, Xiuli; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher; Grass, Gregor

    2012-03-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans strain L19, isolated from a European 50-cent copper alloy coin. Multiple genes potentially involved in copper resistance were identified; however, it is unknown if these copper ion resistance determinants contribute to prolonged survival of this strain on dry metallic copper.

  7. LIBS and Raman spectroscopic investigation of historical copper alloy objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmuda-Trzebiatowska, Iwona; Śliwiński, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigation of the historical copper and copper alloy objects covered by patina and surface contamination are reported and discussed in this work. For analysis of the surface layers (bulk material, primer/grounding, patina and atmospheric contamination) the Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS), Raman and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopic techniques are used. Useful data on chemical structure and composition are obtained from stratigraphic analysis performed by a stepwise layer penetration with successive laser pulses. The LIBS, XRF and Raman spectra confirm the presence of patina and contamination layers of the compositions influenced by the atmospheric environment. The elemental composition reveals in the case of the original copper substrate the presence of Cu with traces of Ag and Sb, and of impurities Fe and Pb, while objects made of copper alloys (brass) show different Zn/Cu ratios greater than 20% in all cases and admixtures of Sn and Pb. Consistent results are obtained from the elemental and Raman data indicating presence of the antlerite (Cu3(OH)4SO4), carbon and microcrystalline calcite which are ascribed to patina, surface contamination (atmospheric soot) and primer layers, respectively.

  8. Graphite/copper alloy interfacial energies determined using the sessile drop method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary M.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite surfaces are not wet by pure copper. This lack of wetting is responsible for a debonding phenomenon that was found in continuous graphite fiber/copper matrix composites materials subjected to elevated temperatures. By suitably alloying copper, its capability to wet graphite surfaces can be enhanced. In situ measurements of graphite/copper alloy wetting angles were made using the sessile drop method. Interfacial energy values were calculated based upon these measurements.

  9. "Bulk" Nanocrystalline Metals: Review of the Current State of the Art and Future Opportunities for Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Murdoch, H. A.; Kecskes, L. J.; Darling, K. A.

    2014-06-01

    It is a new beginning for innovative fundamental and applied science in nanocrystalline materials. Many of the processing and consolidation challenges that have haunted nanocrystalline materials are now more fully understood, opening the doors for bulk nanocrystalline materials and parts to be produced. While challenges remain, recent advances in experimental, computational, and theoretical capability have allowed for bulk specimens that have heretofore been pursued only on a limited basis. This article discusses the methodology for synthesis and consolidation of bulk nanocrystalline materials using mechanical alloying, the alloy development and synthesis process for stabilizing these materials at elevated temperatures, and the physical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials with a focus throughout on nanocrystalline copper and a nanocrystalline Cu-Ta system, consolidated via equal channel angular extrusion, with properties rivaling that of nanocrystalline pure Ta. Moreover, modeling and simulation approaches as well as experimental results for grain growth, grain boundary processes, and deformation mechanisms in nanocrystalline copper are briefly reviewed and discussed. Integrating experiments and computational materials science for synthesizing bulk nanocrystalline materials can bring about the next generation of ultrahigh strength materials for defense and energy applications.

  10. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ratka, J.O. )

    1992-01-01

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  11. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J.; Ratka, J.O.

    1992-12-01

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  12. Effects of aluminum-copper alloy filtration on photon spectra, air kerma rate and image contrast.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréa; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, without the original aluminum filter, for dental radiography in terms of x-ray energy spectrum, air kerma rate and image quality. Comparisons of various thicknesses of aluminum-copper alloy in three different percentages were made with aluminum filtration. Tests were conducted on an intra-oral dental x-ray machine and were made on mandible phantom and on step-wedge. Depending on the thickness of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, the beam could be hardened and filtrated. The use of the aluminum-copper alloy filter resulted in reductions in air kerma rate from 8.40% to 47.33%, and indicated the same image contrast when compared to aluminum filtration. Aluminum-copper alloy filtration may be considered a good alternative to aluminum filtration.

  13. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  14. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  15. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  16. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report, January--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    The distribution of graphite particles in graphite containing copper alloy was further improved very significantly using several procedures and technological modifications. The developed techniques attacked the graphite distribution problem in two ways. Realizing that clustering of very fine (5um) graphite particles is one of the two major problems, a pretreatment process has been developed using aluminum powders to deagglomerate graphite particles. Along with this, a two-stage stirring technique was used to first incorporate and then to distribute uniformly the deagglomerated particles in the melt. During this year, based on these developments, several components were cast to evaluate the castability of Cu alloy-graphite melts. In addition, machinability tests were done to clearly established that addition of graphite particles improve the machinability of copper MMC alloys over and above that of monolithic copper alloys. The results show that the machining chip sizes and cutting forces of Cu alloys containing graphite particles are smaller than these of the corresponding monolithic Cu alloys. This clearly establishes that the presence of graphite particles in copper alloy improves the machinability in a fashion similar to lead additions to copper alloys. Centrifugal casting of shapes of different sizes appear to be a very attractive method for casting graphite containing copper alloys, since all the graphite particles (regardless of their distribution in the melt) are forced to segregate to the inner periphery of the castings where they impart a very desirable solid lubrication property for bushing and bearing use. A very large number of cylindrical elements of lead bearing copper alloys are now used for similar bearing bushing applications and the manufacturers of these type of bearings are under safety and health hazard pressure to remove lead. This year several parameters for centrifugal casting of copper graphite alloys have been established.

  17. Desorption measurements of copper and copper alloys for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Korn, G.; Calderon, M.; Barletta, W.

    1992-12-31

    PEP-II will be a meson factory circulating asymmetric beams of 9 GeV and 3.1 GeV having maximum currents of 3.0A. Copper beam chambers and absorbers will intercept resulting synchrotron radiation and it is critical that the dynamic gas load from photo stimulated desorption (PSD) and thermal outgassing is below 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} molecules per photon. An experiment was set up to measure PSD from 1m long bar samples and a chamber sample, fabricated from selected copper and copper alloys then exposed to white light with a critical energy of 500 eV, on beamline U10B at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Based on U10B results a prototype chamber was built and will be exposed to white light with higher critical energies of up to 5 KeV, on beamline X-28A at the X-ray Ring of the NSLS. This paper presents the measurements of H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} desorption yields as function of accumulated photon flux, angle of incidence, sample material, and surface condition. The results are compared with that of previous work on similar materials and with that of others for copper.

  18. Role of plastic deformation in wear of copper and copper - 10-percent-aluminum alloy in cryogenic fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    High-purity copper specimens and a copper-aluminum (10%) alloy specimen were subjected to sliding against Type 440 C in cryogenic fuel environments. It was found that virtually all wear occurred by the plastic deformation of a recrystallized layer extending to about 10 micrometers below the wear scar surface of the copper or copper alloy. The wear debris was in the form of a layered structure adhering to the exit region of the wear scar. Measurements on the high purity copper specimens indicated that the wear rate was proportional to the applied load and to the sliding velocity squared. A physical model of the wear process is proposed to account for these observations.

  19. Microstructures of ancient and modern cast silver–copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Northover, S.M.; Northover, J.P.

    2014-04-01

    The microstructures of modern cast Sterling silver and of cast silver objects about 2500 years old have been compared using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructures of both ancient and modern alloys were typified by silver-rich dendrites with a few pools of eutectic and occasional cuprite particles with an oxidised rim on the outer surface. EBSD showed the dendrites to have a complex internal structure, often involving extensive twinning. There was copious intragranular precipitation within the dendrites, in the form of very fine copper-rich rods which TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and STEM suggest to be of a metastable face-centred-cubic (FCC) phase with a cube–cube orientation relationship to the silver-rich matrix but a higher silver content than the copper-rich β in the eutectic. Samples from ancient objects displayed a wider range of microstructures including a fine scale interpenetration of the adjoining grains not seen in the modern material. Although this study found no unambiguous evidence that this resulted from microstructural change produced over archaeological time, the copper supersaturation remaining after intragranular precipitation suggests that such changes, previously proposed for wrought and annealed material, may indeed occur in ancient silver castings. - Highlights: • Similar twinned structures and oxidised surfaces seen in ancient and modern cast silver • General precipitation of fine Cu-rich rods apparently formed by discontinuous precipitation is characteristic of as-cast silver. • The fine rods are cube-cube related to the matrix in contrast with the eutectic. • The silver-rich phase remains supersaturated with copper. • Possibly age-related grain boundary features seen in ancient cast silver.

  20. Laser-initiated combustion studies of selected aluminum, copper, iron, and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Clark, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The results of combustion studies at atmospheric pressure on ten metal alloys are presented. The alloys studied were aluminum alloys 1100, 2219, 6061, and tensile-50; 304, 347 and 21-6-9 stainless steel; inconel 600; beryllium copper and a bronze. It was found that once ignition was achieved all alloys would generally burn to completion. The overall combustion process appears to obey a first order rate process. Preliminary conclusions are presented along with recommendations for future work.

  1. Surface characterization of artificial corrosion layers on copper alloy reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinides, I.; Adriaens, A.; Adams, F.

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes the surface characterization of artificial patina layers on five different copper alloys. The chemical composition of the examined bronzes covers the major families of archaeological copper alloys from antiquity until the Roman period. The patina layers of the five samples were formed under identical conditions by electrochemical means. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (SEM-EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to describe the main properties of the patina layers. The results were interpreted and classified according to an existing corrosion model for copper alloys.

  2. Membrane lipid peroxidation in copper alloy-mediated contact killing of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hong, Robert; Kang, Tae Y; Michels, Corinne A; Gadura, Nidhi

    2012-03-01

    Copper alloy surfaces are passive antimicrobial sanitizing agents that kill bacteria, fungi, and some viruses. Studies of the mechanism of contact killing in Escherichia coli implicate the membrane as the target, yet the specific component and underlying biochemistry remain unknown. This study explores the hypothesis that nonenzymatic peroxidation of membrane phospholipids is responsible for copper alloy-mediated surface killing. Lipid peroxidation was monitored with the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay. Survival, TBARS levels, and DNA degradation were followed in cells exposed to copper alloy surfaces containing 60 to 99.90% copper or in medium containing CuSO(4). In all cases, TBARS levels increased with copper exposure levels. Cells exposed to the highest copper content alloys, C11000 and C24000, exhibited novel characteristics. TBARS increased immediately at a very rapid rate but peaked at about 30 min. This peak was associated with the period of most rapid killing, loss in membrane integrity, and DNA degradation. DNA degradation is not the primary cause of copper-mediated surface killing. Cells exposed to the 60% copper alloy for 60 min had fully intact genomic DNA but no viable cells. In a fabR mutant strain with increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids, sensitivity to copper alloy surface-mediated killing increased, TBARS levels peaked earlier, and genomic DNA degradation occurred sooner than in the isogenic parental strain. Taken together, these results suggest that copper alloy surface-mediated killing of E. coli is triggered by nonenzymatic oxidative damage of membrane phospholipids that ultimately results in the loss of membrane integrity and cell death.

  3. Membrane Lipid Peroxidation in Copper Alloy-Mediated Contact Killing of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Robert; Kang, Tae Y.; Michels, Corinne A.

    2012-01-01

    Copper alloy surfaces are passive antimicrobial sanitizing agents that kill bacteria, fungi, and some viruses. Studies of the mechanism of contact killing in Escherichia coli implicate the membrane as the target, yet the specific component and underlying biochemistry remain unknown. This study explores the hypothesis that nonenzymatic peroxidation of membrane phospholipids is responsible for copper alloy-mediated surface killing. Lipid peroxidation was monitored with the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay. Survival, TBARS levels, and DNA degradation were followed in cells exposed to copper alloy surfaces containing 60 to 99.90% copper or in medium containing CuSO4. In all cases, TBARS levels increased with copper exposure levels. Cells exposed to the highest copper content alloys, C11000 and C24000, exhibited novel characteristics. TBARS increased immediately at a very rapid rate but peaked at about 30 min. This peak was associated with the period of most rapid killing, loss in membrane integrity, and DNA degradation. DNA degradation is not the primary cause of copper-mediated surface killing. Cells exposed to the 60% copper alloy for 60 min had fully intact genomic DNA but no viable cells. In a fabR mutant strain with increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids, sensitivity to copper alloy surface-mediated killing increased, TBARS levels peaked earlier, and genomic DNA degradation occurred sooner than in the isogenic parental strain. Taken together, these results suggest that copper alloy surface-mediated killing of E. coli is triggered by nonenzymatic oxidative damage of membrane phospholipids that ultimately results in the loss of membrane integrity and cell death. PMID:22247141

  4. Corrosion of copper, nickel, and gold dental casting alloys: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B I; Lucas, L C; Lemons, J E

    1989-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercially available copper, nickel, and gold alloys for dental castings was investigated. The alloys investigated included: three copper alloys (76-87Cu, 6-11A1, 0-12Zn, 1-5Ni, 0-4Fe, 0.5-1.2Mn), two nickel alloys (68-78Ni, 12-16Cr, 4-14Mo, 0-1.7Be), and one gold alloy (77Au, 14Ag, 8Cu, 1Pd). Anodic and cathodic polarization curves, long-term immersion tests in saline and artificial saliva solutions, and dog crown studies were conducted to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo corrosion characteristics of the alloys. All evaluations conducted demonstrated that the copper alloys were highly susceptible to corrosion attack. High corrosion currents were observed in the in vitro tests, and SEM of the alloys specimens showed significantly altered surfaces. The anodic polarization curves predicted that the beryllium-containing nickel alloy should be susceptible to localized corrosion and SEM revealed an etched surface with corrosion of certain microstructural features. No significant corrosion was predicted or observed for the non-beryllium nickel alloy and the gold alloy. The in vitro corrosion evaluations predicted the in vivo corrosion behavior for the alloys. Since the three copper alloys and the beryllium-containing nickel alloy demonstrated significant corrosion under the tested conditions, the use of these alloys for restorative procedures is questionable due to the release of significant levels of selected ions to the oral cavity.

  5. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  6. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  7. Geometric modelling of viscosity of copper-containing liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Ali; Arslan, Hüseyin

    2016-02-01

    In this work, viscosities of ternary Au-Ag-Cu and Al-Cu-Si liquid alloys have been calculated as a function of gold, aluminium and copper compositions for the sections Au-Ag-Cu (xAg/xCu = 0.543 at 1373 K), Alx(Cu50-Si50)(1-x) and Cux(Al50-Si50)(1-x) at 1375 K using Chou's general solution model, Muggianu, Kohler, Toop, Hillert, Budai et al., Kozlov et al., Schick et al. and Kaptay et al. models. The present study finds that a comparison of the predicted values of viscosities associated with the geometric and physical models indicate good mutual agreement. The Muggianu model indicates the best agreement with the results obtained for Au-Ag-Cu and Alx-Cu50-Si50 alloy systems and the Kaptay et al. model, which is a physical model, indicates the best agreement with the results obtained for Al50-Cux-Si50.

  8. Fracture toughness of copper-base alloys for ITER applications: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1997-04-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloys and a precipitation-hardened copper-nickel-beryllium alloy showed a significant reduction in toughness at elevated temperature (250{degrees}C). This decrease in toughness was much larger than would be expected from the relatively modest changes in the tensile properties over the same temperature range. However, a copper-chromium-zirconium alloy strengthened by precipitation showed only a small decrease in toughness at the higher temperatures. The embrittled alloys showed a transition in fracture mode, from transgranular microvoid coalescence at room temperature to intergranular with localized ductility at high temperatures. The Cu-Cr-Zr alloy maintained the ductile microvoid coalescence failure mode at all test temperatures.

  9. Generation of copper, nickel, and CuNi alloy nanoparticles by spark discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, Alex; Wagner, Moritz; Meyer, Jörg; Seipenbusch, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The generation of copper, nickel, and copper-nickel alloy nanoparticles by spark discharge was studied, using different bespoke alloy feedstocks. Roughly spherical particles with a primary particle Feret diameter of 2-10 nm were produced and collected in agglomerate form. The copper-to-nickel ratios determined by Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and therefore averaged over a large number of particles, matched the nominal copper content quite well. Further investigations showed that the electrode compositions influenced the evaporation rate and the primary particle size. The evaporation rate decreased with increasing copper content, which was found to be in good accordance with the Llewellyn-Jones model. However, the particle diameter was increasing with an increasing copper content, caused by a decrease in melting temperature due to the lower melting point of copper. Furthermore, the alloy compositions on the nanoscale were investigated via EDX. The nanoparticles exhibited almost the same composition as the used alloy feedstock, with a deviation of less than 7 percentage points. Therefore, no segregation could be detected, indicating the presence of a true alloy even on the nanoscale.

  10. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  11. Development of lead-free copper alloy-graphite casting. Annual report, January--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-02-01

    Water model experiments were conducted to develop a two-stage stirring method for obtaining higher yields and a more uniform distribution of particles in copper alloys. This was followed by several melts for synthesis of copper-graphite alloys in which T1 was used as a wetting agent to improve the wettability of graphite in the copper melt. In the first stage, a vortex method was employed to facilitate the suction of graphite particles into the copper melt. In the second stage, the specially designed stirrer was used to avoid the formation of vortex in melt. The two stage stirring was found to considerably improve the recovery of graphite, over those obtained with the prior practice of single stage stirring. In addition, graphite recoveries increased with increasing Ti content. Flotation, fluidity, and directional solidification experiments were also conducted on copper-graphite alloys synthesized in this study. Tests showed that the spiral fluidity length of the yellow brass alloy increased with temperature and decreased with graphite. The fluidity of copper-graphite alloys investigated to date remained adequate to make a variety of castings. The observations of microstructure of directional solidification and flotation showed that in certain castings the graphite particles were agglomerated and they float to the upper part of the castings where they reduced the size of grains. However, in the agglomerated form, the graphite particles improved the machinability of copper alloys in a manner similar to lead. The result of the first years work provide an improved method of synthesis of lead free copper graphite alloys with improved machinability and adequate fluidity. Future work will continue to further improve the distribution of graphite particles in casting while retaining adequate fluidity and improved machinability. Techniques like centrifugal casting will be developed to concentrate graphite in regions where it is required for machinability in bearings.

  12. A New Modelling of Blanking for Thin Sheet in Copper Alloys with Dynamic Recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Touache, A.; Thibaud, S.; Chambert, J.; Picart, P.

    2007-05-17

    Precision blanking process is widely used by electronic and micromechanical industries to produce small and thin components in large quantities. To take account of the influence of strain rate and temperature on precision blanking of thin sheet in copper alloys, we have proposed a thermo-elasto-visco-plastic modelling. In addition, dynamic recrystallization takes place in Cual copper alloy during the blanking process of thin sheet. A new modelling of dynamic recrystallization based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes is presented. Blanking simulations of Cual copper sheet are carried out in order to analyze the softening effect induced by dynamic recrystallization.

  13. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  14. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J.

    1994-05-01

    When a literature search and discussion with manufacturers revealed that there was virtually no existing data related to the fracture properties and behavior of copper beryllium alloy C17510, a series of test programs was undertaken to ascertain this information for several variations in material processing and chemistry. These variations in C17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing and fatigue crack growth rate tests, as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature. In order to confirm the test results, duplicate and independent test programs were awarded to separate facilities with appropriate test experience, whenever possible. The primary goal of the test program, to determine and bound the fracture toughness and Paris constants for C17510,was accomplished. In addition, a wealth of information was accumulated pertaining to crack growth characteristics, effects of directionality and potential testing pitfalls. The paper discusses the test program and its findings in detail.

  15. Thermal Stability of Nanocrystalline Copper Alloyed with Antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Mark A.; Mula, Suhrit; Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C.

    2013-12-01

    Nanocrystalline copper (Cu) was generated by cryogenic, high-energy ball milling. Antimony (Sb) was added to investigate its utility in stabilizing the grain structure during annealing up to a maximum temperature of 1073 K (800 °C). When alloyed with Sb in quantities up to 1 at. pct, thermal stability was maintained up to 673 K (400 °C). Cu and Sb have very different molar volumes which can drive segregation of the solute due to the elastic strain energy and hence stabilize the grain size by reducing grain boundary energy. The elastic mismatch of Sb in Cu is calculated to be quite large (113 kJ/mol) when molar volume is used, but when an equivalent equation using atomic radius is applied, the driving force is nearly an order of magnitude lower (~12 kJ/mol). The low elastic mismatch is corroborated by the large equilibrium solubility of Sb in Cu. The results for the Cu-Sb system are compared to the nanocrystalline Ni-W system and the large amount of equilibrium solubility of the solute in both cases is thought to hinder thermal stabilization since segregation is not strongly favored.

  16. Strength of copper alloys in high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Saito, M.

    2002-12-01

    The first wall of ITER is expected to be hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonded structure of copper-alloy/SS316. Firstly, fracture toughness and crack propagation tests were performed on DS-Cu and DS-Cu/SS316 HIP joints at ambient temperature and 573 K T. Yamada, M. Uno, M. Saito, Fall Meeting of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, vol. I, 1998, p. 187 (in Japanese). JIC values of DS-Cu and DS-Cu/SS316 decreased significantly at 573 K. In crack propagation test, DS-Cu lost its ductility at 573 K. Secondly, we performed fracture toughness tests on CuCrZr and CuCrZr/CuCrZr, CuCrZr/SS316 HIP joints at ambient and 573 K. CuCrZr base metal had higher JIC values than DS-Cu. Concerning CuCrZr/CuCrZr and CuCrZr/SS316 HIP joint, its JIC value decreased to less than that of CuCrZr base metal.

  17. Surface microstructures and antimicrobial properties of copper plasma alloyed stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Jiang, Li; Ma, Yong; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces is one of the major reason causing the cross-contamination and infection in many practical applications. An approach to solve this problem is to enhance the antibacterial properties on the surface of stainless steel. In this paper, novel antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different copper content have been prepared by a plasma surface alloying technique at various gas pressures. The microstructure of the alloyed surfaces was investigated using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of bacteria attached to the antibacterial surfaces was tested using the spread plate method. The antibacterial mechanism of the alloyed surfaces was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that gas pressure has a great influence on the surface elements concentration and the depth of the alloyed layer. The maximum copper concentration in the alloyed surface obtained at the gas pressure of 60 Pa is about 7.1 wt.%. This alloyed surface exhibited very strong antibacterial ability, and an effective reduction of 98% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) within 1 h was achieved by contact with the alloyed surface. The maximum thickness of the copper alloyed layer obtained at 45 Pa is about 6.5 μm. Although the rate of reduction for E. coli of this alloyed surface was slower than that of the alloyed surface with the copper content about 7.1 wt.% over the first 3 h, few were able to survive more than 12 h and the reduction reached over 99.9%. The XPS analysis results indicated that the copper ions were released when the copper alloyed stainless steel in contact with bacterial solution, which is an important factor for killing bacteria. Based on an overall consideration of bacterial killing rate and durability, the alloyed surface with the copper content of 2.5 wt.% and the thickness of about 6.5 μm obtained at the gas pressure of 45 Pa is expected

  18. Tensile and toughness assessment of the procured advanced alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-09-11

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance by 2024 in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments

  19. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  20. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-07-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 deg. C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 deg. C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 deg. C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  1. Oxidation Behavior of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications (Technical Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J.; Humphrey, Donald H.; Barrett, Charles A.; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie (Technical Monitor); Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A rocket engine's combustion chamber is lined with material that is highly conductive to heat in order to dissipate the huge thermal load (evident in a white-hot exhaust plume). Because of its thermal conductivity copper is the best choice of liner material. However, the mechanical properties of pure copper are inadequate to withstand the high stresses, hence, copper alloys are needed in this application. But copper and its alloys are prone to oxidation and related damage, especially "blanching" (an oxidation-reduction mode of degradation). The space shuttle main engine combustion chamber is lined with a Cu-Ag-Zr alloy, "NARloy-Z", which exhibits blanching. A superior liner is being sought for the next generation of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) It should have improved mechanical properties and higher resistance to oxidation and blanching, but without substantial penalty in thermal conductivity. GRCop84, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy (Cr2Nb in Cu matrix), developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Case Western Reserve University, is a prime contender for RLV liner material. In this study, the oxidation resistance of GRCop-84 and other related/candidate copper alloys are investigated and compared

  2. Odontologic use of copper/aluminum alloys: mitochondrial respiration as sensitive parameter of biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon A; Carvalho, Antônio A V F; Azevedo, Antônio L M; Cruz, Cecília B B V; Maia, Antônio Wanderley C

    2003-01-01

    Copper/aluminum alloys are largely utilized in odontological restorations because they are less expensive than gold or platinum. However, tarnishing and important corrosion in intrabuccal prostheses made with copper/aluminum alloys after 28 days of use have been reported. Several kinds of food and beverage may attack and corrode these alloys. Copper is an essential component of several important enzymes directly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Aluminum, in contrast, is very toxic and, when absorbed, plasma values as small as 1.65 to 21.55 microg/dl can cause severe lesions to the nervous system, kidneys, and bone marrow. Because mitochondria are extremely sensitive to minimal variation of cellular physiology, the direct relationship between the mitocondrial respiratory chain and cell lesions has been used as a sensitive parameter to evaluate cellular aggression by external agents. This work consisted in the polarographic study of mitochondrial respiratory metabolism of livers and kidneys of rabbits with femoral implants of titanium or copper/aluminum alloy screws. The experimental results obtained did not show physiological modifications of hepatic or renal mitochondria isolated from animals of the three experimental groups, which indicate good biocompatibility of copper/ aluminum alloys and suggest their odontological use.

  3. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  4. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-17

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  5. Stability and structure of nanowires grown from silver, copper and their alloys by laser ablation into superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Eugene; Karabulin, Alexander; Matyushenko, Vladimir; Sizov, Vyacheslav; Khodos, Igor

    2014-12-14

    Nanowires with 5 nm diameter made of silver, copper, and their alloys were grown in superfluid helium. The silver nanowires being heated to 300 K disintegrated into individual clusters. In contrast, copper nanowires were stable at room temperature, and nanowires made of alloys were also stable despite their low melting temperature.

  6. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  7. A survey of the properties of copper alloys for use as fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, G. J.; Forty, C. B. A.

    1992-08-01

    Pure copper and some selected dilute alloys are widely utilised in experimental plasma confinement devices and have also been proposed for various applications in fusion power reactors where a high thermal or electrical conductivity in the material is required. Available data on physical and mechanical properties of a number of commercial coppers and alloys at elevated temperatures are collated and reviewed as an aid to materials selection and component design. Properties examined include the thermal and electrical conductivities, thermal fatigue resistance, softening behaviour, and creep and fatigue strengths. The effects of neutron irradiation on copper alloys are briefly discussed in terms of radiation damage and its influence on conductivity and mechanical properties, the compositional changes occurring through transmutation and the induced activity and associated γ-dose rate and biological hazard potential. Data emerging from recent fission reactor irradiation programmes on void swelling and changes in electrical conductivity and mechanical properties are presented and discussed.

  8. Acoustic emission characteristics of copper alloys under low-cycle fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Ono, K.; Green, A.

    1975-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of pure copper, zirconium-copper, and several copper alloys were determined to develop nondestructive evaluation schemes of thrust chambers through AE techniques. The AE counts rms voltages, frequency spectrum, and amplitude distribution analysis evaluated AE behavior under fatigue loading conditions. The results were interpreted with the evaluation of wave forms, crack propagation characteristics, as well as scanning electron fractographs of fatigue-tested samples. AE signals at the beginning of a fatigue test were produced by a sample of annealed alloys. A sample of zirconium-containing alloys annealed repeatedly after each fatigue loading cycle showed numerous surface cracks during the subsequent fatigue cycle, emitting strong-burst AE signals. Amplitude distribution analysis exhibits responses that are characteristic of certain types of AE signals.

  9. Recent advances and developments in refractory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-11-01

    Refractory metal alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Ta, and Nb (Cb) find applications in a wide range of aerospace applications because of their high melting points and high-temperature strength. This paper, presents recent progress in understanding and applications of these alloys. Recent studies to improve the oxidation and mechanical behavior of refractory metal alloys, and particularly Nb alloys, are also discussed. Some Re structures, for extremely high temperature applications (> 2000C), made by CVD and P/M processes, are also illustrated. Interesting work on the development of new W alloys (W-HfC-X) and the characterization of some commercial refractory metals, e.g., K-doped W, TZM, and Nb-1%Zr, continues. Finally, recent developments in high temperature composites reinforced with refractory metal filaments, and refractory metal-based intermetallics, e.g., Nb{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Be{sub 17}, and MoSi{sub 2}, are briefly described.

  10. Determination of the gaseous hydrogen ductile-brittle transition in copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    A series of copper-nickel alloys were fabricated, notched tensile specimens machined for each alloy, and the specimens tested in 34.5 MPa hydrogen and in air. A notched tensile ratio was determined for each alloy and the hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) determined for the alloys of 47.7 weight percent nickel to 73.5 weight percent nickel. Stacking fault probability and stacking fault energies were determined for each alloy using the x ray diffraction line shift and line profiles technique. Hydrogen environment embrittlement was determined to be influenced by stacking fault energies; however, the correlation is believed to be indirect and only partially responsible for the HEE behavior of these alloys.

  11. Properties of experimental copper-aluminium-nickel alloys for dental post-and-core applications

    PubMed Central

    Rittapai, Apiwat; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep; Harniratisai, Choltacha

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to develop a copper-aluminium-nickel alloy which has properties comparable to that of dental alloys used for dental post and core applications with the reasonable cost. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen groups of experimental copper alloys with variants of 3, 6, 9, 12 wt% Al and 0, 2, 4, 6 wt% Ni were prepared and casted. Their properties were tested and evaluated. The data of thermal, physical, and mechanical properties were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The alloy toxicity was evaluated according to the ISO standard. RESULTS The solidus and liquidus points of experimental alloys ranged from 1023℃ to 1113℃ and increased as the nickel content increased. The highest ultimate tensile strength (595.9 ± 14.2 MPa) was shown in the Cu-12Al-4Ni alloy. The tensile strength was increased as the both elements increased. Alloys with 3-6 wt% Al exhibited a small amount of 0.2% proof strength. Accordingly, the Cu-9Al-2Ni and Cu-9Al-4Ni alloys not only demonstrated an appropriate modulus of elasticity (113.9 ± 8.0 and 122.8 ± 11.3 GPa, respectively), but also had a value of 0.2% proof strength (190.8 ± 4.8 and 198.2 ± 3.4 MPa, respectively), which complied with the ISO standard requirement (>180 MPa). Alloys with the highest contents of nickel (6 wt% Ni) revealed a widespread decolourisation zone (5.0-5.9 mm), which correspondingly produced the largest cell response, equating positive control. CONCLUSION The copper alloys fused with 9 wt% Al and 2-4 wt% Ni can be considered for a potential use as dental post and core applications. PMID:25006386

  12. [Effect of casting techniques on castability of copper-aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Scaranelo, R M; Bombonatti, P E; de Barros, L E; Pellizzer, A J

    1990-01-01

    It was evaluated the castability of four copper-aluminium alloy according the melting casting method used. The specimens were made using polyester mesh screen, with 11 x 11 filaments of 0.26 mm thick, fixed along of two adjacent edges in wax bar, with the sprue attached at their junction. The alloys were in an electrical casting machine and a centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. The castability values were obtained by the percentage of completed segments of the resulting cast alloy screen. It was verified that the use of the electrical casting machine produced higher castability values to the copper-aluminium alloys than those produced by a centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch.

  13. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  14. Combined elemental and microstructural analysis of genuine and fake copper-alloy coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, L.; Agresti, J.; Mascalchi, M.; Mencaglia, A.; Cacciari, I.; Siano, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    Innovative noninvasive material analysis techniques are applied to determine archaeometallurgical characteristics of copper-alloy coins from Florence's National Museum of Archaeology. Three supposedly authentic Roman coins and three hypothetically fraudolent imitations are thoroughly investigated using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy and time of flight neutron diffraction along with 3D videomicroscopy and electron microscopy. Material analyses are aimed at collecting data allowing for objective discrimination between genuine Roman productions and late fakes. The results show the mentioned techniques provide quantitative compositional and textural data, which are strictly related to the manufacturing processes and aging of copper alloys.

  15. Combined elemental and microstructural analysis of genuine and fake copper-alloy coins

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, L; Agresti, J; Mascalchi, M; Mencaglia, A; Cacciari, I; Siano, Salvatore

    2011-07-31

    Innovative noninvasive material analysis techniques are applied to determine archaeometallurgical characteristics of copper-alloy coins from Florence's National Museum of Archaeology. Three supposedly authentic Roman coins and three hypothetically fraudolent imitations are thoroughly investigated using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy and time of flight neutron diffraction along with 3D videomicroscopy and electron microscopy. Material analyses are aimed at collecting data allowing for objective discrimination between genuine Roman productions and late fakes. The results show the mentioned techniques provide quantitative compositional and textural data, which are strictly related to the manufacturing processes and aging of copper alloys. (laser applications)

  16. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Junjun Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  17. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2014-05-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  18. Design and screening of nanoprecipitates-strengthened advanced ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Chen, Tianyi; Sridharan, K.; He, Li

    2016-12-30

    Advanced nuclear reactors as well as the life extension of light water reactors require advanced alloys capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Extensive studies, including fundamental theories, have demonstrated the superior resistance to radiation-induced swelling in ferritic steels, primarily inherited from their body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. This study aims at developing nanoprecipitates strengthened advanced ferritic alloys for advanced nuclear reactor applications. To be more specific, this study aims at enhancing the amorphization ability of some precipitates, such as Laves phase and other types of intermetallic phases, through smart alloying strategy, and thereby promote the crystalline®amorphous transformation of these precipitates under irradiation.

  19. Response of solute and precipitation-strengthened copper alloys at high neutron exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Shikama, T. ); Edwards, D.J.; Newkirk, J.W. )

    1991-11-01

    A variety of solute and precipitation strengthened copper base alloys have been irradiated to neutron-induced displacement levels of 34 to 150 dpa at 415{degrees}C and 32 dpa at 529{degrees}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility to assess their potential for high heat flux applications in fusion reactors. Several MZC-type alloys appear to offer the most promise for further study. For low fluence applications CuBeNi and spinodally strengthened CuNiTi alloys may also be suitable. Although Cu-2Be resists swelling, it is not recommended for fusion reactor applications because of its low conductivity.

  20. Conventionally cast and forged copper alloy for high-heat-flux thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Repas, George A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion chamber liner of the space shuttle main engine is made of NARloy-Z, a copper-silver-zirconium alloy. This alloy was produced by vacuum melting and vacuum centrifugal casting; a production method that is currently now available. Using conventional melting, casting, and forging methods, NASA has produced an alloy of the same composition called NASA-Z. This report compares the composition, microstructure, tensile properties, low-cycle fatigue life, and hot-firing life of these two materials. The results show that the materials have similar characteristics.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Larson, L. A.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitaton events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significantly alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  2. Exploratory Investigation of Advanced-Temperature Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, John C.; Waters, William J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy with properties suitable for aircraft turbine blades as well as for possible space vehicle applications. An entire series of alloys that do not require vacuum melting techniques and that generally provide good stress-rupture and impact properties was evolved. The basic-alloy composition of 79 percent nickel, 8 percent molybdenum, 6 percent chromium, 6 percent aluminum, and 1 percent zirconium was modified by a series of element additions such as carbon, titanium, and boron, with the nickel content adjusted to account for the additives. Stress-rupture, impact, and swage tests were made with all the alloys. The strongest composition (basic alloy plus 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon) displayed 384- and 574-hour stress-rupture lives at 1800 F and 15,000 psi in the as-cast and homogenized conditions, respectively. All the alloys investigated demonstrated good impact resistance. Several could not be broken in a low-capacity Izod impact tester and, on this basis, all compared favorably with several high-strength high-temperature alloys. Swaging cracks were encountered with all the alloys. In several cases, however, these cracks were slight and could be detected only by zyglo examination. Some of these compositions may become amenable to hot working on further development. On the basis of the properties indicated, it appears that several of the alloys evolved, particularly the 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon basic-alloy modification, could be used for advanced- temperature turbine blades, as well as for possible space vehicle applications.

  3. The Effects of Test Temperature, Temper, and Alloyed Copper on the Hydrogen-Controlled Crack Growth Rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young, Jr.; J.R. Scully

    2000-09-17

    The hydrogen embrittlement controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt.% Zn, 2.14 wt% Mg, 2.19 wt.% Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged, peak aged, and overaged conditions were tested in 90% relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 and 90 C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from underaged to overaged) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal copper and low copper alloys, the fracture path was predominantly intergranular at all test temperatures (25-90 C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II crack growth rates for normal (2.19 wt.%) and low (0.06 wt.%) copper alloys in the peak aged and overaged tempers showed the beneficial effect of copper additions on stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt.% copper alloy, the significant decrease ({approx} 10 times at 25 C) in stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. IN the 0.06 wt.% copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor, {nu}{sub 0}, resulting in a modest ({approx} 2.5 times at 25 C) decrease in crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II crack growth rate. Overaged, copper bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen environment assisted cracking but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

  4. Recent results for bonding S-65C grade Be to copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, D.W.

    1995-09-01

    Novel processes for bonding beryllium to copper alloys without the use of a silver bonding aid have been developed at Brush Wellman. Tensile strength results will be presented at room temperature and elevated temperatures. A comparison will be made between bond strengths derived from rectangular tensile specimens and reduced section tensile specimens. Failure modes of the specimens at various temperatures will be shown.

  5. Laser forming of structures of zinc oxide on a surface of products from copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, D. V.; Gorudko, T. N.; Koblov, A. N.; Nogtev, D. S.; Novikova, O. A.

    Laser formation of a protective zinc oxide layer on a surface of products from copper alloys is present. This layer is formed with using of carbon nanotubes. Destructions of the basic material are avoided or minimized at laser nanostructuring of product surfaces. Such laser processing can be made repeatedly. Offered covering have self-clearing and water-repellent properties.

  6. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Stubbins, J. F.; Edwards, D. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop Al25), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop Al25 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface.

  7. The Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels and Copper Alloys Exposed to Natural Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    significant changes of the corrosion potential (Ecw) or surface properties. Rotating cylinder experiments indicated that both E., and corrosion rates for...and inorganic chloride corrosion layer that contained alloying elements; a biof ilm; and crystalline, spherical phosphate-rich deposits. All copper...nichtrostendem Stahl und bacteria and diatoms that did not cause significant changes of the Titan entstehenden dfinnen Biofilme bestanden aus

  8. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners

  9. Micro and Nano Laser Pulses for Melting and Surface Alloying of Aluminum with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoudi, Walid K.; Ismail, Raid A.; Sultan, Fatima I.; Jaleel, Summayah

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the use of microsecond and nanosecond laser pulses to alloy copper in aluminum is presented. In the first run, high purity (99.999%) copper thin film was thermally evaporated over (99.9%) purity, 300 μm aluminum sheet. Thereafter, surface alloying was performed using (1-3) 500 μs, (0.1-1.5) Joule Nd: YAG laser pulses; operating at 1060 nm wavelength. Hard homogeneous alloyed zone was obtained at depths between 60 and 110 μm below the surface. In the second run, 9 ns laser pulses from Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1060 nm was employed to melt/alloy Al-Cu sheets. The resulted alloyed depth, after using 20 laser pulses, was 199.22 μm for Al over Cu samples and 419.61 μm for Cu over Al samples. X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis revealed the formation of Cu2Al2, CuAl2 and δ- Al4Cu9 phases with percentage depended on laser energy and copper layer thicknesses.

  10. The chloride stress corrosion cracking behavior of beryllium copper and other nonmagnetic drill collar alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Turn, J.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmagnetic drill collars and other structural components are used to provide a region in the bottom hole assembly near the bit in which sensitive magnetic measurements can be made. Beryllium copper, Cl7200, is paramagnetic with low magnetic permeability which makes it aptly suited for nonmagnetic components. Not only are the magnetic properties of the alloys for these components important, but the integrity of the alloys under dynamic loading in a range of hostile drilling fluids is critical as well. Chlorides in certain drilling muds can cause unpredictable stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of susceptible alloys. In a standard test for chloride SCC, ASTM G 36-73, beryllium copper, Cl7200, showed no failure after 1000 hr of exposure to boiling 45 weight percent magnesium chloride solution. The applied stresses were 100 percent of the 0.2 percent offset yield strength for the alloy. Failures for austenitic stainless steels generally occurred in less than 200 hr in this environment at applied stresses of 25 percent of the yield strength. Although benefits can be obtained by controlling the environment and introducing residual compressive stresses to austenitic stainless steel components, these remedies cannot permanently eliminate the underlying susceptibility of these alloys to chloride SCC. Beryllium copper is immune to chloride SCC.

  11. Dealloying of gold-copper alloy nanowires: From hillocks to ring-shaped nanopores.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Adrien; Delacôte, Cyril; Boujtita, Mohammed; Angleraud, Benoit; Ding, Junjun; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Tessier, Pierre-Yves; El Mel, Abdel-Aziz

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel fabrication approach of metal nanowires with complex surface. Taking advantage of nodular growth triggered by the presence of surface defects created intentionally on the substrate as well as the high tilt angle between the magnetron source axis and the normal to the substrate, metal nanowires containing hillocks emerging out of the surface can be created. The approach is demonstrated for several metals and alloys including gold, copper, silver, gold-copper and gold-silver. We demonstrate that applying an electrochemical dealloying process to the gold-copper alloy nanowire arrays allows for transforming the hillocks into ring-like shaped nanopores. The resulting porous gold nanowires exhibit a very high roughness and high specific surface making of them a promising candidate for the development of SERS-based sensors.

  12. Dealloying of gold–copper alloy nanowires: From hillocks to ring-shaped nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Adrien; Delacôte, Cyril; Boujtita, Mohammed; Angleraud, Benoit; Ding, Junjun; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report on a novel fabrication approach of metal nanowires with complex surface. Taking advantage of nodular growth triggered by the presence of surface defects created intentionally on the substrate as well as the high tilt angle between the magnetron source axis and the normal to the substrate, metal nanowires containing hillocks emerging out of the surface can be created. The approach is demonstrated for several metals and alloys including gold, copper, silver, gold–copper and gold–silver. We demonstrate that applying an electrochemical dealloying process to the gold–copper alloy nanowire arrays allows for transforming the hillocks into ring-like shaped nanopores. The resulting porous gold nanowires exhibit a very high roughness and high specific surface making of them a promising candidate for the development of SERS-based sensors. PMID:27826510

  13. A promising structure for fabricating high strength and high electrical conductivity copper alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rengeng; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fan, Guohua; Zou, Cunlei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shaojian; Lu, Yiping; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Li, Tingju; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-01-01

    To address the trade-off between strength and electrical conductivity, we propose a strategy: introducing precipitated particles into a structure composed of deformation twins. A Cu-0.3%Zr alloy was designed to verify our strategy. Zirconium was dissolved into a copper matrix by solution treatment prior to cryorolling and precipitated in the form of Cu5Zr from copper matrix via a subsequent aging treatment. The microstructure evolutions of the processed samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, and the mechanical and physical behaviours were evaluated through tensile and electrical conductivity tests. The results demonstrated that superior tensile strength (602.04 MPa) and electrical conductivity (81.4% IACS) was achieved. This strategy provides a new route for balancing the strength and electrical conductivity of copper alloys, which can be developed for large-scale industrial application. PMID:26856764

  14. A promising structure for fabricating high strength and high electrical conductivity copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Rengeng; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fan, Guohua; Zou, Cunlei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shaojian; Lu, Yiping; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Li, Tingju; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-02-09

    To address the trade-off between strength and electrical conductivity, we propose a strategy: introducing precipitated particles into a structure composed of deformation twins. A Cu-0.3%Zr alloy was designed to verify our strategy. Zirconium was dissolved into a copper matrix by solution treatment prior to cryorolling and precipitated in the form of Cu5Zr from copper matrix via a subsequent aging treatment. The microstructure evolutions of the processed samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, and the mechanical and physical behaviours were evaluated through tensile and electrical conductivity tests. The results demonstrated that superior tensile strength (602.04 MPa) and electrical conductivity (81.4% IACS) was achieved. This strategy provides a new route for balancing the strength and electrical conductivity of copper alloys, which can be developed for large-scale industrial application.

  15. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  16. Method of preparing copper-dendritic composite alloys for mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Spitzig, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Copper-dendritic composite alloys are prepared for mechanical reduction to increase tensile strength by dispersing molten droplets of the composite alloy into an inert gas; solidifying the droplets in the form of minute spheres or platelets; and compacting a mass of the spheres or platelets into an integrated body. The spheres preferably have diameters of from 50 to 2000 .mu.m, and the platelets thicknesses of 100 to 2000 .mu.m. The resulting spheres or platelets will contain ultra-fine dendrites which produce higher strengths on mechanical reduction of the bodies formed therefrom, or comparable strengths at lower reduction values. The method is applicable to alloys of copper with vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and cobalt.

  17. Method of preparing copper-dendritic composite alloys for mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spitzig, W.A.

    1988-09-13

    Copper-dendritic composite alloys are prepared for mechanical reduction to increase tensile strength by dispersing molten droplets of the composite alloy into an inert gas; solidifying the droplets in the form of minute spheres or platelets; and compacting a mass of the spheres or platelets into an integrated body. The spheres preferably have diameters of from 50 to 2,000 [mu]m, and the platelets thicknesses of 100 to 2,000 [mu]m. The resulting spheres or platelets will contain ultra-fine dendrites which produce higher strengths on mechanical reduction of the bodies formed therefrom, or comparable strengths at lower reduction values. The method is applicable to alloys of copper with vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and cobalt. 3 figs.

  18. Electrical Resistivity of Ten Selected Binary Alloy Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    alloys --* Aluminum Alloys --*Copper alloys --*Gold alloys --*Nickel Alloys --*Silver alloys --*Iron alloys --*Palladium alloys ... aluminum -magnesium, and copper-zinc) are given for 27 compositions: 0 (pure element).* For aluminum -copper, aluninu.-eagnes tur, end copper-zinc alloy ...available data and infor- mation. The ten binary alloy systems selected are the systems of aluminum - copper, aluminum -magnesium, copper-gold,

  19. The erosion-corrosion of copper-based and nickel-based alloys in warm polluted Arabian Gulf seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.A.; Islam, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the erosion-corrosion behavior of copper-nickel alloys (90:10 Cu/Ni and 7030 Cu/Ni), nickel-copper alloy UNS N04400 and nickel-based alloys (UNS N06022, N06030 and UNS S32550) used as heat exchanger tubes, in warm flowing Arabian Gulf seawater containing up to 5 ppm of sulphide ions. Visual and optical examinations of the internal surfaces of the tubes were carried out to compare the susceptibilities to erosion-corrosion attack of the different alloys, taking into consideration the nature of the product films formed.

  20. Electrical conductivity in directionally solidified lead-9 and -20 wt pct copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwoo; Flanagan, W. F.; Lichter, B. D.; Grugel, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    Composites consisting of aligned copper dendrites in a lead matrix have been produced by directional solidification processing for potential application as grids in lead-acid batteries. To promote a uniform composite of aligned copper dendrites in a protective lead matrix, two alloy compositions, Pb-9 and -20 wt pct Cu, have been directionally solidified through a temperature gradient of 4.5 K/mm at constant growth velocities which ranged from 1 to 100 micron/s. With slow growth rates (below about 10 microns/s), the copper dendrites were generally columnar and continuous along the sample length; at higher velocities (above 60 microns/s), they assumed an intricate and equiaxed morphology. In accordance with copper content and growth rate, the electrical conductivity of the directionally solidified composites was found to be as much as a 2.5 times that of pure lead. The results are compared with that predicted by a model based on a geometrical dendrite.

  1. A Simplified Test for Blanching Susceptibility of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.; Humphrey, Donald; Setlock, John

    2003-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is a dispersion-strengthened alloy developed for space-launch rocket engine applications, as a liner for the combustion chamber and nozzle ramp. Its main advantage over rival alloys, particularly NARloy-Z (Cu-Ag-Zr), the current liner alloy, is in high temperature mechanical properties. Further validation required that the two alloys be compared with respect to service performance and durability. This has been done, under conditions resembling those expected in reusable launch engine applications. GRCop-84 was found to have a superior resistance to static and cyclic oxidation up to approx. 700 C. In order to improve its performance above 700 C, Cu-Cr coatings have also been developed and evaluated. The major oxidative issue with Cu alloys is blanching, a mode of degradation induced by oxidation-reduction fluctuations in hydrogen-fueled engines. That fluctuation cannot be addressed with conventional static or cyclic oxidation testing. Hence, a further evaluation of the alloy substrates and Cu-Cr coating material necessitated our devising a test protocol that involves oxidaton-reduction cycles. This paper describes the test protocols used and the results obtained.

  2. Study on improved tribological properties by alloying copper to CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Ma, Zheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Song, Jian; Yang, Ke; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-12-01

    Copper alloying to titanium and its alloys is believed to show an antibacterial performance. However, the tribological properties of Cu alloyed titanium alloys were seldom studied. Ti-5Cu and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu alloys were fabricated in the present study in order to further study the friction and wear properties of titanium alloys with Cu additive. The microstructure, composition and hardness were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and hardness tester. The tribological behaviors were tested with ZrO2 counterface in 25% bovine serum using a ball-on-disc tribo-tester. The results revealed that precipitations of Ti2Cu intermetallic compounds appeared in both Ti-5Cu and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu alloys. The tribological results showed an improvement in friction and wear resistance for both Ti-5Cu and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu alloys due to the precipitation of Ti2Cu. The results also indicated that both CP-Ti and Ti-5Cu behaved better wear resistance than Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu due to different wear mechanisms when articulated with hard zirconia. Both CP-Ti and Ti-5Cu revealed dominant adhesive wear with secondary abrasive wear mechanism while both Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu showed severe abrasive wear and cracks with secondary adhesive wear mechanism due to different surface hardness integrated by their microstructures and material types.

  3. Low-temperature metallic alloying of copper and silver nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles through digestive ripening.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Alexander B; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Sorensen, Christopher M; Ponce, Audaldo A; Mwale, Benny

    2006-02-09

    We describe a remarkable and simple alloying procedure in which noble metal intermetallic nanoparticles are produced in gram quantities via digestive ripening. This process involves mixing of separately prepared colloids of pure Au and pure Ag or Cu particles and then heating in the presence of an alkanethiol under reflux. The result after 1 h is alloy nanoparticles. Particles synthesized according to this procedure were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, EDX analysis, and high-resolution electron microscopy, the results of which confirm the formation of alloy particles. The particles of 5.6+/-0.5 nm diameter for Au/Ag and 4.8+/-1.0 nm diameter for Cu/Au undergo facile self-assembly to form 3-D superlattice ordering. It appears that during this digestive ripening process, the organic ligands display an extraordinary chemistry in which atom transfer between atomically pure copper, silver, and gold metal nanoparticles yields monodisperse alloy nanoparticles.

  4. Intermetallic compounds, copper and palladium alloys in Au-Pd ore of the Skaergaard pluton, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudashevsky, N. S.; Rudashevsky, V. N.; Nielsen, T. F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Copper-palladium intermetallic compounds and alloys (2314 grains) from the Au-Pd ore of the Skaergaard layered gabbroic pluton have been studied. Skaergaardite PdCu, nielsenite PdCu3, (Cu,Pd)β, (Cu,Pd)α, (Pd,Cu,Au,Pt) alloys, and native palladium have been identified as a result of 1680 microprobe analyses. The average compositions and various chemical varieties of these minerals are characterized, as well as vertical and lateral zoning in distribution of noble metals. The primary Pd-Cu alloys were formed within a wide temperature interval broadly synchronously with cooling and crystallization of host gabbro and in close association with separation of Fe-Cu sulfide liquid. In the course of crystallization of residual gabbroic melt enriched in iron, noble and heavy metals and saturated with the supercritical aqueous fluid, PGE and Au are selectively concentrated in the Fe-Cu sulfide phase as Pd-Cu and Cu-Au alloys.

  5. Biocidal Efficacy of Copper Alloys against Pathogenic Enterococci Involves Degradation of Genomic and Plasmid DNAs ▿

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, S. L.; Green, S. M.; Michels, H. T.; Keevil, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing incidence of nosocomial infections caused by glycopeptide-resistant enterococci is a global concern. Enterococcal species are also difficult to eradicate with existing cleaning regimens; they can survive for long periods on surfaces, thus contributing to cases of reinfection and spread of antibiotic-resistant strains. We have investigated the potential use of copper alloys as bactericidal surfaces. Clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were inoculated onto copper alloy and stainless steel surfaces. Samples were assessed for the presence of viable cells by conventional culture, detection of actively respiring cells, and assessment of cell membrane integrity. Both species survived for up to several weeks on stainless steel. However, no viable cells were detected on any alloys following exposure for 1 h at an inoculum concentration of ≤104 CFU/cm2. Analysis of genomic and plasmid DNA from bacterial cells recovered from metal surfaces indicates substantial disintegration of the DNA following exposure to copper surfaces that is not evident in cells recovered from stainless steel. The DNA fragmentation is so extensive, and coupled with the rapid cell death which occurs on copper surfaces, that it suggests that mutation is less likely to occur. It is therefore highly unlikely that genetic information can be transferred to receptive organisms recontaminating the same area. A combination of effective cleaning regimens and contact surfaces containing copper could be useful not only to prevent the spread of viable pathogenic enterococci but also to mitigate against the occurrence of potential resistance to copper, biocides, or antibiotics and the spread of genetic determinants of resistance to other species. PMID:20581191

  6. On Heat-Treatable Copper-Chromium Alloy, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, S.; Isono, E.

    1984-01-01

    A mother alloy of 10% Cr and 90% Cu was prepared by sintering. This was alloyed with the Cu melt and Cu-Cr alloys containing about 0.5% Cr was obtained. These alloys could be deformed easily in both the hot and cold states. By measuring the hardness change, age-hardening properties of cast alloys were studied, which were quenched from 950 deg and aged at 300 to 700 deg for 1 hour. The maximum hardness was obtained with the tempering temperature of 500 deg. For the temperature of solution-treatment, 950 deg was insufficient and that above 1000 deg necessary. For the tempering time, a treatment at 500 deg for 1 hr. or at 450 deg for 3 hrs. yielded the maximum hardness. As for the properties for electrical conductors, 3 kinds of wires (diam. 2 mm.) were made: (1) after cold-drawn to 2 mm., solution-treated, quenched, and then tempered (500 deg, 1 hr.); (2) after quenching, cold-drawn (75% reduction) to 2 mm. and tempered (500 deg, 1 hr.); and (3) after quenching, cold-drawn (81%) to intermediate diameter, tempered (500 deg, 1 hr.) and then cold-drawn (88%) again. Properties obtained for the 3 kinds, respectively, were as follows: conductivity 91, 90, and 86%. Tensile strength and strength for electrical conductivity are given.

  7. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  8. Fabrication of the supersaturated solid solution of carbon in copper by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xueran; Liu Yongbing; Ran Xu; An Jian; Cao Zhanyi . E-mail: caozy@jlu.edu.cn

    2007-06-15

    Mechanical alloying of powder mixtures of copper and graphite was performed in a high energy ball mill. The as-milled powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. These investigations indicated that high energy ball milling could largely extend the solid solubility of carbon in copper and the 4 wt.% C was dissolved in Cu. It was ascribed to the decrease of the grain size and the increase of the lattice strain. Nanostructures, amorphous carbon and lamellar graphite were observed in the as-milled powder after milling for 24 h.

  9. Microstructure and segregation behavior of palladium in silver-copper-palladium alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, K I; Lin, J H; Ju, C P

    1996-07-01

    It has been reported that the addition of palladium can modify the microstructure and improve the properties of Ag-Cu eutectic alloy as well as admixed Cu-rich amalgam. The purpose of this work was to study the microstructure and segregation behavior of palladium in a series of Ag-Cu-Pd alloys. All microstructural and microchemical results consistently indicated a strong tendency for palladium to form the ordered Cu3Pd superlattice in the copper-rich phase of the present ternary alloys. Transmission electron microscopic examination indicated that, in addition to the large Cu-rich particles, numerous small (typically tens of nanometers) Cu-rich particles were distributed in the Ag-rich phase. In the alloys containing 10 and 15 wt% Pd, the Cu3Pd superlattice had an L1(2)-type crystal structure. In the alloy containing 20 wt% Pd, the Cu3Pd had a periodic (regular) APB structure. The solubility of palladium in the Cu-rich phase was always much larger than that in the Ag-rich phase. The ratio of the palladium concentration in the copper-rich phase to that in the silver-rich phase decreased with the overall palladium content.

  10. Characterization of copper-cementite nanocomposite produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.A. . E-mail: pac@ist.utl.pt; Fonseca, I.; Marques, M.T.; Correia, J.B.; Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    2005-02-01

    A copper-iron carbide nanocomposite has been synthesized by high-energy milling of elemental powders (Cu{sub 69}-Fe{sub 23}-C{sub 8}), followed by annealing at 873 K. Phase identification and microstructure characterization have been carried out by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The carbide phase found in the as-milled material has been identified as Fe{sub 3}C and/or Fe{sub 7}C{sub 3}, but clearly only Fe{sub 3}C was present after annealing. Overall, grain sizes ranged from 10 to 50 nm in the as-milled condition and from 30 to 160 nm after annealing, with the carbide phase presenting a higher growth rate than copper. Stacking faults and a dispersion of Cu nanoparticles (5-10 nm) have been detected in annealed cementite while copper grains exhibited twins on (1 1 1) planes. Cementite growth could be evaluated in terms of precipitate growth theory. The remarkable thermal stability of the copper matrix is proposed to be related to solute drag effects.

  11. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I.; Xu, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 µm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 µm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  12. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I; Xu, J J

    2009-02-18

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 microm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 microm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  13. Aerospace applications of advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Langenbeck, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced metallic materials within the Al-base family are being developed for applications on current and future aerospace vehicles. These advanced materials offer significant improvements in density, strength, stiffness, fracture resistance, and/or higher use temperature which translates into improved vehicle performance. Aerospace applications of advanced metallic materials include space structures, fighters, military and commercial transport aircraft, and missiles. Structural design requirements, including not only static and durability/damage tolerance criteria but also environmental considerations, drive material selections. Often trade-offs must be made regarding strength, fracture resistance, cost, reliability, and maintainability in order to select the optimum material for a specific application. These trade studies not only include various metallic materials but also many times include advanced composite materials. Details of material comparisons, aerospace applications, and material trades will be presented.

  14. NEW SERDP Project: Copper- Beryllium Alternatives Alloys Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-10

    Eric Fodran Northrop Grumman Corporation Solidification and phase transformation, metallics processing, and system integration Dr. Abhijeet Misra...short in performance. • Computational toolset available to evaluate this class of alloys for further optimization to attain required properties...Considerable evaluation previously conducted via previously executed programs. • Materials investigated included Al-bronze, Cu-Sn-Ni, Co-Cr-Mo

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of serum nitrite and nitrate by copper-cadmium alloy.

    PubMed

    Sastry, K V H; Moudgal, R P; Mohan, J; Tyagi, J S; Rao, G S

    2002-07-01

    A macro and micro assay for the spectrophotometric determination of serum nitrite and nitrate was developed. Nitrite/nitrate in biological samples can be estimated in a single step by this method. The principle of the assay is the reduction of nitrate by copper-cadmium alloy, followed by color development with Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-naphthylethylenediamine) in acidic medium. This assay is sensitive to 1 microM nitrate and is suitable for different biological fluids, including sera with a high lipid concentration. The copper-cadmium alloy used in the present method is easy to prepare and can completely reduce nitrate to nitrite in an hour. The present method provides a simple, cost-effective assay for the estimation of stable oxidation products of nitric oxide in biological samples.

  16. Development of strength and conductivity in deformation processed copper base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Insoo, M.

    1992-07-20

    Deformation processed copper based composite alloys have been recently investigated. In these composite alloys, copper, a matrix material, contributes to a high thermal and electrical conductivity, and a second phase material such as Fe, Nb, Cr, Mo, Ta and W acts as a reinforcement of the strength of the composites. Tungsten was chosen as the bcc phase in the first experiment because W has a high melting temperature which is expected to reduce the decrease in high temperature strength resulting from coarsening of fibers. However, brittleness of tungsten may bring crack problems. Because the matrix is ductile but the second phase is hard enough to resist the external forces, cracks may occur at the interfaces between deformed matrix and undeformed second phase. The purpose of the first experiment is to investigate the possibility of deformation of Cu-W compacts.

  17. Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Falsey, John

    2005-01-01

    The powder metallurgy disk alloy LSHR was designed with a relatively low gamma precipitate solvus temperature and high refractory element content to allow versatile heat treatment processing combined with high tensile, creep and fatigue properties. Grain size can be chiefly controlled through proper selection of solution heat treatment temperatures relative to the gamma precipitate solvus temperature. However, forging process conditions can also significantly influence solution heat treatment-grain size response. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the relationships between forging process conditions and the eventual grain size of solution heat treated material. A series of forging experiments were performed with subsequent subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments, in search of suitable forging conditions for producing uniform fine grain and coarse grain microstructures. Subsolvus, supersolvus, and combined subsolvus plus supersolvus heat treatments were then applied. Forging and subsequent heat treatment conditions were identified allowing uniform fine and coarse grain microstructures.

  18. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  19. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  20. Selective separation of copper over solder alloy from waste printed circuit boards leach solution.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Maryam; Sattari, Anahita; Alamdari, Eskandar Keshavarz; Firozi, Sadegh

    2017-02-01

    The printed circuit boards (PCBs) from electronic waste are important resource, since the PCBs contain precious metals such as gold, copper, tin, silver, platinum and so forth. In addition to the economic point of view, the presence of lead turns this scrap into dangerous to environment. This study was conducted as part of the development of a novel process for selective recovery of copper over tin and lead from printed circuit boards by HBF4 leaching. In previous study, Copper with solder alloy was associated, simultaneously were leached in HBF4 solution using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant at room temperature. The objective of this study is the separation of copper from tin and lead from Fluoroborate media using CP-150 as an extractant. The influence of organic solvent's concentration, pH, temperature and A/O phase ratio was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism and the composition of the extracted species have been determined. The separation factors for these metals using this agent are reported, while efficient methods for separation of Cu (II) from other metal ions are proposed. The treatment of leach liquor for solvent extraction of copper with CP-150 revealed that 20% CP-150 in kerosene, a 30min period of contact time, and a pH of 3 were sufficient for the extraction of Cu(II) and 99.99% copper was recovered from the leached solution.

  1. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  2. An x-ray study of shock-loaded internally oxidized copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Teslenko, T.S.

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the microstresses in the initial internally oxidized specimens from the broadening of the copper diffraction lines. X-ray examination of a multiphase alloy has an advantage over microhardness measurement in that one can determine the microstress level independently for each phase, and without altering it during the measurements. The widths of the x-ray diffraction lines for copper were measured with a DRON-1 diffractometer. The line broadening for the copper matrix was determined at distances from the loading surface where the pressures were 330, 280, and 210 kbar. It is concluded that although microhardness and line broadening methods usually give similar relationships for a single-phase metal, they are sensitive to different features of the structure, so it is desirable to use x-ray methods in examining the causes of hardening in multiphase materials.

  3. Method For Creating Corrosion Resistant Surface On An Aluminum Copper Alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Wang, You; Lin, Simon H.

    1997-06-03

    A method for treating the surface of aluminum alloys hang a relatively high copper content is provided which includes the steps of removing substantially all of the copper from the surface, contacting the surface with a first solution containing cerium, electrically charging the surface while contacting the surface in an aqueous molybdate solution, and contacting the surface with a second solution containing cerium. The copper is substantially removed from the surface in the first step either by (i) contacting the surface with an acidic chromate solution or by (ii) contacting the surface with an acidic nitrate solution while subjecting the surface to an electric potential. The corrosion-resistant surface resulting from the invention is excellent, consistent and uniform throughout the surface. Surfaces treated by the invention may often be certified for use in salt-water services.

  4. The characterization of copper alloys for the application of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, S.; Fukaya, K.; Eto, M.; Akiba, M.

    1995-12-31

    Three kinds of candidate copper alloys for divertor structural materials of fusion experimental reactors, that is, Oxygen Free High thermal conductivity Copper (OFHC), alumina disperse reinforced copper (DSC) and the composite of W and Cu (W/Cu), were prepared for strength and fatigue tests at temperatures ranging from R.T. to 500 C in a vacuum. High temperature strength of DSC and W/Cu with rapid fracture after peak loading at the temperatures is higher than that of OFHC by factor of 2, but fracture strains of DFC and W/Cu are smaller than that of OFHC. Fatigue life of DSC, which shows the same fatigue behavior of OFHC at room temperature, is longer than other materials at 400 C. Remarkable fatigue life reduction of OFHC found in this experiment is to be due to recrystallization of OFHC yielded above 400 C.

  5. Initial aging phenomena in copper-chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, H.; Motohiro, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of quenching and aging temperatures on the initial aging curves of Cu-Cr alloy were examined mainly by means of electrical resistivity measurements. Three Cu-Cr alloy specimens having 0.24, 0.74, and 1.0% Cr were solution-treated at 950-1050 C, quenched into ice-water, and subsequently aged at 300-500 C. The results were as follows: (1) At the very early stage of aging (within about 30 sec), an abrupt decrease of resistivity with lowering aging tempratures. (T sub A) and rising solution temperatures (T sub S) was observed at (T sub A) up to about 400 C. In contrast, a transient increase of resistivity with rising T sub A and lowering T sub S was observed at T sub A from about 450 to 500 C. These phenomena seem to be caused by a rapid formation of solute clusters and the reversion of clusters formed during quenching, which are enhanced by quenched-in vacancies, respectively. (2) The amount of precipitation increased at the latter stage of aging with rising T sub S and T sub A as generally expected, where T sub S was not so high as to form secondary defects. (3) As a result, the initial aging phenomena in Cr-Cr alloy were revealed to be complicated against expectations. This was considered to be due to the migration energy of vacancies so larger in Cu-base.

  6. Grain refinement of permanent mold cast copper base alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, M.; Thomson, J. P.; Elboujdaini, M.; Gu, G. Ping; Sahoo, M.

    2004-04-29

    Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys

  7. Recent advances in alloy design of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys for structural use

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; George, E.P.

    1996-12-31

    This is a comprehensive review of recent advances in R&D of Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys for structural use at elevated temperatures in hostile environments. Recent studies indicate that polycrystalline Ni{sub 3}Al is intrinsically quite ductile at ambient temperatures, and its poor tensile ductility and brittle grain-boundary fracture are caused mainly by moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement when the aluminide is tested in moisture- or hydrogen-containing environments. Tensile ductility is improved by alloying with substitutional and interstitial elements. Among these additives, B is most effective in suppressing environmental embrittlement and enhancing grain-boundary cohesion, resulting in a dramatic increase of tensile ductility at room temperature. Both B-doped and B-free Ni{sub 3}Al alloys exhibit brittle intergranular fracture and low ductility at intermediate temperatures (300-850 C) because of oxygen-induced embrittlement in oxidizing environments. Cr is found to be most effective in alleviating elevated-temperature embrittlement. Parallel efforts on alloy development using physical metallurgy principles have led to development of several Ni{sub 3}Al alloys for industrial use. The unique properties of these alloys are briefly discussed. 56 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. Advances of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles synthesized via chemical reduction route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kim Seah; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-04-01

    Silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) nanoparticles have shown great potential in variety applications due to their excellent electrical and thermal properties resulting high demand in the market. Decreasing in size to nanometer scale has shown distinct improvement in these inherent properties due to larger surface-to-volume ratio. Ag and Cu nanoparticles are also shown higher surface reactivity, and therefore being used to improve interfacial and catalytic process. Their melting points have also dramatically decreased compared with bulk and thus can be processed at relatively low temperature. Besides, regularly alloying Ag into Cu to create Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles could be used to improve fast oxidizing property of Cu nanoparticles. There are varieties methods have been reported on the synthesis of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles. This review aims to cover chemical reduction means for synthesis of those nanoparticles. Advances of this technique utilizing different reagents namely metal salt precursors, reducing agents, and stabilizers, as well as their effects on respective nanoparticles have been systematically reviewed. Other parameters such as pH and temperature that have been considered as an important factor influencing the quality of those nanoparticles have also been reviewed thoroughly.

  9. Advanced Tribological Coatings for High Specific Strength Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-29

    Hard Anodised 4 HSSA12 (SHT) Plasma Nitrided 1 HSSA13 (H&G) Plasma Nitrided 2 HSSA14 (SHT) High Temperature Nitrocarburized 1 HSSA15 (H&G) Nitrox 1...HSSA26 ( High Temperature Plasma Nitriding) has recently arrived, and is currently undergoing metallographic examination. The remaining samples are still...Report No 3789/607 Advanced Tribological Coatings For High Specific Strength Alloys, R&D 5876-MS-01 Contract DAJ A45-87-C-0044 5th Interim Report

  10. Hydrogen-environment-assisted cracking of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium(copper) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, George Aloysius, Jr.

    There is strong evidence to indicate that hydrogen embrittlement plays a significant, if not controlling, role in the environmentally assisted cracking of 7XXX series aluminum alloys. In order to better understand hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC), crack growth rate tests in the K-independent stage II crack growth regime were conducted on fracture mechanics specimens of an Al-6.09Zn-2.14Mg-2.19Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant (Al-6.87Zn-2.65Mg-0.06Cu). Crack growth rate tests were performed in 90% relative humidity (RH) air between 25 and 90°C to assure hydrogen embrittlement control. The underaged, peak aged, and overaged tempers were investigated. Hydrogen uptake in humid air, hydrogen diffusion, and hydrogen trapping were investigated for each temper. Lastly, near crack tip hydrogen concentration depth profiles were analyzed via nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) using a liquid gallium, focused ion beam sputtering source (FIB/SIMS). The results of this study help explain and quantify empirically known trends concerning HEAC resistance and also establish new findings. In the copper bearing alloy, overaged tempers are more resistant but not immune to HEAC. Humid air is an aggressive environment for Al-Zn-Mg alloys because water vapor reacts with bare aluminum to produce high surface concentrations of hydrogen. This occurs in all tempers. Hydrogen diffuses from the near surface region to the high triaxial stress region ahead of the crack tip and collects at the high angle grain boundaries. The combination of tensile stress and high hydrogen concentration at the grain boundaries then causes intergranular fracture. Crack extension bares fresh metal and the process of hydrogen production, uptake, diffusion to the stressed grain boundary, and crack extension repeats. One reason increased degree of aging improves HEAC resistance in copper bearing 7XXX series alloys is that volume lattice and effective

  11. Silver-copper alloy nanoparticles for metal enhanced luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sanchari; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.; Sen, Rajan

    2009-09-01

    Large metal enhanced luminescence was realized at the vicinity of easily fabricated Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles upon tuning of their surface plasmon resonance spectra by changing only one experimental variable—the annealing temperature, for maximum spectral overlap with the emission and excitation spectra of the luminophores. We observed strong emission enhancement of luminophores (141.48±19.20 times for Alexa Fluor 488 and 23.91±12.37 times for Alexa Fluor 594) at the vicinity of these Ag-Cu nanoparticles, which is significantly larger than for pure Ag nanoparticles. We present theoretical calculations to provide insights into these experimental findings.

  12. The effects of test temperature, temper, and alloyed copper on the hydrogen-controlled crack growth rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, George A.; Scully, John R.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogen-environment embrittlement (HEE)-controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt pct Zn, 2.14 wt pct Mg, and 2.19 wt pct Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged (UA), peak-aged (PA), and overaged (OA) conditions were tested in 90 pct relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 °C and 90 °C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from UA to OA) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal-copper and low-copper alloys, the fracture path was predominately intergranular at all test temperatures (25 °C to 90 °C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II HEE crack growth rates for normal- (2.19 wt pct) and low- (0.06 wt pct) copper alloys in the peak PA aged and OA tempers showed a beneficial effect of copper additions on the stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt pct copper alloy, the significant decrease (˜10 times at 25 °C) in the stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. In the 0.06 wt pct copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor ( v 0), resulting in a modest (˜2.5 times at 25 °C) decrease in the crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II HEE crack growth rates. The OA, copper-bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen-environment-assisted cracking, but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

  13. The effects of test temperature, temper, and alloyed copper on the hydrogen-controlled crack growth rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, George A.; Scully, John R.

    2002-04-01

    The hydrogen-environment embrittlement (HEE)-controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt pct Zn, 2.14 wt pct Mg, and 2.19 wt pct Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged (UA), peak-aged (PA), and overaged (OA) conditions were tested in 90 pct relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 °C and 90 °C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from UA to OA) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal-copper and low-copper alloys, the fracture path was predominately intergranular at all test temperatures (25 °C to 90 °C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II HEE crack growth rates for normal- (2.19 wt pct) and low- (0.06 wt pct) copper alloys in the peak PA aged and OA tempers showed a beneficial effect of copper additions on the stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt pct copper alloy, the significant decrease (˜10 times at 25 °C) in the stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. In the 0.06 wt pct copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor ( v 0), resulting in a modest (˜2.5 times at 25 °C) decrease in the crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II HEE crack growth rates. The OA, copper-bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen-environment-assisted cracking, but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

  14. Antimicrobial copper alloy surfaces are effective against vegetative but not sporulated cells of gram-positive Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    San, Kaungmyat; Long, Janet; Michels, Corinne A; Gadura, Nidhi

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the role of membrane phospholipid peroxidation in the copper alloy mediated contact killing of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterial species. We found that B. subtilis endospores exhibited significant resistance to copper alloy surface killing but vegetative cells were highly sensitive to copper surface exposure. Cell death and lipid peroxidation occurred in B. subtilis upon copper alloy surface exposure. In a sporulation-defective strain carrying a deletion of almost the entire SpoIIA operon, lipid peroxidation directly correlated with cell death. Moreover, killing and lipid peroxidation initiated immediately and at a constant rate upon exposure to the copper surface without the delay observed previously in E. coli. These findings support the hypothesis that membrane lipid peroxidation is the initiating event causing copper surface induced cell death of B. subtilis vegetative cells. The findings suggest that the observed differences in the kinetics of copper-induced killing compared to E. coli result from differences in cell envelop structure. As demonstrated in E. coli, DNA degradation was shown to be a secondary effect of copper exposure in a B. subtilis sporulation-defective strain.

  15. Antimicrobial copper alloy surfaces are effective against vegetative but not sporulated cells of gram-positive Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    San, Kaungmyat; Long, Janet; Michels, Corinne A; Gadura, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the role of membrane phospholipid peroxidation in the copper alloy mediated contact killing of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterial species. We found that B. subtilis endospores exhibited significant resistance to copper alloy surface killing but vegetative cells were highly sensitive to copper surface exposure. Cell death and lipid peroxidation occurred in B. subtilis upon copper alloy surface exposure. In a sporulation-defective strain carrying a deletion of almost the entire SpoIIA operon, lipid peroxidation directly correlated with cell death. Moreover, killing and lipid peroxidation initiated immediately and at a constant rate upon exposure to the copper surface without the delay observed previously in E. coli. These findings support the hypothesis that membrane lipid peroxidation is the initiating event causing copper surface induced cell death of B. subtilis vegetative cells. The findings suggest that the observed differences in the kinetics of copper-induced killing compared to E. coli result from differences in cell envelop structure. As demonstrated in E. coli, DNA degradation was shown to be a secondary effect of copper exposure in a B. subtilis sporulation-defective strain. PMID:26185055

  16. TEM Examination of Advanced Alloys Irradiated in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan, PhD

    2007-09-01

    Successful development of materials is critical to the deployment of advanced nuclear power systems. Irradiation studies of candidate materials play a vital role for better understanding materials performance under various irradiation environments of advanced system designs. In many cases, new classes of materials have to be investigated to meet the requirements of these advanced systems. For applications in the temperature range of 500 800ºC which is relevant to the fast neutron spectrum burner reactors for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and ferritic martensitic steels (e.g., MA957 and others) are candidates for advanced cladding materials. In the low temperature regions of the core (<600ºC), alloy 800H, HCM12A (also called T 122) and HT 9 have been considered.

  17. The effect of copper, chromium, and zirconium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of the systematic variation of copper, chromium, and zirconium contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 7000-type aluminum alloy. Fracture toughness and tensile properties are evaluated for each alloy in both the peak aging, T8, and the overaging, T73, conditions. Results show that dimpled rupture essentially characterize the fracture process in these alloys. In the T8 condition, a significant loss of toughness is observed for alloys containing 2.5 pct Cu due to the increase in the quantity of Al-Cu-Mg-rich S-phase particles. An examination of T8 alloys at constant Cu levels shows that Zr-bearing alloys exhibit higher strength and toughness than the Cr-bearing alloys. In the T73 condition, Cr-bearing alloys are inherently tougher than Zr-bearing alloys. A void nucleation and growth mechanism accounts for the loss of toughness in these alloys with increasing copper content.

  18. Alloy development for the enhanced stability of Omega precipitates in aluminum-copper-magnesium-(silver) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gable, Brian M.

    This research involved a combined analytical and experimental approach to the design of an age-hardenable Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy for moderate temperature application. The applied methodology involved the complimentary techniques of thermal analysis, calculated phase diagrams, analytical microscopy and quantitative microstructural characterization. The objective of this research was to exploit several avenues for enhancing the coarsening resistance and thermal stability of the O phase through careful control of the alloy chemistry and processing. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with conventional and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were implemented to refine the calculation of the Al-rich corner of the quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag phase diagram for subsequent alloy development. Quantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) demonstrated that Ag preferentially partitioned to S-phase for all conditions investigated, which ultimately led to a concomitant loss of O precipitates. The elimination of S-phase precipitation and limiting the alloy Si content proved to enhance the nucleation and thermal stability of the O phase. Several O-dominated microstructures were manipulated through various thermo-mechanical processing techniques in order to evaluate the O nucleation density, particle size and thermal stability as a function of alloy composition and processing conditions. The long-term stability of O plates was found to coincide with high levels of Ag and moderate Mg additions, with the latter limiting the competition with S-phase precipitation. Several alloys were found to be dominated by O precipitation, which remained stable through long-term isothermal and double-aging heat treatments. This enhanced thermal stability of O plates is a significant improvement over the previous generation of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys in which O plates dissolved sacrificially at long aging times for moderate aging temperatures. The competitive microstructural

  19. The effect of nickel addition on antimicrobial, physical, and mechanical properties of copper-nickel alloy against suspensions of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayani, Dinni; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection can cause serious illness. Humans can be infected by E. coli via contact with the contaminated food and water. Copper and copper alloys were known for their antimicrobial properties and were applied in several healthcare setting as antimicrobial material. However, the people preference in the appearance of stainless steel and aluminum contribute to the low application of copper and its alloy. In this study, the mechanical, physical, and antibacterial properties of copper and copper-nickel alloy compared with stainless steel 304 were tested. The antibacterial activity of stainless steel, copper, and copper-nickel alloy was evaluated by inoculating 7.5 × 106 - 2.5 × 107 CFU/ml suspensions of E. coli. The bacterial colonies were investigated after 0-4 hour incubation at 37°C. The result showed that on the observation time, copper and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloys have antibacterial activity while the bacteria in stainless steel remain existed. The appearance (color / shade) of Cu-Ni alloys in some composition is silvery which is stainless steel-like. For the mechanical properties, copper-nickel alloys have lower hardness than stainless steel (SS 304). This research proved that copper-nickel alloys have the ability to reduce the amount of E. col colonies. The copper content may affect the antibacterial activity but not directly linked. Cu-Ni alloys also have the appearance and mechanical properties that quite similar compared to SS304. Therefore, Cu-Ni alloys have the potential to be applied as substitution or complementary material of SS304 in various applications for preventing the bacterial contamination especially E. coli.

  20. The response of dispersion-strengthened copper alloys to high fluence neutron irradiation at 415 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Newkirk, J.W. ); Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Nadkarny, A.; Samal, P. )

    1992-06-01

    Various oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloys have been irradiated to 150 dpa at 415{degree}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} - strengthened GlidCop{trademark} alloys, followed closely by a HfO{sub 2} - strengthened alloy, displayed the best swelling resistance, electrical conductivity, and tensile properties. The conductivity of the HfO{sub 2} - strengthened alloy reached a plateau at the higher levels of irradiation, instead of exhibiting the steady decrease in conductivity observed in the other alloys. A high initial oxygen content resulted in significantly higher swelling for a series of castable oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys, while a Cr{sub 2}0{sub 3} - strengthened alloy showed poor resistance to radiation.

  1. The response of dispersion-strengthened copper alloys to high fluence neutron irradiation at 415{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Newkirk, J.W.; Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Nadkarny, A.; Samal, P.

    1992-06-01

    Various oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloys have been irradiated to 150 dpa at 415{degree}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} - strengthened GlidCop{trademark} alloys, followed closely by a HfO{sub 2} - strengthened alloy, displayed the best swelling resistance, electrical conductivity, and tensile properties. The conductivity of the HfO{sub 2} - strengthened alloy reached a plateau at the higher levels of irradiation, instead of exhibiting the steady decrease in conductivity observed in the other alloys. A high initial oxygen content resulted in significantly higher swelling for a series of castable oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys, while a Cr{sub 2}0{sub 3} - strengthened alloy showed poor resistance to radiation.

  2. Russian aluminum-lithium alloys for advanced reusable spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charette, Ray O.; Leonard, Bruce G.; Bozich, William F.; Deamer, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Cryotanks that are cost-affordable, robust, fuel-compatible, and lighter weight than current aluminum design are needed to support next-generation launch system performance and operability goals. The Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-MDA) and NASA's Delta Clipper-Experimental Program (DC-XA) flight demonstrator test bed vehicle provided the opportunity for technology transfer of Russia's extensive experience base with weight-efficient, highly weldable aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys for cryogenic tank usage. As part of NASA's overall reusable launch vehicle (RLV) program to help provide technology and operations data for use in advanced RLVs, MDA contracted with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS/IMASH) for design, test, and delivery of 1460 Al-Li alloy liquid oxygen (LO2) cryotanks: one for development, one for ground tests, and one for DC-XA flight tests. This paper describes the development of Al-Li 1460 alloy for reusable LO2 tanks, including alloy composition tailoring, mechanical properties database, forming, welding, chemical milling, dissimilar metal joining, corrosion protection, completed tanks proof, and qualification testing. Mechanical properties of the parent and welded materials exceeded expectations, particularly the fracture toughness, which promise excellent reuse potential. The LO2 cryotank was successfully demonstrated in DC-XA flight tests.

  3. Nucleation, wetting and agglomeration of copper and copper-alloy thin films on metal liner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBarbera, Stephanie Florence

    One of the key challenges in fabricating narrower and higher aspect ratio interconnects using damascene technology has been achieving an ultra-thin (˜2 nm) and continuous Cu seed coverage on trench sidewalls. The thin seed is prone to agglomeration because of poor Cu wetting on the Ta liner. Using in-situ conductance measurements, the effect of lowering the substrate temperature during Cu seed deposition has been studied on tantalum (Ta) and ruthenium (Ru) liner surfaces. On a Ta surface, it was found that lowering the deposition temperature to --65°C increases the nucleation rate of the Cu thin film, and reduces the minimum coalescing thickness for Cu on Ta liner from ˜4.5 nm (at room temperature) to ˜2 nm. On a Ru surface, Cu coalesces at < 1 nm at room temperature, and no further reduction in initial coalescing thickness was found at low temperature. For the Cu seed deposited at --65°C on a Ta liner on trench sidewalls, extensive thermal stress-induced grain growth was observed during warming up to room temperature. No grain growth was observed in the seed layer deposited at low temperatures on a Ru liner. Small feature size and high current densities make electromigration an important concern for on-chip Cu interconnects. Cu-alloy seeds or Cu-alloy interconnects are therefore needed for future technology. The wetting angle, coalescing thickness, and agglomeration resistance of thin Cu-3% Au, Cu-3% Mn, and Cu-3% Al layers on a Ta liner surface have been studied. It was found that the alloying increases the wetting angle of Cu on Ta at high temperature, as a result of either reduction in Cu alloy surface energy, solute surface segregation, or solute-liner interactions. In addition, the Cu alloys were found to be less agglomeration resistive as compared to pure Cu; their smaller grain size, interaction with the liner surface, and tendency to oxidize were found to accelerate their agglomeration. The coalescing thickness of the Cu alloys was found to be reduced

  4. Tensile and electrical properties of high-strength high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1998-09-01

    Electrical conductivity and tensile properties have been measured on an extruded and annealed CuCrNb dispersion strengthened copper alloy which has been developed for demanding aerospace high heat flux applications. The properties of this alloy are somewhat inferior to GlidCop dispersion strengthened copper and prime-aged CuCrZr over the temperature range of 20--500 C. However, if the property degradation in CuCrZr due to joining operations and the anisotropic properties of GlidCop in the short transverse direction are taken into consideration, CuCrNb may be a suitable alternative material for high heat flux structural applications in fusion energy devices. The electrical conductivity and tensile properties of CuCrZr that was solution annealed and then simultaneously aged and diffusion bonded are also summarized. A severe reduction in tensile elongation is observed in the diffusion bonded joint, particularly if a thin copper shim is not placed in the diffusion bondline.

  5. Microscopic mechanisms contributing to the synchronous improvement of strength and plasticity (SISP) for TWIP copper alloys

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R.; Zhang, Z. J.; Li, L. L.; An, X. H.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the concept of “twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) alloys” is broadened, and the underlying intrinsic microscopic mechanisms of the general TWIP effect are intensively explored. For the first aspect, “TWIP copper alloys” was proposed following the concept of “TWIP steels”, as they share essentially the same strengthening and toughening mechanisms. For the second aspect, three intrinsic features of twinning: i.e. “dynamic development”, “planarity”, as well as “orientation selectivity” were derived from the detailed exploration of the deformation behavior in TWIP copper alloys. These features can be considered the microscopic essences of the general “TWIP effect”. Moreover, the effective cooperation between deformation twinning and dislocation slipping in TWIP copper alloys leads to a desirable tendency: the synchronous improvement of strength and plasticity (SISP). This breakthrough against the traditional trade-off relationship, achieved by the general “TWIP effect”, may provide useful strategies for designing high-performance engineering materials. PMID:25828192

  6. Electrochemical properties of silver-copper alloy microelectrodes for use in voltammetric field apparatus.

    PubMed

    Skogvold, Silje M; Mikkelsen, Oyvind; Billon, Gabriel; Garnier, Cedric; Lesven, Ludovic; Barthe, Jean-Francois

    2006-04-01

    Microelectrodes of silver-copper alloys have been evaluated for use in voltammetric analyses. Increased overpotential towards the hydrogen overvoltage reaction (HER) was found as a function of increased copper content in the silver. A study of oxidizing products by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in NaOH solution showed ten anodic and eight cathodic peaks which are described in the present paper. The behaviour of these alloy electrodes is somewhere between pure silver and pure copper electrodes. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) was used to measure zinc, cadmium and lead in ultrapure water only (18 MOmegacm), and good linearity was found for all metals (r (2)=0.998) in the range of 0.5 to 5 ppb with a 600- to 1,200-s plating time. It was additionally found that cadmium and lead were better separated on the alloy electrodes compared to pure silver electrodes. Measurements of nickel were carried out on alloy electrodes by use of adsorptive differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (Ad-DPCSV), and good linearity (r (2)=1.000) was found in the range from 0.5 to 5 ppb with an adsorption time of 120 s. The alloy electrodes were also found to be sensitive to nitrate, and good linearity (r (2)=0.997) was found in the range from 1 mg L(-1) to 100 mg L(-1) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) scanning from -450 mV to -1,500 mV. Addition of nitrate in ultrapure water afforded two different peaks related to the successive reductions of nitrate and nitrite. In ammonium buffer solution (pH 8.6) only one peak resulting from reduction of nitrate was observed. Furthermore, the use of alloy electrodes containing 17% Cu was tested in real samples, by installing it in a voltammetric system for monitoring of zinc and lead in a polluted river, the river Deûle, near the town of Douai in northern France. Results were found to be in agreement with parallel measurements carried out by ICP-MS.

  7. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  8. Increasing the life of molds for casting copper and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. N.; Spiridonov, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    The work of the molds intended for casting copper and copper alloys in semicontinuous casters for producing flat billets is considered. It is shown that, to increase the resistance of mold plates, the inner space of the mold should have a taper shape toward the casting direction and take into account the shrinkage of the linear dimensions of the ingot during its motion in the mold. The taper shape increases the intensity and uniformity of heat removal due to close contact between the ingot and the mold inner surface. Testing of new design molds under industrial conditions demonstrates that their resistance increases by a factor of 4.0-4.5. The taper effect of the mold plates is much more pronounced in their narrow faces.

  9. Self-healing coatings based on halloysite clay polymer composites for protection of copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Abdullayev, Elshad; Abbasov, Vagif; Tursunbayeva, Asel; Portnov, Vasiliy; Ibrahimov, Hikmat; Mukhtarova, Gulbaniz; Lvov, Yuri

    2013-05-22

    Halloysite clay nanotubes loaded with corrosion inhibitors benzotriazole (BTA), 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI), and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) were used as additives in self-healing composite paint coating of copper. These inhibitors form protective films on the metal surface and mitigate corrosion. Mechanisms involved in the film formation have been studied with optical and electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrometry, and adhesivity tests. Efficiency of the halloysite lumen loading ascended in the order of BTA < MBT < MBI; consequently, MBI and MBT halloysite formulations have shown the best protection. Inhibitors were kept in the tubes buried in polymeric paint layer for a long time and release was enhanced in the coating defects exposed to humid media with 20-50 h, sufficient for formation of protective layer. Anticorrosive performance of the halloysite-based composite acrylic and polyurethane coatings have been demonstrated for 110-copper alloy strips exposed to 0.5 M aqueous NaCl for 6 months.

  10. Tensile and electrical properties of copper alloys irradiated in a fission reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Postirradiation electrical sensitivity and tensile measurements have been completed on pure copper and copper alloy sheet tensile specimens irradiated in the SM-2 reactor to doses of {approx}0.5 to 5 dpa and temperatures between {approx}80 and 400{degrees}C. Considerable radiation hardening and accompanying embrittlement was observed in all of the specimens at irradiation temperature below 200{degrees}C. The radiation-induced electrical conductivity degradation consisted of two main components: solid transmutation effects and radiation damage (defect cluster and particle dissolution) effects. The radiation damage component was nearly constant for the doses in this study, with a value of {approx}1.2n{Omega}m for pure copper and {approx}1.6n{Omega}m for dispersion strengthened copper irradiated at {approx}100{degrees}C. The solid transmutation component was proportional to the thermal neutron flux, and became larger than the radiation damage component for fluences larger than {approx}5 10{sup 24} n.m{sup 2}. The radiation hardening and electrical conductivity degradation decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and became negligible for temperatures above {approx}300{degrees}C.

  11. —Part I. Interaction of Calcium and Copper-Calcium Alloy with Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikov, Yurii P.; Batukhtin, Victor P.; Shurov, Nikolay I.; Ivanovskii, Leonid E.; Suzdaltsev, Andrey V.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the interaction between calcium and molten CaCl2 and the solubility of calcium in this melt, depending on the calcium content in the copper-calcium alloy that comes in contact with the molten CaCl2. The negative influence of the dissolved calcium on the current efficiency was verified. The negative effects of moisture and CaO impurities on the calcium current efficiency were demonstrated. The dependence of the current efficiency and the purity of the metal obtained by the electrolysis conditions were studied in a laboratory electrolyzer (20 to 80 A).

  12. Mechanisms of Corrosion of Copper-Nickel Alloys in Sulfide-Polluted Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    aerated seawater, but the major constituent is thought to be Cu2.362 7 Also varying amounts of Cu2 (OH) 3 C1, Cu(OH) 2 , CuO, CuCl 2 , Cu3 (OH) 2...Recommended Practice Gl-72 for copper alloy:), rinsed with methyl alcohol, rinsed with deionized water , and then dried in warm air. The snecimens were...solution used in this study contained 500 ml HCl, 100 ml H12S04, and water to make I liter. The mass loss from corrosion can be determined to within an

  13. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  14. Evaluation of thiouracil-based adhesive systems for bonding cast silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Miyuki; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Ishii, Takaya; Furuchi, Mika; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of adhesive systems based on a thiouracil monomer on bonding to silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy (Castwell M.C.12). Disk specimens were cast from the alloy and then air-abraded with alumina. The disks were bonded using six bonding systems selected from four primers and three luting materials. Shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling. Bond strength varied from 2.7 MPa to 32.0 MPa. Three systems based on a thiouracil monomer (MTU-6) showed durable bonding to the alloy, with post-thermocycling bond strengths of 22.4 MPa for the Metaltite (MTU-6) primer and Super-Bond, a tri-n-butylborane (TBB) initiated resin, 9.0 MPa for the Multi-Bond II resin, and 8.1 MPa for the Metaltite and Bistite II system. It can be concluded that a combination of thiouracil-based primer and TBB initiated resin is effective for bonding Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

  15. The Effect of Ferrous Sulfate on Sulfide-Induced Corrosion of Copper-Base Condenser Alloys in Aerated Seawater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    been further 8-16 enhanced by the addition of iron to the seawater. This iron has been introduced either through addition of ferrous sulfate or by...direct oxidation of an iron "waster piece" using an externally applied current. 6 North and Pryor conducted experiments on copper in sodium chloride... iron -containing surface films on copper alloys. 15 Gasparini, et al, built upon the work of North and Pryor by investigating the colloidal chemistry

  16. Extrusion of aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, T.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years the importance of extruded alloys has increased due to the decline in copper extrusion, increased use in structural applications, environmental impact and reduced energy consumption. There have also been huge technical advances. This text provides comprehensive coverage of the metallurgical, mathematical and practical features of the process. The contents include: continuum principles; metallurgical features affecting the extrusion of Al-alloys; extrusion processing; homogenization and extrusion conditions for specific alloys; processing of 6XXX alloys; plant utilization; Appendix A: specification of AA alloys and DIN equivalents; Appendix B: chemical compositions; and Appendix C: typical properties.

  17. Microstructures and properties of Al2O3 dispersion-strengthened copper alloys prepared through different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-qiao; Chen, Feng; Ye, Fu-xing; Zhang, Dong-ping; Cai, Yi-xiang

    2016-12-01

    Al2O3 dispersion copper alloy powder was prepared by internal oxidation, and three consolidation methods—high-velocity compaction (HVC), hot pressing (HP), and hot extrusion (HE)—were used to prepare Al2O3 dispersion-strengthened copper (Cu-Al2O3) alloys. The microstructures and properties of these alloys were investigated and compared. The results show that the alloys prepared by the HP and HE methods exhibited the coarsest and finest grain sizes, respectively. The alloy prepared by the HVC method exhibited the lowest relative density (98.3% vs. 99.5% for HP and 100% for HE), which resulted in the lowest electrical conductivity (81% IACS vs. 86% IACS for HP and 87% IACS for HE). However, this alloy also exhibited the highest hardness (77 HRB vs. 69 HRB for HP and 70 HRB for HE), the highest compressive strength (443 MPa vs. 386 MPa for HP and 378 MPa for HE), and the best hardness retention among the investigated alloys. The results illustrate that the alloy prepared by the HVC method exhibits high softening temperature and good mechanical properties at high temperatures, which imply long service life when used as spot-welding electrodes.

  18. Inactivation of Murine Norovirus on a Range of Copper Alloy Surfaces Is Accompanied by Loss of Capsid Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Summersgill, Emma N.; Keevil, C. William

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus is one of the most common causes of acute viral gastroenteritis. The virus is spread via the fecal-oral route, most commonly from infected food and water, but several outbreaks have originated from contamination of surfaces with infectious virus. In this study, a close surrogate of human norovirus causing gastrointestinal disease in mice, murine norovirus type 1 (MNV-1), retained infectivity for more than 2 weeks following contact with a range of surface materials, including Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ceramic tiles, glass, silicone rubber, and stainless steel. Persistence was slightly prolonged on ceramic surfaces. A previous study in our laboratory observed that dry copper and copper alloy surfaces rapidly inactivated MNV-1 and destroyed the viral genome. In this new study, we have observed that a relatively small change in the percentage of copper, between 70 and 80% in copper nickels and 60 and 70% in brasses, had a significant influence on the ability of the alloy to inactivate norovirus. Nickel alone did not affect virus, but zinc did have some antiviral effect, which was synergistic with copper and resulted in an increased efficacy of brasses with lower percentages of copper. Electron microscopy of purified MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and stainless steel surfaces suggested that a massive breakdown of the viral capsid had occurred on copper. In addition, MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and treated with RNase demonstrated a reduction in viral gene copy number. This suggests that capsid integrity is compromised upon contact with copper, allowing copper ion access to the viral genome. PMID:25452290

  19. Advanced austenitic alloys for fossil power systems. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Cole, N.C.; Canonico, D.A.; Henry, J.F.

    1998-08-01

    In 1993, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ABB Combustion Engineering t examine advanced alloys for fossil power systems. Specifically, the use of advanced austenitic stainless steels for superheater/reheater construction in supercritical boilers was examined. The strength of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels was reviewed and compared to the strength and ductility of advanced austenitic stainless steels. The advanced stainless steels were found to retain their strength to very long times at temperatures where cold-worked standard grades of austenitic stainless steels became weak. Further, the steels exhibited better long-time stability than the stabilized 300 series stainless steels in either the annealed or cold worked conditions. Type 304H mill-annealed tubing was provided to ORNL for testing of base metal and butt welds. The tubing was found to fall within range of expected strength for 304H stainless steel. The composite 304/308 stainless steel was found to be stronger than typical for the weldment. Boiler tubing was removed from a commercial boiler for replacement by newer steels, but restraints imposed by the boiler owners did not permit the installation of the advanced steels, so a standard 32 stainless steel was used as a replacement. The T91 removed from the boiler was characterized.

  20. Corrosion studies of a copper-beryllium alloy in a simulated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikam, Vaibhav V.; Reddy, Ramana G.

    Bipolar plates play an important role in the performance, and cost of fuel cell. The properties of copper-beryllium alloy were studied in simulated fuel cell environment. Corrosion studies of the alloy were carried out by using Tafel extrapolation, and potentiodynamic polarization plots at various temperatures. The conditions selected were 0.5 M H 2SO 4 with varying pH in the range of 3-5 and 5% (v/v) HCl + 5% (v/v) Na 2SO 4 with the bubbling of oxygen, and argon. The corrosion rate for the alloy was found to be 0.05, and 0.28 μm year -1 at 25 and 70 °C, respectively. A similar range of corrosion rates was reported in literature for other copper alloys. Due to their good corrosion resistance and high conductivity the alloy can be considered as a candidate material for bipolar plates. Use of copper alloy in bipolar plate will reduce the contact resistance in cell stack due to their high conductivity.

  1. Bactericidal activity of copper and niobium-alloyed austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Baena, M I; Márquez, M C; Matres, V; Botella, J; Ventosa, A

    2006-12-01

    Biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion are processes of material deterioration that originate from the attachment of microorganisms as quickly as the material is immersed in a nonsterile environment. Stainless steels, despite their wide use in different industries and as appliances and implant materials, do not possess inherent antimicrobial properties. Changes in hygiene legislation and increased public awareness of product quality makes it necessary to devise control methods that inhibit biofilm formation or to act at an early stage of the biofouling process and provide the release of antimicrobial compounds on a sustainable basis and at effective level. These antibacterial stainless steels may find a wide range of applications in fields, such as kitchen appliances, medical equipment, home electronics, and tools and hardware. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibacterial stainless steel and thus mitigate the microbial colonization and bacterial infection. Copper is known as an antibacterial agent; in contrast, niobium has been demonstrated to improve the antimicrobial effect of copper by stimulating the formation of precipitated copper particles and its distribution in the matrix of the stainless steel. Thus, we obtained slides of 3.8% copper and 0.1% niobium alloyed stainless steel; subjected them to three different heat treatment protocols (550 degrees C, 700 degrees C, and 800 degrees C for 100, 200, 300, and 400 hours); and determined their antimicrobial activities by using different initial bacterial cell densities and suspending solutions to apply the bacteria to the stainless steels. The bacterial strain used in these experiments was Escherichia coli CCM 4517. The best antimicrobial effects were observed in the slides of stainless steel treated at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C using an initial cell density of approximately 10(5) cells ml(-1) and phosphate-buffered saline as the solution in which the bacteria came into contact with

  2. L α X-Ray Emission Spectra of Copper Compounds and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1994-05-01

    With a two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with beryl crystals,the Cu Lα emission spectra in fluorescence have been measuredfor selected copper compounds Cu2O, CuO, CuCl, CuBr, CuI,CuF2, CuCl2, CuBr2, CuF2·2H2O,CuCl2·2H2O and Cu3P, and alloysα-Cu+35%Zn and Cu+2%Be. The measured spectra aregrouped into three classes. The first class comprises the spectraof alloys, which consist of a single broad band similar to thatof Cu metal. The second class includes the spectra of monovalentcopper compounds, which are composed of a prominent peak and itshigh- and low-energy structures. To the third class belong thespectra of divalent copper compounds, which consist of a strongpeak accompanied with a characteristic dip and hump on thehigh-energy side. The Cu Lα emission bands of Cu2O,CuCl and CuBr are compared with available XPS spectra andtheoretical Cu-3d-DOS.

  3. Surface topographic characterization for polyamide composite injection molds made of aluminum and copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A; Hernández, P; Martinez, J; Pérez, J A; Mathia, T G

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure flexibility and rapid new product development, the mold industry made use of soft materials for cavity inserts in injection molds. However, materials of this kind are prone to wear. This article analyzes the topographic characterization of the surface and wear processes in injection molds cavities. Two materials have been used to produce the cavities: aluminum alloy EN AW‐6082 T4 and copper alloy Cu Zn39 Pb3. The surface topography was measured with the use of optical interferometry profiling technology; roughness and surface parameters were determined according to ISO 4287, ISO 25178, and EUR 15178N. In order to complete this research, an experimental part with different thicknesses and shapes was designed, and cavity inserts of aluminum and copper were made. Polyamide PA6, with 30% fiberglass reinforcement, was employed in the experimental procedure. Measurements of cavity mold surfaces were performed after 9,200 cycles on each mold and at different locations on the mold. The surface measurement was made with a white light vertical scanning interferometry, also known as coherence scanning interferometry (ISO DIS 25178‐604). The results are analyzed and differences between the two types of cavity inserts materials are discussed.

  4. Direct production of nanostructured copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Apaydin, Ramazan Oguzhan; Ebin, Burcak; Gurmen, Sebahattin

    2013-12-16

    Copper-Nickel (CuNi) nanostructured alloy particles were produced by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Hydrogen Reduction Method (USP-HR) from high purity copper and nickel nitrate aqueous solutions. The effect of the precursor solution in the range of 0.1 and 0.5 mol/L on the morphology and crystallite size of CuNi nanoparticles were investigated under 2 h running time, 700 °C operating temperature and 0.5 L/min H{sub 2} flow rate. Particle size, morphology, composition and crystallite structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Particle characterization studies show that nanostructured alloy particles have cubic crystal structure and they are in submicron size range with spherical morphology. The crystallite sizes of the particles calculated with Scherrer formula are 40 and 34 nm and average particles sizes observed from the SEM images are 300 and 510 nm for each experiment respectively.

  5. Laser cladding of nickel-based alloy coatings on copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Rea, Edward; Deng, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The wear resistance of high-value copper components used in the metal casting, automotive, aerospace and electrical equipment industries can be improved by applying nickel (Ni)-based coatings through laser cladding. A high-power diode laser array providing continuous power levels up to 10 kilowatts with beam-shaping optics providing a rectangular focal region of various dimensions was used to deposit Ni-based alloy coatings with controlled thickness ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm in a single pass on copper (Cu) substrates. Slotted powder feeding plates with various discrete widths delivered uniform streams of powdered metal particles entrained in a carrier gas, matching the selected focal spot dimensions. To enhance laser beam coupling with the substrate and to avoid defects such as cracks, delamination and porosity, Cu substrates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C. The effect of heat input on microstructure of the cladding and extent of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Excessive heat input with longer interaction time increased dilution, porosity and expanded HAZ that significantly reduced the hardness of both the clad and the Cu substrates. Average microhardness of the Ni-C-B-Si-W alloy coating was 572 HV, which was almost 7 times greater than the hardness of the Cu substrate (84 HV).

  6. Examination of an alternative method for the pyrometallurgical production of copper-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenk, J.; Hassan-Pour, S.; Spiess, P.; Friedrich, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper an alternative to the usual route for the production of copper-chromium alloys by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) followed by Vacuum Arc Remelting (VAR) is investigated. Therefore the HIP is replaced by an aluminothermic reduction. As oxidizing agents for this aluminothermic reduction (ATR) chromium oxide (Cr2O3) and copper oxide (CuO) are used. These oxidants are mixed in a stoichiometric relation with aluminium (Al) to get the following aluminothermic reactions going: As ATRs always are exothermic reductions, it is important to control the heat output of the reaction. A common simplification for the heat calculation in the field of ATR is the “Shemshushny Factor” (Sh-Factor). This factor determines the rate of energy input per reactant mass: To avoid a secondary melt phase after ATR, inline casting is used to directly obtain vacuum arc remeltable electrodes out of the liquid melt of the ATR. The second part of this work deals with the remelting of these electrodes via VAR. The first VAR trials aim at finding process parameters for remelting a copper-chromium ingot. As demixing is to avoid, it is necessary to control process parameters within a small range to obtain a shallow melt pool.

  7. Facile synthesis of pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals and their plasmonic and catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong; Wang, You-Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zhantong; Liu, Gang; Zhou, Wei; Wen, Longping; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zeng, Jie; Hou, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of gold and copper is a good way to pull down the cost of gold and ameliorate the instability of copper. Through shape control, the synergy of these two metals can be better exploited. Here, we report an aqueous phase route to the synthesis of pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals with fivefold twinning, the size of which can be tuned in the range from 45 to 200 nm. The growth is found to start from a decahedral core, followed by protrusion of branches along twinning planes. Pentacle products display strong localized surface plasmon resonance peaks in the near-infrared region. Under irradiation by an 808-nm laser, 70-nm pentacle nanocrystals exhibit a notable photothermal effect to kill 4T1 murine breast tumours established on BALB/c mice. In addition, 70-nm pentacle nanocrystals show better catalytic activity than conventional citrate-coated 5-nm Au nanoparticles towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:24999674

  8. EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-21

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  9. Dissimilar laser welding of NiTi shape memory alloy and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z.; Panton, B.; Oliveira, J. P.; Han, A.; Zhou, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    This work is the first investigation of joining NiTi and copper. The successful Nd:YAG laser welding of NiTi to copper achieved in this work enables new methods of connecting shape memory alloys to electro-mechanical systems. Joints made with an optimum peak power of 2.2 kW accommodated pseudoelastic deformation of NiTi, proving their use with high strength actuators. Fracture occurred through the cross section of these defect-free joints. A lower peak power of 1.8 kW created weak joints with limited weld penetration of the copper sheet. This lack of bonding resulted in fracture occurring across the small disconnected joint areas. Joints made with a higher peak power of 2.6 kW had significant cracking in the fusion zone. Two regions of distinct Cu composition were found in the fusion zone, and cracking occurred at the interface between these regions because of their different physical properties. Failure initiated at this cracking and propagated through the fusion zone that had been embrittled by mixing with over 20 at.% Cu.

  10. In situ oxidation studies on /001/ copper-nickel alloy thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Rao, D. B.; Douglass, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies are reported of (001)-oriented single crystalline thin films of Cu-3%Ni, Cu-4.6%Ni, and Cu-50%Ni alloy which were prepared by vapor deposition onto (001) NaCl substrates and subsequently annealed at around 1100 K and oxidized at 725 K at low oxygen partial pressure. At all alloy concentrations, Cu2O and NiO nucleated and grew independently without the formation of mixed oxides. The shape and growth rates of Cu2O nuclei were similar to rates found earlier. For low-nickel alloy concentrations, the NiO nuclei were larger and the number density of NiO was less than that of Cu-50%Ni films for which the shape and growth rates of NiO were identical to those for pure nickel films. Phenomena involving a reduced induction period, surface precipitation, and through-thickness growth are also described. The results are consistent with previously established oxidation mechanisms for pure copper and pure nickel films.

  11. Rapid solidification of high-conductivity copper alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Theodore Atlas

    1989-01-01

    The main objective was to develop improved copper alloys of high strength and high thermal and electric conductivity. Chill block melt spinning was used to produce binary alloys of Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr, and ternary alloys of Cu-Cr-Ag. By quenching from the liquid state, up to 5 atomic percent of Cr and Zr were retained in metastable extended solid solution during the rapid solidification process. Eutectic solidification was avoided and the full strengthening benefits of the large volume fraction of precipitates were realized by subsequent aging treatment. The very low solid solubility of Cr and Zr in Cu result in a high conductivity Cu matrix strengthened by second phase precipitates. Tensile properties on as-cast and aged ribbons were measured at room and elevated temperatures. Precipitate coarsening of Cr in Cu was studied by changes in electrical resistance during aging. X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameter and the degree of supersaturation of the matrix. The microstructures were characterized by optical and electron microscopy.

  12. Strength of Hycon 3 HP Be-Cu and other copper alloys from 20 C to 200 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weggel, Robert J.; Ratka, John O.; Spiegelberg, William D.; Sakai, Yoshikazu

    1994-07-01

    To be suitable for high-performance water-cooled magnets a conductor must have an excellent combination of electrical conductivity and tensile strength at moderately elevated temperatures. We have measured the 0.2% yield and ultimate tensile strengths, elongation and modulus of five copper alloys, in the form of heavily cold-worked strip 0.4 mm to 1.2 mm thick, at temperatures up to 200 C. The alloys are Hycon 3 HP Be-Cu (UNS alloy C17510), a 24% silver-copper being developed by NRIM (Tsukuba, Japan), Glidcop(sup (R)), Zr-Cu and electrolytic tough pitch copper. Be-Cu, Zr-Cu and Ag-Cu all retained strength very well. Be-Cu decreased in U.T.S. only 10% from room temperature to 200 C, Zr-Cu, 15%. For Ag-Cu the decrease was 10% from 20 C to 150 C, and another 10% during the next 50 C. Glidcop weakened 20% by 150 C. So did ETP copper, whose strength then plummeted another 50% by 200 C. Except for Ag-Cu, with its filamentary microstructure, all alloys were isotropic within about 5%. The anisotropy of Ag-Cu was about 12%, with the transverse direction being the stronger.

  13. The transition from columnar to equiaxed dendritic growth in proeutectic, low-volume fraction copper, Pb-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwoo; Grugel, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    Lead, 17.1, 11.2, and 5 volume fraction copper (14, 9, and 4 wt pct Cu) alloys have been directionally solidified at constant growth velocities ranging from 1 to 100 microns/s. Serially increasing the growth velocity within this range results in a graded microstructural transition from fully columnar, albeit segregated, copper dendrites in a lead matrix to one consisting only of equiaxed grains. The imposed velocity necessary to effect fully equiaxed growth is found to drop rapidly as the volume fraction of copper is decreased. Factors which complicate the controlled, directional solidification of these alloys are discussed and the experimental results are interpreted in view of, and seen to be in qualitative agreement with, Hunt's theory on the transition from columnar to equiaxed growth of dendrites.

  14. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  15. Effect of composition of titanium in silver-copper-titanium braze alloy on dissimilar laser brazing of binder-less cubic boron nitride and tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sechi, Yoshihisa; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Nakata, Kazuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Laser brazing with Ti as an active element in silver-copper alloy braze metal has been carried out for binder-less cubic boron nitride and tungsten carbide, using silver-copper- titanium braze alloys with titanium content that varied between 0.28 mass% and 1.68 mass%. Observations of the interface using electron probe microanalysis and scanning acoustic microscopy show that efficient interface adhesion between binder-less cubic boron nitride and the silver-copper-titanium braze alloy was achieved for the braze with a titanium content of 0. 28 mass%.

  16. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  17. Destruction of the Capsid and Genome of GII.4 Human Norovirus Occurs during Exposure to Metal Alloys Containing Copper.

    PubMed

    Manuel, C S; Moore, M D; Jaykus, L A

    2015-08-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) represents a significant public health burden worldwide and can be environmentally transmitted. Copper surfaces have been shown to inactivate the cultivable surrogate murine norovirus, but no such data exist for HuNoV. The purpose of this study was to characterize the destruction of GII.4 HuNoV and virus-like particles (VLPs) during exposure to copper alloy surfaces. Fecal suspensions positive for a GII.4 HuNoV outbreak strain or GII.4 VLPs were exposed to copper alloys or stainless steel for 0 to 240 min and recovered by elution. HuNoV genome integrity was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) (without RNase treatment), and capsid integrity was assessed by RT-qPCR (with RNase treatment), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, and a histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) binding assay. Exposure of fecal suspensions to pure copper for 60 min reduced the GII.4 HuNoV RNA copy number by ∼3 log10 units when analyzed by RT-qPCR without RNase treatment and by 4 log10 units when a prior RNase treatment was used. The rate of reduction of the HuNoV RNA copy number was approximately proportional to the percentage of copper in each alloy. Exposure of GII.4 HuNoV VLPs to pure-copper surfaces resulted in noticeable aggregation and destruction within 240 min, an 80% reduction in the VP1 major capsid protein band intensity in 15 min, and a near-complete loss of HBGA receptor binding within 8 min. In all experiments, HuNoV remained stable on stainless steel. These results suggest that copper surfaces destroy HuNoV and may be useful in preventing environmental transmission of the virus in at-risk settings.

  18. Destruction of the Capsid and Genome of GII.4 Human Norovirus Occurs during Exposure to Metal Alloys Containing Copper

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, C. S.; Moore, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) represents a significant public health burden worldwide and can be environmentally transmitted. Copper surfaces have been shown to inactivate the cultivable surrogate murine norovirus, but no such data exist for HuNoV. The purpose of this study was to characterize the destruction of GII.4 HuNoV and virus-like particles (VLPs) during exposure to copper alloy surfaces. Fecal suspensions positive for a GII.4 HuNoV outbreak strain or GII.4 VLPs were exposed to copper alloys or stainless steel for 0 to 240 min and recovered by elution. HuNoV genome integrity was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) (without RNase treatment), and capsid integrity was assessed by RT-qPCR (with RNase treatment), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, and a histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) binding assay. Exposure of fecal suspensions to pure copper for 60 min reduced the GII.4 HuNoV RNA copy number by ∼3 log10 units when analyzed by RT-qPCR without RNase treatment and by 4 log10 units when a prior RNase treatment was used. The rate of reduction of the HuNoV RNA copy number was approximately proportional to the percentage of copper in each alloy. Exposure of GII.4 HuNoV VLPs to pure-copper surfaces resulted in noticeable aggregation and destruction within 240 min, an 80% reduction in the VP1 major capsid protein band intensity in 15 min, and a near-complete loss of HBGA receptor binding within 8 min. In all experiments, HuNoV remained stable on stainless steel. These results suggest that copper surfaces destroy HuNoV and may be useful in preventing environmental transmission of the virus in at-risk settings. PMID:25979897

  19. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 2: Zirconium-copper at 482, 538 and 593 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Zirconium-copper (1/2 hard) was tested in argon over the temperature range from 482 to 593 C in an evaluation of short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties was evaluated at 538 C and in general it was found that the yield and ultimate strengths increased as the strain rate was increased from 0.0004 to 0.01/sec. Ductility was essentially insensitive to strain rate in the case of the zirconium-copper alloy. Strain-rate and hold-time effects on the low cycle fatigue behavior of zirconium-copper were evaluated in argon at 538 C. These effects were as expected in that decreased fatigue life was noted as the strain rate decreased and when hold times were introduced into the tension portion of the strain-cycle. Hold times in compression were much less detrimental than hold times in tension.

  20. EFFECT OF THERMAL PROCESSES ON COPPER-TIN ALLOYS FOR ZINC GETTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Golyski, M.

    2013-11-01

    A contamination mitigation plan was initiated to address the discovery of radioactive zinc‐65 in a glovebox. A near term solution was developed, installation of heated filters in the glovebox piping. This solution is effective at retaining the zinc in the currently contaminated area, but the gamma emitting contaminant is still present in a system designed for tritium beta. A project was initiated to develop a solution to contain the {sup 65}Zn in the furnace module. Copper and bronze (a Cu/Sn alloy) were found to be candidate materials to combine with zinc‐65 vapor, using thermodynamic calculations. A series of binary Cu/Sn alloys were developed (after determining that commercial alloys were unacceptable), that were found to be effective traps of zinc vapor. The task described in this report was undertaken to determine if the bronze substrates would retain their zinc gettering capability after being exposed to simulated extraction conditions with oxidizing and reducing gases. Pure copper and three bronze alloys were prepared, exposed to varying oxidation conditions from 250 to 450{degree}C, then exposed to varying reduction conditions in He-H{sub 2} from 250-450{degree}C, and finally exposed to zinc vapor at 350{degree}C for four hours. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass change, and visual observation. It was observed that the as fabricated samples and the reduced samples all retained their zinc gettering capacity while samples in the "as-oxidized" condition exhibited losses in zinc gettering capacity. Over the range of conditions tested, i.e., composition, oxidation temperature, and reduction temperature, no particular sample composition appeared better. Samples reduced at 350{degree}C exhibited the greatest zinc capacity, although there were some testing anomalies associated with these samples. This work clearly demonstrated that the zinc gettering was not adversely

  1. Processing and response of aluminum-lithium alloy composites reinforced with copper-coated silicon carbide particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Cao, Y.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Hanada, K.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sudarshan, T. S.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1998-02-01

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys have shown promise for demanding aerospace applications because of their light weight, high strength, and good damage tolerance characteristics. Additions of ceramic reinforcements to an aluminum-lithium alloy can significantly enhance specific strength, and specific modulus while concurrently offering acceptable performance at elevated temperatures. The processing and fabrication of aluminum-lithium alloy-based composites are hampered by particulate agglomeration or clustering and the existence of poor interfacial relationships between the reinforcing phase and the matrix. The problem of distribution of the reinforcing phase in the metal matrix can be alleviated by mechanical alloying. This article presents the results of a study aimed at addressing and improving the interfacial relationship between the host matrix and the reinforcing phase. Copper-coated silicon carbide particulates are introduced as the particulate reinforcing phase, and the resultant composite mixture is processed by conventional milling followed by hot pressing and hot extrusion. The influence of extrusion ratio and extrusion temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was established. Post extrusion processing by hot isostatic pressing was also examined. Results reveal the increase in elastic modulus of the aluminum-lithium alloy matrix reinforced with copper-coated SiC to be significantly more than the mechanically alloyed Al-Li/SiC counterpart. This suggests the possible contributions of interfacial strengthening on mechanical response in direct comparison with a uniform distribution of the reinforcing ceramic particulates.

  2. Direct Metal Deposition of H13 Tool Steel on Copper Alloy Substrate: Parametric Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M. Khalid; Masood, S. H.; Brandt, Milan

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated interest in tribology and prototyping by the laser aided material deposition process. Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) enables the formation of a uniform clad by melting the powder to form desired component from metal powder materials. In this research H13 tool steel has been used to clad on a copper alloy substrate using DMD. The effects of laser parameters on the quality of DMD deposited clad have been investigated and acceptable processing parameters have been determined largely through trial-and-error approaches. The relationships between DMD process parameters and the product characteristics such as porosity, micro-cracks and microhardness have been analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), image analysis software (ImageJ) and microhardness tester. It has been found that DMD parameters such as laser power, powder mass flow rate, feed rate and focus size have an important role in clad quality and crack formation.

  3. Some Studies into Electrical Discharge Machining of Nimonic75 Super Alloy Using Rotary Copper Disk Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Pandey, A.

    2013-05-01

    The present study reports the rotary disk electrical discharge machining of Nimonic75 super alloy, extensively used in aerospace industries. The experiments have been performed using Taguchi's orthogonal array L18 (21 × 35) with copper disk electrode. The control factors considered were, viz., peak current, pulse on time, pulse off-time, gap voltage, and rotational speed of disk electrode with three levels each, and aspect ratio (AR) of the disk electrode having two levels, as noise factor. The novel approach of this article is to study the effect of the AR of the disk electrode on the performance measures, viz., material removal rate, disk electrode wear rate, and surface roughness. The results based on Taguchi's analysis show that among the considered process parameters, the AR and peak current significantly affect the machining characteristics. Furthermore, the rotating disk electrode easily flushes off the debris, resulting in better machining and reducing the chances of re-solidified layer formation.

  4. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guojie, Huang; Shuisheng, Xie; Lei, Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 K˜1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/h˜10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/s˜4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  5. Cell structure in cold worked and creep deformed phosphorus alloyed copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rui; Pettersson, Niklas; Martinsson, Åsa; Sandström, Rolf

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations on as-received, cold worked, as well as cold worked and creep tested phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) have been carried out to study the role of the cell structure. The cell size decreased linearly with increasing plastic deformation in tension. The flow stress in the tests could also be correlated to the cell size. The observed relation between the flow stress and the cell size was in excellent agreement with previously published results. The dense dislocation walls that appeared after cold work in tension is likely to be the main reason for the dramatic increase in creep strength. The dense dislocation walls act as barriers against dislocation motion and their presence also reduces the recovery rate due to an unbalanced dislocation content.

  6. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of Nitinol-Copper Shape Memory Alloy Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongweerayoot, E.; Srituravanich, W.; Pimpin, A.

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of annealing conditions on nitinol (NiTi) characteristics and applies this knowledge to fabricate a NiTi-copper shape memory alloy bimorph actuator. The effect of the annealing conditions was investigated at various temperatures, i.e., 500, 600, and 650 °C, for 30 min. With the characterizations using x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry techniques, the results showed that annealing temperatures at 600 and 650 °C were able to appropriately form the crystalline structure of NiTi. However, at these high annealing temperatures, the oxide on a surface was unavoidable. In the fabrication of actuator, the annealing at 650 °C for 30 min was chosen, and it was performed at two pre-stressing conditions, i.e., straight and curved molds. From static and dynamic response experiments, the results suggested that the annealing temperature significantly affected the deflection of the actuator. On the other hand, the effect of pre-stressing conditions was relatively small. Furthermore, the micro gripper consisting of two NiTi-copper bimorph actuators successfully demonstrated for the viability of small object manipulation as the gripper was able to grasp and hold a small plastic ball with its weight of around 0.5 mg.

  8. The effect of copper content and microstructure on the hydrogen embrittlement of AI-6Zn-2Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, D. A.; Thompson, A. W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1983-12-01

    Two commercially-processed Al-6Zn-2Mg alloys, 7050 and a “low copper” 7050, were tested for susceptibility to embrittlement by precharged hydrogen and by simultaneous cathodic charging and straining (SET procedure). Specimens were heat treated to underaged, peak-strength aged, and overaged conditions. In 7050, the peak strength and overaged conditions were not embrittled by hydrogen, though underaged material showed marked embrittlement. All microstructures tested for the low-copper alloy were embrittled. The results agree with the microstructural rationale established through earlier work on 7075 and 2124 aluminum alloys, particularly with respect to the susceptibility of underaged material to hydrogen. As in earlier work, the extent of dislocation transport of hydrogen, and local hydrogen accumulation at grain boundaries, evidently controlled the extent and degree of brittle fracture. These three important alloys can now be ranked in the order 7050, 2124, 7075 of increasing relative susceptibility to the onset of stress corrosion cracking.

  9. The microstructure and electrical transport properties of immiscible copper-niobium alloy thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rajarshi; Bose, Sangita; Ayyub, Pushan; Genc, Arda

    2008-02-01

    Mutually immiscible in the solid state, copper and niobium exhibit a relatively strong clustering (phase separating) tendency in the liquid state and can therefore only be alloyed in a highly metastable form: for example, by vapor quenching. We have deposited metastable Cu-Nb alloy thin films with nominal compositions ranging from 5 to 90 at. % Nb by magnetron cosputtering. The microstructure of these films depends strongly on the composition and ranges from coarse-grained solid solutions for Cu-rich and Nb-rich compositions to phase-separated amorphous mixtures when the two elements are in comparable amounts. The crystalline Cu- or Nb-rich compositions exhibit positive temperature coefficients of resistivity (TCR) with the Cu-90 at. % Nb film exhibiting a superconducting transition with (T{sub C}){sub onset}{approx}4.5 K. The amorphous films show high room temperature resistivity, a negative TCR, and composition dependent superconducting transitions. We investigate the relation between the microstructure, phase stability, and the electrical transport properties.

  10. New Screening Test Developed for the Blanching Resistance of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's extensive efforts towards more efficient, safer, and more affordable space transportation include the development of new thrust-cell liner materials with improved capabilities and longer lives. For rocket engines fueled with liquid hydrogen, an important metric of liner performance is resistance to blanching, a phenomenon of localized wastage by cycles of oxidation-reduction due to local imbalance in the oxygen-fuel ratio. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine combustion chamber, a Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr alloy (NARloy-Z) is degraded in service by blanching. Heretofore, evaluating a liner material for blanching resistance involved elaborate and expensive hot-fire tests performed on rocket test stands. To simplify that evaluation, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a screening test that uses simple, in situ oxidation-reduction cycling in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The principle behind this test is that resistance to oxidation or to the reduction of oxide, or both, implies resistance to blanching. Using this test as a preliminary tool to screen alloys for blanching resistance can improve reliability and save time and money. In this test a small polished coupon is hung in a TGA furnace at the desired (service) temperature. Oxidizing and reducing gases are introduced cyclically, in programmed amounts. Cycle durations are chosen by calibration, such that all copper oxides formed by oxidation are fully reduced in the next reduction interval. The sample weight is continuously acquired by the TGA as usual.

  11. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2004-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the first year of research funding from DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2004. Composite membranes, consisting of a thin Pd alloy film supported on a porous substrate have been investigated as a means of reducing the membrane cost and improving H{sub 2} flux. An electroless plating technique was utilized to deposit subsequent layers of palladium and copper over zirconia and alumina-based microfilters. The composite membranes thus made were annealed and tested at temperatures ranging from 250 to 500 C, under very high feed pressures (up to 450 psig) using pure gases and gaseous mixtures containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, with the purpose of determining the effects these variables had on the H{sub 2} permeation rate, selectivity and percent recovery. The inhibition caused by CO/CO{sub 2} gases on a 7 {micro}m thick Pd-Cu composite membrane was less than 17% over a wide range of compositions at 350 C. H{sub 2}S caused a strong inhibition of the H{sub 2} flux of the same Pd-Cu composite membrane, which is accentuated at levels of 100 ppm or higher. The membrane was exposed to 50 ppm three times without permanent damage. At higher H{sub 2}S levels, above 100 ppm the membrane suffered some physical degradation and its performances was severely affected. The use of sweep gases improved the hydrogen flux and recovery of a Pd-Cu composite membrane. Recently, we have been able to dramatically reduce the thickness of these Pd alloy membranes to approximately one micron. This is significant because at this thickness, it is the cost of the porous support that controls the materials cost of a composite Pd alloy membrane, not the palladium inventory. Very recent results show that the productivity of our membranes is very high, essentially meeting the DOE pure hydrogen flux target value set by the DOE Hydrogen

  12. Machining characteristics and fracture morphologies in a copper-beryllium (Cu-2Be) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, K. V.; Cisneros, J. C.; Cervantes, Hector; Pineda, Cosme Gomez

    2006-02-01

    The technology of materials removal is improved greatly by the introduction of advanced cutting tools like cubic boron nitride, ceramics, polycrystalline diamond and the more recent whisker-reinforced materials. In this paper, the influence of cutting temperature on machinability, mechanical properties, microstructure, and fracture morphology of Cu-2Be alloy using a polycrystalline diamond cutter is investigated. The information on machining, microstructure, and fracture morphology of Cu-2Be alloy are very useful to understand their fabrication characteristics and the basic mechanisms of its deformation and fracture. The machinability (in terms of surface finish) of Cu-2Be alloy is evaluated as a function of cutting temperature, resulting from wet and dry cutting. Machining is carried out on a Hardinge Cobra 42 CNC machine (Hardinge Inc., Elmira, NY), and the machining parameters used—cutting speed, depth of cut, and feed rate—are kept constant during both wet and dry cutting. The machined surface finish on Cu-2Be alloy is measured using a surface finish analyzer (Surftest 401, series 178) technique. The machined specimens are examined for their strength and hardness properties using a standard Universal Testing Machine and Rockwell hardness tester, respectively. Wet cutting (using coolants) produced a smooth surface finish when compared with dry cutting of the Cu-2Be alloy. The machined specimens are examined for their microstructural features using a Nikon optical microscope. The specimens are etched using a suitable etchant solution for revealing such microstructure constituents as grain size, phase proportions, and the possible overheated areas (especially in dry cutting). The fractured surfaces from the tensile and impact toughness tests are investigated for their fracture morphologies (dry and wet cutting) using a microprocessor-controlled scanning electron microscope (Jeol Model JSM 5910 LV). A detailed analysis is also made to understand and interpret

  13. The antimicrobial activity of copper and copper alloys against nosocomial pathogens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from healthcare facilities in the Western Cape: an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mehtar, S; Wiid, I; Todorov, S D

    2008-01-01

    Clinical isolates of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Candida albicans and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) were tested against copper (Cu) and its alloys. Stainless steel and polyvinylchloride (PVC) were used as controls. The amount of Cu required to inhibit test isolates at room temperature (24 degrees C) and at 4 degrees C was determined. At room temperature, Cu, DZR Brass (Cu 62%, Pb 2.5%, arsenate 0.13% and Zn 22.5%) and Brass 70/30 (Cu 70% and zinc 30%) inhibited C. albicans and K. pneumoniae at 60 min; nickel silver (NiAg) inhibited C. albicans at 60 min and K. pneumoniae at 270 min. P. aeruginosa was inhibited by Brass 70/30 and nickel silver (NiAg) at 180 min and at 270 min by Cu and DZR. Cu and DZR inhibited A. baumannii at 180 min while the other alloys were effective at 360 min. Stainless steel and PVC showed little or no inhibitory activity. Two M. tuberculosis strains, one isoniazid resistant (R267) and the other multidrug resistant (R432), demonstrated growth inhibition with Cu of 98% and 88% respectively compared with PVC; the other alloys were less active. Time to positivity (TTP) for R267 was >15 days with Cu and 11 days for the other alloys; with R432 it was 5 days. Effective inhibition of nosocomial pathogens and MTB by Cu and alloys was best when the Cu content was >55%.

  14. Development of Advanced Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloy for Penetrator Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    preparation, sintering, cyclic heat-treatment, swaging , and annealing processes, on microstructures and static/dynamic mechanical properties of ODS tungsten ... tungsten / tungsten contiguity. The swaging and annealing processes of ODS tungsten heavy alloy increase the tensile strength with decreasing the...Final Report for 2nd Year Contract of AOARD 034032 Development of Advanced Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloy for

  15. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report for the period January through December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1997-03-01

    Centrifugal casting of Copper alloys containing graphite particles established the feasibility of making hollow cylindrical castings. In theses castings, the graphite particles are segregated to the inner periphery making them well suited for bearing applications because of the lubricity of the graphite particles. The recovery of graphite is found to be around 90%. Chemical analysis shows that the average concentration of graphite particles near the inner periphery is 13 vol.% (3.5 wt.%) and 16.3 vol.% (4.54 wt.%) for castings made from melts originally containing 7 vol.% (2 wt.%) and 13 vol.% (3.5 wt. %) graphite particles, respectively. Hardness tests show that as the volume fraction of graphite particles increases, the hardness values in the graphite rich zone is found to be widely scattered. The results indicate that it is feasible to centrifugally cast copper alloys containing dispersed graphite particles to produce cylindrical components with graphite rich inner periphery for bearing and plumbing applications.

  16. Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Triazole Derivatives on Copper-Nickel Alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.; Jiang, S. L.; Liu, X.; Ma, A. L.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the performance of three triazole derivatives with different molecular structures as corrosion inhibitors for the copper-nickel alloy CuNi 90/10 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Inhibition behavior was systematically determined through electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, adsorption behavior and the inhibition mechanism were investigated via quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic simulation. Experimental results indicate that the three inhibitors with triazole rings and heteroatoms exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition capabilities on the copper-nickel alloy surface through physisorption and chemisorption. In particular, 3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole showed the best inhibition capability according to the concentration ranges considered in the experiments. The results of quantum chemical calculation agreed with the experimental findings.

  17. Advanced oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloys for improved combustor durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henricks, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Burner design modifications that will take advantage of the improved creep and cyclic oxidation resistance of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys while accommodating the reduced fatigue properties of these materials were evaluated based on preliminary analysis and life predictions, on construction and repair feasibility, and on maintenance and direct operating costs. Two designs - the film cooled, segmented louver and the transpiration cooled, segmented twin Wall - were selected for low cycle fatigue (LCF) component testing. Detailed thermal and structural analysis of these designs established the strain range and temprature at critical locations resulting in predicted lives of 10,000 cycles for MA 956 alloy. The ODs alloys, MA 956 and HDA 8077, demonstrated a 167 C (300 F) temperature advantage over Hastelloy X alloy in creep strength and oxidation resistance. The MA 956 alloy was selected for mechanical property and component test evaluations. The MA 956 alloy was superior to Hastelloy X in LCF component testing of the film cooled, segmented louver design.

  18. Production of FR Tubing from Advanced ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Lavender, Curt; Omberg, Ron; Lewandowski, John

    2016-10-25

    Significant research is underway to develop LWR nuclear fuels with improved accident tolerance. One of the leading candidate materials for cladding are the FeCrAl alloys. New alloys produced at ORNL called Gen I and Gen II FeCrAl alloys possess excellent oxidation resistance in steam up to 1400°C and in parallel methods are being developed to produce tubing from these alloys. Century tubing continues to produce excellent tubing from FeCrAl alloys. This memo reports receipt of ~21 feet of Gen I FeCrAl alloy tubing. This tubing will be used for future tests including burst testing, mechanical testing and irradiation testing.

  19. Effects of silicon, copper and iron on static and dynamic properties of alloy 206 (aluminum-copper) in semi-solids produced by the SEED process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Alain

    The advantages of producing metal parts by rheocasting are generally recognised for common foundry alloys of Al-Si. However, other more performing alloys in terms of mechanical properties could have a great interest in specialized applications in the automotive industry, while remaining competitive in the forming. Indeed, the growing demand for more competitive products requires the development of new alloys better suited to semi-solid processes. Among others, Al-Cu alloys of the 2XX series are known for their superior mechanical strength. However, in the past, 2XX alloys were never candidates for pressure die casting. The main reason is their propensity to hot tearing. Semi-solid processes provide better conditions for molding with the rheological behavior of dough and molding temperatures lower reducing this type of defect. In the initial phase, this research has studied factors that reduce hot tearing susceptibility of castings produced by semi-solid SEED of alloy 206. Subsequently, a comparative study on the tensile properties and fatigue was performed on four variants of the alloy 206. The results of tensile strength and fatigue were compared with the specifications for applications in the automotive industry and also to other competing processes and alloys. During this study, several metallurgical aspects were analyzed. The following main points have been validated: i) the main effects of compositional variations of silicon, iron and copper alloy Al-Cu (206) on the mechanical properties, and ii) certain relationships between the mechanism of hot cracking and the solidification rate in semi-solid. Parts produced from the semi-solid paste coming from the SEED process combined with modified 206 alloys have been successfully molded and achieved superior mechanical properties than the requirements of the automotive industry. The fatigue properties of the two best modified 206 alloys were higher than those of A357 alloy castings and are close to those of the

  20. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  1. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-02-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  2. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-03-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy study of initial stages of oxidation in a copper - 19.6-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine the initial stages of oxidation of a polycrystalline copper - 19.6 a/o-aluminum alloy. The growth of the 55-eV aluminum oxide peak and the decay of the 59-, 62-, and 937-eV copper peaks were examined as functions of temperature, exposure, and pressure. Pressures ranged from 1x10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0005 torr of O2. Temperatures ranged from room temperature to 700 C. A completely aluminum oxide surface layer was obtained in all cases. Complete disappearance of the underlying 937-eV copper peak was obtained by heating at 700 C in O2 at 0.0005 torr for 1 hr. Temperature studies indicated that thermally activated diffusion was important to the oxidation studies. The initial stages of oxidation followed a logarithmic growth curve.

  4. Advances in the Understanding of Mammalian Copper Transporters12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanfang; Hodgkinson, Victoria; Zhu, Sha; Weisman, Gary A.; Petris, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient. Its ability to exist in 2 oxidation states (Cu1+ and Cu2+) allows it to function as an enzymatic cofactor in hydrolytic, electron transfer, and oxygen utilization reactions. Cu transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B play key roles in ensuring that adequate Cu is available for Cu-requiring processes and the prevention of excess Cu accumulation within cells. Two diseases of Cu metabolism, Menkes disease and Wilson disease, which are caused by mutations in ATP7A and ATP7B, respectively, exemplify the critical importance of regulating Cu balance in humans. Herein, we review recent studies of the biochemical and cell biological characteristics of CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B, as well as emerging roles for Cu in new areas of physiology. PMID:22332042

  5. Electrochemical Processing Tools for Advanced Copper Interconnects: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Madhav

    The change from vacuum-deposited aluminum to electroplated copper in 1997 brought about a paradigm shift in interconnect technology and in chip making [1]. Since then, most of the leading chip manufacturers have converted to electroplated Cu technology for chip interconnects. Cu interconnects are fabricated by dual Damascene process which is referred to a metallization patterning process by which two insulator (dielectric) levels are patterned, filled with copper, and planarized to create a metal layer consisting of vias and lines. The process steps consist of laying a sandwich of two levels of insulator and etch stop layers that are patterned as holes for vias and troughs for lines. They are then filled with a single metallization step. Finally, the excess material is removed, and the wafer is planarized by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). While finer details of exact sequence of fabrication steps vary, the end result of forming a metal layer remains the same in which vias are formed in the lower layer, and trenches are formed in the upper layer. Electroplating enables deposition of Cu in via holes and overlying trenches in a single step thus eliminating a via/line interface and significantly reducing the cycle time. Due to these reasons and due to relatively less expensive tooling, electroplating is a cost-effective and efficient process for Cu interconnects [2, 3]. Compared with vacuum deposition processes, electroplated Cu provides improved super filling capabilities and abnormal grain growth phenomena. These properties contribute significantly to improved reliability of Cu interconnects. With the proper choice of additives and plating conditions, void-free, seam-free Damascene deposits are obtained which eliminates surface-like fast diffusion paths for Cu electromigration.

  6. [Stress in teeth restored with gold and copper-aluminum alloys under distributed force. Finite element method].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, R C; Matson, E

    1990-01-01

    The author studied the stress distribution which occurs in casted metalic restoration a gold alloy type II and a copper-aluminum, with cavity preparation of both types: intracoronal or extracoronal cavity using the finite elements method in a first right inferior molar. The conclusion was that the mechanical performance of both are very similar. Stress occurred in a dental structure which alloy cast restoration are smaller than that occurred in a tooth without cavity preparation. The cavity preparation with intracoronal shows a better stress distribution in the dentine than that with extracoronal. In the region near the buccopulpal line angle occurs a stress concentration in despite of the type of the cavity metallic alloy used.

  7. Microanalysis of oligodeoxynucleotides by cathodic stripping voltammetry at amalgam-alloy surfaces in the presence of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Hason, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2006-05-15

    The application of gold amalgam-alloy electrode (AuAE) for a sensitive voltammetric detection of different oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing the purine units within the ODN-chains in the presence of copper is described. The detection of ODNs is based on the following procedure: (i) the first step includes an acidic hydrolysis of the ODN (ahODN) samples performing the release of the purine bases from ODN-chain; (ii) the second step includes an electrochemical accumulation of the complex of the purine base residues released from ODN-chain with copper ions Cu(I) (ahODN-Cu(I) complex) at the potential of reduction of copper ions Cu(II) on the amalgam-alloy electrode surfaces; (iii) finally followed the cathodic stripping of the electrochemically accumulated ahODN-Cu(I) complex from the electrode surface. The proposed electrochemical method was used for: (a) detection of different ODN lengths containing only adenine units (the number of adenine units within the ODN-chains was changed from 10 to 80), and (b) determination of the number of purine units within the 30-mer ODNs containing a random sequence segments involving both the purine and pyrimidine units. The intensity of the cathodic stripping current density peak (j(CSP)) of the electrochemically accumulated ahODN-Cu(I) complex increased linearly with the increasing number of purine units within the ODN-chains. We observed a good correlation between the percentage content of purine units to the whole length of different 30-mer ODNs and the percentage content of the intensity of the j(CSP) of the electrochemically accumulated 30-mer ahODN-Cu(I) complexes. The detection of acid hydrolysed 80-mer (A(80)) in the bulk solution and in a 20-mul volume is possible down to 200pM and 2nM at the AuAE, respectively. For the shortest 10-mer (A(10)) a detectable value of 5nM in the bulk solution on the AuAE was observed. The sensitive detection of different ODNs containing the purine units in their chains in the presence of

  8. I Situ Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Dealloying and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Copper - Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Syung Fred

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Cu-30Au in 0.6 M NaCl was investigated by a series of experiments, in which samples were dealloyed (i.e., selective removal of copper atoms) by potentiostatic anodic polarization at zero applied stress (i) for varying lengths of time (10 seconds to 30 minutes) and then impact bent, and (ii) for 30 minutes followed by a period of time (5 seconds to 10 minutes) at the open circuit potential and then impact bent. The results indicate that dealloying at zero applied stress produces a surface porous layer that is capable, for a brief period of time (<= ~ 15 seconds), of inducing intergranular cleavage failure of the normally ductile FCC substrate. However, for time >15 seconds at open circuit potential, aging or coarsening reverses the ability of the surface layer to induce cleavage. In addition, samples were dealloyed and simultaneously stressed at various nominal values. At low values of applied stress, failure occurred by brittle intergranular cracking (IGSCC); and at high values of stress, failure occurred by brittle transgranular cracking (TGSCC). The results indicate that the mechanism of IGSCC is identical to that of TGSCC and can best be described by a modification of the "film-induced cleavage" model. The implication of the aging phenomenon to the film-induced cleavage model of stress corrosion cracking is also discussed. An electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) was built and used to study the in-situ dealloying process of thin-film Cu-Au alloys. Thin-films of Cu-75 at%Au alloy were prepared by thermal evaporation of the bulk alloy and deposition of the vapor onto heated mica. The surface structure of the thin film thus grown consists of terrace of well defined (111) planes separated by atomic height steps. The results from in-situ ESTM indicate that if applied potentials were lower than the critical potential (E_{rm c}), dissolution of Cu preferentially occurred at the low coordination sites

  9. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  10. The effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the final irradiation experiment in a series of screening experiments aimed at investigating the effects of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on irradiated copper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment. The post-irradiation tests at 100 C revealed the greatest loss of ductility occurred in the CuCrZr alloys, irrespective of the pre-irradiation heat treatment, with the uniform elongation dropping to levels of less than 1.5%. The yield and ultimate strengths for all of the individual heat treated samples increased substantially after irradiation. The same trend was observed for the CuNiBe alloys, which overall exhibited a factor of 3 higher uniform elongation after irradiation with almost double the strength. In both alloys irradiation-induced precipitation lead to a large increase in the strength of the solution annealed specimens with a noticeable decrease in uniform elongation. The Al25 alloy also experienced an increase in the overall strength of the alloy after irradiation, accompanied by approximately a 50% decrease in the uniform and total elongation. The additional bakeout treatments given to the CuCrZr and CuNiBe before irradiation served to increase the strength, but in terms of the ductility no improvement or degradation resulted from the additional thermal exposure. The results of this experiment confirm that the al25 possesses the most resistant microstructure to thermal and irradiation-induced changes, while the competing effects of ballistic dissolution and reprecipitation lead to important changes in the two precipitation strengthened alloys. This study and others have repeatedly shown that these materials can only be used if the very low uniform elongation (1% or less) can be accounted for in the design since pre-irradiation thermal processing cannot mitigate the irradiation embrittlement.

  11. Mechanisms and rate of dislocation nucleation in aluminum-copper alloys near Guinier-Preston zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukhanov, I. A.; Larin, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    This article is devoted to a molecular dynamics simulation study of partial dislocation loop nucleation with respect to its mechanism and rate, and its propagation process under high shear stress in aluminum-copper alloys. The mechanisms of dislocation nucleation near Guinier-Preston (GP) zones of various diameters and concentrations have been analyzed. Dislocation nucleation rates near plain GP Cu-zones with diameters of 3.5, 7.5, and 13.5 nm and at various concentrations have been calculated using the mean lifetime method with temperatures in range of 100 and 700 K. It has been found that depending on the temperature and applied stress, the dislocation can nucleate either from the edge, or from the plain area of a GP zone. The dislocation nucleation is preceded by a generation of defect clusters that are formed due to local opposite atomic shifts in two adjacent (111) planes by the half-length of a Burgers vector of a partial dislocation. The expansion of a partial dislocation loop can be accompanied by the formation of twins via a shift of the atoms in the internal region of the loop. The twin velocity along the direction of the partial dislocation Burgers vector inside the loop can achieve longitudinal sound speed. The speeds of the edge and screw segments of a partial dislocation loop as a function of a shear stress component along the Burgers vector have been estimated. The latter seems to be limited by the shear sound speed.

  12. Inverse Calibration Free fs-LIBS of Copper-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaldone, Antonella; De Bonis, Angela; Galasso, Agostino; Guarnaccio, Ambra; Santagata, Antonio; Teghil, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    In this work the analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique of copper-based alloys having different composition and performed with fs laser pulses is presented. A Nd:Glass laser (Twinkle Light Conversion, λ = 527 nm at 250 fs) and a set of bronze and brass certified standards were used. The inverse Calibration-Free method (inverse CF-LIBS) was applied for estimating the temperature of the fs laser induced plasma in order to achieve quantitative elemental analysis of such materials. This approach strengthens the hypothesis that, through the assessment of the plasma temperature occurring in fs-LIBS, straightforward and reliable analytical data can be provided. With this aim the capability of the here adopted inverse CF-LIBS method, which is based on the fulfilment of the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition, for an indirect determination of the species excitation temperature, is shown. It is reported that the estimated temperatures occurring during the process provide a good figure of merit between the certified and the experimentally determined composition of the bronze and brass materials, here employed, although further correction procedure, like the use of calibration curves, can be demanded. The reported results demonstrate that the inverse CF-LIBS method can be applied when fs laser pulses are used even though the plasma properties could be affected by the matrix effects restricting its full employment to unknown samples provided that a certified standard having similar composition is available.

  13. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  14. Evaluation of two thione primers and composite luting agents used for bonding a silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Tanoue, N

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of two metal adhesive systems bonded to a silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd) alloy. Disk specimens were cast from an Ag-Pd alloy (Castwell M.C. 12), air-abraded with 50 micro m grain-sized alumina, and they were bonded with two primer-cement bonding systems (Alloy Primer and Panavia Fluoro Cement; Metaltite and Bistite II). For each cement, unprimed specimens were also prepared as experimental controls. Shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C, 1 min each, 100 000 cycles). The average post-thermocycling bond strengths in MPa (n=8) were: 39.0 for the Metaltite-Bistite II system, 32.2 for the Alloy Primer-Panavia Fluoro Cement system, 23.1 for the Bistite II material and 21.0 for the Panavia Fluoro Cement material. The use of proprietary primers, both of which contain thione functional monomer, enhanced the post-thermocycling bond strengths of both cements (P < 0.05). After thermocycling, however, the difference in bond strength between the two cements was not significant regardless of the use of the primers (P > 0.05). It is concluded that the combined use of the thione primer and the luting agent is necessary for bonding the Ag-Pd alloy examined.

  15. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  16. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  17. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  18. Auger electron spectroscopic study of mechanism of sulfide-accelerated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Malcolm E.

    The mechanism of sulfide-induced accelerated corrosion of 90-10 copper-nickel(iron) alloy is investigated. Samples of the alloy are exposed to flowing (2.4 m/s) seawater, with and without 0 01 mg/l sulfide, for various periods of time. The resulting surfaces are examined by means of Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with inert-ion-homoardment. A detailed depth profile is thereby obtained of concentrations in the surface region of a total of nine elements. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that iron hydroxide segregates at the surface to form a protective gelatinous layer against the normal chloride-induced corrosion process. Trace sulfide interferes with formation of a good protective layer and leaves the iron hydroxide vulnerable to ultimate partial or complete debonding. When the alloy is first exposed to "pure" seawater for a prolonged period of time, however, subsequent exposure to sulfide is no longer deleterious. This is apparently due to a layer of copper-nickel salt that slowly forms over the iron hydroxide.

  19. Development of Advanced Carbide for Nickel-Based Alloy Machining for Turbine Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-20

    based alloys such as Inconel 718 with 40% higher machining productivity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NCDMM; Success Stories; Kennametal, Inc.; Inconel 718 ...Inc. involved developing an advanced coated carbide cutting tool for turning nickel-based alloys such as Inconel 718 with 40% higher machining...nd DOC constant for the ng of six (6) cutting tools t 180 and 250 SFM led to l performance goal. It was r resulting from premature e in Inconel

  20. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  1. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in advanced alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Jin, Ke; Xue, Haizhou; Lu, Chenyang; Olsen, Raina J.; Beland, Laurent K.; Ullah, Mohammad W.; Zhao, Shijun; Bei, Hongbin; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Samolyuk, German D.; Wang, Lumin; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Larson, Ben C.; Robertson, Ian M.; Correa, Alfredo A.; Weber, William J.

    2016-08-01

    We report that historically, alloy development with better radiation performance has been focused on traditional alloys with one or two principal element(s) and minor alloying elements, where enhanced radiation resistance depends on microstructural or nanoscale features to mitigate displacement damage. In sharp contrast to traditional alloys, recent advances of single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs) have opened up new frontiers in materials research. In these alloys, a random arrangement of multiple elemental species on a crystalline lattice results in disordered local chemical environments and unique site-to-site lattice distortions. Based on closely integrated computational and experimental studies using a novel set of SP-CSAs in a face-centered cubic structure, we have explicitly demonstrated that increasing chemical disorder can lead to a substantial reduction in electron mean free paths, as well as electrical and thermal conductivity, which results in slower heat dissipation in SP-CSAs. The chemical disorder also has a significant impact on defect evolution under ion irradiation. Considerable improvement in radiation resistance is observed with increasing chemical disorder at electronic and atomic levels. Finally, the insights into defect dynamics may provide a basis for understanding elemental effects on evolution of radiation damage in irradiated materials and may inspire new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for advanced energy systems.

  2. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in advanced alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yanwen; Jin, Ke; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2016-08-01

    We report that historically, alloy development with better radiation performance has been focused on traditional alloys with one or two principal element(s) and minor alloying elements, where enhanced radiation resistance depends on microstructural or nanoscale features to mitigate displacement damage. In sharp contrast to traditional alloys, recent advances of single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs) have opened up new frontiers in materials research. In these alloys, a random arrangement of multiple elemental species on a crystalline lattice results in disordered local chemical environments and unique site-to-site lattice distortions. Based on closely integrated computational and experimental studies using a novel setmore » of SP-CSAs in a face-centered cubic structure, we have explicitly demonstrated that increasing chemical disorder can lead to a substantial reduction in electron mean free paths, as well as electrical and thermal conductivity, which results in slower heat dissipation in SP-CSAs. The chemical disorder also has a significant impact on defect evolution under ion irradiation. Considerable improvement in radiation resistance is observed with increasing chemical disorder at electronic and atomic levels. Finally, the insights into defect dynamics may provide a basis for understanding elemental effects on evolution of radiation damage in irradiated materials and may inspire new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for advanced energy systems.« less

  3. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  4. SU-E-T-10: A Dosimetric Comparison of Copper to Lead-Alloy Apertures for Electron Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusk, B; Hogstrom, K; Gibbons, J; Carver, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences of copper compared to conventional lead-alloy apertures for electron beam therapy. Methods: Copper apertures were manufactured by .decimal, Inc. and matching lead-alloy, Cerrobend, apertures were constructed for 32 square field sizes (2×2 – 20×20 cm{sup 2}) for five applicator sizes (6×6–25×25 cm{sup 2}). Percent depth-dose and off-axis-dose profiles were measured using an electron diode in water with copper and Cerrobend apertures for a subset of aperture sizes (6×6, 10×10, 25×25 cm{sup 2}) and energies (6, 12, 20 MeV). Dose outputs were measured for all field size-aperture combinations and available energies (6–20 MeV). Measurements were taken at 100 and 110 cm SSDs. Using this data, 2D planar absolute dose distributions were constructed and compared. Passing criteria were ±2% of maximum dose or 1-mm distance-to-agreement for 99% of points. Results: A gamma analysis of the beam dosimetry showed 93 of 96 aperture size, applicator, energy, and SSD combinations passed the 2%/1mm criteria. Failures were found for small field size-large applicator combinations at 20 MeV and 100-cm SSD. Copper apertures showed a decrease in bremsstrahlung production due to copper's lower atomic number compared to Cerrobend (greatest difference was 2.5% at 20 MeV). This effect was most prominent at the highest energies with large amounts of shielding material present (small field size-large applicator). Also, an increase in electrons scattered from the collimator edge of copper compared to Cerrobend resulted in an increased dose at the field edge for copper at shallow depths (greatest increase was 1% at 20 MeV). Conclusion: Apertures for field sizes ≥6×6 cm{sup 2} at any energy, or for small fields (≤4×4 cm{sup 2}) at energies <20 MeV, showed dosimetric differences less than 2%/1mm for more than 99% of points. All field size-applicator size-energy combinations passed 3%/1mm criteria for 100% of points. Work partially funded

  5. Roseomonas pecuniae sp. nov., isolated from the surface of a copper-alloy coin.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André; Esp Rito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor; Chung, Ana Paula; Morais, Paula V

    2011-03-01

    Strain N75(T) was isolated from the surface of a copper-alloy 50 Euro cent coin collected from general circulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain N75(T) formed a distinct branch within the genus Roseomonas and placed it in the Alphaproteobacteria. Strain N75(T) showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 92.4-97.1  % to type strains of species of the genus Roseomonas. Strain N75(T) was a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile coccoid, with an optimum growth temperature of about 30 °C; the strain did not grow at 5 or 37 °C. Strain N75(T) did not grow in medium containing NaCl. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). The major fatty acids were unsaturated C₁₆:₁ω7c/C₁₆:₁ω6c and C₁₈:₁ω7c (around 70 % of the total fatty acids); the third most abundant fatty acid was the hydroxylated C₁₈:₁ 2-OH. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown aminolipid. The DNA G+C content was 72.8 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis and physiological and biochemical characteristics, we conclude that strain N75(T) represents a novel species of the genus Roseomonas, for which we propose the name Roseomonas pecuniae sp. nov. (type strain N75(T) =LMG 25481(T) =CIP 110074(T)).

  6. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials.

  7. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    PubMed Central

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. PMID:26568442

  8. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    SciTech Connect

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  9. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    PubMed Central

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions. PMID:26449766

  10. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  11. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  12. An exploratory study of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-30 copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened alloy has been produced through minor additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. Comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the Zr-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  13. Nanostructured Fe-Cr Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-04-26

    We have completed research on the grain-size stabilization of model nanostructured Fe14Cr base alloys at high temperatures by the addition of non-equilibrium solutes. Fe14Cr base alloys are representative for nuclear reactor applications. The neutron flux in a nuclear reactor will generate He atoms that coalesce to form He bubbles. These can lead to premature failure of the reactor components, limiting their lifetime and increasing the cost and capacity for power generation. In order to mitigate such failures, Fe14Cr base alloys have been processed to contain very small nano-size oxide particles (less than 10 nm in size) that trap He atoms and reduce bubble formation. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the grain boundaries can also be very effective traps for He atoms and bubble formation. An optimum grain size will be less than 100 nm, ie., nanocrystalline alloys must be used. Powder metallurgy methods based on high-energy ball milling can produce Fe-Cr base nanocrystalline alloys that are suitable for nuclear energy applications. The problem with nanocrystalline alloys is that excess grain-boundary energy will cause grains to grow at higher temperatures and their propensity for He trapping will be lost. The nano-size oxide particles in current generation nuclear alloys provide some grain size stabilization by reducing grain-boundary mobility (Zener pinning – a kinetic effect). However the current mitigation strategy minimizing bubble formation is based primarily on He trapping by nano-size oxide particles. An alternate approach to nanoscale grain size stabilization has been proposed. This is based on the addition of small amounts of atoms that are large compared to the base alloy. At higher temperatures these will diffuse to the grain boundaries and will produce an equilibrium state for the grain size at higher temperatures (thermodynamic stabilization – an equilibrium effect). This would be preferred compared to a kinetic effect, which is not

  14. Heat-Affected Zone Liquation Cracking Resistance of Friction Stir Processed Aluminum-Copper Alloy AA 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, G. M.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2016-12-01

    In the current work, the effect of friction stir processing on heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking resistance of aluminum-copper alloy AA 2219 was evaluated. In Gleeble hot-ductility tests and longitudinal Varestraint tests, the FSPed material, despite its very fine dynamically recrystallized equiaxed grain structure, showed considerably higher susceptibility to HAZ liquation cracking when compared to the base material. Detailed microstructural studies showed that the increased cracking susceptibility of the FSPed material is due to (i) increase in the amount of liquating θ phase (equilibrium Al2Cu) and (ii) increase in the population of grain boundary θ particles. An important learning from the current work is that, in certain materials like alloy 2219, the use of FSP as a pretreatment to fusion welding can be counterproductive.

  15. Structural and phase transformations during copper and iron mechanical alloying in liquid medium studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eryomina, Marina Anatol'evna; Lomayeva, Svetlana Fedorovna; Ul'yanov, Alexandr Leonidovich; Yelsukov, Evgeny Petrovich

    2016-03-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to study the kinetics of structural and phase transformations in Cu + 2 at% 57Fe during mechanical activation in liquid media (heptane, distilled water) and subsequent heat treatment (600 and 700 °C). The initial stages of mechanical alloying are associated with the transition of components to the nanostructural state. Iron atom groups form near the grain boundaries, and isolated iron atoms penetrate from the boundaries into the grains. Oxidation of groups of iron atoms that form highly dispersed phases of ternary oxide and magnetite occur in the initial stages of mechanical alloying of Cu + 2 at% 57Fe in water. The formation of the solid solution in the form of isolated iron atoms in the lattice of copper proceeds, regardless of the milling media used. Samples prepared in heptane contain carbon and oxygen, and upon heat treatment, carbide and oxide phases are formed.

  16. Heat-Affected Zone Liquation Cracking Resistance of Friction Stir Processed Aluminum-Copper Alloy AA 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, G. M.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-04-01

    In the current work, the effect of friction stir processing on heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking resistance of aluminum-copper alloy AA 2219 was evaluated. In Gleeble hot-ductility tests and longitudinal Varestraint tests, the FSPed material, despite its very fine dynamically recrystallized equiaxed grain structure, showed considerably higher susceptibility to HAZ liquation cracking when compared to the base material. Detailed microstructural studies showed that the increased cracking susceptibility of the FSPed material is due to (i) increase in the amount of liquating θ phase (equilibrium Al2Cu) and (ii) increase in the population of grain boundary θ particles. An important learning from the current work is that, in certain materials like alloy 2219, the use of FSP as a pretreatment to fusion welding can be counterproductive.

  17. Superthermostability of nanoscale TIC-reinforced copper alloys manufactured by a two-step ball-milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenglin; Li, Yunping; Xu, Xiandong; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Yamanaka, Kenta; Bian, Huakang; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    A Cu-TiC alloy, with nanoscale TiC particles highly dispersed in the submicron-grained Cu matrix, was manufactured by a self-developed two-step ball-milling process on Cu, Ti and C powders. The thermostability of the composite was evaluated by high-temperature isothermal annealing treatments, with temperatures ranging from 727 to 1273 K. The semicoherent nanoscale TiC particles with Cu matrix, mainly located along the grain boundaries, were found to exhibit the promising trait of blocking grain boundary migrations, which leads to a super-stabilized microstructures up to approximately the melting point of copper (1223 K). Furthermore, the Cu-TiC alloys after annealing at 1323 K showed a slight decrease in Vickers hardness as well as the duplex microstructure due to selective grain growth, which were discussed in terms of hardness contributions from various mechanisms.

  18. Welding of unique and advanced alloys for space and high-temperature applications: welding and weldability of iridium and platinum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, Stan A.; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-08-31

    Advances have been made in developing alloys for space power systems for spacecraft that travel long distances to various planets. The spacecraft are powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the fuel element in RTGs is plutonia. For safety and containment of the radioactive fuel element, the heat source is encapsulated in iridium or platinum alloys. Ir and Pt alloys are the alloys of choice for encapsulating radioisotope fuel pellets. Ir and Pt alloys were chosen because of their high-temperature properties and compatibility with the oxide fuel element and the graphite impact shells. This review addresses the alloy design and welding and weldability of Ir and Pt alloys for use in RTGs.

  19. Welding of unique and advanced alloys for space and high-temperature applications: welding and weldability of iridium and platinum alloys

    DOE PAGES

    David, Stan A.; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-08-31

    Advances have been made in developing alloys for space power systems for spacecraft that travel long distances to various planets. The spacecraft are powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the fuel element in RTGs is plutonia. For safety and containment of the radioactive fuel element, the heat source is encapsulated in iridium or platinum alloys. Ir and Pt alloys are the alloys of choice for encapsulating radioisotope fuel pellets. Ir and Pt alloys were chosen because of their high-temperature properties and compatibility with the oxide fuel element and the graphite impact shells. This review addresses the alloy design andmore » welding and weldability of Ir and Pt alloys for use in RTGs.« less

  20. Study of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and enzymatic bio-Fenton process-mediated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, U; Hocheng, H

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the corrosion behavior of the copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans) and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. In both the cases ferric ions played an important role in weight loss and thereby to carry out the corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy. A corrosion rate of 0.6 (±0.008), 2.11 (±0.05), 3.69 (±0.26), 0.7 (±0.006) and 0.08 (±0.002) mm/year was obtained in 72 h using 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, A. ferrooxidans culture supernatant, A. ferrooxidans cells, GOx enzyme and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution respectively. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that a variable extent of corrosion was caused by 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells. An arithmetic average surface roughness (Ra) of 174.78 nm was observed for the control work-piece using optical profilometer. The change in Ra was observed with the treatment of the Cu-Ni alloy using various systems. The Ra for 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells was 374.54, 607.32 and 799.48 nm, respectively, after 24 h. These results suggest that A. ferrooxidans cells were responsible for more corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy than other systems used.

  1. [Determination of copper alloy hardness, in original form and after casting as a function of casting techniques].

    PubMed

    Bombonatti, P E; de Barros, L E; Scaranelo, R M; Pellizzer, A J; Feitosa, S A

    1990-01-01

    It was evaluated the Vickers hardness of five high-copper casting alloys, in their original package form and after casting, according to the casting method used. That way, ten ingots, supplied by the manufacturers of each alloy, were included in self-curing acrylic resin, polished, numerated and submitted to Vickers hardness test at load of 200 g during 30 seconds. Afterwards the numerated ingots were removed from the acrylic resin and five of those were cast in an electrical casting machine and the other five in a centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. The specimens obtained were included in self-curing acrylic resin, polished and submitted to Vickers hardness test. As a result it was verified that there is a variation of hardness among the alloys tested, and the use of the electrical casting machine produced lower hardness values than those produced when used the centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. Also, there is a decrease of hardness of the cast alloys when they are tested in their original form and after casting.

  2. Advanced Thermal-Barrier Bond Coatings for Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secura, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    New and improved bond coatings developed for use in thermal-barrier systems on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. Use of these new bond coatings, containing ytterbium instead of yttrium, significantly increased lives of resultant thermal-barrier systems. Uses include many load-bearing applications in high-temperature, hostile environments.

  3. Investigation of the influence of grain boundary chemistry, test temperatures, and strain rate on the fracture behavior of ITER copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leedy, K.; Stubbins, J.F.; Krus, D.

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanical behavior at elevated temperatures (>200{degrees}C) of the various copper alloys being considered for use in the ITER first wall, divertor, and limiter, a collaborative study has been initiated by the University of Illinois and PNNL with two industrial producers of copper alloys, Brush Wellman and OMG Americas. Details of the experimental matrix and test plans have been finalized and the appropriate specimens have already been fabricated and delivered to the University of Illinois and PNNL for testing and analysis. The experimental matrix and testing details are described in this report.

  4. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases,more » Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.« less

  5. Copper-Silicon Bronzes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1933-05-11

    copper alloys which have good static properties are disa:cinting in their endurance properties. The silicide allo~rs that are given high tensile strength...notched endurance tests and on cast alloys of this type, are lacking. uowever, preliminary reports state that a copper beryllium alloy of about 2 1/2...properties re- main almost the same. Grain size increases with sil- icon. III A study of hardening copper by heat treating its alloys with silicides

  6. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  7. Copper-beryllium alloy, bars, rods, shapes, and forgings 98Cu 1.9Be solution heat treated tb00 (a). (SAE standard)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This specification covers one type of copper-beryllium alloy in the form of bars, rods, forgings, and forging stock. These products have been used typically for parts requiring a combination of high strength, good wear resistance, and corrosion resistance and where electrical conductivity or low magnetic susceptibility may be important, but usage is not limited to such applications. Alloy: C17200 UNS Number: C1720.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  9. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  10. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  11. Evaluation of copper slag to catalyze advanced oxidation processes for the removal of phenol in water.

    PubMed

    Huanosta-Gutiérrez, T; Dantas, Renato F; Ramírez-Zamora, R M; Esplugas, S

    2012-04-30

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of copper slag to catalyze phenol degradation in water by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Copper slag was tested in combination with H(2)O(2) (slag/H(2)O(2)) and H(2)O(2)/UV (slag/H(2)O(2)/UV). The studied methods promoted the complete photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Besides, they were able to reduce about 50% the TOC content in the samples. Slag/H(2)O(2)/UV and slag/H(2)O(2) treatments have favored biodegradability increment along the reaction time. Nevertheless, the irradiated method achieved higher values of the biodegradability indicator (BOD(5)/TOC). The toxicity assessment indicated the formation of more toxic compounds in both treatments. However, the control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the effluents.

  12. Process Simulation and Modeling for Advanced Intermetallic Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Alloys Alloy Tauperaturo(K) _____________BeUating Cooling F Tri-44A1 1390 Ti-44Al-4V 1373 1383 Ti-44A1-7V 1378 1373 Ti-44&l-15V 1358 11376 40 17 TABLE 4 ...N. ~ 04 to 14 tie ttS 04 1100 tt~m ~ ir no 4 st lb m ti tim 300 T330 1’ 17 t~m S Ci t SqJC Figure~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~I 3. Throrm f()Ti4A-N-M n etn,()T-81...a peritectic y--- 4 3 + L reaction. The varying TiB2 morphologies observed as a function of both solidification rate and volume percent TiB2 show that

  13. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  14. Polyphase alloys as rechargeable electrodes in advanced battery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The rechargeability of electrochemical cells is often limited by negative electrode problems. These may include loss of capacity, increased impedance, macroscopic shape change, dendrite growth, or a tendency for filamentary or whisker growth. In principle, these problems can be reduced or eliminated by the use of alloys that undergo either displacement or insertion reactions at reactant species activities less than unity, rather than pure elements. The fundamental reasons for some of these problems with elemental electrodes, as well as the basic principles involved in the different behavior of alloys, are briefly discussed. More information is now available concerning the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of a number of alloys of potential interest for use as electrodes in elevated temperature lithium battery systems. Recent results have extended these results down to ambient temperatures, indicating that some such materials may be of interest for use with new low temperature molten salt electrolytes, or with organic solvent electrolytes. The all solid mixed conductor matrix concept is also reviewed.

  15. ADVANCED THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEMICONDUCTING FILMS), (* SOLAR CELLS , MANUFACTURING, GALLIUM ALLOYS, ARSENIC ALLOYS, PLATINUM, OXIDES, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM, METAL FILMS, COPPER, HYDROGEN, GERMANIUM ALLOYS, TIN ALLOYS, ZINC, CRYSTAL GROWTH.

  16. Online determination of copper in aluminum alloy by microchip solvent extraction using isotope dilution ICP-MS method.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masashi; Seki, Tatsuya; Chikama, Katsumi

    2009-09-15

    Isotope dilution mass spectroscopy (IDMS)/ICP-MS combined with microchip solvent extraction was successfully applied for the online determination of copper in an aluminum alloy. The microchip solvent extraction was developed for the separation of Cu from major element, and optimal pH range was wider than that of the batchwise extraction method. The dimensions of the microchip were 30 mm x 70 mm and that of micro-channel on the microchip was 180 microm wide and 40 microm deep. The copper complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline was extracted into o-xylene at pH 5.5 and back extracted with 0.1 mol l(-1) nitric acid at flow rate of 20 microl min(-1). The total extraction efficiency (water/organic solvent/nitric acid) was around 40%. IDMS/ICP-MS was coupled with solvent extraction for precise determination of Cu. The extraction and back-extraction on the microchip took about 1s and the total measurement time for the IDMS/ICP-MS was about 40s/sample. The blank value of this method was 0.1 ng g(-1). The proposed method was used for the determination of Cu in Al standard materials (JSAC 0121-C, The Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry and 7074 Al alloy, Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd.). The obtained analytical results are in good agreement with the certified values.

  17. Pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals: a new system for entering male germ cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; He, Rong; Sun, Liping; Yang, Yushan; Li, Wenqing; Sun, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Gold-based nanocrystals have attracted considerable attention for drug delivery and biological applications due to their distinct shapes. However, overcoming biological barriers is a hard and inevitable problem, which restricts medical applications of nanomaterials in vivo. Seeking for an efficient transportation to penetrate biological barriers is a common need. There are three barriers: blood-testis barrier, blood-placenta barrier, and blood-brain barrier. Here, we pay close attention to the blood-testis barrier. We found that the pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals not only could enter GC-2 cells in vitro in a short time, but also could overcome the blood–testis barrier and enter male germ cells in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the entrance efficiency would become much higher in the development stages. The results also suggested that the pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals could easier enter to germ cells in the pathological condition. This system could be a new method for theranostics in the reproductive system.

  18. Pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals: a new system for entering male germ cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu; He, Rong; Sun, Liping; Yang, Yushan; Li, Wenqing; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Gold-based nanocrystals have attracted considerable attention for drug delivery and biological applications due to their distinct shapes. However, overcoming biological barriers is a hard and inevitable problem, which restricts medical applications of nanomaterials in vivo. Seeking for an efficient transportation to penetrate biological barriers is a common need. There are three barriers: blood-testis barrier, blood-placenta barrier, and blood-brain barrier. Here, we pay close attention to the blood-testis barrier. We found that the pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals not only could enter GC-2 cells in vitro in a short time, but also could overcome the blood–testis barrier and enter male germ cells in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the entrance efficiency would become much higher in the development stages. The results also suggested that the pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals could easier enter to germ cells in the pathological condition. This system could be a new method for theranostics in the reproductive system. PMID:28000742

  19. Mechanism of Sulfide-Accelerated Corrosion of Copper-Nickel (90-10) Alloy in Seawater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    there was considerable peeling of the corrosion layer to expose the copper colored surface underneath. Auger electron spectroscopy with ion -bombardment...2 CONCLUSIONS ............... ................................... RECO MENDAT IONS ...Elements in Surface Region as Determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopic Analysis During Ion -Bombardment: Copper-Nickel (Iron) Allov Exposed to Fresh

  20. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  1. Investigation of Advanced Processed Single-Crystal Turbine Blade Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. J.; Biondo, C. M.; DeLuca, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation studied the influence of thermal processing and microstructure on the mechanical properties of the single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys PWA 1482 and PWA 1484. The objective of the program was to develop an improved single-crystal turbine blade alloy that is specifically tailored for use in hydrogen fueled rocket engine turbopumps. High-gradient casting, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and alternate heat treatment (HT) processing parameters were developed to produce pore-free, eutectic-free microstructures with different (gamma)' precipitate morphologies. Test materials were cast in high thermal gradient solidification (greater than 30 C/cm (137 F/in.)) casting furnaces for reduced dendrite arm spacing, improved chemical homogeneity, and reduced interdendritic pore size. The HIP processing was conducted in 40 cm (15.7 in.) diameter production furnaces using a set of parameters selected from a trial matrix study. Metallography was conducted on test samples taken from each respective trial run to characterize the as-HIP microstructure. Post-HIP alternate HT processes were developed for each of the two alloys. The goal of the alternate HT processing was to fully solution the eutectic gamma/(gamma)' phase islands and to develop a series of modified (gamma)' morphologies for subsequent characterization testing. This was accomplished by slow cooling through the (gamma)' solvus at controlled rates to precipitate volume fractions of large (gamma)'. Post-solution alternate HT parameters were established for each alloy providing additional volume fractions of finer precipitates. Screening tests included tensile, high-cycle fatigue (HCF), smooth and notched low-cycle fatigue (LCF), creep, and fatigue crack growth evaluations performed in air and high pressure (34.5 MPa (5 ksi)) hydrogen at room and elevated temperature. Under the most severe embrittling conditions (HCF and smooth and notched LCF in 34.5 MPa (5 ksi) hydrogen at 20 C (68 F), screening test

  2. Characterization of the Temperature Capabilities of Advanced Disk Alloy ME3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.; OConnor, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    The successful development of an advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy, ME3, was initiated in the NASA High Speed Research/Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR/EPM) Compressor/Turbine Disk program in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. This alloy was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables to have extended durability at 1200 F in large disks. Disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of the program using a realistic scaled-up disk shape and processing to enable demonstration of these properties. The objective of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technologies disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. These disks were sectioned, machined into specimens, and extensively tested. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and selectively tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process can produce 1300 to 1350 F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements.

  3. In Situ Reaction Kinetics and Microstructure Evolution in Preparing Particle-Containing Copper Alloys by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingxing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xukai

    2015-04-01

    To improve alloy properties and the distribution level of TiB2 particles in the alloy matrix, mechanical alloying was used to prepare the Cu-TiB2 alloy. But even after long-time ball milling, the in situ reaction between Cu-B and Cu-Ti alloy powders still cannot be observed in the whole process. The kinetics of the in situ reaction during high-temperature heat treatment was first investigated and led to the following results. With the increase of heat-treatment time t or diffusion depth X, both the moving speed Δ x/Δ t of reaction front edge and nucleation rate Z( x) of TiB2 particles decrease at a fast rate and finally stabilize at a very low level. The falling rate of moving speed Δ x/Δ t increases with the decrease of temperature. Although the C Ti' value of the Ti element gives a poor effect on the moving speed Δ x/Δ t, it significantly affects the nucleation rate of TiB2 particles, and its falling rate increases with a decreasing C Ti' value. And for the same diffusion depth X and C Ti', the nucleation rate of TiB2 decreases with increasing the heat-treatment temperature. These results were verified by the microstructure change after the heat treatments at temperatures of 773 K, 973 K, and 1173 K (500 °C, 700 °C, and 900 °C), respectively. Finally, the best combination of ball-milling and heat-treatment conditions was obtained.

  4. The study of marine corrosion of copper alloys in chlorinated condenser cooling circuits: the role of microbiological components.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria L; Doma, Jemimah; Sztyler, Magdalena; Beech, Iwona; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2014-06-01

    The present paper reports the on-line monitoring of corrosion behavior of the CuNi 70:30 and Al brass alloys exposed to seawater and complementary offline microbiological analyses. An electrochemical equipment with sensors specifically set for industrial application and suitable to estimate the corrosion (by linear polarization resistance technique), the biofilm growth (by the BIOX electrochemical probe), the chlorination treatment and other physical-chemical parameters of the water has been used for the on-line monitoring. In order to identify and better characterize the bacteria community present on copper alloys, tube samples were collected after a long period (1year) and short period (2days) of exposition to treated natural seawater (TNSW) and natural seawater (NSW). From the collected samples, molecular techniques such as DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and identification by sequencing were performed to better characterize and identify the microbial biodiversity present in the samples. The monitoring data confirmed the significant role played by biofouling deposition against the passivity of these Cu alloys in seawater and the positive influence of antifouling treatments based on low level dosages. Molecular analysis indicated biodiversity with the presence of Marinobacter, Alteromonas and Pseudomonas species.

  5. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of end-chill cast Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeshvaghani, R. Arabi; Ghahvechian, H.; Pirnajmeddin, H.; Shahverdi, H. R.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content. In order to study the relationship between microstructure features and wear behavior, the alloys prepared by an end-chill cast apparatus and then heat treated. Heat treatment procedure involved solutionizing at temperature of 350 °C for 72 h followed by cooling within the furnace to room temperature. Microstructural characteristics of as-cast and heat-treated alloys at different distances from the chill were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests were performed using a pin-on-disk test machine. To determine the wear mechanisms, the worn surfaces of the samples were also examined by SEM and EDS. Results showed that heat treatment led to the complete dissolution of as-cast dendritic microstructure and formation of a fine lamellar structure with well-distributed microconstituents. Moreover, addition of copper up to 1 wt% had no significant change in the microstructure, while addition of 2 and 4 wt% copper resulted in formation of ɛ (CuZn4) particle in the interdendritic regions. The influence of copper content on the wear behavior of the alloys was explained in terms of microstructural characteristics. Delamination was proposed as the dominant wear mechanism.

  6. Properties of experimental titanium-silver-copper alloys for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Kuk; Moon, Seoung-Kyun; Oh, Keun-Taek; Choi, Good-Sun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Ti-Ag-Cu alloys with a higher corrosion resistance, better biocompatibility, and better mechanical properties than commercially pure titanium and its alloys. The microstructure, corrosion resistance, mechanical property and cytotoxicity of the Ti-Ag-Cu alloys were investigated. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by open circuit potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization tests in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. The mechanical properties were evaluated using tensile and microhardness tests. The biocompatibility was tested by evaluating the cytotoxicity of the alloys using an agar-overlay test and MTT assay. It was found that the open circuit potentials of the Ti-Ag-Cu alloys were higher than that of pure Ti. However, the passive current densities of the Ti-Ag-Cu alloys were similar to that of pure titanium. The mechanical properties improved with increasing Ag and Cu content. All the Ti-Ag-Cu alloys examined were found to be noncytotoxic similar to pure Ti. Therefore, Ti-Ag-Cu alloys can be used as biomaterials in the dental field.

  7. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Berg, Regina; Straub, Bernd F

    2013-12-02

    The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I) alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC's catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I) catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates.

  8. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary The copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I) alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC’s catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I) catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates. PMID:24367437

  9. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including titanium and its alloys. Thus solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding (FSWing) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSWing), are being pursued as alternatives to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Unlike the FSWing process where the tool is used to heat the workpiece, TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material prior to stirring thus minimizing the burden on the weld tool and thereby extending its life. This study reports on the initial results of using a hybrid (H)-TSW process to join commercially pure, 1.3cm thick panels of titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2.

  10. Gold-copper nanostars as photo-thermal agents: synthesis and advanced electron microscopy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazán-Díaz, Lourdes; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Velázquez-Salazar, J. Jesús; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Romeu, David; Reyes-Gasga, José; Herrera-Becerra, Raúl; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Guisbiers, Grégory

    2015-12-01

    Nanoalloys have emerged as multi-functional nanoparticles with applications in biomedicine and catalysis. This work reports the efficient production and the advanced transmission electron microscopy characterization of gold-copper pentagonal nanostars. The morphology of the branches is controlled by the adequate choice of the capping agent. When oleylamine is used rounded nanostars are produced, while pointed nanostars are obtained by using hexadecylamine. Both types of nanostars were proved to be thermally stable and could therefore be used as therapeutic agents in photo-thermal therapies as confirmed by the near-infrared absorption spectra.Nanoalloys have emerged as multi-functional nanoparticles with applications in biomedicine and catalysis. This work reports the efficient production and the advanced transmission electron microscopy characterization of gold-copper pentagonal nanostars. The morphology of the branches is controlled by the adequate choice of the capping agent. When oleylamine is used rounded nanostars are produced, while pointed nanostars are obtained by using hexadecylamine. Both types of nanostars were proved to be thermally stable and could therefore be used as therapeutic agents in photo-thermal therapies as confirmed by the near-infrared absorption spectra. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06491k

  11. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  12. Thermal effects in equilibrium surface segregation in a copper/10-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1972-01-01

    Equilibrium surface segregation of aluminum in a copper-10-atomic-percent-aluminum single crystal alloy oriented in the /111/ direction was demonstrated by using Auger electron spectroscopy. This crystal was in the solid solution range of composition. Equilibrium surface segregation was verified by observing that the aluminum surface concentration varied reversibly with temperature in the range 550 to 850 K. These results were curve fitted to an expression for equilibrium grain boundary segregation and gave a retrieval energy of 5780 J/mole (1380 cal/mole) and a maximum frozen-in surface coverage three times the bulk layer concentration. Analyses concerning the relative merits of sputtering calibration and the effects of evaporation are also included.

  13. Progress report on the influence of test temperature and grain boundary chemistry on the fracture behavior of ITER copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Stubbins, J.F.; Edwards, D.J.

    1998-09-01

    This collaborative study was initiated to determine mechanical properties at elevated temperatures of various copper alloys by University of Illinois and Pacific Northwestern National Lab (PNNL) with support of OMG Americas, Inc. and Brush Wellman, Inc. This report includes current experimental results on notch tensile tests and pre-cracked bend bar tests on these materials at room temperature, 200 and 300 C. The elevated temperature tests were performed in vacuum and indicate that a decrease in fracture resistance with increasing temperature, as seen in previous investigations. While the causes for the decreases in fracture resistance are still not clear, the current results indicate that environmental effects are likely less important in the process than formerly assumed.

  14. A tunable amorphous p-type ternary oxide system: The highly mismatched alloy of copper tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, Patrick J. M. Walls, John M.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-09-14

    The approach of combining two mismatched materials to form an amorphous alloy was used to synthesise ternary oxides of CuO and SnO{sub 2}. These materials were analysed across a range of compositions, and the electronic structure was modelled using density functional theory. In contrast to the gradual reduction in optical band gap, the films show a sharp reduction in both transparency and electrical resistivity with copper contents greater than 50%. Simulations indicate that this change is caused by a transition from a dominant Sn 5s to Cu 3d contribution to the upper valence band. A corresponding decrease in energetic disorder results in increased charge percolation pathways: a “compositional mobility edge.” Contributions from Cu(II) sub band-gap states are responsible for the reduction in optical transparency.

  15. Joining of SiC Fiber-Bonded Ceramics using Silver, Copper, Nickel, Palladium, and Silicon-Based Alloy Interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Asthana, Rajiv; Singh, Mrityunjay; Lin, Hua-Tay; Matsunaga, Kenji; Ishikawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    SiC fiber-bonded ceramics, SA-Tyrannohex, (SA-THX) with perpendicular and parallel fiber orientations were brazed using Ag-, Ni- and Pd-base brazes, and four Si X (X: Ti, Cr, Y, Ta) eutectics. Outcomes were variable, ranging from bonded joints through partially bonded to un-bonded joints. Prominent Ti- and Si-rich interfaces developed with Cusil-ABA, Ticusil, and Copper-ABA and Ni- and Si-rich layers with MBF-20. Stress rupture tests at 650 and 750 C on Cusil-ABA-bonded joints revealed a temperature-dependent behavior for the perpendicular joints but not for the parallel joints with failure occurring at brazed interface. Higher-use temperatures can be targeted with eutectic Si Ti and Si Cr alloys.

  16. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases, Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.

  17. Advanced investment cast processing for gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.; Govern, C.

    1995-12-31

    Investment casting of gamma titanium aluminide alloys has become the near-term process of choice for component manufacture. This is largely due to its near-net shape processing capabilities which allow cast gamma components to be manufactured at a lower cost when compared to wrought or powder methods. Many papers have been published discussing the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure of HIP processed samples. However, the relationship between casting parameters and resultant microstructures has not been widely discussed. An L9 DOE casting experiment was performed to examine mold preheat, furnace atmosphere, shell type and gating design parameters. It was determined that mold preheat had a very significant effect on as-cast and as-HIP processed microstructures. Mold preheats of 70 F and 750 F produced HIP Processed microstructures containing 80 to >90% equiaxed gamma grains and 2,100 F mold preheats produced structures containing 10--30% equiaxed gamma grains. The results of this experiment will be presented, including optical microstructures and microprobe analysis.

  18. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  19. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 2: Strainrange partitioning and low-cycle fatigue results at 538 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Low-cycle fatigue tests of 1/2 Hard AMZIRC Copper and NARloy Z were performed in argon at 538 C to determine partitioned strain range versus life relationships. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests of a Zr-Cr-Mg copper-base alloy were also performed. Strain ranges, lower than those employed in previous tests, were imposed in order to extend the fatigue life curve out to approximately 400,000 cycles. An experimental copper alloy and an experimental silver alloy were also studied. Tensile tests were performed in air at room temperature and in argon at 538 C. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were performed at 538 C in argon to define the fatigue life over the regime from 300 to 3,000 cycles. For the silver alloy, three additional heat treatments were introduced, and a limited evaluation of the short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior at 538 C was performed.

  20. Characterization of nickel-copper alloy specimens processed as a part of the M553 sphere forming experiment during the Skylab 1 and 2 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, J. L.; Johnson, J. W.; Brown, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Both processed nickel-copper alloy specimens apparently completely melted by the electron beam in the Skylab M512 materials processing facility and either floated free in space, but collided with some smooth flat surface before solidifying, or remained attached to its support post during solidification. Both specimens had a smooth flat area on the surface due to this adherence during solidification. The nominal composition of the alloy before processing in space was 70 percent Ni and 30 percent Cu. Tests show that a considerable amount of copper was lost during processing by evaporation. It was further found that less copper was present in the cap areas, particularly at the surface, than was in the remainder of the specimens. The microchemistry of the dendrites and interdendritic regions, however, is in agreement with the phase diagram for this alloy. The measured densities of these specimens were less than the theoretical density of the alloy due to the amount of porosity present, however, no large voids were found by radiographic techniques.

  1. Stress-induced changes in the magnetic properties of some nickel-copper and nickel-cobalt alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jiles, D.C.; Chang, T.T.; Hougen, D.R.; Ranjan, R.

    1988-10-01

    This paper presents results on the magnetic properties of NiCu and NiCo alloys with compositions in the range 70%--100% Ni. Measurements include coercivity initial susceptibility, maximum differential susceptibility, magnetostriction, and Barkhausen effect emissions. Results revealed a surprising increase in the magnetostriction as a function of magnetic induction B as the copper content increased. The saturation magnetostriction lambda/sub s/ was nevertheless found to decrease with copper content. The addition of cobalt reduced the magnitude of the magnetostriction resulting in a change of sign from negative to positive at between 20% and 30% cobalt. Coercivity was found to be little affected by elastic stress, but strongly affected by plastic deformation such as occurs, for example, in cold working. A similar result was true for initial susceptibility. Maximum differential susceptibility was, however, found to be strongly dependent on elastic stress. Results were interpreted in terms of stress induced uniaxial anisotropy. As the tensile stress increased the magnetization became more reversible, but the susceptibility decreased.

  2. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    DOE PAGES

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; ...

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation.more » γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.« less

  3. Chemistry and electrochemistry of environment-assisted cracking of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kevin Richard

    2001-11-01

    The mechanism of environment-assisted cracking (EAC) of 7xxx-series alloys is unclear, involving uncertain contributions of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and anodic dissolution (AD). Fundamental understanding of the EAC mechanism is lacking in part because the role of the crack environment is not well understood. The objective of this research was to characterize and understand the role of the crack chemistry and electrochemistry during aqueous EAC of AA 7050. The crack environment can differ significantly from bulk conditions. Cations, produced by AD, hydrolyze causing local acidification; anions from the bulk electrolyte concentrate within the crack to maintain charge neutrality; ohmic potential drop results from ion migration and diffusion. A positive correlation exists between da/dt and [Al3+]Tip in chromate-chloride electrolyte wherein tip dissolution dominates flank corrosion in establishing the crack chemistry. Tip pH was 2 to 4 and determined by the reaction Al3+ + H 2O = AlOH2+ + H+. The tip potential (ETip) was approximately -0.90 VSCE and independent of EApp . The low ETip and pH promote H+ reduction, generating atomic and molecular H. Hydrogen bubbles restrict ion movement, substantially increasing the effective crack resistance over bulk conditions. Absorbed atomic hydrogen facilitates HE. The spontaneous transition from slow, incubation to high-rate da/dt coincides with the establishment of a critical aggressive tip chemistry and tip depolarization. Development of the critical occluded chemistry necessary for accelerated da/dt is a competitive process between opposing forces: AD, hydrolysis and migration promote an aggressive environment whereas diffusion reduces concentration gradients, thereby retarding the formation of an aggressive chemistry. Quantitative assessment of the contribution of tip dissolution to crack advance is hindered by a lack of knowledge of two key parameters: the tip corrosion front height and the effective crack conductivity

  4. Advanced Gear Alloys for Ultra High Strength Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Tony; Krantz, Timothy; Sebastian, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Single tooth bending fatigue (STBF) test data of UHS Ferrium C61 and C64 alloys are presented in comparison with historical test data of conventional gear steels (9310 and Pyrowear 53) with comparable statistical analysis methods. Pitting and scoring tests of C61 and C64 are works in progress. Boeing statistical analysis of STBF test data for the four gear steels (C61, C64, 9310 and Pyrowear 53) indicates that the UHS grades exhibit increases in fatigue strength in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) regime. In the high cycle fatigue (HCF) regime, the UHS steels exhibit better mean fatigue strength endurance limit behavior (particularly as compared to Pyrowear 53). However, due to considerable scatter in the UHS test data, the anticipated overall benefits of the UHS grades in bending fatigue have not been fully demonstrated. Based on all the test data and on Boeing s analysis, C61 has been selected by Boeing as the gear steel for the final ERDS demonstrator test gearboxes. In terms of potential follow-up work, detailed physics-based, micromechanical analysis and modeling of the fatigue data would allow for a better understanding of the causes of the experimental scatter, and of the transition from high-stress LCF (surface-dominated) to low-stress HCF (subsurface-dominated) fatigue failure. Additional STBF test data and failure analysis work, particularly in the HCF regime and around the endurance limit stress, could allow for better statistical confidence and could reduce the observed effects of experimental test scatter. Finally, the need for further optimization of the residual compressive stress profiles of the UHS steels (resulting from carburization and peening) is noted, particularly for the case of the higher hardness C64 material.

  5. Post-anti-van't Hoff-Le Bel motif in atomically thin germanium-copper alloy film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Popov, Ivan A; Boldyrev, Alexander I; Heine, Thomas; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-07-21

    Using quantum-chemical calculations and reduced dimensionality, we show that the "post-anti-van't Hoff-Le Bel" motif of germanium can be stabilized in a novel two-dimensional (2D) copper-germanium alloy film. This hypercoordinate sheet is the first stable planar hexacoordinate germanium material in 2D space. First principle calculations and molecular dynamics indicate that this Cu2Ge alloy film is a diamagnetic metal, and survives brief 10 ps annealing up to 1200 K. The electron delocalization and chemical bonding are unique and different from that of graphene, the all-boron α-sheet, and the BC3 honeycomb epitaxial sheet. Furthermore, we open a new route for the transformation of individual molecules to extended planar 2D sheets. This will provide new possibilities for extended planar hypercoordinate materials. We hope that these results will provide new opportunities to design post-anti-van't Hoff-Le Bel motifs by manipulation of dimensionality and quantum confinement.

  6. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 1: Preliminary results for 12 alloys at 1000 F (538 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Short-term tensile evaluations at room temperature and 538 C and low-cycle fatigue evaluations at 538 C are presented for the following materials: Zirconium copper-annealed, Zirconium copper-1/4 hard, Zirconium copper-1/2 hard, Tellurium copper-1/2 hard, Chromium copper-SA and aged, OFHC copper-hard, OFHC copper-1/4 hard, OFHC copper-annealed, Silver-as drawn, Zr-Cr-Mg copper-SA, CW and aged, Electroformed copper-30-35 ksi, and Co-Be-Zr- copper-SA, aged. A total of 50 tensile tests and 76 low-cycle fatigue tests were performed using a strain rate of 0.2 percent per second.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of copper clustering in Fe-Cu alloys under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.; Kwon, S. C.; Hong, J. H.

    2004-10-01

    We present the computational approach for studying the microstructures of Cu clusters in Fe-Cu alloys by combining the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Monte Carlo methods. The MD simulation is used to characterize the primary damage resulting from the displacement cascade in Fe. Then, using the Metropolis Monte Carlo methods, the microstructure of the Cu clusters is predicted under the assumption that the system will evolve towards the equilibrium state. The formation of the Cu clusters is apparent for Fe-Cu alloys of a higher Cu content (1.0 w/o), whereas the degree of Cu clustering is not significant for the lower Cu content (0.1 w/o) alloys. The atomic configuration of the Cu-vacancy complex under irradiation, produced by this simulation, is in a fair agreement with the experiments. The simulation is expected to provide important information on the Cu-cluster morphology, which is useful for experimental data analysis.

  8. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  9. Preparation of Copper (Cu)-Nickel (Ni) Alloy Thin Films for Bilayer Graphene Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    1, 4:1, and 3:1 were developed for use as a catalyst for the growth of graphene. A design of experiments was initiated with 3 tasks to complete: 1...Experimental 2 2.1 Metal Catalyst Preparation 2 2.2 Alloy and Grain Growth Conditions 3 3. Results and Discussion 4 3.1 Metal Catalyst ...surface is fully covered by 1 layer of graphene due to the self- limiting effect.4 Recently, Cu-nickel (Ni) alloy foils have been used as a catalyst to

  10. Raising the Reliability of Forming Rolls by Alloying Their Core with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhkina, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical properties and the structure of forming rolls from cast irons of different compositions are studied. A novel iron including a copper additive that lowers its chilling and raises the homogeneity of the structure is suggested for the roll cores. The use of such iron should raise the reliability of the rolls in operation.

  11. Effect of Copper Addition on Crystallization and Properties of Hafnium Containing HITPERM Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    grain growth, thus increasing ther- mal stability. 3 Chromium and vanadium additions have detrimental ef- fect on magnetic properties. 4 Combined...selective oxidation of iron and formation of MO–Fe2O3 type where M=Co and/or other alloying elements spinel structures. These surface oxides do not block

  12. Alloying effect of copper on the corrosion properties of low-alloy steel for flue gas desulfurization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hong; Park, Sun-Ah; Kim, Jung-Gu; Shin, Kee-Sam; He, Yinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The alloying effect of Cu for a flue gas desulfurization materials was investigated using the electrochemical methods in the modified green death solution and the surface analyses. The test results demonstrated that the densely formed rust layer with high metallic Cu content improves the corrosion resistance of Cu-containing steel in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) environment. The rust layer on the surface of the 0.02 wt% Cu steel, which has an insufficient Cu content, was less protective than others. The 0.05 wt% Cu steel represented the highest corrosion resistance due to the formation of the densely formed rust layer with optimum Cu content. Because the free standing Cu2S precipitates had the insoluble characteristic in highly acidic solution, it produced the relatively porous Cu-enriched layer on the 0.08 wt% Cu steel surface. From these phenomena, the corrosion resistance of specimen decreased as the Cu content of specimen increased from 0.05 wt% to 0.08 wt%.

  13. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  14. Effectiveness of nickel plating in inhibiting atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, T.; Sorensen, R.; Guilinger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A series of tests was run to determine the effect of Ni plating thickness on connector contact resistance. Copper coupons were plated with an electrolytic nickel strike followed by electroless nickel to produce Ni layers of 10, 20, 55 and 100 {micro}in. The coupons were then exposed to a simulated industrial environment. Pore corrosion was observed after the exposure, which correlated with Ni thickness. In a second series of tests, beryllium-copper four-tine contacts with 50 {micro}in of gold plate over electrolytic nickel strike/electroless-nickel plates of varying thickness were exposed the same corrosive environment. Contact resistance of mated pairs was monitored over a two-month period. The degradation in contact resistance correlated with the Ni thickness used in the connectors.

  15. Cavitation Erosion of Copper, Brass, Aluminum and Titanium Alloys in Mineral Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The variations of the mean depth of penetration, the mean depth rate of penetration, MDRP, the pit diameter 2a and depth h due to cavitation attack on Al 6061-T6, Cu, brass of composition Cu-35Zn-3Pb and Ti-5A1-2.5Sn are presented. The experiments are conducted in a mineral oil of viscosity 110 CS using a magnetostrictive oscillator of 20 kHz frequency. Based on MDRP on the materials, it is found that Ti-5Al-2.5Sn exhibits cavitation erosion resistance which is two orders of magnitude higher than the other three materials. The values of h/a are the largest for copper and decreased with brass, titanium, and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope studies show that extensive slip and cross slip occurred on the surface prior to pitting and erosion. Twinning is also observed on copper and brass.

  16. Migration protocol to estimate metal exposure from mouthing copper and tin alloy objects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low blood lead levels previously thought to pose no health risks may have an adverse impact on the cognitive development of children. This concern has given rise to new regulatory restrictions upon lead metal containing products intended for child use. However few reliable experimental testing methods to estimate exposure levels from these materials are available. Methods The present work describes a migration test using a mimetic saliva fluid to estimate the chronic exposure of children to metals such as lead while mouthing metallic objects. The surrogate saliva medium was composed of: 150 mM NaCl, 0.16% porcine Mucin and 5 mM buffer MOPS, adjusted to pH 7.2. Alloys samples, in the form of polished metallic disc of known surface area, were subjected to an eight hours test. Results Two whitemetal alloys Sn/Pb/Sb/Cu and three brass alloys Cu/Zn/Pb were tested using the saliva migration protocol. In the case of the whitemetal alloys, first order release kinetics resulting in the release of 0.03 and 0.51 μg lead/cm2 after 8 hours of tests were observed, for lead contents of 0.05-0.07% and 5.5%, respectively. Brasses exhibited linear incremental release rates of 0.043, 0.175 and 0.243 μg lead/cm2h for lead contents of 0.1-0.2%, 1.7-2.2% and 3.1-3.5%, respectively. The linear regression analysis of lead release rates relative to Pb content in brasses yielded a slope of 0.08 μg lead/cm2h%Pb (r2 = 0.92). Lead release rates were used to estimate the mean daily mouthing exposure of a child to lead, according to age-specific estimates of mouthing time behavior. Calculated daily intakes were used as oral inputs for the IEUBK toxicokinetic model, predicting only marginal changes in blood lead levels (0.2 μg lead/dL or less) for children aged 0.5 to 1 years old exposed to either class of alloy. Conclusions The results of this study as a whole support the use of migration data of metal ions, rather than total metal content, to estimate health risk

  17. Thermal and Mechanical Property Characterization of the Advanced Disk Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.

    2005-01-01

    A low solvus, high refractory (LSHR) powder metallurgy disk alloy was recently designed using experimental screening and statistical modeling of composition and processing variables on sub-scale disks to have versatile processing-property capabilities for advanced disk applications. The objective of the present study was to produce a scaled-up disk and apply varied heat treat processes to enable full-scale demonstration of LSHR properties. Scaled-up disks were produced, heat treated, sectioned, and then machined into specimens for mechanical testing. Results indicate the LSHR alloy can be processed to produce fine and coarse grain microstructures with differing combinations of strength and time-dependent mechanical properties, for application at temperatures exceeding 1300 F.

  18. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Part 2: Scale-up investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Three experimental tantalum alloy compositions containing 14-16% W, 1% Re, 0.7% Hf, 0.025% C or 0.015% C and 0.015% N were prepared as two inch diameter ingots by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The as-cast ingots were processed by extrusion and swaging to one inch and 0.4 inch diameter rod and evaluated. Excellent high temperature forging behavior was exhibited by all three compositions. Creep strength at 2000 F to 2400 F was enhanced by higher tungsten additions as well as substitution of nitrogen for carbon. Weldability of all three compositions was determined to be adequate. Room temperature ductility was retained in the advanced tantalum alloy compositions as well as a notched/unnotched strength ratio of 1.4 for a notched bar having a K sub t = 2.9.

  19. Anti-corrosion film formed on HAl77-2 copper alloy surface by aliphatic polyamine in 3 wt.% NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinzhe; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Daquan; Wang, Yizhen; Gao, Lixin

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of a polyamine compound, N-(4-amino-2, 3-dimethylbutyl)-2, 3-dimethylbutane-1, 4-diamine (ADDD), was investigated for HAl77-2 copper alloy in 3 wt.% NaCl solution. Electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques were employed for this research. The results show that ADDD strongly suppresses the corrosion of HAl77-2 alloy. The inhibition efficiency of ADDD is 98.6% at 0.5 mM, which is better than benzotriazole (BTAH) at the same concentration. Polarization curves indicate that ADDD is an anodic type inhibitor. Surface analysis suggests that a protective film is formed via the interaction of ADDD and copper. FT-IR reveals that the inhibition mechanism of ADDD is dominated by chemisorption onto the copper alloy surface to form an inhibition film. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations methods show that ADDD adsorbs on HAl77-2 surface via amino group in its molecule.

  20. Mechanical property changes and microstructures of dispersion-strengthened copper alloys after neutron irradiation at 411, 414, and 529 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Stubbins, J.F. ); Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys have shown promise for certain high heat flux applications in both near term and long term fusion devices. This study examines mechanical properties changes and microstructural evolution in several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys which were subjected to high levels of irradiation-induced displacement damage. Irradiations were carried out in FFTF to 34 and 50 dpa at 411--414{degree}C and 32 dpa at 529{degree}C. The alloys include several oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys based on the Cu-Al system, as well as ones based on the Cu-Cr and Cu-Hf systems. Of this group, certain of the Cu-Al alloys, those produced by an internal oxidation technique to contain alumina weight fractions of 0.15 to 0.25% outperformed the other alloys in all respects. These alloys, designated CuAl15, CuAl20, and CuAl25, were found to be resistant to void swelling up to 50 dpa at 414{degree}C, and to retain their superior mechanical and physical properties after extended irradiation. The major factor which controls the stability during irradiation was found to be the dispersoid volume fraction and distribution. The other alloys examined were less resistant to radiation-induced properties changes for a variety of reasons. Some of these include dispersoid redistribution by ballistic resolution, effects of retained dissolved oxygen, and non-uniformity of dispersion distribution. The effect of laser welding was also examined. This joining technique was found to be unacceptable since it destroys the dispersoid distribution and thereby the resistance of the alloys to radiation-induced damage.

  1. Tailoring the magnetic properties of CoFeNi alloys with variations in copper contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Oh; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Gyeung Ho; Jeung, Won Young

    2006-04-01

    CoFeNi alloys are some of the most studied soft magnetic materials because of their superior properties over FeNi alloys as write head core materials in hard disk drives. Pulsed electrodeposition was shown to be an interesting approach to vary the crystalline structure of the fcc-bcc mixed phase CoFeNi and CoFeNiCu films without changing the composition and the grain size by using a single bath. The permeability μ of CoFeNiCu films plated from bath composition exceeded 4.6×106. Coercivity Hc was 20-73 A/m. The high saturation magnetic flux Bs was 1.8 T. The soft magnetic CoFeNiCu film prepared satisfies all the requirements needed for the preparation of magnetic recording heads, as all magnetic properties were improved in this direction.

  2. High Temperature, Slow Strain Rate Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy ME3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; OConnor, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    The advanced disk alloy ME3 was designed in the HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 F in large disks. This was achieved by designing a disk alloy and process producing balanced monotonic, cyclic, and time-dependent mechanical properties. combined with robust processing and manufacturing characteristics. The resulting baseline alloy, processing, and supersolvus heat treatment produces a uniform, relatively fine mean grain size of about ASTM 7, with as-large-as (ALA) grain size of about ASTM 3. There is a long term need for disks with higher rim temperature capabilities than 1250 F. This would allow higher compressor exit (T3) temperatures and allow the full utilization of advanced combustor and airfoil concepts under development. Several approaches are being studied that modify the processing and chemistry of ME3, to possibly improve high temperature properties. Promising approaches would be applied to subscale material, for screening the resulting mechanical properties at these high temperatures. n obvious path traditionally employed to improve the high temperature and time-dependent capabilities of disk alloys is to coarsen the grain size. A coarser grain size than ASTM 7 could potentially be achieved by varying the forging conditions and supersolvus heat treatment. The objective of this study was to perform forging and heat treatment experiments ("thermomechanical processing experiments") on small compression test specimens of the baseline ME3 composition, to identify a viable forging process allowing significantly coarser grain size targeted at ASTM 3-5, than that of the baseline, ASTM 7.

  3. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  4. Processing Studies of Aluminum-Magnesium and Aluminum-Copper-Lithium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    mechanisim of microstructural refinement during processing. Most recently, Gorsuch has investigated the effects of varying the annealing time between...obtained during testing at 300°C [Ref 3]. A portion of this research will follow that of Gorsuch by extending the annealing interval to 60 minutes in...on an Al.10Mg.0.lZr(wt.pct) alloy wherein Gorsuch varied the annealing times between rolling passes. As the annealing times are increased from 5

  5. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2005-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

  6. Atomic structure and thermophysical properties of molten silver-copper oxide air braze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, John Steven

    The Ag-CuOx materials system is the basis for a family of filler alloys used in a recently developed ceramic-metal joining technique referred to as air brazing, which is a brazing process that can be carried out in ambient air rather than under the vacuum or inert to reducing gas conditions required for conventional brazing methods. This research was conducted to elucidate the atomic coordination and selected thermophysical properties of these materials as a function of temperature when they are in the salient liquid state in air, since this is when the critical steps of wetting and spreading occur in the joining process. A series of alloys was selected spanning the entire length of the phase diagram including the pure end members, Ag and CuOx; alloys that form the two constituent single phase liquids; and alloys for which the two liquid phases coexist in the miscibility gap of the phase diagram. The oxygen content of the liquid alloys in air was measured using thermogravimetry. The oxidative weight gain of 99.999% pure metallic precursors was measured while simultaneously accounting for the concurrent silver volatility using a method that was developed in the course of the study. The surface tension and mass density were measured using the maximum bubble pressure method. The number density was calculated based on the information gained from the oxygen content and mass density measurements. For compositions that were amenable to laser heating, containerless high energy x-ray scattering measurements of the liquid atomic coordination were performed using a synchrotron beamline, an aerodynamic levitator, and laser heating. For the remaining compositions x-ray scattering measurements were performed in a beamline-compatible furnace. The two liquid phases that form in this materials system have distinct atomic coordinations characterized by an average of nearly two-fold coordinated ionic metal-oxygen pairs in the CuOx-rich liquid and nearly eight-fold coordinated atomic

  7. Effects of copper content on the shell characteristics of hollow steel spheres manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-04-01

    Metallic hollow spheres are used as base materials in the manufacture of hollow sphere structures and metallic foams. In this study, steel hollow spheres were successfully manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique. The spheres' shells were characterized by optical microscopy in conjunction with microstructural image analysis software, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microscopic evaluations revealed that the shells consist of sintered iron powder, sintered copper powder, sodium silicate, and porosity regions. In addition, the effects of copper content on various parameters such as shell defects, microcracks, thickness, and porosities were investigated. The results indicated that increasing the copper content results in decreases in the surface fraction of shell porosities and the number of microcracks and an increase in shell thickness.

  8. Evaluation of single liquid primers with organic sulfur compound for bonding between indirect composite material and silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Shimoe, Saiji; Tanoue, Naomi; Satoda, Takahiro; Murayama, Takeshi; Nikawa, Hiroki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of primers on bonding between a silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy and an indirect composite material. Cast disks were air-abraded with alumina, conditioned with one of five primers (Alloy Primer, Luna-Wing Primer, Metal Primer II, Metaltite, M.L. Primer), and bonded with a light-activated indirect composite. Shear bond strengths were determined after 20,000 times of thermocycling. The results showed that four of the primers, except the Luna-Wing Primer, were effective in enhancing the bond strength as compared with the unprimed control group. Of these four primers, Alloy Primer, Metal Primer II, and M.L. Primer exhibited significantly greater bond strengths. It can be concluded that the effectiveness of primers varies considerably according to the organic sulfur compounds added to the solvent, and that care must be taken in selecting priming agents for bonding the composite material and the silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

  9. Inhibition of steam-condensate corrosion of copper-based alloys by hydrazine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Breeze, G.A.; Berry, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    An experimental evaluation was made of the potential inhibiting effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of CDA 687 (aluminium brass), and CDA 706 (90 copper - 10 nickel) in a simulated steam condensate containing ammonia under deaerated and partially aerated conditions. It was found that hydrazine inhibited the corrosion of CDA 687 under deaerated conditions, but increased corrosion rates somewhat under partially aerated (1 ppM oxygen) conditions. Corrosion rates of CDA 706 were more than an order of magnitude lower than CDA 687 and were not measurably influenced by hydrazine.

  10. Investigation into the stress corrosion cracking properties of AA2099, an aluminum-lithium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Barbara Nicole

    Recently developed Al-Li-Cu alloys show great potential for implementation in the aerospace industry because of the attractive mix of good mechanical properties and low density. AA2099 is an Al-Li-Cu alloy with the following composition Al-2.69wt%Cu-1.8wt%Li-0.6wt%Zn-0.3wt%Mg-0.3wt%Mn-0.08wt%Zr. The environmental assisted cracking and localized corrosion behavior of the AA2099 was investigated in this thesis. The consequences of uncontrolled grain boundary precipitation via friction stir welding on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2099 was investigated first. Using constant extension rate testing, intergranular corrosion immersion experiments, and potentiodynamic scans, the heat-affected zone on the trailing edge of the weld (HTS) was determined to be most susceptible of the weld zones. The observed SCC behavior for the HTS was linked to the dissolution of an active phase (Al2CuLi, T1) populating the grain boundary. It should be stated that the SCC properties of AA2099 in the as-received condition were determined to be good. Focus was then given to the electrochemical behavior of precipitate phases that may occupy grain and sub-grain boundaries in AA2099. The grain boundary micro-chemistry and micro-electrochemistry have been alluded to within the literature as having significant influence on the SCC behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Major precipitates found in this alloy system are T1 (Al 2CuLi), T2 (Al7.5Cu4Li), T B (Al6CuLi3), and theta (Al2 Cu). These phases were produced in bulk form so that the electrochemical nature of each phase could be characterized. It was determined T1 was most active electrochemically and theta was least. When present on grain boundaries in the alloy, electrochemical behavior of the individual precipitates aligned with the observed corrosion behavior of the alloy (e.g. TB was accompanied by general pitting corrosion and T 1 was accompanied by intergranular corrosion attack). In addition to the electrochemical behavior of

  11. Degradation of the shape memory effect in copper-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stalmans, R.; Van Humbeeck, J.; Delaey, L. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science)

    1994-12-01

    The reversible transformation of the parent phase (austenite) to the product phase (martensite) is the basis of several shape memory properties in specific Cu-base alloys. In this respect, the two-way memory effect (TWME) refers the reversible, spontaneous shape change from a hot austenitic shape to a cold martensitic shape during cooling and heating without the application of external stresses. It is known that the magnitude of the TWME decrease during thermal or thermomechanical cycling, in particular in Cu-base shape memory alloys. It is however important to remark that this decrease, indicated as degradation of the TWME, can be caused as well by a decrease of the spontaneous martensitic strain, i.e. a degradation of the cold shape, as by an increase of the residual austenitic strain, i.e. a degradation of the hot shape, or by a combination of both. The degradation of the TWME, and of the hot and cold shape is influenced by a number of factors including the alloy composition, the processing, the heat treatment, the training procedure and the parameters of the thermal or thermomechanical cycling. The knowledge of the degradation phenomena is still limited. In a subsequent study of the relationships between training and the two-way memory behavior, the authors have shown that the degradation of the hot shape already starts during training. It was found that the residual austenitic strain [gamma][sub a] increases gradually during training cycling; [gamma][sub a] is also in the case of training composed of a recoverable residual strain [gamma][sub ar] and a non-recoverable residual strain [gamma][sub anr]. The present paper reports the results of the specific experiments which were designed based upon the results described above. The evolutions during thermal cycling of the TWME, of the martensitic strain and austenitic strain, and of the recoverable and non-recoverable austenitic strain are presented and discussed.

  12. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the a three year University Coal Research grant (DEFG26-03NT41792) at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2006. We made excellent progress toward our goal of contributing to the development of high productivity, sulfur tolerant composite metal membranes for hydrogen production and membrane reactors. Composite Pd and Pd alloy metal membranes with thin metal films (1-7 {micro}m) were prepared on porous stainless steel and ceramic supports that meet or exceed the DOE 2010 and 2015 pure hydrogen flux targets at differential pressure of only 20 psi. For example, a 2 {micro}m pure Pd membrane on a Pall AccuSep{reg_sign} substrate achieved an ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor of over 6000, with a pure hydrogen flux of 210 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at only 20 psig feed pressure. Similar performance was achieved with a Pd{sub 80}Au{sub 20} composite membrane on a similar stainless steel substrate. Extrapolating the pure hydrogen flux of this PdAu membrane to the DOE Fossil Energy target conditions of 150 psia feed pressure and 50 psia permeate pressure gives a value of 508 SCFH/ft{sup 2}, exceeding the 2015 target. At these thicknesses, it is the support cost that will dominate the cost of a large scale module. In a direct comparison of FCC phase PdCu and PdAu alloys on identical supports, we showed that a Pd{sub 85}Au{sub 15} (mass %) alloy membrane is not inhibited by CO, CO{sub 2}, or steam present in a water-gas shift feed mixture at 400 C, has better resistance to sulfur than a Pd{sub 94}Cu{sub 6} membrane, and has over twice the hydrogen permeance.

  13. Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Copper-Nickel Thin Film and Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    1000 °C in a low- pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) reactor with a gas mixture of 40%H2/60%Ar at 15 Torr pressure to form the final alloys...uniformity of the film improves if the chamber pressure is decreased and/or the distance between target and substrate is increased, we decided to...of 500 W d.c. to improve the deposition rate in order to achieve a film thickness of 1 µm within a reasonable amount of time. Substrate rotation

  14. Gold-copper nano-alloy, "Tumbaga", in the era of nano: phase diagram and segregation.

    PubMed

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Mejia-Rosales, Sergio; Khanal, Subarna; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Whetten, Robert L; José-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-11-12

    Gold-copper (Au-Cu) phases were employed already by pre-Columbian civilizations, essentially in decorative arts, whereas nowadays, they emerge in nanotechnology as an important catalyst. The knowledge of the phase diagram is critical to understanding the performance of a material. However, experimental determination of nanophase diagrams is rare because calorimetry remains quite challenging at the nanoscale; theoretical investigations, therefore, are welcomed. Using nanothermodynamics, this paper presents the phase diagrams of various polyhedral nanoparticles (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, decahedron, dodecahedron, rhombic dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, cuboctahedron, and icosahedron) at sizes 4 and 10 nm. One finds, for all the shapes investigated, that the congruent melting point of these nanoparticles is shifted with respect to both size and composition (copper enrichment). Segregation reveals a gold enrichment at the surface, leading to a kind of core-shell structure, reminiscent of the historical artifacts. Finally, the most stable structures were determined to be the dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, and icosahedron with a Cu-rich core/Au-rich surface. The results of the thermodynamic approach are compared and supported by molecular-dynamics simulations and by electron-microscopy (EDX) observations.

  15. Particle clearance and histopathology in lungs of C3H/HeJ mice administered beryllium/copper alloy by intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Benson, J M; Holmes, A M; Barr, E B; Nikula, K J; March, T H

    2000-08-01

    Beryllium/copper (BeCu) alloys are commonly used in the electronics, automotive, consumer, defense, and aerospace industries. Some individuals exposed occupationally to BeCu alloys have developed chronic beryllium disease. However, little is known of the toxicity and fate of BeCu alloys in the respiratory tract. To begin to address this question, we investigated the pulmonary toxicity and clearance of BeCu alloy (2% Be; 98% Cu) in mice. Groups of 40 female C3H/HeJ mice were administered 12.5, 25, and 100 microg BeCu alloy or 2 and 8 microg Be metal by intratracheal instillation. Mice were sacrificed at 1 h and 1, 7, 14, and 28 days postinstillation. Left lungs were evaluated for histopathological change. Right lungs were analyzed for Be and Cu content. Twenty-five percent of the high-dose BeCu mice and 7.5% of the mid-dose BeCu mice died within 24 h of dosing. Acute pulmonary lesions included acute alveolitis and interstitial inflammation. Type II epithelial cell hyperplasia and centriacinar fibrosis were present by 7 days after dosing. Lesions persisted through 28 days after instillation. No lesions attributable to alloy exposure were present in liver or kidney. Be metal instillation caused no deaths and minimal pulmonary changes over the time studied, indicating that the pulmonary lesions were due to Cu rather than Be. Cu cleared the lung with a half-time of 0. 5-2 days. Be cleared with a half-time of several weeks or longer. Results of this study suggest that exposure to BeCu alloy is more acutely toxic to lung than Be metal. The results of tissue analyses also indicate that, while the Cu component of the alloy clears the lung rapidly, Be is retained and may accumulate upon repeated exposure.

  16. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  17. Self-diffusivity and interdiffusivity of molten aluminum-copper alloys under pressure, derived from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, Robert E.; Cabot, William H.; Caspersen, Kyle J.; Greenough, Jeffrey A.; Richards, David F.; Streitz, Frederick H.; Miller, Paul L.

    2012-03-01

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate diffusion in molten aluminum-copper (AlCu) alloys. The self-diffusivities and Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities are calculated for AlCu mixtures using the Green-Kubo formulas at temperatures from 1000 to 4000 K and pressures from 0 to 25 GPa, along with additional points at higher temperatures and pressures. The diffusivities are corrected for finite-size effects. The Maxwell-Stefan diffusivity is compared to the diffusivity calculated from the self-diffusivities using a generalization of the Darken equation. We find that the effects of cross-correlation are small. Using the calculated self-diffusivities, we have assessed whether dilute hard-sphere and dilute Lennard-Jones models apply to the molten mixture. Neither of the two dilute gas diffusivities describes the diffusivity in molten Al and Cu. We report generalized analytic models for the self-diffusivities and interdiffusivity (mutual diffusivity) that fit the MD results well. The MD-derived transport coefficients are in good agreement with the available experimental data. We also report MD calculations of the viscosity and an analytic fit to those results. The ionic thermal conductivity is discussed briefly.

  18. Micro/nanobinary structure of silver films on copper alloys with stable water-repellent property under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changdong; Ren, Hang; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2009-10-20

    Facile galvanic replacement was adopted to grow cauliflower-like and dendrite coral-like silver films on commercial copper alloy substrates. Both types of silver films possess micro/nanobinary structures, the formation and evolution of which are achieved through the oriented attachment growth mechanism. After modification by a monolayer of n-dodecanethiol, the cauliflower-like silver film becomes hydrophobic with a contact angle (CA) of 115 +/- 1 degrees and a CA hysteresis of 74 +/- 1 degrees and the dendrite coral-like silver film exhibits the extreme hydrophobicity characterized by a CA of 158 +/- 1 degrees and a CA hysteresis of less than 2 +/- 1 degrees . Furthermore, the bouncing property of millimeter-sized water droplets on the modified dendrite coral-like silver surface is much better than that on the modified cauliflower-like silver surface. The different wetting property between the two silver films is attributed to the surface roughness. Larger surface roughness provided by the dendrite coral-like silver film means more air pockets, among the micro/nanobinary structures, that bounce water droplets back more strongly. The dynamic bouncing behavior of water droplets, such as restitution coefficient and contact time, on the superhydrophobic modified cauliflower-like silver surface was also investigated at different impact velocities.

  19. Physicochemical properties of copper important for its antibacterial activity and development of a unified model.

    PubMed

    Hans, Michael; Mathews, Salima; Mücklich, Frank; Solioz, Marc

    2015-03-16

    Contact killing is a novel term describing the killing of bacteria when they come in contact with metallic copper or copper-containing alloys. In recent years, the mechanism of contact killing has received much attention and many mechanistic details are available. The authors here review some of these mechanistic aspects with a focus on the critical physicochemical properties of copper which make it antibacterial. Known mechanisms of contact killing are set in context to ionic, corrosive, and physical properties of copper. The analysis reveals that the oxidation behavior of copper, paired with the solubility properties of copper oxides, are the key factors which make metallic copper antibacterial. The concept advanced here explains the unique position of copper as an antibacterial metal. Based on our model, novel design criteria for metallic antibacterial materials may be derived.

  20. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

    2012-10-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

  1. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C–H bond amidation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C–N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C–H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  2. DEFORMATION SUBSTRUCTURES AND THEIR TRANSITIONS IN LASER SHOCK-COMPRESSED COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M A; Schneider, M S; Jarmakani, H; Kad, B; Remington, B A; Kalantar, D H; McNaney, J; Cao, B; Wark, J

    2007-10-17

    It is shown that the short pulse durations (0.1-10 ns) in laser shock compression ensure a rapid decay of the pulse and quenching of the shocked sample in times that are orders of magnitude lower than in conventional explosively driven plate impact experiments. Thus, laser compression, by virtue of a much more rapid cooling, enables the retention of a deformation structure closer to the one existing during shock. The smaller pulse length also decreases the propensity for localization. Copper and copper aluminum (2 and 6 wt% Al) with orientations [001] and [{bar 1}34] were subjected to high intensity laser pulses with energy levels of 70 to 300 J delivered in an initial pulse duration of approximately 3 ns. The [001] and [{bar 1}34] orientations were chosen since they respectively maximize and minimize the number of slip systems with highest resolved shear stresses. Systematic differences of the defect substructure were observed as a function of pressure, stacking-fault energy and crystalline orientation. The changes in the mechanical properties for each condition were compared using micro- and nano-hardness measurements and correlated well with observations of the defect substructure. Three regimes of plastic deformation were identified and their transitions modeled: dislocation cells, stacking-faults, and twins. An existing constitutive description of the slip to twinning transition, based on the critical shear stress, was expanded to incorporate the effect of stacking-fault energy. A new physically-based criterion accounting for stacking-fault energy was developed that describes the transition from perfect loop to partial loop homogeneous nucleation, and consequently from cells to stacking-faults. These calculations predict transitions that are in qualitative agreement with the effect of SFE.

  3. Handling characteristics of a palladium-free gallium-based alloy compared with a high copper dental amalgam in a simulated clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Shaini, F J; Shortall, A C; Ellakwa, A E; Marquis, P M

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the handling characteristics of a palladium-free gallium-based alloys (Galloy) with those of a high-copper amalgam (Permite C). The study had a particular interest in the evaluation of the direct placement delivery system used with both alloys. Ten dentists participated in the current study. Each placed two amalgam and two gallium-based alloy restorations in conventional class II cavities prepared in acrylic typodont teeth. None of the participating dentists had used the direct placement delivery system or had any previous experience with gallium-based alloy and no practice was allowed beforehand. The restorations were evaluated according to the following criteria: ease of loading the cavity (delivery system), ease of condensation, capacity to produce and sustain contact area, ease of carving, resistance to damage during removal of the matrix band, overall quality of the restoration and the available working time. Each criterion was given a score on a scale of 1-5 (1: very poor, 2: poor, 3: fair, 4: good, 5: very good). The results showed no statistically significant difference in the evaluated criteria between the two alloys (P > 0.05) except for criterion number 2 (ease of condensation, P=0.0005).

  4. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  5. Thermomechanical characterization of nickel-titanium-copper shape memory alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, K P; Ramsey, P B; Krulevitch, P

    2000-10-31

    In an effort to develop a more extensive model for the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy (SMA) films, a novel characterization method has been developed. This automated test has been tailored to characterize films for use in micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) actuators. The shape memory effect in NiTiCu is seen in the solid-state phase transformation from an easily deformable low-temperature state to a 'shape remembering' high-temperature state. The accurate determination of engineering properties for these films necessitates measurements of both stress and strain in microfabricated test structures over the full range of desired deformation. Our various experimental methods (uniaxial tensile tests, bimorph curvature tests and diaphragm bulge tests) provide recoverable stress and strain data and the stress-strain relations for these films. Tests were performed over a range of temperatures by resistive heating or ambient heating. These measurements provide the results necessary for developing active SMA structural film design models.

  6. Electrical resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power of liquid copper-lead alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaı̈b, C.; Gasser, J. G.; Hugel, J.; Roubi, L.

    1998-07-01

    The absolute thermoelectric power S has been measured for the system Cu-Pb from the liquidus to 1100°C. The whole phase diagram has been explored. The thermoelectric power of these alloys has, to our knowledge, never been measured before. These experimental results as well as those of the electrical resistivity (C. Chaı̈b, J.G. Gasser, Z. Phys. Chem. Neue Folge 156 (1988) S483-S487) are interpreted and discussed in terms of the extended Ziman formula using the t-matrix formalism with hard-sphere structure factors. The concentration and energy dependence of the phase shifts have been taken into account for a complete resistivity and thermopower calculation.

  7. Corrosion protection of high-copper aluminum alloys using green technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The concept of surface modification as a new method of corrosion protection using chemicals without toxic problems is described for the Al alloys Al 6061, Al 7075-T6 and Al 2024-T3. In the Ce-Mo process Ce and Mo are incorporated into the original oxide film by chemical and electrochemical processes. The resulting surfaces are resistant to pitting in aggressive solutions such as 0.5 N NaCl. Surface modified Al 6013 has passed the salt spray test according to ASTM B 117. For Al 6061 and 7075, hot solutions of CeCl{sub 3} and Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} are used, while for Al 2024 CeCl{sub 3} is replaced by Ce acetate. For all alloys anodic polarization is carried out in Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. For Al 2024 and Al 7075 a Cu removal pre-treatment step is used in which Cu intermetallic compounds are removed from the outer surface layers. The resistance to localized corrosion has been evaluated by recording of impedance spectra in 0.5 N NaCl for 30 days. Surface analysis data suggest that Ce and Mo are concentrated at sites where local cathodes such as Cu intermetallic compounds are located. Polarization curves show that both the cathodic and the anodic reaction are inhibited on modified surfaces. The pitting potential E{sub pit} is increased for surface modified samples at constant corrosion potential E{sub corr}. This result could be due to a decrease of the amount of Cl adsorbed at a given potential for oxide layers containing Ce and Mo.

  8. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 107 MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen. PMID:26826226

  9. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Warnes, Sarah L; Keevil, C William

    2016-01-29

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 10(7) MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen.

  10. Metallurgical and chemical characterization of copper alloy reference materials within laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Method development for minimally-invasive analysis of ancient bronze objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walaszek, Damian; Senn, Marianne; Faller, Markus; Philippe, Laetitia; Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa; Ulrich, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of ancient metal objects provides important information for manufacturing studies and authenticity verification of ancient copper or bronze artifacts. Non- or minimal-destructive analytical methods are preferred to mitigate visible damage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) enables the determination of major elements as well as impurities down to lower ppm-levels, however, accuracy and precision of analysis strongly depend on the homogeneity of reference materials used for calibration. Moreover, appropriate analytical procedures are required e.g. in terms of ablation strategies (scan mode, spot size, etc.). This study reviews available copper alloy (certified) reference materials — (C)RMs from different sources and contributes new metallurgical data on homogeneity and spatial elemental distribution. Investigations of the standards were performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) for the following copper alloy and bronze (certified) reference materials: NIST 454, BAM 374, BAM 211, BAM 227, BAM 374, BAM 378, BAS 50.01-2, BAS 50.03-4, and BAS 50.04-4. Additionally, the influence of inhomogeneities on different ablation and calibration strategies is evaluated to define an optimum analytical strategy in terms of line scan versus single spot ablation, variation of spot size, selection of the most appropriate RMs or minimum number of calibration reference materials.

  11. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  12. Effect of interactions between bubbles and graphite particles in copper alloy melts on microstructure formed during centrifugal casting. Part 1: Theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.K.; Rohatgi, P.K.

    1999-06-01

    Frequently, particles get associated with gas bubbles in a melt and their interaction influences the final distribution of particles and porosity in the casting. An analytical model for the separation of a particle from a bubble in melts containing dispersed particles and bubbles is proposed. During centrifugal casting of alloys containing dispersed particles, both the particles and gas bubbles present in the melt move with the centrifugal forces. Using the force balance between surface tension and net centrifugal forces (centrifugal force minus buoyancy force), the critical rotational speed of the mold for the separation of the particles and the bubbles during centrifugal casting is calculated. The critical rotational speed of the mold to separate the particle from the bubble is lower for a small particle attached to a larger bubble, as compared to the case when a large particle is attached to a smaller bubble. For a given bubble size, the critical rotational speed of the mold to separate the bubble from the particle decreases with increasing particle size. For the specific case of spherical 5-{micro}m radius graphite particles dispersed in copper alloy melt, it was found that even at a low semiapical angle of about 9 deg, the critical rotational speed needs to be around 5000 rpm for a bubble size of 500-{micro}m radius and 0.09-m-diameter mold. The rotational speed decreases to 1000 rpm when the graphite particle radius increases to 100 {micro}m for the same bubble size in copper alloy melt.

  13. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  14. Heterogeneous dislocation nucleation in single crystal copper-antimony solid-solution alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajgarhia, Rahul K.; Spearot, Douglas E.; Saxena, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to study the partial dislocation nucleation process in single crystal copper with varying concentrations of antimony (0.0-2.0 at%Sb) under uniaxial tension. A well-established embedded-atom method potential is used to represent the Cu-Cu interactions and a recently developed Lennard-Jones potential is used for the Cu-Sb and Sb-Sb interactions. Antimony atoms are randomly distributed as substitutional defects in the Cu single crystal. MD simulations indicate that the tensile stress required for partial dislocation nucleation in the crystal decreases with increasing concentration of Sb. The strain field around Sb dopant atoms in the Cu lattice reduces the unstable stacking fault energy, which promotes heterogeneous nucleation of partial dislocations and reduces the tensile stresses required for plastic deformation. In addition, the role of Sb on the reduction in the stress required for dislocation nucleation is found to be orientation-dependent. Finally, both temperature and Sb distribution play a role in the statistical variation of the stress required for heterogeneous partial dislocation nucleation; this variation is maximum at moderate levels of Sb concentration (0.20-0.50 at%Sb).

  15. Genes involved in copper resistance influence survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on copper surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elguindi, Jutta; Wagner, Janine; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 on copper cast alloys and the influence of genes on survival on copper containing medium and surfaces. Methods and Results Different strains of P. aeruginosa were inoculated on copper containing medium or different copper cast alloys and the survival rate determined. The survival rates were compared to rates on copper-free medium and stainless steel as control. In addition, the effect of temperature on survival was examined. Conclusions Copper cast alloys had previously shown to be bactericidal to various bacteria but the mechanism of copper-mediated killing is still not known. In this report we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 is rapidly killed on different copper cast alloys and that genes involved in conferring copper resistance in copper-containing medium also influenced survival on copper cast alloys. We also show that the rate of killing is influenced by temperature. PMID:19239551

  16. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Dissimilar Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Using Copper Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding with Cu3Si filler wire was employed to join dissimilar Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and AISI316 stainless steel (316SS). The effects of welding parameters on bead shape, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior were investigated in detail. The results show that cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 212 MPa. In the joint, obvious nonuniformity of the microstructure is found in the fusion zone (FZ) and at the interfaces from the top to the bottom, which could be improved by increasing heat input. For the homogeneous joint, the FZ is characterized by Fe67- x Si x Ti33 dendrites spreading on α-Cu matrix, and the two interfaces of 316SS/FZ and FZ/Ti6Al4V are characterized by a bamboo-like 316SS layer and a CuTi2 layer, respectively. All the tensile samples fractured in the hardest CuTi2 layer at Ti6Al4V side of the joints. The fracture surface is characterized by river pattern revealing brittle cleavage fracture. The bead formation mechanisms were discussed according to the melt flow and the thermodynamic calculation.

  17. Interstitial-impurity interactions in copper-silver and aluminum-magnesium alloys. [Electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    The configurations and dynamical properties of complexes formed between interstitials and oversized impurities in electron-irradiated aluminum and copper were determined. Measurements were taken of the ultrasonic attention and resonant frequency in single crystal samples of Cu-Ag and Al-Mg. A variety of peaks appeared in both materials in plots of the logarithmic decrement versus temperature. The simultaneous presence of multiple defects was established by the different annealing behavior shown by each peak. It was found that interstitial trapping in our oversized systems was generally weaker than in previously studied undersized systems. The principal features in Cu-Ag that must be accounted for by a model include the following: (1) Three low-temperature peaks were seen having trigonal symmetry. The main peak annealed away at 110 K uncorrelated with any resistivity recovery and it grew at 60 K, correlated with a resistivity decrease. For Al-MG, the principal features associated with the main peak include: seen at high temperature (>135 K) having trigonal symmetry; annealed away at 127 K and seemed to correlate with a resistivity decrease; remaining peaks grew while the main peak annealed away. The implications of an existing model were developed. No evidence was found for the deeply-trapped <110>-orthorhombic defect predicted by the existing model. Therefore, two alternative models were developed. Model A uses a canted dumb-bell at the next-nearest neighbor position to explain the results. Model B uses a point interstitial at an octahedral position. A distinction between the two which is subject to experimental check is that model A predicts that interstitial migration between different impurity atoms occurs near 127 K in Cu-Ag while model B predicts a migration temperature near 60 K.

  18. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-02-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  19. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  20. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  1. Electrical and Magneto-Resistivity Measurements on Amorphous Copper-Titanium Alloys at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Renyong

    1992-01-01

    parameters of the theoretical fits to the data were similar for both rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50} and rm Cu_{60}Ti_ {40} alloys. The two important exceptions were the inelastic and spin-orbit lifetimes: their zero -field values were about an order of magnitude smaller than those from the magnetoresistances. Also the inelastic lifetimes tend to saturate for T<0.1K in non-zero magnetic fields. Finally, we were also able to estimate the expected superconducting transition temperatures of both rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50} and rm Cu_{60}Ti _{40} alloys: less than 15mK and 5mK, respectively. Our novel technique can, in principle, be used to make high precision resistance measurements down to 15mK on any ribbon or film-like high resistivity metal.

  2. Finite Element Analysis of a Copper Single Crystal Shape Memory Alloy-Based Endodontic Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Marin; Thiebaud, Frédéric; Bel Haj Khalifa, Saifeddine; Engels-Deutsch, Marc; Ben Zineb, Tarak

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is the development of endodontic Cu-based single crystal Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) instruments in order to eliminate the antimicrobial and mechanical deficiencies observed with the conventional Nickel-Titane (NiTi) SMA files. A thermomechanical constitutive law, already developed and implemented in a finite element code by our research group, is adopted for the simulation of the single crystal SMA behavior. The corresponding material parameters were identified starting from experimental results for a tensile test at room temperature. A computer-aided design geometry has been achieved and considered for a finite element structural analysis of the endodontic Cu-based single crystal SMA files. They are meshed with tetrahedral continuum elements to improve the computation time and the accuracy of results. The geometric parameters tested in this study are the length of the active blade, the rod length, the pitch, the taper, the tip diameter, and the rod diameter. For each set of adopted parameters, a finite element model is built and tested in a combined bending-torsion loading in accordance with ISO 3630-1 norm. The numerical analysis based on finite element procedure allowed purposing an optimal geometry suitable for Cu-based single crystal SMA endodontic files. The same analysis was carried out for the classical NiTi SMA files and a comparison was made between the two kinds of files. It showed that Cu-based single crystal SMA files are less stiff than the NiTi files. The Cu-based endodontic files could be used to improve the root canal treatments. However, the finite element analysis brought out the need for further investigation based on experiments.

  3. Structure and Stability of Aluminum-Copper Face-Centered Icosahedral Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, Jeffrey E.

    The phases and microstructures in rapidly solidified Al-Cu-Ru alloys were investigated in this study. A chemically and topologically disordered icosahedral (i) phase grows dendritically from the liquid as the primary solidification product over the entire compositional region studied. The as-solidified i-phase is metastable and transforms to crystalline products at ~500^ circC. The i-phase was not found as a product of the exothermic transformation for any composition, indicating that it is not the low temperature stable phase in the Al-Cu-Ru system. A chemically and topologically ordered i-phase was found to be an equilibrium phase at temperatures above ~670^circ C and exists over a compositional region of several atomic percent. Once formed, this phase was easily retained at lower temperatures because of kinetic limitations of the transformation to the low temperature crystalline phase. Crystalline phases which from diffraction results appear structurally similar to the i-phase were also found in the Al-Cu-Ru system. These "approximant" phases aid in the determination of the atomic structure of i-phases by having common structural units. A simple cubic structure (a = 12.38 A, Pm3) containing a bcc network of icosahedral clusters was discovered. Comparisons of this phase with the i-phase indicated that strong similarities exist between the two structures. A rhombohedral approximant phase was also found. It exists as a transition state between the low-temperature crystalline phase and the high-temperature i-phase. This approximant phase also contains local icosahedral symmetry. The strong presence of icosahedral clusters in approximant phases in the Al-Cu-Ru system points to the distinct possibility that the i-phase is a quasiperiodic packing of icosahedral clusters of atoms.

  4. Impact of advanced water conservation features and new copper pipe on rapid chloramine decay and microbial regrowth.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Caroline; Elfland, Carolyn; Edwards, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Taste and odor issues occurring in new buildings were attributed to rapid loss of chloramine residual, high levels of microbes in the potable water system, and high water age due to use of advanced water conservation devices. Laboratory experiments confirmed that chloramine could decay rapidly in the presence of new copper pipe, providing a possible explanation for the rapid disinfectant loss in the new buildings. Higher temperature and lower pH also accelerated the rate of chloramine decay in copper pipes. The reaction was slowed by the addition of phosphate inhibitor or aluminum, which presumably formed barriers between the pipe wall and the chloramine in the bulk water. Additional research is needed to better understand how to maintain high quality water in buildings while also conserving water.

  5. Effect of Pre-Treatment on Copper Precipitation Characteristics in a Copper-Alloyed Interstitial Free Steel Studied by Thermoelectric Power Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Radhakanta; Massardier, Véronique; Singh, Shiv Brat; Mohanty, Omkar Nath

    2013-01-01

    Copper precipitation has been studied by thermoelectric power measurements in a high strength interstitial free steel processed under various conditions like batch annealing (BA) (4 hours at 973 K (700 °C)), continuous annealing (CA) (1 minute at 1093 K (820 °C)) and full annealing (FA) (2 hours at 1173 K (900 °C)). The results show that the kinetics of copper precipitation depend on the annealing pre-treatments which influence the amount of copper in solid solution before aging. Extensive copper precipitation associated with a marked increase in hardness was observed in the CA and FA material aged between 773 K and 873 K (500 °C and 600 °C), however, this precipitation was not detected when the steel was subjected to BA before aging.

  6. Difference in Magnetic Field Threshold for Thermal Plasma Formation between Copper Alloys 145 and 101 Pulsed to Multi-Megagauss Surface Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, B. S.; Fuelling, S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Yates, K. C.; Awe, T. J.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the impact of choice of metal alloy on plasma formation is important for plasma physics and applications (e.g., fusion energy). Thermal ionization by pulsed ohmic heating of Cu-145 (99.5% Cu, 0-0.7% Te, 0-0.012% P) has been compared with that of a purer alloy, Cu-101 (>99.99% Cu), via well-characterized experiments that avoided contamination by arcing. Copper rods were pulsed to 1.0-MA peak current in 100 ns, with the applied magnetic field rising linearly at 50-80 MG/ μs, depending on the rod initial diameter (0.49-1.59 mm). The initial magnetic skin depth was much smaller than the rod radius, so surface plasma formation was observed while current was propagating into the conductor as a nonlinear diffusion wave. The rod surface finish was controlled (electropolished or not) and examined with optical and scanning electron microscopy. The expansion and ionization of the rod were observed with visible and EUV radiometry, time-resolved imaging, and laser shadowgraphy. Rods of both alloys explode when the applied magnetic field reaches 2 MG, well before plasma formation. Rods of both alloys expand at 3.5 km/s surface velocity. However, Cu-145 undergoes bulk surface ionization at 3.0 MG, whereas Cu-101 only turns to plasma when the magnetic field exceeds 3.5 MG.

  7. Feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment for vanadium alloys in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) for vanadium alloys in the water-cooled Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being investigated as part of the U.S./Monbusho collaboration. Preliminary findings suggest that such an experiment is feasible, with certain constraints. Creating a suitable irradiation position in the ATR, designing an effective thermal neutron filter, incorporating thermocouples for limited specimen temperature monitoring, and handling of tritium during various phases of the assembly and reactor operation all appear to be feasible. An issue that would require special attention, however, is tritium permeation loss through the capsule wall at the higher design temperatures (>{approx}600{degrees}C). If permeation is excessive, the reduced amount of tritium entering the test specimens would limit the helium generation rates in them. At the lower design temperatures (<{approx}425{degrees}C), sodium, instead of lithium, may have to be used as the bond material to overcome the tritium solubility limitation.

  8. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  9. Effect of interactions between bubbles and graphite particles in copper alloy melts on microstructure formed during centrifugal casting. Part 2: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.K.; Rohatgi, P.K.

    1999-06-01

    During centrifugal casting of copper alloys containing graphite particles, both particles and bubbles move under the influence of centrifugal forces and influence the final microstructure, including porosity and the distribution of graphite. The movement of graphite particles and bubbles in the melts of copper alloys, originally containing 7 and 13 vol pct graphite particles and centrifugally cast at 800 and 1900 rpm in horizontal rotating molds, has been examined. Microstructural observations of sections of these centrifugal castings show that the graphite particles are segregated near the inner periphery and the amount of porosity in the graphite-rich zone is higher than the porosity in the graphite-free and transition zones. The intimate association of porosity with graphite particles in the graphite-rich zone was explained on the basis of attachment of graphite particles to bubbles in the melt and the viscosity of the melt, which increases with increasing concentration of graphite particles near the inner periphery of the castings. It was found that the amount of the porosity in the graphite-rich zone increases with volume fraction of graphite particles used in this study; the size of the porosity in the graphite-rich zone also increases with increasing rotational speed of the mold. This suggests that the graphite particles and bubbles were attached to each other in the melt and they did not get separated during centrifugal casting conditions of the present study. The present experiments qualitatively confirm theoretical computations.

  10. Growth and characterization of CVD ruthenium and amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films for liner application in copper interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jinhong

    Copper interconnect requires liner materials that function as a diffusion barrier, a seed layer for electroplating, and an adhesion promoting layer. Ruthenium has been considered as a promising liner material, however it has been reported that Ru itself is not an effective Cu diffusion barrier due to its microstructure, which is polycrystalline with columnar grains. The screening study of Ru precursors revealed that all Ru films were polycrystalline with columnar structure, and, due to its strong 3D growth mode, a conformal and ultrathin Ru film was difficult to form, especially on high aspect ratio features. The microstructure of Ru films can be modified by incorporating P. Amorphous Ru(P) films are formed by chemical vapor deposition at 575 K using a single source precursor, cis-RuH2(P(CH3) 3)4, or dual sources, Ru3(CO)12 and P(CH3)3 or P(C6H5)3. The films contain Ru and P, which are in zero-valent states, and C as an impurity. Phosphorus dominantly affects the film microstructure, and incorporating >13% P resulted in amorphous Ru(P) films. Metastable Ru(P) remains amorphous after annealing at 675 K for 3 hr, and starts recrystallization at ˜775 K. The density of states analysis of the amorphous Ru(P) alloy illustrates metallic character of the films, and hybridization between Ru 4d and P 3p orbitals, which contributes to stabilizing the amorphous structure. Co-dosing P(CH) 3 with Ru3(CO)12 improves film step coverage, and the most conformal Ru(P) film is obtained with cis-RuH 2(P(CH3)3)4; a fully continuous 5 nm Ru(P) film is formed within 1 mum deep, 8:1 aspect ratio trenches. First principles density functional theory calculations illustrate degraded Cu/Ru adhesion by the presence of P at the interface, however, due to the strong Ru-Cu bonds, amorphous Ru(P) forms a stronger interface with Cu than Ta and TaN do. Cu diffusion studies at 575 K suggests improved barrier property of amorphous Ru(P) films over polycrystalline PVD Ru.

  11. Radiation behavior of high-entropy alloys for advanced reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter K.; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-04-30

    In the first task, we have demonstrated the radiation damage and the recrystallization behaviors in multicomponent alloys through molecular-dynamics simulations. It is found that by alloying with atoms of different sizes, the atomic-level strain increases, and the propensity of the radiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition increases as the defects cluster in the cascade body. Recrystallization of the radiation induced supercooled or glass regions show that by tuning the composition and the equilibrium temperature, the multicomponent alloys can be healed. The crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transitions predict the potential high radiation resistance in multicomponent alloys. In the second task, three types of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were fabricated from AlCoCrFeNi and AlCuCrFeNi quinary alloys. Hardness and reduced contact modulus were measured using nanoindentation tests. Heavy ion irradiation were performed using 10 MeV gold and 5 MeV nickel to study radiation effects. Al0.5CrCuFeNi2 shows phase separation upon the presence of copper. Both hardness and contact modulus exhibit the same trend as increasing the applied load, and it indicates that excessive free volume may alter the growth rate of the plastic zone. The as-cast Al0.1CoCrFeNi specimen undergone the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process and steady cooling rate which mitigate the quenching effect. The swelling behavior was characterized by the atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the swelling rate is approximately 0.02% dpa. Selected area diffraction (SAD) patters show irradiation-induced amorphization throughout the ion projected range. Within the peak damage region, an amorpous ring is observed, and a mixture of amorphous/ crystalline structure at deeper depth is found. The Al0.3CoCrFeNi HEAs shows good radiation resistance up to 60 peak dpa. No voids or dislocations are observed. The crystal structures remain face-centered-cubic (FCC) before and

  12. Copper-based alloys, crystallographic and crystallochemical parameters of alloys in binary systems Cu-Me (Me=Co, Rh, Ir, Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porobova, Svetlana; Markova, Tat'jana; Klopotov, Vladimir; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Loskutov, Oleg; Vlasov, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of the analysis of phase equilibrium of ordered phases in binary systems based on copper Cu- Me (where Me - Co, Rh, Ir, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt) to find correlations of crystallochemical and crystallographic factors. It is established that the packing index in disordered solid solutions in binary systems based on copper is close to the value of 0.74 against the background of an insignificant deviation of atomic volumes from the Zen's law.

  13. Copper-based alloys, crystallographic and crystallochemical parameters of alloys in binary systems Cu-Me (Me=Co, Rh, Ir, Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt)

    SciTech Connect

    Porobova, Svetlana Loskutov, Oleg; Markova, Tat’jana; Klopotov, Vladimir; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Vlasov, Viktor

    2016-01-15

    The article presents the results of the analysis of phase equilibrium of ordered phases in binary systems based on copper Cu- Me (where Me - Co, Rh, Ir, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt) to find correlations of crystallochemical and crystallographic factors. It is established that the packing index in disordered solid solutions in binary systems based on copper is close to the value of 0.74 against the background of an insignificant deviation of atomic volumes from the Zen’s law.

  14. Advancement of Al - Li alloys and of multistage modes of their heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kolobnev, N. I.; Khokhlatova, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    Third-generation aluminum alloys 1441, 1424 and V-1461, V-1469 of medium and high strength, respectively, which have been developed as an alternative to the base aluminum alloys 1163 and V95 widely used in the aircraft industry, are studied. The advantages of the suggested alloys with respect to the strength, life characteristics, weldability and corrosion resistance are shown.

  15. Effect of chloride ions on the corrosion behavior of low-alloy steel containing copper and antimony in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun-Ah; Kim, Seon-Hong; Yoo, Yun-Ha; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-05-01

    The influence of the addition of HCl on the corrosion behavior of low-alloy steel containing copper and antimony was investigated using electrochemical (potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization tests, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and weight loss tests in a 1.6M H2SO4 solution with different concentrations of hydrochloric acid (0.00, 0.08, 0.15 and 0.20 M HCl) at 60 °C. The result showed that the corrosion rate decreased with increasing HCl by the formation of protective layers. SEM, EDS and XPS examinations of the corroded surfaces after the immersion test indicated that the corrosion production layer formed in the solution containing HCl was highly comprised of metallic Cu, Cu chloride and metallic (Fe, Cu, Sb) compounds. The corrosion resistance was improved by the Cu-enriched layer, in which chloride ions are an accelerator for cupric ion reduction during copper deposition. Furthermore, cuprous and antimonious chloride species are complex salts for cuprous ions adsorbed on the surface during copper deposition.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of arsenic in concentrates and copper-base alloys by the molybdenum blue method after separations by iron collection and xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1977-02-01

    A method for determining 0.0001-1% of arsenic in copper, nickel, molybdenum, lead and zinc concentrates is described. After sample decomposition, arsenic is separated from most of the matrix elements by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric oxide from an ammoniacal medium. Following reprecipitation of arsenic and iron, the precipitate is dissolved in approximately 2 M hydrochloric acid and the solution is evaporated to a small volume to remove water. Arsenic(V) is reduced to the tervalent state with iron(II) and separated from iron, lead and other co-precipitated elements by chloroform extraction of its xanthate from an 11M hydrochloric acid medium. After oxidation of arsenic(III) in the extract to arsenic(V) with bromine-carbon tetrachloride solution, it is back-extracted into water and determined by the molybdenum blue method. Small amounts of iron, copper and molybdenum, which are co-extracted as xanthates, and antimony, which is co-extracted to a slight extent as the chloro-complex under the proposed conditions, do not interfere. The proposed method is also applicable to copper-base alloys.

  17. Characterization of Tubing from Advanced ODS alloy (FCRD-NFA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Aydogan, Eda; Anderoglu, Osman; Lavender, Curt; Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Lewandowski, John; Hoelzer, Dave; Odette, George R.

    2016-09-20

    Fabrication methods are being developed and tested for producing fuel clad tubing of the advanced ODS 14YWT and FCRD-NFA1 ferritic alloys. Three fabrication methods were based on plastically deforming a machined thick-wall tube sample of the ODS alloys by pilgering, hydrostatic extrusion or drawing to decrease the outer diameter and wall thickness and increase the length of the final tube. The fourth fabrication method consisted of the additive manufacturing approach involving solid-state spray deposition (SSSD) of ball milled and annealed powder of 14YWT for producing thin-wall tubes. Of the four fabrication methods, two methods were successful at producing tubing for further characterization: production of tubing by high-velocity oxy-fuel spray forming and production of tubing using high-temperature hydrostatic extrusion. The characterization described shows through neutron diffraction the texture produced during extrusion while maintaining the beneficial oxide dispersion. In this research, the parameters for innovative thermal spray deposition and hot extrusion processing methods have been developed to produce the final nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) tubes having approximately 0.5 mm wall thickness. Effect of different processing routes on texture and grain boundary characteristics has been investigated. It was found that hydrostatic extrusion results in combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate rolling textures of α- and γ-fibers on {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a shear texture of ζ-fiber on {011}<211> and {011}<011>. On the other hand, multi-step plane strain deformation in cross directions leads to a strong rolling textures of θ- and ε-fiber on {001}<110> together with weak γ-fiber on {111}<112>. Even though the amount of the equivalent strain is similar, shear deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to the plane strain deformations. Moreover, while 50% of hot rolling brings about a large number of

  18. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  19. Recent advances on the development of magnesium alloys for biodegradable implants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Zhigang; Smith, Christopher; Sankar, Jag

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made on the development of biodegradable magnesium alloys as "smart" implants in cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. Mg-based alloys as biodegradable implants have outstanding advantages over Fe-based and Zn-based ones. However, the extensive applications of Mg-based alloys are still inhibited mainly by their high degradation rates and consequent loss in mechanical integrity. Consequently, extensive studies have been conducted to develop Mg-based alloys with superior mechanical and corrosion performance. This review focuses on the following topics: (i) the design criteria of biodegradable materials; (ii) alloy development strategy; (iii) in vitro performances of currently developed Mg-based alloys; and (iv) in vivo performances of currently developed Mg-based implants, especially Mg-based alloys under clinical trials.

  20. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  1. Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    alloys: copper, yellow brass, molybdenum, Grade H-13 steel and plasma sprayed molybdenum on copper. Seven additional substrates were used for experiments...chromium on copper, electroplated chromium on steel and copper oxide. The chill roll dimensions were 190 mm (7.5 in) diameter by 50 mm (2 in) wide. The...Silver was electro-plated on a copper chill roll that was threaded on the circumference. Chromium was electroplated on a Cl0 copper and Grade H-13 steel

  2. In-line monitoring of advanced copper CMP processes with picosecond ultrasonic metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming Hsun; Yeh, J. H.; Tsai, Mingsheng; Yang, Chan Lon; Tan, John; Leary, Sean Patrick

    2006-03-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a challenging process step for manufacturers implementing dualdamascene architectures at the 65 nm technology node. The polishing rate can vary significantly from wafer-to-wafer, across a single wafer, and across a single die, depending on factors including electroplate profile, slurry chemistry, pad wear, and underlying structure. The process is further complicated by the introduction of low-k dielectrics that have significantly different mechanical properties than the harder SiO II they replace. Picosecond ultrasonics is a nondestructive, small-spot method that can be used for in-line on-product monitoring of metal processes including copper CMP. In this paper we will present gauge-capable picosecond ultrasonic results on copper erosion test structures that also demonstrate excellent correlation with electrical test measurements and TEM results on 65 nm products.

  3. Advanced image analysis of the surface pattern emerging in Ni3Al intermetallic alloys on anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Marco; Stępniowski, Wojciech; Cieślak, Grzegorz; Norek, Małgorzata; Michalska-Domańska, Marta; Karczewski, Krzysztof; Chilimoniuk, Paulina; Polkowski, Wojciech; Jóźwik, Paweł; Bojar, Zbigniew

    2016-07-01

    Anodization of Ni3Al alloy is of interest in the field of industrial manufacturing, thanks to the formation of protective oxide layer on the materials working in corrosive environments and high temperatures. However, homogeneous surface treatment is paramount for technological applications of this material. The anodization conditions have to be set outside the ranges of corrosion and “burning”, which is the electric field enhanced anodic dissolution of the metal. In order to check against occurrence of these events, proper quantitative means for assessing the surface quality have to be developed and established. We approached this task by advanced analysis of scanning electron microscope images of anodized Ni3Al plates. The anodization was carried out in 0.3 M citric acid at two temperatures of 0 and 30°C and at voltages in the range of 2 12 V. Different figures can be used to characterize the quality of the surface, in terms of uniformity. Here, the concept of regularity ratio spread is used for the first time on surfaces of technological interest. Additionally, the Minkowski parameters have been calculated and their meaning is discussed.

  4. Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals

    SciTech Connect

    P.Andreson

    2004-10-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

  5. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  6. Mechanistic Studies Of Combustion And Structure Formation During Combustion Synthesis Of Advanced Materials: Phase Separation Mechanism For Bio-Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A.

    2003-01-01

    Among all implant materials, Co-Cr-Mo alloys demonstrate perhaps the most useful balance of resistance to corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with strength and biocompatibility [1]. Currently, these widely used alloys are produced by conventional furnace technology. Owing to high melting points of the main alloy elements (e.g. Tm.p.(Co) 1768 K), high-temperature furnaces and long process times (several hours) are required. Therefore, attempts to develop more efficient and flexible methods for production of such alloys with superior properties are of great interest. The synthesis of materials using combustion phenomena is an advanced approach in powder metallurgy [2]. The process is characterized by unique conditions involving extremely fast heating rates (up to 10(exp 6 K/s), high temperatures (up to 3500 K), and short reaction times (on the order of seconds). As a result, combustion synthesis (CS) offers several attractive advantages over conventional metallurgical processing and alloy development technologies. The foremost is that solely the heat of chemical reaction (instead of an external source) supplies the energy for the synthesis. Also, simple equipment, rather than energy-intensive high-temperature furnaces, is sufficient. This work was devoted to experiments on CS of Co-based alloys by utilizing thermite (metal oxide-reducing metal) reactions, where phase separation subsequently produces materials with tailored compositions and properties. Owing to high reaction exothermicity, the CS process results in a significant increase of temperature (up to 3000 C), which is higher than melting points of all products. Since the products differ in density, phase separation may be a gravitydriven process: the heavy (metallic phase) settles while the light (slag) phase floats. The goal was to determine if buoyancy is indeed the major mechanism that controls phase segregation.

  7. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  8. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  9. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Pint, Bruce A.; Chen, Xiang

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  11. Interfacial characterization of SLM parts in multi-material processing: Metallurgical diffusion between 316L stainless steel and C18400 copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.H. Zhang, D.Q. Sing, S.L. Chua, C.K. Loh, L.E.

    2014-08-15

    Multi-material processing in selective laser melting using a novel approach, by the separation of two different materials within a single dispensing coating system was investigated. 316L stainless steel and UNS C18400 Cu alloy multi-material samples were produced using selective laser melting and their interfacial characteristics were analyzed using focused ion beam, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron back scattered diffraction techniques. A substantial amount of Fe and Cu element diffusion was observed at the bond interface suggesting good metallurgical bonding. Quantitative evidence of good bonding at the interface was also obtained from the tensile tests where the fracture was initiated at the copper region. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of steel/Cu SLM parts was evaluated to be 310 ± 18 MPa and the variation in microhardness values was found to be gradual along the bonding interface from the steel region (256 ± 7 HV{sub 0.1}) to the copper region (72 ± 3 HV{sub 0.1}). - Highlights: • Multi-material processing was successfully implemented and demonstrated in SLM. • Bi-metallic laminates of steel/Cu were successfully produced with the SLM process. • A substantial amount of Fe and Cu diffusion was observed at the bond interface. • Good metallurgical bonding was obtained at the interface of the steel/Cu laminates. • Highly refined microstructure was obtained due to rapid solidification in SLM.

  12. Conducting water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-based nuclear power plant units constructed without using copper containing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkov, V. F.

    2014-07-01

    The secondary coolant circuit water chemistry with metering amines began to be put in use in Russia in 2005, and all nuclear power plant units equipped with VVER-1000 reactors have been shifted to operate with this water chemistry for the past seven years. Owing to the use of water chemistry with metering amines, the amount of products from corrosion of structural materials entering into the volume of steam generators has been reduced, and the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of pipelines and equipment has been slowed down. The article presents data on conducting water chemistry in nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 reactors for the secondary coolant system equipment made without using copper-containing alloys. Statistical data are presented on conducting ammonia-morpholine and ammonia-ethanolamine water chemistries in new-generation operating power units with VVER-1000 reactors with an increased level of pH. The values of cooling water leaks in turbine condensers the tube system of which is made of stainless steel or titanium alloy are given.

  13. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  14. Lead-Sulfide-Selenide Quantum Dots and Gold-Copper Alloy Nanoparticles Augment the Light-Harvesting Ability of Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Deepa, Melepurath; Ghosal, Partha

    2017-01-10

    Lead-sulfide-selenide (PbSSe) quantum dots (QDs) and gold-copper (AuCu) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) were incorporated into a cadmium sulfide (CdS)/titanium oxide (TiO2 ) photoanode for the first time to achieve enhanced conversion of solar energy into electricity. PbSSe QDs with a band gap of 1.02 eV extend the light-harvesting range of the photoanode from the visible region to the near-infrared region. The conduction band (CB) edge of the PbSSe QDs is wedged between the CBs of TiO2 and CdS; this additional level coupled with the good electrical conductivity of the dots facilitate charge transport and collection, and a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.44 % is achieved for the champion cell with the TiO2 /PbSSe/CdS electrode. Upon including AuCu alloy NPs in the QD-sensitized electrodes, light absorption is enhance by plasmonic and light-scattering effects and also by the injection of hot electrons to the CBs of the QDs. Comparison of the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency enhancement factors in addition to fluorescence decay and impedance studies reveal that the PbSSe QDs and AuCu alloy NPs promote charge injection to the current collector and increase the photogenerated charges produced, which thus enables the TiO2 /PbSSe/CdS/AuCu cell to deliver the highest PCE of 5.26 % among all the various photoanode compositions used.

  15. Modulating fcc and hcp Ruthenium on the Surface of Palladium-Copper Alloy through Tunable Lattice Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yancai; He, Dong Sheng; Lin, Yue; Feng, Xiaoqian; Wang, Xin; Yin, Peiqun; Hong, Xun; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-25

    Herein, we report an epitaxial-growth-mediated method to grow face-centered cubic (fcc) Ru, which is thermodynamically unfavorable in the bulk form, on the surface of Pd-Cu alloy. Induced by the galvanic replacement between Ru and Pd-Cu alloy, a shape transformation from a Pd-Cu@Ru core-shell to a yolk-shell structure was observed during the epitaxial growth. The successful coating of the unconventional crystallographic structure is critically dependent on the moderate lattice mismatch between the fcc Ru overlayer and PdCu3 alloy substrate. Further, both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) Ru can be selectively grown through varying the lattice spacing of the Pd-Cu substrate. The presented findings provide a new synthetic pathway to control the crystallographic structure of metal nanomaterials.

  16. Evaluation of an advanced directionally solidified gamma/gamma'-alpha Mo eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, M. F.; Jackson, M. R.; Gigliotti, M. F. X.; Nelson, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve on the properties of the candidate jet engine turbine blade material AG-60, a gamma/gamma prime-alpha Mo eutectic composite. Alloy 38 (AG-170) was evaluated in the greatest detail. This alloy, Ni-5.88 A1-29.74 Mo-1.65 V-1.2C Re (weight percent), represents an improvement beyond AG-60, based on mechanical testing of the transverse and/or longitudinal orientations over a range of temperatures in tension, shear, rupture, and rupture after thermal exposure. It is likely that other alloys in the study represent a similar improvement.

  17. Copper-Nickel Cladding on Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    steel,. Monel (65Ni/35Cu) alloy consumables should be used as they can tolerate more iron dilution from the steel than the 70-30 copper-nickel alloy ...Cooper Alloys , 400 , K-500 Stainless Steel - Tyles 302, 304, 321, 347 N ickel 200 Silver Braze Alloys Nickel-Chromium Alloy 600 Nickel-Aluminum Bronze 70...cladding of austenitic stainless steels may also offer some ballistic, non-magnetic, and electromagnetic signature advantages over current hull alloys and

  18. Pumped lithium loop test to evaluate advanced refractory metal alloys and simulated nuclear fuel elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandenburf, G. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance was determined of refractory metal alloys and uranium nitride fuel element specimens in flowing 1900F (1083C) lithium. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected materials to perform satisfactorily from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  19. Computer Aided Design of Advanced Turbine Airfoil Alloys for Industrial Gas Turbines in Coal Fired Environments

    SciTech Connect

    G.E. Fuchs

    2007-12-31

    Recent initiatives for fuel flexibility, increased efficiency and decreased emissions in power generating industrial gas turbines (IGT's), have highlighted the need for the development of techniques to produce large single crystal or columnar grained, directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy turbine blades and vanes. In order to address the technical difficulties of producing large single crystal components, a program has been initiated to, using computational materials science, better understand how alloy composition in potential IGT alloys and solidification conditions during processing, effect castability, defect formation and environmental resistance. This program will help to identify potential routes for the development of high strength, corrosion resistant airfoil/vane alloys, which would be a benefit to all IGT's, including small IGT's and even aerospace gas turbines. During the first year, collaboration with Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Rolls-Royce, Howmet and Solar Turbines has identified and evaluated about 50 alloy compositions that are of interest for this potential application. In addition, alloy modifications to an existing alloy (CMSX-4) were also evaluated. Collaborating with SPC and using computational software at SPC to evaluate about 50 alloy compositions identified 5 candidate alloys for experimental evaluation. The results obtained from the experimentally determined phase transformation temperatures did not compare well to the calculated values in many cases. The effects of small additions of boundary strengtheners (i.e., C, B and N) to CMSX-4 were also examined. The calculated phase transformation temperatures were somewhat closer to the experimentally determined values than for the 5 candidate alloys, discussed above. The calculated partitioning coefficients were similar for all of the CMSX-4 alloys, similar to the experimentally determined segregation behavior. In general, it appears that computational materials science has become a

  20. Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by Coatings With Advanced Properties and Enhanced Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    Sim6es, D. E. Tallman, G. P. Bierwagen, "Electrochemical Behaviour of a Mg-Rich Primer in the Protection of Al Alloys ," Corrosion Science 48 (2006...December 20, 200 Final Report July 1, 2004-June 30, 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by...Prof. Dennis E. Tallman: A) New Scanning Probe Studies of Novel Cr-free Active Coatings B) Examination of the Influence of Surface Preparation of Al

  1. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  2. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  3. The Effects of Grain Size on the Martensitic Transformation in Copper-Zinc-Aluminum Shape Memory Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    production or nearly so. In the medical arts these alloys are being exploited for their SME properties as orthodontic appliances, intercranial aneurism...easy data reduction from the strip chart recordings. Ms was determined from the strip chart by the point of departure of the exothermic curve from the

  4. A study of the protective properties of oxide films formed at reactive aluminum-copper and aluminum-beryllium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potucek, Rudolf Karel

    Two Al alloys of interest to the aerospace industry were studied during this research. AA2219 is an Al/Cu alloy containing about 6%-wt Cu, forming Cu-rich particles in a Cu-poor Al-matrix. AlBeMet162 is an At/Be alloy consisting of ca. 38%-wt A1 and 62%-wt Be, forming intermeshed networks of Al and Be. Both alloys do not respond to standard anodization techniques in sulfuric or chromic acid, yielding pitted surfaces and friable anodic coatings. Corrosion protection can be achieved on AA2219 but a significant part of its fatigue strength will be sacrificed as a result of these anodization processes, while no corrosion protection results from the anodization of AIBeMetl62. Thus, the main goals of this work were preventing the dissolution of the more reactive alloy constituents and electrochemical formation of a passivating surface coating. Cyclic Voltammetry methods (CV) were used as a means of creating barrier and porous oxide layers on AA2219, AlBeMet162 and the individual phases making up these alloys. The CV data and measurements of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to determine the thickness and dissolution activity of the barrier oxide layers formed. Changes in the barrier oxide thickness during EIS and CV experiments in neutral borate and phosphate buffer as well as H2SO4 and H3PO4 solutions provided a means for predicting whether a stable barrier or porous oxide film would likely be formed in a given electrolyte. This approach was shown to be usable even in the presence of an overlying porous oxide film. The CV data were also examined for an indication of the oxide growth mechanism, with a particular focus on the High Field and Point Defect models, indicating that the High Field Model more closely fits the data acquired. EIS data collected in 5%-wt NaCl solution were shown to give a good indication of the corrosion protection granted by anodic coatings formed on A1 alloys and thus to be a suitable method for accelerated corrosion testing

  5. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  6. Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species

    DOEpatents

    Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

    2013-08-06

    A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

  7. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S.

    2013-12-16

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

  8. Identification of salt-alloy combinations for thermal energy storage applications in advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Misra, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations based on the available data for flouride salt systems reveal that a number of congruently melting compositions and eutectics exist which have the potential to meet the lightweight, high energy storage requirements imposed for advanced solar dynamic systems operating between about 1000 and 1400 K. Compatibility studies to determine suitable containment alloys to be used with NaF-22CaF2-13MgF2, NaF-32CaF2, and NaF-23MgF2 have been conducted at the eutectic temperature + 25 K for each system. For these three NaF-based eutectics, none of the common, commercially available high temperature alloys appear to offer adequate corrosion resistance for a long lifetime; however mild steel, pure nickel and Nb-1Zr could prove useful. These latter materials suggest the possibility that a strong, corrosion resistant, nonrefractory, elevated temperature alloy based on the Ni-Ni3Nb system could be developed.

  9. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  10. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Antibacterial Mechanism of Copper-Bearing Titanium Alloys against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Ma, Zheng; Zhu, Ye; Xia, Hong; Yao, Mengyu; Chu, Xiao; Wang, Xiaolan; Yang, Ke; Yang, Mingying; Zhang, Yu; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-09

    The antibacterial mechanism of the Cu-containing materials has not been fully understood although such understanding is crucial for the sustained clinical use of Cu-containing antibacterial materials such as bone implants. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus is inactivated through Cu-bearing titanium alloys (Ti6Al4V5Cu). Cu ions released from the alloys are found to contribute to lethal damage of bacteria. They destroy the permeability of the bacterial membranes, resulting in the leakage of reducing sugars and proteins from the cells. They also promote the generation of bacteria-killing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS production is confirmed by several assays including fluorescent staining of intracellular oxidative stress, detection of respiratory chain activity, and measurement of the levels of lipid peroxidation, catalase, and glutathione. Furthermore, the released Cu ions show obvious genetic toxicity by interfering the replication of nuc (species-specific) and 16SrRNA genes, but with no effect on the genome integrity. All of these effects lead to the antibacterial effect of Ti6Al4V5Cu. Collectively, our work reconciles the conflicting antibacterial mechanisms of Cu-bearing metallic materials or nanoparticles reported in the literature and highlights the potential use of Ti6Al4V5Cu alloys in inhibiting bacterial infections.

  11. High temperature, low cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 3: Zirconium-copper; thermal-mechanical strain cycling, hold-time and notch fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue characteristics of smooth bar and notched bar specimens (hourglass shape) of zirconium-copper, 1/2 Hard, material (R-2 Series) were evaluated at room temperature in axial strain control. Over the fatigue life range from about 300 to 3000 cycles the ratio of fatigue life for smooth bar to fatigue life for notched bar remained constant at a value of about 6.0. Some additional hold-time data for the R-2 alloy tested in argon at 538 C are reported. An analysis of the relaxation data obtained in these hold-time tests is also reported and it is shown that these data yield a fairly consistent correlation in terms of instantaneous stress rate divided by instantaneous stress. Two thermal-mechanical strain cycling tests were also performed using a cyclic frequency of 4.5 cycles per hour and a temperature cycling interval from 260 to 538 C. The fatigue life values in these tests were noticeably lower than that observed in isothermal tests at 538 C.

  12. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  13. Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium alloy with enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Si, Conghui; Gao, Yulai; Frenzel, Jan; Sun, Junzhe; Eggeler, Gunther; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium (np-PtRuCuOsIr) electrocatalyst has been facilely fabricated by chemical dealloying of mechanically alloyed AlCuPtRuOsIr precursor. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst exhibits a typical three-dimensional bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of ∼2.5 nm. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst reaches a higher level in the mass activity (857.5 mA mgPt-1) and specific activity (3.0 mA cm-2) towards methanol oxidation compared to the commercial PtC catalyst (229.5 mA mgPt-1 and 0.5 mA cm-2 respectively). Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.54 V (vs. SCE), 130 mV negative shift in comparison with the commercial PtC (0.67 V vs. SCE). The half-wave potential of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.900 V vs. RHE, 36 mV positive compared with that of the commercial PtC (0.864 V vs. RHE). The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst also shows 1.8 and 3.8 times enhancement in the mass and specific activity towards oxygen reduction than the commercial PtC. Moreover, the np-PtRuCuOsIr alloy exhibits superior oxygen reduction activities even after 15 K cycles, indicating its excellent long-term stability. The present np-PtRuCuOsIr can act as a promising candidate for the electrocatalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  14. Long-Length Semiproducts from Ni - Ti Alloys with Advanced Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Yusupov, V. S.; Perkas, M. M.; Prosvirnin, V. V.; Bondareva, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of cold deformation and heat treatment on the mechanical properties of hot-rolled long-length semiproducts from shape-memory Ni - Ti alloys is studied. It is shown that cold deformation to ɛtot = 30% with intermediate annealing operations promotes reversible changes in the shape. The effect may be associated with relaxation of oriented microstresses created during plastic deformation.

  15. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  16. Effects of thermal and mechanical processing on microstructures and desired properties of particle-strengthened copper-chromium-niobium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kenneth Reed

    Ternary Cu-Cr-Nb alloys, particularly Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb (in at.%), have demonstrated good thermal stability as well as high strength and high conductivity at low and high temperatures. This behavior---due to the insoluble and strong Cr2Nb intermetallic phase that forms from the 2:1 Cr/Nb ratio---has put Cu-Cr-Nb alloys at the forefront as the next-generation particle-strengthened Cu alloys for aerospace applications. The initial powder material, produced by Ar-gas atomization, has a bimodal size distribution of Cr2Nb precipitates. Primary Cr2Nb precipitates, formed congruently from the melt, are typically ˜1 mum in size, and secondary Cr2Nb particles, precipitated from atomized solid solution, are typically 30--200 nm in size. This study provides the first detailed examination of the stability and strengthening effects of these particles in Cu-Cr-Nb alloys. Extruded Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb exposed to temperatures of up to 1323 K for up to 100 hr sustained a drop in strength of only 25--30%. This investigation also revealed that the primary particles, usually situated at grain boundaries and triple points, provide a direct grain boundary pinning effect, and moreover, an indirect, grain boundary strengthening effect, but virtually no Orowan strengthening effect. The secondary Cr2Nb particles, typically found within grains (and to a lesser extent, at grain boundaries), do provide Orowan strengthening. For extruded material, it was established that grain-boundary strengthening (Hall-Petch effect) accounts for about two-thirds of the overall strength of material, with Orowan effects essentially contributing the remainder. The proven thermal stability, strengthening effects and, more importantly, strength retention, was the driving force to further improve upon these attributes via microstructural refinement of Cu-Cr-Nb alloys. Mechanical milling (MM) of Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb and Cu-8 Cr-2 Nb produced an increase in hot pressed Vickers hardness of 122% and 96%, respectively. However, MM also

  17. The structure and composition of chromate conversion coatings formed on aluminum-copper alloy AA2024-T3 and thin film analogs of constituent intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Marvin Jaime

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of spectroscopy have been used to study the composition and structure of Chromate Conversion Coatings (CCC) formed on Aluminum Copper (Al-Cu) alloy AA2024-T3 and constituent Intermetallic Compounds (IMCs). Based on previous work the CCC formed over the IMCs is expected to be thinner and therefore different in structure and composition than the CCC formed on the matrix. The formation of the CCC over the different IMCs is expected to be dependent on the chemistry and the interaction of the IMCs with accelerators such as ferricyanide. Surface chemical and structural data determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Secondary Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDAX) have been developed to refine an existing model for the CCC formed on the AA2024-T3 surface, an Al-Cu aircraft alloy, by considering the composition and structure of the CCC formed on constituent intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The limited corrosion behavior of AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy is generally attributed to the presence of a variety of constituent IMC. These IMC particles are of the order of 1--20 mum which makes their direct analysis exceedingly difficult and has lead to a limited understanding of their surface chemical properties relative to CCC formation. To overcome this limitation, it was necessary to develop for the first time large area samples composed of compositionally homogenous thin films of the various IMCs found on the AA2024-T3 surface, which were galvanically attached to thin films of Al-4.2wt%Cu (representative of the AA2024-T3 matrix). This was performed in a two-step process: Disks of IMC compositions were formed by Reactive Arc Melting (RAM), followed by ultra-fast laser ablation of the RAM IMCs resulting in the formation of homogenous thin films

  18. Investigation of Hafnium oxide/Copper resistive memory for advanced encryption applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Benjamin D.

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a widely used encryption algorithm to protect data and communications in today's digital age. Modern AES CMOS implementations require large amounts of dedicated logic and must be tuned for either performance or power consumption. A high throughput, low power, and low die area AES implementation is required in the growing mobile sector. An emerging non-volatile memory device known as resistive memory (ReRAM) is a simple metal-insulator-metal capacitor device structure with the ability to switch between two stable resistance states. Currently, ReRAM is targeted as a non-volatile memory replacement technology to eventually replace flash. Its advantages over flash include ease of fabrication, speed, and lower power consumption. In addition to memory, ReRAM can also be used in advanced logic implementations given its purely resistive behavior. The combination of a new non-volatile memory element ReRAM along with high performance, low power CMOS opens new avenues for logic implementations. This dissertation will cover the design and process implementation of a ReRAM-CMOS hybrid circuit, built using IBM's 10LPe process, for the improvement of hardware AES implementations. Further the device characteristics of ReRAM, specifically the HfO2/Cu memory system, and mechanisms for operation are not fully correlated. Of particular interest to this work is the role of material properties such as the stoichiometry, crystallinity, and doping of the HfO2 layer and their effect on the switching characteristics of resistive memory. Material properties were varied by a combination of atomic layer deposition and reactive sputtering of the HfO2 layer. Several studies will be discussed on how the above mentioned material properties influence switching parameters, and change the underlying physics of device operation.

  19. Gold–Copper Nano-Alloy, “Tumbaga”, in the Era of Nano: Phase Diagram and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gold–copper (Au–Cu) phases were employed already by pre-Columbian civilizations, essentially in decorative arts, whereas nowadays, they emerge in nanotechnology as an important catalyst. The knowledge of the phase diagram is critical to understanding the performance of a material. However, experimental determination of nanophase diagrams is rare because calorimetry remains quite challenging at the nanoscale; theoretical investigations, therefore, are welcomed. Using nanothermodynamics, this paper presents the phase diagrams of various polyhedral nanoparticles (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, decahedron, dodecahedron, rhombic dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, cuboctahedron, and icosahedron) at sizes 4 and 10 nm. One finds, for all the shapes investigated, that the congruent melting point of these nanoparticles is shifted with respect to both size and composition (copper enrichment). Segregation reveals a gold enrichment at the surface, leading to a kind of core–shell structure, reminiscent of the historical artifacts. Finally, the most stable structures were determined to be the dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, and icosahedron with a Cu-rich core/Au-rich surface. The results of the thermodynamic approach are compared and supported by molecular-dynamics simulations and by electron-microscopy (EDX) observations. PMID:25338111

  20. Selective dissolution in copper-tin alloys: Formation of corrosion- resistant patina on ancient Chinese bronze mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Taube, M. |; Davenport, A.J.; King, A.H.; Chase, T. III

    1996-07-01

    Many ancient Chinese bronze mirrors have survived with a patina that leaves the delicate relief surface decorations intact. The microstructure of these ancient mirrors is two-phase and consists of acicular {alpha}-phase (Cu-rich) regions encased in a {delta}-phase (Sn-rich) matrix. At the surface, there is evidence of selective dissolution of the ct phase; the cc-phase regions are replaced pseudomorphically by a mineral product with the {delta} phase remaining metallic. Electrochemical polarization has been used to drive the copper dealloying process in modem, cast bronze. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction was employed to compare the ancient samples with those that were prepared potentiostatically. Poorly crystallized tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) was found in the {alpha} replacement products of both sample types. The corrosion-resistance of the potentiostatically-treated bronze samples was tested by atmospheric exposure. Comparison with exposed, untreated samples indicated that the treatment was protective.

  1. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  2. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  3. (Zn,H)-codoped copper oxide nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation on Cu-Zn alloy in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2012-05-01

    Nanosized (5 to 10 nm) amorphous and crystalline nanocondensates, i.e., metallic α-phase of Zn-Cu alloy in face-centered cubic structure and (Zn,H)-codoped cuprite (Cu2O) with high-pressure-favored close-packed sublattice, were formed by pulsed laser ablation on bulk Cu65Zn35 in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffractions and optical spectroscopy. The as-fabricated hybrid nanocondensates are darkish and showed photoluminescence in the whole visible region. Further dwelling of such nanocondensates in water caused progressive formation of a rice-like assembly of (Zn,H)-codoped tenorite (CuO) nanoparticles with (001), (100), and {111} preferred orientations, (111) tilt boundary, yellowish color, and minimum bandgap narrowing down to ca. 2.7 eV for potential photocatalytic applications.

  4. (Zn,H)-codoped copper oxide nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation on Cu-Zn alloy in water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanosized (5 to 10 nm) amorphous and crystalline nanocondensates, i.e., metallic α-phase of Zn-Cu alloy in face-centered cubic structure and (Zn,H)-codoped cuprite (Cu2O) with high-pressure-favored close-packed sublattice, were formed by pulsed laser ablation on bulk Cu65Zn35 in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffractions and optical spectroscopy. The as-fabricated hybrid nanocondensates are darkish and showed photoluminescence in the whole visible region. Further dwelling of such nanocondensates in water caused progressive formation of a rice-like assembly of (Zn,H)-codoped tenorite (CuO) nanoparticles with (001), (100), and {111} preferred orientations, (111) tilt boundary, yellowish color, and minimum bandgap narrowing down to ca. 2.7 eV for potential photocatalytic applications. PMID:22647312

  5. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  6. PdCu alloy nanoparticle-decorated copper nanotubes as enhanced electrocatalysts: DFT prediction validated by experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dengfeng; Xu, Haoxiang; Cao, Dapeng; Fisher, Adrian; Gao, Yi; Cheng, Daojian

    2016-12-01

    In order to combine the advantages of both 0D and 1D nanostructured materials into a single catalyst, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to study the PdCu alloy NP-decorated Cu nanotubes (PdCu@CuNTs). These present a significant improvement of the electrocatalytic activity of formic acid oxidation (FAO). Motivated by our theoretical work, we adopted the seed-mediated growth method to successfully synthesize the nanostructured PdCu@CuNTs. The new catalysts triple the catalytic activity for FAO, compared with commercial Pd/C. In summary, our work provides a new strategy for the DFT prediction and experimental synthesis of novel metal NP-decorated 1D nanostructures as electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  7. Process Optimization of Dual-Laser Beam Welding of Advanced Al-Li Alloys Through Hot Cracking Susceptibility Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yingtao; Robson, Joseph D.; Riekehr, Stefan; Kashaev, Nikolai; Wang, Li; Lowe, Tristan; Karanika, Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    Laser welding of advanced Al-Li alloys has been developed to meet the increasing demand for light-weight and high-strength aerospace structures. However, welding of high-strength Al-Li alloys can be problematic due to the tendency for hot cracking. Finding suitable welding parameters and filler material for this combination currently requires extensive and costly trial and error experimentation. The present work describes a novel coupled model to predict hot crack susceptibility (HCS) in Al-Li welds. Such a model can be used to shortcut the weld development process. The coupled model combines finite element process simulation with a two-level HCS model. The finite element process model predicts thermal field data for the subsequent HCS hot cracking prediction. The model can be used to predict the influences of filler wire composition and welding parameters on HCS. The modeling results have been validated by comparing predictions with results from fully instrumented laser welds performed under a range of process parameters and analyzed using high-resolution X-ray tomography to identify weld defects. It is shown that the model is capable of accurately predicting the thermal field around the weld and the trend of HCS as a function of process parameters.

  8. Adding silver and copper to hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid in the disinfection of an advanced primary treatment effluent.

    PubMed

    Orta De Velásquez, M T; Yáñez-Noguez, I; Jiménez-Cisneros, B; Luna Pabello, V M

    2008-11-01

    This paper evaluates the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and peracetic acid (PAA) in the disinfection of an Advanced Primary Treatment (APT) effluent, and how said disinfection capacities can be enhanced by combining the oxidants with copper (Cu2+) and silver (Ag). The treatment sequence consisted of APT (adding chemicals to water to remove suspended solids by coagulation and flocculation), followed by disinfection with various doses of HP, HP+Cu2+, HP+Ag, PAA and PAA+Ag. Microbiological quality was determined by monitoring concentrations of fecal coliforms (FC), pathogenic bacteria (PB) and helminth eggs (HE) throughout the sequence. The results revealed that APT effluent still contains very high levels of bacteria as the treatment only removes 1-2 log of FC and PB, but the reduction in the number of viable helminth eggs was 83%. Subsequent disinfection stages demonstrated that both HP+Cu2+ and HP+Ag have a marked disinfection capacity for bacteria (3.9 and 3.4 log-inactivation, respectively). Peracetic acid on its own was already extremely efficient at disinfecting for bacteria, and the effect was enhanced when combining PAA with silver (PAA+Ag). The best result for HE removal was achieved by combining PAA with silver (PAA+Ag) at doses of 20 + 2.0 mg l(-1), respectively. The study concluded that the PAA+Ag and HP+Ag combinations were good alternatives for APT effluent disinfection, because the disinfected effluents met the standards in NOM-001-SEMARNAT-1996, Mexico's regulation governing the microbiological quality required in treated wastewater destined for unrestricted reuse in agricultural irrigation (< or =1 helminths per litre). Combining either of these disinfection treatments with a primary method such as APT, therefore, offers an effective and practical way of reducing the health risks normally associated with the reuse of wastewaters.

  9. Development of an Advanced Carbide Cutting Tool for Nickel-based Alloy Machining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-28

    Inconel 718 utilizing state-of-the-market and state-of-the-art methods. The goal of increasing machining productivity by 40% was achieved with the...project is turning of Inconel 718 alloy. 1.3 Funding The total NCDMM funding for the project was $150,000 ($120,000 for labor and $30,000 for workpiece...tasks Task 1: Review current Inconel machining practice Task 2: Establish the current state of the art in Inconel 718 turning  Establish baseline data

  10. High temperature characteristics and solidification microstructures of dental metallic materials part I: silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Terashima, Nobuyoshi; Ito, Michio; Platt, Jeffrey A; Oshida, Yoshiki

    2003-09-01

    Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was subjected to a Thermo-Mechanical Analyzer to investigate high temperature properties up to its liquidus temperature. Microstructural examination and elemental analysis with EPMA were also conducted in the solid/liquid mixture region. The following conclusions were obtained. (1) The solidus temperature was 838.3 +/- 2.52 degrees C and 957.7 +/- 1.53 degrees C for the liquidus point. (2) Thermal expansion coefficients were 1.39 +/- 0.08% at the solidus, 2.338 +/- 0.13% at the liquidus, and the melting expansion coefficient was 0.932 +/- 0.058%. (3) The expansion during melting was controlled by a small amount of pressure such as 1/100 of the air pressure, therefore the fit accuracy of castings is suggested not to be influenced by the solidification shrinkage. (4) Although the softening heat treatment and casting exhibited an influence on thermal expansion behavior, casting temperature in addition to post-casting plastic deformation did not show an effect on the thermal expansion. (5) The yield strength at 750 degrees C was reduced down to about 1/400 of that at room temperature, and the modulus of elasticity was about 1/100 of the room temperature value.

  11. Microstructure and Performance of Kovar/Alumina Joints Made with Silver-Copper Base Active Metal Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS, JOHN J.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HLAVA,PAUL F.; WALKER,CHARLES A.

    1999-12-15

    Poor hermeticity performance was observed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic-ceramic joints having a Kovar{trademark} alloy interlayer. The active Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal was used to braze the substrates together. The Ti active element was scavenged from the filler metal by the formation of a (Fe, Ni, Co){sub x}Ti phase (x= 2-3) that prevented development of a continuous Ti{sub x}O{sub y} layer at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. Altering the process parameters did not circumvent the scavenging of Ti. Molybdenum barrier layers 1000, 2500, or 5000 {angstrom} thick on the Kovar{trademark} surfaces successfully allowed Ti{sub x}O{sub y} formation at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface and hermetic joints. The problems with the Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal for Kovar{trademark}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} braze joints led to the evaluation of a Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal. The Zr (active element) in Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal was not susceptible to the scavenging problem.

  12. Homogenizing Advanced Alloys: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Simulations Followed by Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2016-11-01

    Segregation of solute elements occurs in nearly all metal alloys during solidification. The resultant elemental partitioning can severely degrade as-cast material properties and lead to difficulties during post-processing (e.g., hot shorts and incipient melting). Many cast articles are subjected to a homogenization heat treatment in order to minimize segregation and improve their performance. Traditionally, homogenization heat treatments are based upon past practice or time-consuming trial and error experiments. Through the use of thermodynamic and kinetic modeling software, NETL has designed a systematic method to optimize homogenization heat treatments. Use of the method allows engineers and researchers to homogenize casting chemistries to levels appropriate for a given application. The method also allows for the adjustment of heat treatment schedules to fit limitations on in-house equipment (capability, reliability, etc.) while maintaining clear numeric targets for segregation reduction. In this approach, the Scheil module within Thermo-Calc is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within an alloy, and then diffusion controlled transformations is used to model homogenization kinetics as a function of time and temperature. Examples of computationally designed heat treatments and verification of their effects on segregation and properties of real castings are presented.

  13. Tungsten alloyed with rhenium as an advanced material for heat-resistant silicon ICs interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. N.; Chaplygin, Yu. A.; Golishnikov, A. A.; Kostyukov, D. A.; Putrya, M. G.; Safonov, S. O.; Shevyakov, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of comparative analysis of the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the tungsten and tungsten alloyed with rhenium films deposited on silicon, from the point of view of their use as interconnects in silicon ICs. W and W (Re-5%) alloyed with rhenium films were made by magnetron deposition. Sheet resistivity for W and W (Re- 5%) was 13 and 27 μOhm·cm respectively. Elemental composition the formed films was examined by Auger spectroscopy. To investigate the electromigration resistance of the conductors a methodology based on the accelerated electromigration testing at constant temperature was used. A comparative analysis of the mechanical stresses carried out in the W and W(Re - 5%) films. For this purpose was applied non-destructive method for optical laser scanning. At the same time, these films explored their ability of adhesion to silicon and silicon oxide. It is shown that the pull force of the W(Re - 5%) films was 1500 G/mm2, of the W films 700 G/mm2

  14. Identification of an advanced constitutive model of Magnesium alloy AZ31B

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. G.; Massoni, E.

    2011-05-04

    The main aim of this paper is to study the flow behavior of the AZ31B magnesium alloy by means of tensile tests performed in extended ranges of temperature and strain rates. The flow stress-strain curves analyzed by power law type constitutive equation can only fit well with experimental curves at the work-hardening stage. A new mathematical model is studied to describe the softening behavior of material based on tensile experiments. The relative parameters are obtained by fitting the equation with the experimental data. The genetic algorithm has been used to obtain the global optimal fitting parameters. The comparison between the fitted and experimental data proves the effectiveness of the model. The results indicate that this model leads to a better simulation of the flow stress during the softening stage than that of the power law equation. Based on this model, the deep drawing process has been simulated with the commercial finite element code FORGE registered. The punch load and thickness distribution of AZ31 sheet have been studied. The study of the results is helpful to the application of the stamping technology for the magnesium alloy sheet.

  15. Homogenizing Advanced Alloys: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Simulations Followed by Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Segregation of solute elements occurs in nearly all metal alloys during solidification. The resultant elemental partitioning can severely degrade as-cast material properties and lead to difficulties during post-processing (e.g., hot shorts and incipient melting). Many cast articles are subjected to a homogenization heat treatment in order to minimize segregation and improve their performance. Traditionally, homogenization heat treatments are based upon past practice or time-consuming trial and error experiments. Through the use of thermodynamic and kinetic modeling software, NETL has designed a systematic method to optimize homogenization heat treatments. Use of the method allows engineers and researchers to homogenize casting chemistries to levels appropriate for a given application. The method also allows for the adjustment of heat treatment schedules to fit limitations on in-house equipment (capability, reliability, etc.) while maintaining clear numeric targets for segregation reduction. In this approach, the Scheil module within Thermo-Calc is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within an alloy, and then diffusion controlled transformations is used to model homogenization kinetics as a function of time and temperature. Examples of computationally designed heat treatments and verification of their effects on segregation and properties of real castings are presented.

  16. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  17. Microstructure-sensitive extreme value probabilities of fatigue in advanced engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyla, Craig P.

    A novel microstructure-sensitive extreme value probabilistic framework is introduced to evaluate material performance/variability for damage evolution processes (e.g., fatigue, fracture, creep). This framework employs newly developed extreme value marked correlation functions (EVMCF) to identify the coupled microstructure attributes (e.g., phase/grain size, grain orientation, grain misorientation) that have the greatest statistical relevance to the extreme value response variables (e.g., stress, elastic/plastic strain) that describe the damage evolution processes of interest. This is an improvement on previous approaches that account for distributed extreme value response variables that describe the damage evolution process of interest based only on the extreme value distributions of a single microstructure attribute; previous approaches have given no consideration of how coupled microstructure attributes affect the distributions of extreme value response. This framework also utilizes computational modeling techniques to identify correlations between microstructure attributes that significantly raise or lower the magnitudes of the damage response variables of interest through the simulation of multiple statistical volume elements (SVE). Each SVE for a given response is constructed to be a statistical sample of the entire microstructure ensemble (i.e., bulk material); therefore, the response of interest in each SVE is not expected to be the same. This is in contrast to computational simulation of a single representative volume element (RVE), which often is untenably large for response variables dependent on the extreme value microstructure attributes. This framework has been demonstrated in the context of characterizing microstructure-sensitive high cycle fatigue (HCF) variability due to the processes of fatigue crack formation (nucleation and microstructurally small crack growth) in polycrystalline metallic alloys. Specifically, the framework is exercised to

  18. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  19. A review of modeling techniques for advanced effects in shape memory alloy behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, Cheikh; Zaki, Wael; Ben Zineb, Tarak

    2016-10-01

    micro, micro-macro and macro scales focusing pseudoelastic and shape memory effects. The paper reviews and discusses various techniques used in the literature for modeling complex behaviors observed in shape memory alloys (SMAs) that go beyond the core pseudoelastic and shape memory effects. These behaviors, which will be collectively referred to herein as ‘secondary effects’, include mismatch between austenite and martensite moduli, martensite reorientation under nonproportional multiaxial loading, slip and transformation-induced plasticity and their influence on martensite transformation, strong thermomechanical coupling and the influence of loading rate, tensile-compressive asymmetry, and the formation of internal loops due to incomplete phase transformation. In addition, because of their importance for practical design considerations, the paper discusses functional and structural fatigue, and fracture mechanics of SMAs.

  20. Advancements in Ti Alloy Powder Production by Close-Coupled Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Heidloff, Andy; Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Byrd, David

    2011-04-01

    As the technology for titanium metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) becomes more readily available, efficient Ti alloy fine powder production methods are required. An update on a novel close-coupled gas atomization system has been given. Unique features of the melting apparatus are shown to have measurable effects on the efficiency and ability to fully melt within the induction skull melting system (ISM). The means to initiate the melt flow were also found to be dependent on melt apparatus. Starting oxygen contents of atomization feedstock are suggested based on oxygen pick up during the atomization and MIM processes and compared to a new ASTM specification. Forming of titanium by metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) has been extensively studied with regards to binders, particle shape, and size distribution and suitable de-binding methods have been discovered. As a result, the visibility of Ti-MIM has steadily increased as reviews of technology, acceptability, and availability have been released. In addition, new ASTM specification ASTM F2885-11 for Ti-MIM for biomedical implants was released in early 2011. As the general acceptance of Ti-MIM as a viable fabrication route increases, demand for economical production of high quality Ti alloy powder for the preparation of Ti-MIM feedstock correspondingly increases. The production of spherical powders from the liquid state has required extensive pre-processing into different shapes thereby increasing costs. This has prompted examination of Ti-MIM with non-spherical particle shape. These particles are produced by the hydride/de-hydride process and are equi-axed but fragmented and angular which is less than ideal. Current prices for MIM quality titanium powder range from $40-$220/kg. While it is ideal for the MIM process to utilize spherical powders within the size range of 0.5-20 {mu}m, titanium's high affinity for oxygen to date has prohibited the use of this powder size range. In order to meet oxygen requirements the top size

  1. Advanced tribological coatings for high-specific-strength alloys. Interim report No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, M.K.

    1989-09-29

    The objectives of this contract are to develop and test a surface treatment suitable for the hardening of a titanium alloy precision gear for use in a vacuum environment. Attention was primarily directed at surface hardening by the interstitial diffusion of the elements nitrogen, oxygen and carbon. Targets of a surface hardness of >500 HV and depth 50 microns, without the need of any post-heat-treatment operations were identified. The surface treatments under study were applied to specimens of IMI 318 (Ti6Al4V), cut from plate. The sample numbers and corresponding surface treatments carried out and tested to date are listed. SHT indicates that the plates sample was in a solution heat treated condition before surface treatment.H G indicates that the sample was in a hardened and ground condition before surface treatment.

  2. Advances and Achievements in In Situ Analysis of Corrosion and Structure–Property Relationship in Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D.; Joshi, V.

    2016-11-03

    Every year, TMS Magnesium Committee carefully selects a special topic in magnesium (Mg) related research and development not only having the hottest subject from both academic and industrial perspectives but also demonstrating major achievements within this subject. Following last year’s topic on Mg microallying [1], this year’s focus is on in-situ methods and associated techniques in their broad definition spanning from laboratory- to large- scale facilities to process monitoring. The applications of in-situ techniques have a wide spectrum from the analysis of melts and liquid-solid transitions to solid-state phenomena during thermo-mechanical processing and heat treatments to surface interactions with various environments. Therefore, such works are of significant interest to scientists working in the area of Mg alloy development as well as to a much broader audience from both academia and industry. This interest is primarily caused by challenges in the analysis of structure-property relationship in Mg alloys, and even cursory glance of literature reveals sharp increase of publications relevant to this topic recently. For instance, very high reactivity of Mg as well as its well-known propensity to substantially alter structure upon unloading in mechanical testing makes it difficult to understand and thus to simulate correlation between microstructures observed in post-mortem analysis and physical processes during testing or fabrication. However, recent advances in in-situ analysis based on large-scale research facilities such as neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation sources as well as microscopy-based, acoustic emission, and other more traditional techniques allowed significant achievements. Apart from apparent development of relevant experimental techniques, a significant part of this success should also be attributed to increasing accessibility of the facilities and simplification of their use from a user perspective. The selection of articles in this

  3. Advances in Solid State Joining of Haynes 230 High Temperature Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X engine is being designed for NASA s new class of crew and launch vehicles, the Ares I and Ares V. The J-2X is a LOX/Hydrogen upper stage engine with 294,000 lbs of thrust and a minimum Isp of 448 seconds. As part of the design criteria to meet the performance requirements a large film-cooled nozzle extension is being designed to further expand the hot gases and increases the specific impulse. The nozzle extension is designed using Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum superalloy. The alloy was selected for its high strength at elevated temperatures and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The nozzle extension is manufactured from Haynes 230 plate spun-forged to form the contour and chemically-milled pockets for weight reduction. Currently fusion welding is being evaluated for joining the panels which are then mechanically etched and thinned to required dimensions for the nozzle extension blank. This blank is then spun formed into the parabolic geometry required for the nozzle. After forming the nozzle extension, weight reduction pockets are chemically milled into the nozzle. Fusion welding of Haynes results in columnar grains which are prone to hot cracking during forming processes. This restricts the ability to use spin forging to produce the nozzle contour. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce a structure more amenable to spin forming. Solid state processes have been shown to produce a refined grain structure within the joint regions as illustrated in Figure 1. Solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining the Haynes 230

  4. Recent advances in research on magnesium alloys and magnesium-calcium phosphate composites as biodegradable implant materials.

    PubMed

    Kuśnierczyk, Katarzyna; Basista, Michał

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are modern biocompatible materials suitable for orthopaedic implants due to their biodegradability in biological environment. Many studies indicate that there is a high demand to design magnesium alloys with controllable in vivo corrosion rates and required mechanical properties. A solution to this challenge can be sought in the development of metal matrix composites based on magnesium alloys with addition of relevant alloying elements and bioceramic particles. In this study, the corrosion mechanisms along with corrosion protection methods in magnesium alloys are discussed. The recently developed magnesium alloys for biomedical applications are reviewed. Special attention is given to the newest research results in metal matrix composites composed of magnesium alloy matrix and calcium phosphates, especially hydroxyapatite or tricalcium phosphate, as the second phase with emphasis on the biodegradation behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties in view of potential application of these materials in bone implants.

  5. Computational Analysis of Advanced Shape-Memory Alloy Devices Through a Robust Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalet, Giulia; Conti, Michele; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2017-03-01

    Shape-memory alloys (SMA) provide significant advantages in various industrial fields, but their manufacturing and commercialization are currently hindered. This is attributed mainly to the poor knowledge of material behavior and the lack of standards in its mechanical characterization. SMA products are usually developed by trial-and-error testing to address specific design requirements, thus increasing costs and time. The development of simulation tools offers a possible solution to assist engineers and designers and allows to better understand SMA transformation phenomena. Accordingly, the purpose of the present paper is to numerically analyze and predict the response of spring-like actuators and septal occluders, which are industrial components exploiting the shape-memory and pseudoelastic properties of SMAs, respectively. The methodology includes two main stages: the implementation of the three-dimensional phenomenological model known as Souza-Auricchio model and the finite element modeling of the device. A discussion about the steps of each stage, as parameter identification and model generalizations, is provided. Validation results are presented through a comparison with the results of a performed experimental campaign. The framework proves good prediction capabilities and allows to reduce the number of experimental tests in the future.

  6. Phosphorus-Based Alloy Materials for Advanced Potassium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenchao; Mao, Jianfeng; Li, Sean; Chen, Zhixin; Guo, Zaiping

    2017-03-08

    Potassium-ion batteries (PIBs) are interesting as one of the alternative metal-ion battery systems to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to the abundance and low cost of potassium. We have herein investigated Sn4P3/C composite as a novel anode material for PIBs. The electrode delivered a reversible capacity of 384.8 mA h g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) and a good rate capability of 221.9 mA h g(-1), even at 1 A g(-1). Its electrochemical performance is better than any anode material reported so far for PIBs. It was also found that the Sn4P3/C electrode displays a discharge potential plateau of 0.1 V in PIBs, slightly higher than for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) (0.01 V), and well above the plating potential of metal. This diminishes the formation of dendrites during cycling, and thus Sn4P3 is a relatively safe anode material, especially for application in large-scale energy storage, where large amounts of electrode materials are used. Furthermore, a possible reaction mechanism of the Sn4P3/C composite as PIB anode is proposed. This work may open up a new avenue for further development of alloy-based anodes with high capacity and long cycle life for PIBs.

  7. Synergistic extraction and spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) using 1-(2',4'-dinitro aminophenyl)-4,4,6-trimethyl-1,4-dihydropyrimidine-2-thiol: Analysis of alloys, pharmaceuticals and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Ganesh S.; Kolekar, Sanjay S.; Anuse, Mansing A.

    2011-05-01

    A simple and selective spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of copper(II) with 1-(2',4'-dinitro aminophenyl)-4,4,6-trimethyl-1,4-dihydropyrimidine-2-thiol [2',4'-dinitro APTPT] as a chromogenic reagent. The procedure was based on the synergistic extraction of copper(II) with 2',4'-dinitro APTPT in the presence of 0.5 mol L -1 pyridine to give green colored ternary complex of a molar ratio 1:2:2 (M:L:Py) in the pH range 8.7-10.5. It exhibits a maximum absorption of colored complex at 445 nm and 645 nm in chloroform against the reagent blank. Beer's law was followed in the concentration range 10-80 μg mL -1 of copper(II) and optimum range of 20-70 μg mL -1 the metal as evaluated from Ringbom's plot. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of copper(II)-2',4'-dinitro APTPT-pyridine complex in chloroform are 0.87 × 10 3 L mol -1 cm -1 and 0.072 μg cm -2, respectively. The interfering effects of various cations and anions were also studied, and use of suitable masking agents enhances the selectivity of the method. The proposed method is rapid, reproducible and successfully applied for the determination of copper(II) in binary and synthetic mixtures, alloys, pharmaceutical formulations, environmental and fertilizer samples. Comparison of the results with those obtained using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer also tested the validity of the method.

  8. Development of Advanced Aluminum Alloys from Rapidly Solidified Powders for Aerospace Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    density, compared to Al 7075 -T76, without significant loss in modu- lus, toughness, fatigue behavior , or stress corrosion resistance. Selective... 7075 -T76, without significant loss in modu- lus, toughness, fatigue behavior , or stress corrosion resistance. Selective application of the two advanced...density ratio, when compared to Al 7075 -T76 and without a significant loss in other properties important for structural applications. The program is

  9. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  10. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaydos, P.A.; Dufrane, K.F.

    1993-06-01

    Advanced materials and coatings for low heat rejection engines have been investigated for almost a decade. Much of the work has concentrated on the critical wear interface between the piston ring and cylinder liner. Simplified bench tests have identified families of coatings with high temperature wear performance that could meet or exceed that of conventional engine materials at today`s operating temperatures. More recently, engine manufacturers have begun to optimize material combinations and manufacturing processes so that the materials not only have promising friction and wear performance but are practical replacements for current materials from a materials and manufacturing cost standpoint. In this study, the advanced materials supplied by major diesel engine manufacturers were evaluated in an experimental apparatus that simulates many of the in-cylinder conditions of a low heat rejection diesel engine. Results include ring wear factors and average dynamic friction coefficients measured at intervals during the test. These results are compared with other advanced materials tested in the past as well as the baseline wear of current engines. Both fabricated specimens and sections of actual ring and cylinder liners were used in the testing. Observations and relative friction and wear performance of the individual materials are provided.

  11. Research Advances: Mechanism of Copper Acquisition by Methanotrophs; Honey Bees Use Pheromone To Delay Behavioral Maturation; Liquid Crystal Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Angela G.

    2005-06-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that a molecule used to accumulate copper has been identified; adult foraging bees keep young bees "down" with pheromone; and liquid crystals allow pentagons to tile a plane.

  12. Synthesis of a Photoluminescent and Triboluminescent Copper(I) Compound: An Experiment for an Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchetti, Fabio; Di Nicola, Corrado; Pettinari, Riccardo; Timokhin, Ivan; Pettinari, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    A simple synthesis is proposed from inexpensive reactants of a copper(I) derivative that exhibits strong photoluminescence and, in the crystalline form, exhibits strong triboluminescence. This laboratory provides an opportunity for introducing students to the phenomenon of triboluminescence. (Contains 1 scheme and 4 figures.)

  13. Advantages and challenges of increased antimicrobial copper use and copper mining.

    PubMed

    Elguindi, Jutta; Hao, Xiuli; Lin, Yanbing; Alwathnani, Hend A; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Copper is a highly utilized metal for electrical, automotive, household objects, and more recently as an effective antimicrobial surface. Copper-containing solutions applied to fruits and vegetables can prevent bacterial and fungal infections. Bacteria, such as Salmonellae and Cronobacter sakazakii, often found in food contamination, are rapidly killed on contact with copper alloys. The antimicrobial effectiveness of copper alloys in the healthcare environment against bacteria causing hospital-acquired infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Clostridium difficile has been described recently. The use of copper and copper-containing materials will continue to expand and may lead to an increase in copper mining and production. However, the copper mining and manufacturing industry and the consumer do not necessarily enjoy a favorable relationship. Open pit mining, copper mine tailings, leaching products, and deposits of toxic metals in the environment often raises concerns and sometimes public outrage. In addition, consumers may fear that copper alloys utilized as antimicrobial surfaces in food production will lead to copper toxicity in humans. Therefore, there is a need to mitigate some of the negative effects of increased copper use and copper mining. More thermo-tolerant, copper ion-resistant microorganisms could improve copper leaching and lessen copper groundwater contamination. Copper ion-resistant bacteria associated with plants might be useful in biostabilization and phytoremediation of copper-contaminated environments. In this review, recent progress in microbiological and biotechnological aspects of microorganisms in contact with copper will be presented and discussed, exploring their role in the improvement for the industries involved as well as providing better environmental outcomes.

  14. Advanced Engine Cycles Analyzed for Turbofans With Variable-Area Fan Nozzles Actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced, large commercial turbofan engines using low-fan-pressure-ratio, very high bypass ratio thermodynamic cycles can offer significant fuel savings over engines currently in operation. Several technological challenges must be addressed, however, before these engines can be designed. To name a few, the high-diameter fans associated with these engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge, and a large, heavy gearbox is often necessary to address the differences in ideal operating speeds between the fan and the low-pressure turbine. Also, the large nacelles contribute aerodynamic drag penalties and require long, heavy landing gear when mounted on conventional, low wing aircraft. Nevertheless, the reduced fuel consumption rates of these engines are a compelling economic incentive, and fans designed with low pressure ratios and low tip speeds offer attractive noise-reduction benefits. Another complication associated with low-pressure-ratio fans is their need for variable flow-path geometry. As the design fan pressure ratio is reduced below about 1.4, an operational disparity is set up in the fan between high and low flight speeds. In other words, between takeoff and cruise there is too large a swing in several key fan parameters-- such as speed, flow, and pressure--for a fan to accommodate. One solution to this problem is to make use of a variable-area fan nozzle (VAFN). However, conventional, hydraulically actuated variable nozzles have weight, cost, maintenance, and reliability issues that discourage their use with low-fan-pressure-ratio engine cycles. United Technologies Research, in cooperation with NASA, is developing a revolutionary, lightweight, and reliable shape memory alloy actuator system that can change the on-demand nozzle exit area by up to 20 percent. This "smart material" actuation technology, being studied under NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program and Revolutionary Concepts in Aeronautics (Rev

  15. The Effect of Alloying on Topologically Close Packed Phase Instability in Advanced Nickel-Based Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Arenas, David; Keller, Dennis; Vasudevan, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to describe topologically close packed (TCP) phase instability as a function of composition in the advanced Ni-base superalloy Rene N6. TCP phases are detrimental to overall high-temperature performance of Ni-base superalloys because of their brittle nature and because they deplete the Ni-rich matrix of potent solid solution strengthening elements. Thirty-four variations of polycrystalline Rene N6 determined from a design-of-experiments approach were cast and homogenized at 1315"C for 80 hours followed by exposure at 10930C for 400 hours to promote TCP formation. The alloys had the following composition ranges in atomic percent: Co 10.61 to 16.73%, Mo 0.32 to 1.34%, W 1.85 to 2.52%, Re 1.80 to 2.1 1 %, Ta 2.36 to 3.02%, Al 11.90 to 14.75%, and Cr 3.57 to 6.23%. Physical and chemical characteristics of all n-ticrostructures obtained were described using various analytical techniques. From these observations, a mathematical description of TCP occurrence (omega and P phase) was generated for polycrystalline Rene N6.

  16. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  17. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  18. Effect of multiaxial stresses on the high-temperature behavior and rupture of advanced alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nancy Louise

    1998-05-01

    The evolution and effect of multiaxial stress states on the high temperature deformation and rupture behavior of materials with non-uniform microstructures has been investigated. Through a detailed description of the role that multiaxial stresses play on damage evolution and rupture, the abundant existing data for uniaxial rupture can be used to more successfully design for the life of high temperature components. Three dimensional finite element calculations of primary creep deformation were performed for particulate reinforced metal matrix composites under a variety of multiaxial loading conditions. A quasi-steady state stress distribution develops during primary creep for each of the conditions considered. The results indicate that higher stresses exist in regions above and below the particles and accommodate the development of creep damage. The nature of the stress state within these regions is not significantly altered by the presence of the particles. The strain fields show a distribution similar to the stress fields. Despite significantly large regions of enhanced stress, the overall creep strain rates for all models are decreased by the presence of the particles. The applied effective stress does not have a unique relationship with overall effective strain rate for particulate reinforced composites under different applied stress states. The failure of sections of turbine rotor disks formed from the superalloy V-57 which operate under highly multiaxial stresses has been investigated. Optical microscopy of a turbine rotor disk removed from service after 30,000 hrs showed an intergranular crack that initiated at the root of a fir-tree turbine rotor blade attachment. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed heavy grain boundary oxidation that could account for the cracking and failure of the rotor disks. Heat treatments of a TiAl alloy have been established for producing a microstructure suitable for high temperature multiaxial rupture testing. The

  19. Experimental Evaluation of Cold-Sprayed Copper Rotating Bands for Large-Caliber Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    copper rotating band which is reported to use a copper alloy that is nearly 90% copper.3 The target substrate for this application is an aluminum (7075...munition, thereby causing the projectile to spin. Pure copper, copper alloy , and brass rotating bands are typically fabricated to steel munitions using...the weld-overlay process, a radial-pressing process, or a thermal shrink fit. This paper documents the initial development and demonstration of a cold

  20. Contribution of Copper Ion Resistance to Survival of Escherichia coli on Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Taudte, Nadine; Nies, Dietrich H.; Grass, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of touch surfaces poses a serious threat for public health. The use of bactericidal surface materials, such as copper and its alloys, might constitute a way to aid the use of antibiotics and disinfectants, thus minimizing the risk of emergence and spread of multiresistant germs. The survival of Escherichia coli on metallic copper surfaces has been studied previously; however, the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation on copper surfaces have not been elucidated. Data presented in this study suggest that bacteria are killed rapidly on dry copper surfaces. Several factors, such as copper ion toxicity, copper chelators, cold, osmotic stress, and reactive oxygen species, but not anaerobiosis, influenced killing rates. Strains deleted in copper detoxification systems were slightly more sensitive than was the wild type. Preadaptation to copper enhanced survival rates upon copper surface exposure. This study constitutes a first step toward understanding the reasons for metallic copper surface-mediated killing of bacteria. PMID:18156321

  1. Copper-acrylic enamel serves as lubricant for cold drawing of refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beane, C.; Karasek, F.

    1966-01-01

    Acrylic enamel spray containing metallic copper pigment lubricates refractory metal tubing during cold drawing operations so that the tubing surface remains free from scratches and nicks and does not seize in the die. Zirconium alloys, zirconium, tantalum alloys, niobium alloys, vanandium alloys and titanium alloys have been drawn using this lubricant.

  2. Three-dimensional hierarchical porous platinum-copper alloy networks with enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Zhang, Zong-Wen; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Porous Pt-Cu alloy networks are synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal process, with ethylene glycol as the reducing agent and the block copolymer Pluronic F127 as structure-directing agent. The structure, porosity and surface chemical state of as-prepared Pt-Cu alloy with different composition are characterized. The formation mechanism of the porous structure is investigated by time sequential experiments. The obtained Pt53Cu47 alloy possesses a unique 3D hierarchical porous network structure assembled by interconnected nanodendrites as building blocks. Because of the high surface area, concave surface topology and open porous structure, the Pt53Cu47 alloy catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation in comparison with commercial Pt black and the Pt73Cu27 alloy synthesized following the same process as Pt53Cu47.

  3. Copper nanoparticles of well-controlled size and shape: a new advance in synthesis and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Aissa, Mohamed Ali; Tremblay, Benoît; Andrieux-Ledier, Amandine; Maisonhaute, Emmanuel; Raouafi, Noureddine; Courty, Alexa

    2015-02-01

    Here, we report a new synthetic route for spherical small copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with size ranging from 3.5 nm to 11 nm and with an unprecedented associated monodispersity (<10%). This synthesis is based on the reduction of an organometallic precursor (CuCl(PPh3)3) by tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecylamine (DDA) at a moderate temperature (50 to 100 °C). Because of their narrow size distribution, the CuNPs form long-range 2D organizations (several μm2). The wide range of CuNPs sizes is obtained by controlling the reaction temperature and DDA-to-copper phosphine salt ratio during the synthesis process. The addition of oleic acid (OA) after the synthesis stabilizes the CuNPs (no coalescence) for several weeks under a nitrogen atmosphere. The nature and the reactivity of the ligands were studied by IR and UV-visible spectroscopy. We thus show that just after synthesis the nanoparticles are coated by phosphine and DDA. After adding OA, a clear exchange between phosphine and OA is evidenced. This exchange is possible thanks to an acid-base reaction between the free alkylamine in excess in the solution and OA. OA is then adsorbed on the NPs surface in the form of carboxylate. Furthermore, the use of oleylamine (OYA) instead of DDA as the capping agent allows one to obtain other NP shapes (nanorods, triangles and nanodisks). We get evidence that OYA allows the selective adsorption of chloride ions derived from the copper precursor on the different crystallographic faces during the growth of CuNPs that induces the formation of anisotropic shapes such nanorods or triangles.Here, we report a new synthetic route for spherical small copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with size ranging from 3.5 nm to 11 nm and with an unprecedented associated monodispersity (<10%). This synthesis is based on the reduction of an organometallic precursor (CuCl(PPh3)3) by tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecylamine (DDA) at a moderate temperature (50 to 100

  4. The Effect of Aging Treatment on the Microstructure and Properties of Copper-Precipitation Strengthened HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy) Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    precipitation of copper from alpha iron and concluded that the copper precipitates as FCC E-phase without any intermediate compounds being formed. Hornbogen...pre- cipitates in an alpha Iron matrix. Their research confirmed the 4 2 A ST.S 9 00- 0 -1400 6 W COPOOr Content Figure 2. Iron-Rich Portion of Fe-Cu...64-67, August 1984. 6. Hornbogen, E., and Glenn, R. C., "A Metallurgical Study of Precip- itation of Copper from Alpha Iron ," Transactions of the

  5. High-temperature nickel-brazing alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. H.; Thompson, S. R.

    1970-01-01

    Gold-nickel brazing alloy, with 5 percent indium added to depress the melting point, is used for brazing of nickel-clad silver electrical conductors which operate at temperatures to 1200 deg F. Alloy has low resistivity, requires no flux, and is less corrosive than other gold-nickel, gold-copper alloys.

  6. Copper nanoparticles of well-controlled size and shape: a new advance in synthesis and self-organization.

    PubMed

    Ben Aissa, Mohamed Ali; Tremblay, Benoît; Andrieux-Ledier, Amandine; Maisonhaute, Emmanuel; Raouafi, Noureddine; Courty, Alexa

    2015-02-21

    Here, we report a new synthetic route for spherical small copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with size ranging from 3.5 nm to 11 nm and with an unprecedented associated monodispersity (<10%). This synthesis is based on the reduction of an organometallic precursor (CuCl(PPh3)3) by tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecylamine (DDA) at a moderate temperature (50 to 100 °C). Because of their narrow size distribution, the CuNPs form long-range 2D organizations (several μm(2)). The wide range of CuNPs sizes is obtained by controlling the reaction temperature and DDA-to-copper phosphine salt ratio during the synthesis process. The addition of oleic acid (OA) after the synthesis stabilizes the CuNPs (no coalescence) for several weeks under a nitrogen atmosphere. The nature and the reactivity of the ligands were studied by IR and UV-visible spectroscopy. We thus show that just after synthesis the nanoparticles are coated by phosphine and DDA. After adding OA, a clear exchange between phosphine and OA is evidenced. This exchange is possible thanks to an acid-base reaction between the free alkylamine in excess in the solution and OA. OA is then adsorbed on the NPs surface in the form of carboxylate. Furthermore, the use of oleylamine (OYA) instead of DDA as the capping agent allows one to obtain other NP shapes (nanorods, triangles and nanodisks). We get evidence that OYA allows the selective adsorption of chloride ions derived from the copper precursor on the different crystallographic faces during the growth of CuNPs that induces the formation of anisotropic shapes such nanorods or triangles.

  7. Cu-Mn-Fe alloys and Mn-rich amphiboles in ancient copper slags from the Jabal Samran area, Saudi Arabia: With synopsis on chemistry of Fe-Mn(III) oxyhydroxides in alteration zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surour, Adel A.

    2015-01-01

    In the Jabal Samran area (western Saudi Arabia), secondary copper mineralization in a NE-trending shear zone in which the arc metavolcanic host rocks (dacite-rhyodacite) show conjugate fractures and extensive hydrothermal alteration and bleaching. The zones contain frequent Fe-Mn(III) oxyhydroxides (FeOH-MnOH) that resulted from oxidation of pyrite and Mn-bearing silicates. In the bleached part, the groundmass is represented by Fe-bearing interstratified illite-smectite with up to 4.02 wt% FeOt. FeOH-MnOH are pre-weathering phases formed by hydrothermal alteration in a submarine environment prior to uplifting. Five varieties of FeOH are distinguished, four of them are exclusively hydrothermal with ∼20 wt% H2O whereas the fifth contains ∼31-33 wt% H2O and might represent reworking of earlier hydrothermal FeOH phases by weathering. FeOH fills thin fractures in the form of veinlets and crenulated laminae or as a pseudomorph for pyrite, goethite and finally ferrihydrite, and this oxyhydroxide is characterized by positive correlation of Fe2O3 with SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, MOH shows positive correlation between MnO2 and Al2O3 whereas it is negative between Fe2O3 and SiO2. Paratacamite is the most common secondary copper mineral that fills fractures and post-dates FeOH and MnOH. It is believed that Cl- in the structure of paratacamite represents inherited marine storage rather than from surfacial evaporates or meteoric water. The mineralogy of slags suggests a complicated mineral assemblage that includes native Cu prills, synthetic spinifixed Mn-rich amphiboles with 16.73 wt% MnO, brown glass and Ca-Mn-Fe phase close to the olivine structure. EMPA indicate that the some Cu prills have either grey discontinuous boarder zone of S-rich Mn-Cu alloy (with up to 21.95 wt% S and 19.45 wt% Mn) or grey Cu-Mn-Fe alloy (with up to 15.9 wt% Cu, 39. 12 wt% Mn and 61.64 wt% Fe). Mn in the Cu prills is expelled inward as Cu-Mn-Fe alloy inclusions whereas S is expelled

  8. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    possible today. Extensive work was conducted on casting of semi-solid alloys when highly fluid (’ Rheocasting ’) and when thixotropically gelled...Thixocasting’). In initial phases of the program, copper base alloys and cast iron alloys were prepared with special non-dendritic Rheocast structure by batch...processing. Compatibility studies were carried out to select materials suitable for preparing cast iron with the Rheocast structure. Design

  9. Palladium alloys for biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Shor, Kavita

    2010-07-01

    In the biomedical field, palladium has primarily been used as a component of alloys for dental prostheses. However, recent research has shown the utility of palladium alloys for devices such as vascular stents that do not distort magnetic resonance images. Dental palladium alloys may contain minor or major percentages of palladium. As a minor constituent, palladium hardens, strengthens and increases the melting range of alloys. Alloys that contain palladium as the major component also contain copper, gallium and sometimes tin to produce strong alloys with high stiffness and relatively low corrosion rates. All current evidence suggests that palladium alloys are safe, despite fears about harmful effects of low-level corrosion products during biomedical use. Recent evidence suggests that palladium poses fewer biological risks than other elements, such as nickel or silver. Hypersensitivity to palladium alone is rare, but accompanies nickel hypersensitivity 90-100% of the time. The unstable price of palladium continues to influence the use of palladium alloys in biomedicine.

  10. Selective dissolution in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Carol Rene

    Corrosion is an important issue in the design of engineering alloys. De-alloying is an aspect of alloy corrosion related to the selective dissolution of one or more of the components in an alloy. The work reported herein focuses on the topic of de-alloying specific to single-phase binary noble metal alloy systems. The alloy systems investigated were gold-silver and gold-copper. The onset of a bulk selective dissolution process is typically marked by a critical potential whereby the more reactive component in the alloy begins dissolving from the bulk, leading to the formation of a bi-continuous solid-void morphology. The critical potential was investigated for the entire composition range of gold-silver alloys. The results presented herein include the formulation of an expression for critical potential as a function of both alloy and electrolyte composition. Results of the first investigation of underpotential deposition (UPD) on alloys are also presented herein. These results were implemented as an analytical tool to provide quantitative measurements of the surface evolution of gold during de-alloying. The region below the critical potential was investigated in terms of the compositional evolution of the alloy surface. Below the critical potential, there is a competition between the dissolution of the more reactive alloying constituent (either silver or copper) and surface diffusion of gold that serves to cover dissolution sites and prevent bulk dissolution. By holding the potential at a prescribed value below the critical potential, a time-dependent gold enrichment occurs on the alloy surface leading to passivation. A theoretical model was developed to predict the surface enrichment of gold based on the assumption of layer-by-layer dissolution of the more reactive alloy constituent. The UPD measurements were used to measure the time-dependent surface gold concentration and the results agreed with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  11. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction performance of ultrafine nanoporous platinum-copper alloy: Experiment and density functional theory calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junzhe; Shi, Jun; Xu, Junling; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peng, Zhangquan

    2015-04-01

    Novel ultrafine nanoporous Pt-Cu alloy with a Pt:Cu stoichiometric ratio of 3:1 (np-Pt3Cu) has been prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent two-step chemical dealloying. The obtained np-Pt3Cu has uniform and bicontinuous ligament(metal)-channel(void) structure with the ligament size of 3.3 ± 0.7 nm. To explore its potential application in energy conversion reactions, the np-Pt3Cu alloy has been examined as electrocatalyst for the operating reactions in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Compared with the commercial JM Pt/C, a benchmark catalyst extensively used in fuel cell research, the np-Pt3Cu alloy demonstrates better performance in both the methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in acidic medium. Theoretical calculations reveal that the electronic structure of Pt has been modified with the shift of Pt d-band center due to alloying with Cu, which can decrease CO poisoning and enhance the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction activities.

  12. Properties of copper?stainless steel HIP joints before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Laukkanen, A.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2002-12-01

    The tensile and fracture behaviour of CuCrZr and CuAl25 IG0 alloys joint to 316L(N) stainless steel by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) have been determined in unirradiated and neutron-irradiated conditions. The tensile and fracture behaviour of copper alloy HIP joint specimens are dominated by the properties of the copper alloys, and particularly, by the strength mismatch and mismatch in strain hardening capacities between copper alloys and stainless steel. The test temperature, neutron irradiation and thermal cycles primarily affect the copper alloy HIP joint properties through changing the strength mismatch between the base alloys. Changes in the loading conditions i.e. tensile, bend ( JI) and mixed-mode bend ( JI/ JII) lead to different fracture modes in the copper alloy HIP joint specimens.

  13. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure and hardness of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy with nickel additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Haider T.; Mohammed, Kahtan S.; Ahmad, Khairel R.

    2015-10-01

    The main object of this study is to investigate the effect of friction stir processing (FSP) on the microstructure and hardness of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys that were produced via casting with the addition of 5 wt % nickel. Furthermore, a single-pass FSP with a rotational speed of 1500 rpm and a traveling speed of 40 mm/min was performed on the alloys. The FSP-treated cast alloys were homogenized, aged at 120°C for 24 h, retrogressed at 180°C for 30 min, and then re-aged at 120°C for 24 h. Microstructural evaluations via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, as well as with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were conducted. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to detect the intermetallics and phases of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloys. Before FSP, the microstructural observations indicated the presence of coarse Ni dispersed particles with a precipitate phase within the matrix. After FSP treatment, the grain refinement led to the uniform space distribution of Ni dispersed particles in the stir zone. The Vickers hardness values for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy increased after age tempering at T6 and retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment because of the increased precipitation and particles dispersity. The hardness of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy was enhanced after FSP and a series of heat treatments, especially the RRA process, because of the stirring action of the FSP tool, the grain refinement, the appearance of additional precipitates, and the refinement of dispersed Ni particles.

  14. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  15. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper... introduction of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the forming of beryllium copper alloys....

  16. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper... introduction of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the forming of beryllium copper alloys....

  17. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the forming of beryllium copper alloys....

  18. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper... introduction of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the forming of beryllium copper alloys....

  19. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the forming of beryllium copper alloys....

  20. Establishing a Scientific Basis for Optimizing Compositions, Process Paths and Fabrication Methods for Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys for Use in Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Nicholas J., Wu, Yuan; Etienne, Auriane; Stergar, Erich; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-02-21

    O3 concentration of 0.2 wt.%. An APT characterization of MA957 joined by friction stir welding (FSW) showed that this solid sate joining procedure had only a modest effect on the NF number density (N) and average diameter () compared to an as extruded sample. FSW appears to rearrange the NFs, which become highly aligned with sub-boundary and dislocation structures to an extent that are not observed in the as extruded case. The aligned NF structures are less apparent, but seem to persist after post weld annealing at 1150ºC for 3 h following which reduces N, consistent with a significant reduction in hardness. Lastly, several NFA materials, including MA957 and various 14YWT alloys, have been included in irradiation experiments performed at the Advanced Test Reactor, the JOYO sodium cooled fast reactor, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, and the SINQ spallation neut