Science.gov

Sample records for advanced copper alloys

  1. Oxidation-Reduction Resistance of Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.; Humphrey, D. L.; Setlock, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to oxidation and blanching is a key issue for advanced copper alloys under development for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Candidate alloys, including dispersion-strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb, solution-strengthened Cu-Ag-Zr, and ODS Cu-Al2O3, are being evaluated for oxidation resistance by static TGA exposures in low-p(O2) and cyclic oxidation in air, and by cyclic oxidation-reduction exposures (using air for oxidation and CO/CO2 or H2/Ar for reduction) to simulate expected service environments. The test protocol and results are presented.

  2. Protection of Advanced Copper Alloys With Lean Cu-Cr Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced copper alloys are used as liners of rocket thrusters and nozzle ramps to ensure dissipation of the high thermal load generated during launch, and Cr-lean coatings are preferred for the protection of these liners from the aggressive ambient environment. It is shown that adequate protection can be achieved with thin Cu-Cr coatings containing as little as 17 percent Cr.

  3. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  4. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  5. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  6. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  7. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  8. Comparison of the Fatigue Behavior of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Ellis, David

    2006-01-01

    This presentation is about the development of advanced copper alloys with high thermal conductivity, good creep strength, and adequate fatigue strength for rocket engine applications. It also focuses on the commercial availability of the advanced alloy-GRCop-84 developed at NASA-GRC. The presentation's conclusions are that GRCop-84 has equivalent or better isothermal fatigue lives compared to other commercially available copper alloys, that GRCop-84 can be fabricated in various forms with minimal change in the fatigue lives, that it is equivalent in sothermal, fatigue to AMZIRC at moderate temperatures, and that Narloy-Z is equivalent in fatigue capabilities to GRCop-84 at 400C and below.

  9. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 1: Narloy Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for Narloy Z, a centrifugally cast, copper-base alloy. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature in air and in argon at 482, 538 and 593 C using an axial strain rate of .002/sec to the -1 power. In addition tensile tests were performed at 538 C in an evaluation of tensile properties at strain rates of .004 and .01/sec to the -1 power. Ultimate and yield strength values of about 315 and 200 MN/sq m respectively were recorded at room temperature and these decreased to about 120 and 105 respectively as the temperature was increased to 593 C. Reduction in area values were recorded in the range from 40 to 50% with some indication of a minimum ductility point at 538 C.

  10. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-04-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  11. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  12. Copper and zinc recycling from copper alloys` spent pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Moguel, G.J.; Plascencia, G.; Perez, J.

    1995-12-31

    The precipitation of copper and zinc as cements from a copper alloys` spent pickling solution has been studied at laboratory and pilot scale, with the objective of designing an economic process to recover both metals and render a solution to be either recycled to the pickling process or treated in a standard fashion and produce a non-hazardous sludge. The sulfuric acid spent pickling solution already containing copper and zinc was used first to dissolve another solid residue originated in the copper alloys foundry to neutralize part of the acidity. The resulting enriched solution was treated separately with two reductants: sodium borohydride and iron powder varying pH and excess of reductant under constant agitation. Under the best conditions, precipitation of over 95 percent of zinc and copper was achieved together with the reduction of lead and cadmium contents respectively. A process for the combined residues treatment is proposed.

  13. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  14. Thermotransport in liquid aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A thermotransport study was made on a series of liquid aluminum-copper alloys which contained from trace amounts to 33 weight percent copper. The samples in the form of narrow capillaries were held in known temperature gradient of thermotransport apparatus until the stationary state was reached. The samples were analyzed for the concentration of copper along the length. Copper was observed to migrate to the colder regions in all the samples. The heat of transport, Q*, was determined for each composition from a plot of concentration of copper versus reciprocal absolute temperature. The value of Q* is the highest at trace amounts of copper (4850 cal/gm-atom), but decreases with increasing concentration of copper and levels off to 2550 cal/gm-atom at about 25 weight percent copper. The results are explained on the basis of electron-solute interaction and a gas model of diffusion.

  15. Utilization of Copper Alloys for Marine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, Andrew

    Utilization of copper alloy components in systems deployed in marine environment presents potential improvements by reducing maintenance costs, prolonging service life, and increasing reliability. However, integration of these materials faces technological challenges, which are discussed and addressed in this work, including characterization of material performance in seawater environment, hydrodynamics of copper alloy components, and design procedures for systems with copper alloys. To characterize the hydrodynamic behavior of copper alloy nets, mesh geometry of the major types of copper nets currently used in the marine aquaculture are analyzed and formulae for the solidity and strand length are proposed. Experimental studies of drag forces on copper alloy net panels are described. Based on these studies, empirical values for normal drag coefficients are proposed for various types of copper netting. These findings are compared to the previously published data on polymer nets. It is shown that copper nets exhibit significantly lower resistance to normal currents, which corresponds to lower values of normal drag coefficient. The seawater performance (corrosion and biofouling) of copper alloys is studied through the field trials of tensioned and untensioned specimens in a one-year deployment in the North Atlantic Ocean. The corrosion behavior is characterized by weight loss, optical microscopy, and SEM/EDX analyses. The biofouling performance is quantified in terms of the biomass accumulation. To estimate the effects of stray electrical currents on the seawater corrosion measurements, a low cost three-axis stray electric current monitoring device is designed and tested both in the lab and in the 30-day field deployment. The system consists of a remotely operated PC with a set of pseudo-electrodes and a digital compass. The collected data is processed to determine magnitudes of AC and DC components of electric field and dominant AC frequencies. Mechanical behavior of

  16. Powder-Derived High-Conductivity Coatings for Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2003-01-01

    Makers of high-thermal-flux engines prefer copper alloys as combustion chamber liners, owing to a need to maximize heat dissipation. Since engine environments are strongly oxidizing in nature and copper alloys generally have inadequate resistance to oxidation, the liners need coatings for thermal and environmental protection; however, coatings must be chosen with great care in order to avoid significant impairment of thermal conductivity. Powder-derived chromia- and alumina- forming alloys are being studied under NASA's programs for advanced reusable launch vehicles to succeed the space shuttle fleet. NiCrAlY and Cu-Cr compositions optimized for high thermal conductivity have been tested for static and cyclic oxidation, and for susceptibility to blanching - a mode of degradation arising from oxidation-reduction cycling. The results indicate that the decision to coat the liners or not, and which coating/composition to use, depends strongly on the specific oxidative degradation mode that prevails under service conditions.

  17. Copper and nickel adherently electroplated on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.

    1967-01-01

    Anodic treatment of titanium alloy enables electroplating of tightly adherent coatings of copper and nickel on the alloy. The alloy is treated in a solution of hydrofluoric and acetic acids, followed by the electroplating process.

  18. Zirconium modified nickel-copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved material for use in a catalytic reactor which reduces nitrogen oxide from internal combustion engines is in the form of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-copper alloy. This material has a nominal composition of Ni-30 Cu-0.2 Zr and is characterized by improved high temperature mechanical properties.

  19. Applicability of copper alloys for DEMO high heat flux components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2016-02-01

    The current state of knowledge of the mechanical and thermal properties of high-strength, high conductivity Cu alloys relevant for fusion energy high heat flux applications is reviewed, including effects of thermomechanical and joining processes and neutron irradiation on precipitation- or dispersion-strengthened CuCrZr, Cu-Al2O3, CuNiBe, CuNiSiCr and CuCrNb (GRCop-84). The prospects for designing improved versions of wrought copper alloys and for utilizing advanced fabrication processes such as additive manufacturing based on electron beam and laser consolidation methods are discussed. The importance of developing improved structural materials design criteria is also noted.

  20. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  1. Tantalum-copper alloy and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1984-11-06

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  2. Tantalum-copper alloy and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1983-06-01

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  3. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  4. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  5. Machining of low percentage beryllium copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermeyer, J. G.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne beryllium sampling during machining of low percentage beryllium-copper alloys shows that normal dry machining creates 45.2 microgram/cu m of airborne beryllium in the casting operators breathing zone and 2.3 microgram/cu m in an adjacent machine working area. A small vacuum system placed over the tool effectively removes airborne beryllium in the breathing zone sample to 0.2 microgram/cu m.

  6. Development of Lead-Free Copper Alloy-Graphite Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    In this project, graphite is used as a substitute for lead in order to maintain the machinability of plumbing components at the level of leaded brass. Graphite dispersed in Cu alloy was observed to impart good machinability and reduce the sizes of chips during machining of plumbing components in a manner similar to lead. Copper alloys containing dispersed graphite particles could be successfully cast in several plumbing fixtures which exhibited acceptable corrosion rate, solderability, platability, and pressure tightness. The power consumption for machining of composites was also lower than that of the matrix alloy. In addition, centrifugally cast copper alloy cylinders containing graphite particles were successfully made. These cylinders can therefore be used for bearing applications, as substitutes for lead-containing copper alloys. The results indicate that copper graphite alloys developed under this DOE project have a great potential to substitute for lead copper alloys in both plumbing and bearing applications.

  7. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  8. Copper-rich invar by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, K.; Qi, Qinian; Ilyushin, A. S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    1993-05-01

    An fcc alloy of composition Fe 64Cu 26Cr 7Ni 3 with a0 = 0.362 nm and an average crystalline size of 5 nm was produced by high-energy ball milling iron and copper powder in a stainless-steel container. The average number of electrons per atom is 8.7. The Curie temperature of the alloy is 410 K and the room-temperature magnetization is 48 JT -1 kg -1. The Mössbauer spectrum at 15 K shows a broad distribution of hyperfine field with an average of 15.6 T, which indicates coexistence of high and low moment states for iron. The alloy decomposes exothermically at 775 K to yield a mixture of bcc and fcc phases, but 50% of the iron remains in the fcc form with a low moment.

  9. Environmental Durability of Coated GRCop-84 Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Robinson, C.; Barrett, C.; Humphrey, D.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as liners in combustor chambers and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. As a result, protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The oxidation behavior of several new coating alloys has been evaluated. GRCop-84 specimens were coated with several copper and nickel-based coatings, where the coatings were deposited by either vacuum plasma spraying or cold spraying techniques. Coated and uncoated specimens were thermally cycled in a furnace at different temperatures in order to evaluate the performance of the coatings. Additional studies were conducted in a high pressure burner rig using a hydrocarbon fuel and subjected to a high heat flux hydrogen-oxygen combustion flame in NASA s Quick Access Rocket Exhaust (QARE) rig. The performance of these coatings are discussed.

  10. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  11. Comparison of the Oxidation Rates of Some New Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper alloys were studied for oxidation resistance and mechanisms between 550 and 700 C, in reduced-oxygen environments expected in rocket engines, and their oxidation behaviors compared to that of pure copper. They included two dispersion-strengthened alloys (precipitation-strengthened and oxide-dispersion strengthened, respectively) and one solution-strengthened alloy. In all cases the main reaction was oxidation of Cu into Cu2O and CuO. The dispersion-strengthened alloys were superior to both Cu and the solution-strengthened alloy in oxidation resistance. However, factors retarding oxidation rates seemed to be different for the two dispersion-strengthened alloys.

  12. Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface.

  13. Effect of fission neutron irradiation on the tensile and electrical properties of copper and copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the properties of several copper alloys following fission reactor irradiation at ITER-relevant temperatures of 80 to 200{degrees}C. This study provides some of the data needed for the ITER research and development Task T213. These low temperature irradiations caused significant radiation hardening and a dramatic decrease in the work hardening ability of copper and copper alloys. The uniform elongation was higher at 200{degree}C compared to 100{degree}C, but still remained below 1% for most of the copper alloys.

  14. Oxidation Behavior of GRCop-84 Copper Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's goal of safe, affordable space transportation calls for increased reliability and lifetimes of launch vehicles, and significant reductions of launch costs. The areas targeted for enhanced performance in the next generation of reusable launch vehicles include combustion chambers and nozzle ramps; therefore, the search is on for suitable liner materials for these components. GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb), an advanced copper alloy developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in conjunction with Case Western Reserve University, is a candidate. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine is another copper alloy, NARloy-Z (Cu-3Ag-0.1Zr). It provides a benchmark against which to compare the properties of candidate successors. The thermomechanical properties of GRCop-84 have been shown to be superior, and its physical properties comparable, to those of NARloy-Z. However, environmental durability issues control longevity in this application: because copper oxide scales are not highly protective, most copper alloys are quickly consumed in oxygen environments at elevated temperatures. In consequence, NARloy-Z and most other copper alloys are prone to blanching, a degradation process that occurs through cycles of oxidation-reduction as the oxide is repeatedly formed and removed because of microscale fluctuations in the oxygen-hydrogen fuel systems of rocket engines. The Space Shuttle Main Engine lining typically degraded by blanching-induced hot spots that lead to surface roughening, pore formation, and coolant leakage. Therefore, resistance to oxidation and blanching are key requirements for second-generation reusable launch vehicle liners. The rocket engine ambient includes H2 (fuel) and H2O (combustion product) and is, hence, under reduced oxygen partial pressures. Accordingly, our studies were expanded to include oxygen partial pressures as low as 322 parts per million (ppm) at the temperatures likely to be experienced in service. A comparison of 10-hr weight gains of

  15. Influence of alloying elements on friction and wear of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics were determined for copper binary alloys containing 10 atomic percent aluminum, silicon, indium, and tin. A ternary alloy containing 10 atomic percent aluminum and 5 atomic percent silicon was also examined. The effectiveness of each of the alloying elements aluminum and silicon were very effective in reducing friction. Silicon, however, also reduced wear appreciably. With lubrication, silicon, indium, and tin were all effective alloying elements in reducing friction and wear from values obtained for copper. Silicon was the most effective single element in reducing friction and wear in dry sliding and with lubrication.

  16. New barrierless copper-alloy film for future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chon-Hsin Lin

    2015-09-01

    Since Cu metallization results in a conductivity and an electromigration resistance greater than those of Al, it has become popular for making Si-based interconnects for numerous devices in the field of microelectronics. Following the current trend of miniaturization required for most electronic components, there is a greater need for further size reduction in Si-based devices. The most critical side effect of size reduction is the increase in electronic scattering and resistivity when the barrier-layer thickness is further reduced. To explore advanced Cu-metallization methods and to develop a more economical manufacturing process for Cu-alloy films, the development of Cu materials having better quality and higher thermal stability becomes imperative for the metallization and annealing processes. For this purpose, we first fabricated Cu(GeNx) films and examined their thermal stability and electrical reliability after either cyclic or isothermal annealing. The excellent thermal and electrical properties make these new Cu-alloy films highly promising for applications that require more reliable and inexpensive copper interconnects. In this study, we fabricated Cu alloy films by doping a minute amount of Ge or GeNx, respectively, into the Cu films via barrierless Cu metallization, an inexpensive manufacturing method. Using these newly fabricated alloy films, we were able to eliminate or at least substantially reduce the detrimental interaction between the alloy and the barrierless Si substrate. The Cu(GeNx) films also exhibited high thermal stability, low resistivity and leakage current, and long time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) lifetimes, making such novel films a candidate for high-quality, economical, and more reliable Cu interconnects.

  17. One-step brazing process to join CFC composites to copper and copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, Milena; Casalegno, Valentina; Rizzo, Stefano; Smeacetto, Federico; Ferraris, Monica; Merola, Mario

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a new single-step brazing technique to join carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) to pure copper (Cu) and copper alloy (CuCrZr) for nuclear fusion applications. In order to increase the wettability of CFC by a copper-based brazing alloy containing no active metal, the composite surface was modified by direct reaction with chromium, which forms a carbide layer and allows a large reduction of the contact angle. After the CFC surface modification, the commercial Gemco ® alloy (Cu/Ge) was successfully used to braze CFC to pure copper and pure copper to CuCrZr by the same heat treatment. The shear strength of the CFC/Cu joints measured by single lap shear tests at room temperature was (34 ± 4) MPa, comparable to the values obtained by other joining processes and higher than the intrinsic CFC shear strength.

  18. Alloyed Copper Chalcogenide Nanoplatelets via Partial Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide–sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide–sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide–sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide–sulfide (Cu2–xSeyS1–y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2–xSeyS1–y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV–vis–NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps. PMID:25050455

  19. Volatility from copper and tungsten alloys for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Piet, S.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Accident scenarios for fusion power plants present the potential for release and transport of activated constituents volatilized from first wall and structural materials. The extent of possible mobilization and transport of these activated species, many of which are oxidation driven'', is being addressed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report presents experimental measurements of volatilization from a copper alloy in air and steam and from a tungsten alloy in air. The major elements released included zinc from the copper alloy and rhenium and tungsten from the tungsten alloy. Volatilization rates of several constituents of these alloys over temperatures ranging from 400 to 1200{degree}C are presented. These values represent release rates recommended for use in accident assessment calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Fatigue behavior of copper and selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leedy, K.D.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of standard and subsize specimens was examined for five copper alloys: OFHC Cu, two CuNiBe alloys, a CuCrZr alloy, and a Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy. Fatigue tests were run in strain control to failure. In addition to establishing failure lives, the stress amplitudes were monitored as a function of numbers of accrued cycles. The results indicate that the alloys with high initial yield strengths provide the best fatigue response over the range of failure lives examined in the present study: N{sub f} = 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6}. In fact, the fatigue performance of the best alloys is dominated by the elastic portion of the strain range, as would be expected from the correlation of performance with yield properties. The alumina strengthened alloy and the two CuNiBe alloys show the best overall performance of the group examined here.

  1. High temperature oxidation of copper and copper aluminium alloys: Impact on furnace side wall cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia Barrera, Gabriel

    The high temperature oxidation behaviours of copper and dilute Cu-Al alloys were investigated. Experiments were carried out by: (i) Oxidizing under various oxygen potentials at different temperatures using a combined TG-DTA apparatus. (ii) Oxidizing in a muffle furnace (in air) at different temperatures for extended periods of time. The oxidation mechanisms were evaluated based upon the kinetic data obtained as well as by X-ray diffraction and microscopical (SEM and optical) analyses. It was found that oxidation of copper strongly depends on the temperature. Two distinct mechanisms were encountered. Between 300 and 500°C, the oxidation rate is controlled by lateral growth of the oxide on the metal surface, whereas between 600 and 1000°C oxidation is controlled by lattice diffusion of copper ions through the oxide scale. On the other hand, the partial pressure of oxygen only has a small effect on the oxidation of copper. Alloy oxidation is also dependent on the temperature. As temperature increases, more aluminium is required to protect copper from being oxidized. It was shown that if the amount of oxygen that dissolves in the alloy exceeds the solubility limit of oxygen in copper, an internal oxidation layer will develop, leading to the formation of a tarnishing scale. On the other hand if the oxygen content in the alloy lies below the solubility limit of oxygen in copper, no oxidation products will form since a tight protective alumina layer will form on the alloy surface. Surface phenomena may affect the oxidation behaviour of dilute Cu-Al alloys. Immersion tests in molten copper matte and copper converting slag, using laboratory scale cooling elements with various copper based materials, were conducted. Results from these tests showed that alloying copper with 3 to 4 wt% Al decreases the oxidation rate of pure copper by 4 orders of magnitude; however due to a significant drop in thermal conductivity, the ability to extract heat is compromised, leading to

  2. Survey of physical property data for several alloys. [Nitronic 33; copper C10400; copper C17510

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Williams, R.K.

    1985-08-01

    This report summarizes an examination of physical property data available in the literature for six alloys of potential interest to the Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment in the Fusion Energy Program. The properties of thermal expansion, density, specific heat, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity were compiled for six alloys: Nitronic 33, a low-nickel, high manganese stainless steel; nickel-base Inconnel Alloys 625, 718, and X-750; and copper alloys C10400 and C17510. The temperatures of interest were 4-500 K for the Nitronic 33 and the Inconels, and 250-400 K for the copper alloys. Where data were lacking, estimates were made based on theory or comparisons with similar materials.

  3. Inactivation of Norovirus on Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, Sarah L.; Keevil, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) determined that Cu(II) and especially Cu(I) ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked), which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen. PMID:24040380

  4. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  5. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  6. Copper-Silicon-Magnesium Alloys for Latent Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-01

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. Two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  7. The measurement of the stacking fault energy in copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of hydrogen solubility and the hydrogen embrittlement of high strength, high performance face centered cubic alloys to the stacking fault energy of the alloys was investigated. The stacking fault energy is inversely related to the distance between the two partial dislocations which are formed by the dissociation of a perfect dislocation. The two partial dislocations define a stacking fault in the crystal which offers a region for hydrogen segregation. The distance between the partial dislocations is measured by weak beam, dark field transmission electron microscopy. The stacking fault energy is calculated. Pure copper, pure nickel and copper-nickel single crystals are used to determine the stacking fault energy.

  8. Studies on copper alloys containing chromium on the copper side phase diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, T.

    1984-01-01

    Specimens were prepared from vacuum melted alloys of high purity vacuum melted copper and electrolytic chromium. The liquidus and eutectic point were determined by thermal analysis. The eutectic temperature is 1974.8 F and its composition is 1.28 wt% of chromium. The determination of solid solubility of chromium in copper was made by microscopic observation and electrical resistivity measurement. The solubility of chromium in solid copper is 0.6 wt% at 1050 F, 0.4 wt% at 1000 F, 0.25 wt% at 950 F, 0.17 wt% at 900 F, and 0.30 wt% at 840 F.

  9. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  10. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  11. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  12. Dissolution and corrosion inhibition of copper, zinc, and their alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jinturkar, P.; Guan, Y.C.; Han, K.N.

    1998-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of copper, zinc, and their alloys in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solutions with oxygen and ferric ions (Fe{sup 3+}) was studied using a potentiostat. Oxygen and Fe{sup 3+} ions were shown to play an important role in corrosion of copper and copper-zinc alloys. Cathodic reduction of oxygen mainly was controlled by chemical reaction, and that of Fe{sup 3+} ions was controlled by diffusion. The overall cathodic process was the summation of the reduction of oxygen and Fe{sup 3+} ions. Corrosion of zinc was controlled mainly by reduction of water. Corrosion inhibition using benzotriazole (BTAH) also was investigated in aerated and deaerated solutions. BTAH was found to be a useful inhibitor, and the inhibition layer was shown to be stable and persistent. Morphology of the surface of copper, zinc, and brasses after corrosion in the presence and absence of BTAH was examined by scanning electron microscopy. BTAH formed a protective layer on the surface, thereby inhibiting corrosion. Solution analysis of the dissolution of brasses showed that zinc dissolved preferentially in the initial stages, followed by simultaneous dissolution of copper and zinc.

  13. Characteristics of alumina particles in dispersion-strengthened copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-hui; Li, Xiao-xian

    2014-11-01

    Two types of alumina dispersion-strengthened copper (ADSC) alloys were fabricated by a novel in-situ reactive synthesis (IRS) and a traditional internal oxidation (IO) process. The features of alumina dispersoids in these ADSC alloys were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that nano-sized γ-Al2O3 particles of approximately 10 nm in diameter are homogeneously distributed in the IRS-ADSC composites. Meanwhile, larger-sized, mixed crystal structure alumina with rod-shaped morphology is embedded in the IO-ADSC alloy. The IRS-ADSC composites can obtain better mechanical and physical properties than the IO-ADSC composites; the tensile strength of the IRS-ADSC alloy can reach 570 MPa at room temperature, its electrical conductivity is 85% IACS, and the Rockwell hardness can reach 86 HRB.

  14. Laser treatment of aluminum copper alloys: A mechanical enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    De Mol van Otterloo, J.L.; De Hosson, J.T. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1994-02-15

    Aluminum-copper alloys are commonly used as structural components for the car and aircraft industry. They combine low density, high strength, high fracture toughness and good machinability. Moreover, the strength and wear-resistance of the surface of alloys are improved by a high power laser beam. In this way the molten surface will be self-quenched by conduction of heat into the bulk. This technique ensures solidification velocities of 0.01--1 m/s. These high solidification velocities have a significant influence on the size and distribution of the morphology. This work concentrates on Al-Cu alloys, in which the Cu content ranges between 0--40 wt.%, and is aimed at describing the mechanical and microstructural properties of these alloys upon variation of the laser scan velocity in the range of 0.0125 to 0.125 m/s.

  15. Graphite/copper alloy interfacial energies determined using the sessile drop method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary M.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite surfaces are not wet by pure copper. This lack of wetting is responsible for a debonding phenomenon that was found in continuous graphite fiber/copper matrix composites materials subjected to elevated temperatures. By suitably alloying copper, its capability to wet graphite surfaces can be enhanced. In situ measurements of graphite/copper alloy wetting angles were made using the sessile drop method. Interfacial energy values were calculated based upon these measurements.

  16. Dissociation of dilute immiscible copper alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, K.; Lucadamo, G. A.; Cabral, C.; Lavoie, C.; Harper, J. M. E.

    2000-03-01

    The dissociation behavior of dilute, immiscible Cu-alloy thin films is found to fall into three broad categories that correlate most closely with the form of the Cu-rich end of the binary alloy phase diagrams. Available thermodynamic and tracer diffusion data shed further light on alloy behavior. Eight alloying elements were selected for these studies, with five elements from groups 5 and 6, two from group 8, and one from group 11 of the periodic table. They are respectively V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, Fe, Ru, and Ag. The progress of precipitation in approximately 500-nm-thick alloy films, containing 2.5-3.8 at. % solute, was followed with in situ resistance and stress measurements as well as with in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. In addition, texture analysis and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the evolution of microstructure and texture of Cu(Ta) and Cu(Ag). For all eight alloys, dissociation occurred upon heating, with the rejection of solute and evolution of microstructure often occurring in multiple steps that range over several hundred degrees between approximately 100 and 900 °C. However, in most cases, substantial reductions in resistivity of the films took place below 400 °C, at temperatures of interest to copper metallization schemes for silicon chip technology.

  17. Superplastic Behavior of Copper-Modified 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ravi; Kim, Sooho

    2007-04-01

    An AA5083 aluminum alloy was modified with two different levels of Cu additions, cast by direct-chill method, and thermo-mechanically processed to sheet gauge. Copper additions reduced sheet grain size, decreased tensile flow stress and significantly increased tensile elongation under most elevated temperature test conditions. The high-Cu (0.8 wt.%) alloy had the finest grain size 5.3 μm, a peak strain-rate sensitivity of 0.6 at a strain-rate of 1 × 10-2 s-1, and tensile elongation values between 259 and 584% over the temperature range, 400-525 °C, and the strain rate range, 5 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-2 s-1, investigated. In biaxial pan forming tests, only the Cu-containing alloys successfully formed pans at the higher strain rate 10-2 s-1. The high-Cu alloy showed the least die-entry thinning. Comparison of ambient temperature mechanical properties in O-temper state showed the high-Cu alloy to have significantly higher yield strength, ultimate strength, and ductility compared to the base 5083 alloy.

  18. Friction and wear of titanium alloys and copper alloys sliding against titanium 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy in air at 430 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the friction and wear characteristics of aluminum bronzes and copper-tin, titanium-tin, and copper-silver alloys sliding against a titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Hemispherically tipped riders of aluminum bronze and the titanium and copper alloys were run against Ti-6Al-4V disks in air at 430 C. The sliding velocity was 13 cm/sec, and the load was 250 g. Results revealed that high tin content titanium and copper alloys underwent significantly less wear and galling than commonly used aluminum bronzes. Also friction force was less erratic than with the aluminum bronzes.

  19. Heater utilizing copper-nickel alloy core

    SciTech Connect

    Van Egmond, C.F.H.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes a well heater. It comprises: at least one heating section which is capable of extending for at least a hundred feet within a well borehole adjacent to an interval of subterranean earth formation to be heated, contains at least one electrical heating cable, and contains a combination of heating cable core resistance and core cross-sectional areas capable of producing temperatures between about 600[degrees]C and 1000[degrees]C within the subterranean earth formation, wherein the heating cable is an electrical resistance heating cable comprising: a core consisting essentially of 6 percent by weight nickel and 94 percent by weight copper; electrical insulation surrounding the core; and surrounding the electrical insulation, a metal sheath; and a means of supplying electrical power to the heating cable core.

  20. Effect of alloying elements on the physicomechanical properties of copper and tin bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Kh.; Komkov, V. G.; Ri, E. Kh.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of alloying elements (Al, Si, Mn, Zn, Ni, As) on the physicomechanical properties of copper and tin bronze (6 wt % Sn) is studied. These alloying elements are found to increase the hardness and the microhardness of the structural constituents of Cu- X alloys due to hardening the α solid solution and eutectoid, and this effect of alloying elements is most effective in tin bronze. Alloyed copper and tin bronze have a lower thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance as compared to plain copper and tin bronze.

  1. Development of Advanced Alloys using Fullerenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J.; Wasz, M.; O'Brien, J.; Callahan, D. L.; Barrera, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Development of advanced alloys using fullerenes is currently underway to produce materials for use in the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). These materials will be directed toward commercial usages as they are continually developed. Fullerenes (of which the most common is C(sub 60)) are lightweight, nanometer size, hollow molecules of carbon which can be dispersed in conventional alloy systems to enhance strength and reduce weight. In this research, fullerene interaction with aluminum is investigated and a fullerene-reinforced aluminum alloy is being developed for possible use on the EMU. The samples were manufactured using standard commercial approaches including powder metallurgy and casting. Alloys have been processed having 1.3, 4.0 and 8.0 volume fractions of fullerenes. It has been observed that fullerene dispersion is related to the processing approach and that they are stable for the processing conditions used in this research. Emphasis will be given to differential thermal analysis and wavelength dispersive analysis of the processed alloys. These two techniques are particularly useful in determining the condition of the fullerenes during and after processing. Some discussion will be given as to electrical properties of fullerene-reinforced materials. Although the aluminum and other advanced alloys with fullerenes are being developed for NASA and the EMU, the properties of these materials will be of interest for commercial applications where specific Dual-Use will be given.

  2. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    A select group of copper alloys and bonded copper alloy-stainless steel panels are under consideration for heat sink applications in first wall and divertor structures of a planned thermonuclear fusion reactor. Because these materials must retain high strengths and withstand high heat fluxes, their material properties and microstructures must be well understood. Candidate copper alloys include precipitate strengthened CuNiBe and CuCrZr and dispersion strengthened Cu-Alsb2Osb3 (CuAl25). In this study, uniaxial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on bulk copper alloy materials at temperatures up to 500sp°C in air and vacuum environments. Based on standardized mechanical properties measurement techniques, a series of tests were also implemented to characterize copper alloy-316L stainless steel joints produced by hot isostatic pressing or by explosive bonding. The correlation between mechanical properties and the microstructure of fatigued copper alloys and the interface of copper alloy-stainless steel laminates was examined. Commercial grades of these alloys were used to maintain a degree of standardization in the materials testing. The commercial alloys used were OMG Americas Glidcop CuAl25 and CuAl15; Brush Wellman Hycon 3HP and Trefimetaux CuNiBe; and Kabelmetal Elbrodur and Trefimetaux CuCrZr. CuAl25 and CuNiBe alloys possessed the best combination of fatigue resistance and microstructural stability. The CuAl25 alloy showed only minimal microstructural changes following fatigue while the CuNiBe alloy consistently exhibited the highest fatigue strength. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that small matrix grain sizes and high densities of submicron strengthening phases promoted homogeneous slip deformation in the copper alloys. Thus, highly organized fatigue dislocation structure formation, as commonly found in oxygen-free high conductivity Cu, was inhibited. A solid plate of CuAl25 alloy hot isostatically pressed to a 316L stainless steel

  3. Advanced lightweight alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.; Lee, Eui W.; Donnellan, Mary E.; Thompson, James J.

    1989-05-01

    The design requirements of the next generation of advanced aerospace vehicles and propulsion systems necessitate the development of structural materials with properties vastly superior to those which are currently achievable. Recognizing that each class of materials possesses its own unique set of advantages and disadvantages, the designers of tomorrow's aircraft must choose wisely from the plethora of available alloys.

  4. Welding and performance of advanced high temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, M.; Masuyama, F.

    1995-12-31

    The last decade has witnessed the development of many new alloys for elevated temperature service and recognition of a large number of them in the form of allowable stresses by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. These alloys offer considerable advantages in terms of higher tensile and stress rupture strengths, lower thermal stresses, superior corrosion resistance and, in one case, weldability. The improvements are obtained through additions of tungsten, vanadium, columbium, copper, nitrogen and other elements which significantly affect microstructure and weldability. The paper will discuss where introduction of these advanced materials may be warranted, the properties to be expected in comparison to conventional alloys, PWHT requirements and concerns regarding weld failure modes. Higher performance in operation of power plants is achieved by use of tungsten alloyed advanced 9--12%Cr ferritic steels, NF616 (9Cr-0.5 Mo-1.8W-V-Nb) and HCM12A (12Cr-0.4Mo-2W-1 Cu-V-Nb), which exhibit over 30% higher creep strength than T91/P91 (Mod. 9Cr-1 Mo) at 600 C. Thick-walled and large-diameter pipes of NF616 and HCM12A were subjected to fabrication tests such as joint welding and induction bending, and it was shown that the properties of the fabricated parts were satisfactory for the practical application of those steels. HCM2S, a newly developed low alloy steel (0.06C-2.25Cr-1.6W-0.25V0.05Nb) is approximately 1.8 times stronger than conventional T22 (2.25Cr-1 Mo) at around 600 C. The weldability of this low carbon content steel is much improved, as it needs no pre-weld nor postweld heat treatment. HCM2S was installed in a large capacity utility boiler.

  5. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J.; Ratka, J.O.

    1992-12-01

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  6. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ratka, J.O. )

    1992-01-01

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  7. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  8. Effects of copper precipitation on the magnetic properties of aged copper-containing ferrous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.

    2012-05-01

    Formation of nano-sized copper precipitates induced by neutron irradiation has been identified as one of the primary causes of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. Although it has been shown that magnetic properties are sensitive to these microstructural changes, fundamental understanding is yet to be developed before magnetic NDE techniques can be reliably employed to detect radiation damages. This paper reports on a systematic study of the effects of copper precipitation on magnetic properties using an Fe-1wt%Cu alloy as a model system. Magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen effect measurements were performed on a series of FeCu samples aged for different periods of time to produce different extents of copper precipitation in an iron matrix. The magnetic properties, including coercivity, initial permeability, the Rayleigh constant and Barkhausen effect signal, were found to correlate with the sample hardness as a result of precipitation hardening. The empirical relationships between magnetic and mechanical properties are interpreted in terms of pinning of magnetic domain walls and dislocations by a network of randomly distributed copper precipitates.

  9. Desorption measurements of copper and copper alloys for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Korn, G.; Calderon, M.; Barletta, W.

    1992-12-31

    PEP-II will be a meson factory circulating asymmetric beams of 9 GeV and 3.1 GeV having maximum currents of 3.0A. Copper beam chambers and absorbers will intercept resulting synchrotron radiation and it is critical that the dynamic gas load from photo stimulated desorption (PSD) and thermal outgassing is below 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} molecules per photon. An experiment was set up to measure PSD from 1m long bar samples and a chamber sample, fabricated from selected copper and copper alloys then exposed to white light with a critical energy of 500 eV, on beamline U10B at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Based on U10B results a prototype chamber was built and will be exposed to white light with higher critical energies of up to 5 KeV, on beamline X-28A at the X-ray Ring of the NSLS. This paper presents the measurements of H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} desorption yields as function of accumulated photon flux, angle of incidence, sample material, and surface condition. The results are compared with that of previous work on similar materials and with that of others for copper.

  10. Role of plastic deformation in wear of copper and copper - 10-percent-aluminum alloy in cryogenic fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    High-purity copper specimens and a copper-aluminum (10%) alloy specimen were subjected to sliding against Type 440 C in cryogenic fuel environments. It was found that virtually all wear occurred by the plastic deformation of a recrystallized layer extending to about 10 micrometers below the wear scar surface of the copper or copper alloy. The wear debris was in the form of a layered structure adhering to the exit region of the wear scar. Measurements on the high purity copper specimens indicated that the wear rate was proportional to the applied load and to the sliding velocity squared. A physical model of the wear process is proposed to account for these observations.

  11. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report, January--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    The distribution of graphite particles in graphite containing copper alloy was further improved very significantly using several procedures and technological modifications. The developed techniques attacked the graphite distribution problem in two ways. Realizing that clustering of very fine (5um) graphite particles is one of the two major problems, a pretreatment process has been developed using aluminum powders to deagglomerate graphite particles. Along with this, a two-stage stirring technique was used to first incorporate and then to distribute uniformly the deagglomerated particles in the melt. During this year, based on these developments, several components were cast to evaluate the castability of Cu alloy-graphite melts. In addition, machinability tests were done to clearly established that addition of graphite particles improve the machinability of copper MMC alloys over and above that of monolithic copper alloys. The results show that the machining chip sizes and cutting forces of Cu alloys containing graphite particles are smaller than these of the corresponding monolithic Cu alloys. This clearly establishes that the presence of graphite particles in copper alloy improves the machinability in a fashion similar to lead additions to copper alloys. Centrifugal casting of shapes of different sizes appear to be a very attractive method for casting graphite containing copper alloys, since all the graphite particles (regardless of their distribution in the melt) are forced to segregate to the inner periphery of the castings where they impart a very desirable solid lubrication property for bushing and bearing use. A very large number of cylindrical elements of lead bearing copper alloys are now used for similar bearing bushing applications and the manufacturers of these type of bearings are under safety and health hazard pressure to remove lead. This year several parameters for centrifugal casting of copper graphite alloys have been established.

  12. Microstructures of ancient and modern cast silver–copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Northover, S.M.; Northover, J.P.

    2014-04-01

    The microstructures of modern cast Sterling silver and of cast silver objects about 2500 years old have been compared using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructures of both ancient and modern alloys were typified by silver-rich dendrites with a few pools of eutectic and occasional cuprite particles with an oxidised rim on the outer surface. EBSD showed the dendrites to have a complex internal structure, often involving extensive twinning. There was copious intragranular precipitation within the dendrites, in the form of very fine copper-rich rods which TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and STEM suggest to be of a metastable face-centred-cubic (FCC) phase with a cube–cube orientation relationship to the silver-rich matrix but a higher silver content than the copper-rich β in the eutectic. Samples from ancient objects displayed a wider range of microstructures including a fine scale interpenetration of the adjoining grains not seen in the modern material. Although this study found no unambiguous evidence that this resulted from microstructural change produced over archaeological time, the copper supersaturation remaining after intragranular precipitation suggests that such changes, previously proposed for wrought and annealed material, may indeed occur in ancient silver castings. - Highlights: • Similar twinned structures and oxidised surfaces seen in ancient and modern cast silver • General precipitation of fine Cu-rich rods apparently formed by discontinuous precipitation is characteristic of as-cast silver. • The fine rods are cube-cube related to the matrix in contrast with the eutectic. • The silver-rich phase remains supersaturated with copper. • Possibly age-related grain boundary features seen in ancient cast silver.

  13. Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.E.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-09-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steam oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  14. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  15. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  16. Laser-initiated combustion studies of selected aluminum, copper, iron, and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Clark, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The results of combustion studies at atmospheric pressure on ten metal alloys are presented. The alloys studied were aluminum alloys 1100, 2219, 6061, and tensile-50; 304, 347 and 21-6-9 stainless steel; inconel 600; beryllium copper and a bronze. It was found that once ignition was achieved all alloys would generally burn to completion. The overall combustion process appears to obey a first order rate process. Preliminary conclusions are presented along with recommendations for future work.

  17. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  18. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  19. Fracture toughness of copper-base alloys for ITER applications: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1997-04-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloys and a precipitation-hardened copper-nickel-beryllium alloy showed a significant reduction in toughness at elevated temperature (250{degrees}C). This decrease in toughness was much larger than would be expected from the relatively modest changes in the tensile properties over the same temperature range. However, a copper-chromium-zirconium alloy strengthened by precipitation showed only a small decrease in toughness at the higher temperatures. The embrittled alloys showed a transition in fracture mode, from transgranular microvoid coalescence at room temperature to intergranular with localized ductility at high temperatures. The Cu-Cr-Zr alloy maintained the ductile microvoid coalescence failure mode at all test temperatures.

  20. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of aluminum and copper cleaning procedures for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; McDowell, M.W.; Noonan, J.R. )

    1994-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently under construction, will produce x rays of unprecedented brightness. The storage ring where the x rays will be produced will be constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy, while transition pieces (flanges, etc.) will be made from a 2219 aluminum alloy. In addition, cooled photon absorbers will be placed in strategic locations throughout the ring to intercept the majority of the unused high power-density radiation. These will be made of either CDA-101 (OFHC) copper or glidcop (a dispersion strengthened copper alloy). Before any of these components can be assembled they must be cleaned to remove surface contaminants so that the ultrahigh vacuum ([lt]0.1 nTorr) necessary for successful operation can be achieved. Many recipes for cleaning aluminum and copper exist; however, most of them involve the use of chemicals that present safety and/or environmental concerns. We have undertaken an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the effects of a variety of commercially available cleaners on the surface cleanliness of aluminum and copper. Several important results have been identified in this study. A simple alkaline detergent in an ultrasonic bath cleans aluminum alloys as effectively as the more aggressive cleaning solutions. The detergent can be used at 65 [degree]C to clean the 6063 alloy and at 50 [degree]C to clean the 2219 alloy. A citric acid based cleaner was found to be effective at cleaning copper, although the surface oxidizes rapidly. To date, we have been unable to find a universal cleaning procedure, i.e., one that is optimal for cleaning both Al and Cu.

  2. Development of lead-free copper alloy-graphite casting. Annual report, January--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-02-01

    Water model experiments were conducted to develop a two-stage stirring method for obtaining higher yields and a more uniform distribution of particles in copper alloys. This was followed by several melts for synthesis of copper-graphite alloys in which T1 was used as a wetting agent to improve the wettability of graphite in the copper melt. In the first stage, a vortex method was employed to facilitate the suction of graphite particles into the copper melt. In the second stage, the specially designed stirrer was used to avoid the formation of vortex in melt. The two stage stirring was found to considerably improve the recovery of graphite, over those obtained with the prior practice of single stage stirring. In addition, graphite recoveries increased with increasing Ti content. Flotation, fluidity, and directional solidification experiments were also conducted on copper-graphite alloys synthesized in this study. Tests showed that the spiral fluidity length of the yellow brass alloy increased with temperature and decreased with graphite. The fluidity of copper-graphite alloys investigated to date remained adequate to make a variety of castings. The observations of microstructure of directional solidification and flotation showed that in certain castings the graphite particles were agglomerated and they float to the upper part of the castings where they reduced the size of grains. However, in the agglomerated form, the graphite particles improved the machinability of copper alloys in a manner similar to lead. The result of the first years work provide an improved method of synthesis of lead free copper graphite alloys with improved machinability and adequate fluidity. Future work will continue to further improve the distribution of graphite particles in casting while retaining adequate fluidity and improved machinability. Techniques like centrifugal casting will be developed to concentrate graphite in regions where it is required for machinability in bearings.

  3. Development of lead-free copper alloy-graphite castings. Technical report, January 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1995-07-01

    Water model experiments were conducted to develop a two-stage stirring method for obtaining higher yields and a more uniform distribution of graphite particles in copper alloys. This was followed by several melts for synthesis of copper-graphite alloys in which Ti was used as a wetting agent to improve the wettability of graphite in the copper melt. In the first stage, a vortex method was employed to facilitate the addition of graphite particles into the copper melt. In the second stage, a specially designed stirrer was used for uniform particle distribution while avoiding the formation of vortex in the melt. The two-stage stirring was found to considerably improve the recovery of graphite, over those obtained with the prior practice of single-stage stirring and resulting in a more uniform particle distribution. In addition, graphite recoveries increased with increasing Ti content in the range investigated. Floatation, fluidity, and directional solidification experiments were also conducted on copper-graphite alloys synthesized in this study. Fluidity tests showed that the spiral fluidity length of the yellow brass alloy increased with temperature and decreased with graphite. The fluidity of copper-graphite alloys investigated to-date remained adequate to make a variety of castings. The observations of casting microstructure under directional solidification and floatation showed that in certain castings the graphite particles remained agglomerated, and they readily floated to the upper part of the castings where they reduced the size of gains. However, even in the agglomerated form, the graphite particles improved the machinability of copper alloys in a manner similar to lead. The results of the first year work provide an improved method of synthesis of lead free copper graphite alloys with improved machinability and adequate fluidity.

  4. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  5. Copper, Aluminum and Nickel: A New Monocrystalline Orthodontic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierenga, Mark

    Introduction: This study was designed to evaluate, via tensile and bend testing, the mechanical properties of a newly-developed monocrystalline orthodontic archwire comprised of a blend of copper, aluminum, and nickel (CuAlNi). Methods: The sample was comprised of three shape memory alloys; CuAlNi, copper nickel titanium (CuNiTi), and nickel titanium (NiTi); from various orthodontic manufacturers in both 0.018" round and 0.019" x 0.025" rectangular dimensions. Additional data was gathered for similarly sized stainless steel and beta-titanium archwires as a point of reference for drawing conclusions about the relative properties of the archwires. Measurements of loading and unloading forces were recorded in both tension and deflection testing. Repeated-measure ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare loading and unloading forces across wires and one-way ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare elastic moduli and hysteresis. To identify significant differences, Tukey post-hoc comparisons were performed. Results: The modulus of elasticity, deflection forces, and hysteresis profiles of CuAlNi were significantly different than the other superelastic wires tested. In all tests, CuAlNi had a statistically significant lower modulus of elasticity compared to the CuNiTi and NiTi wires (P <0.0001). The CuAlNi wire exhibited significantly lower loading and unloading forces than any other wire tested. In round wire tensile tests, loading force at all deflections was significantly lower for CuAlNi than CuNiTi or NiTi (P <0.0001). In tensile testing, the CuAlNi alloy was able to recover from a 7 mm extension (10% elongation) without permanent deformation and with little to no loss in force output. In large-deflection bend tests at 4, 5, and 6 mm deflection, CuAlNi showed the significantly lowest loading forces across the three wire materials (P <0.0001). The NiTi wires showed up to 12 times the amount of energy loss due to hysteresis compared to CuAlNi. CuAlNi showed a hysteresis

  6. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  7. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  8. Strength of copper alloys in high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Saito, M.

    2002-12-01

    The first wall of ITER is expected to be hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonded structure of copper-alloy/SS316. Firstly, fracture toughness and crack propagation tests were performed on DS-Cu and DS-Cu/SS316 HIP joints at ambient temperature and 573 K T. Yamada, M. Uno, M. Saito, Fall Meeting of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, vol. I, 1998, p. 187 (in Japanese). JIC values of DS-Cu and DS-Cu/SS316 decreased significantly at 573 K. In crack propagation test, DS-Cu lost its ductility at 573 K. Secondly, we performed fracture toughness tests on CuCrZr and CuCrZr/CuCrZr, CuCrZr/SS316 HIP joints at ambient and 573 K. CuCrZr base metal had higher JIC values than DS-Cu. Concerning CuCrZr/CuCrZr and CuCrZr/SS316 HIP joint, its JIC value decreased to less than that of CuCrZr base metal.

  9. Effect of alloying elements on the corrosion behaviour of copper-nickel alloys in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Abulmaali M. Y.

    Copper-nickel alloys have been used in many applications in marine environments, because of excellent corrosion and biofouling resistance. In this study, the effect of alloying elements (including iron, aluminum, chromium, cobalt, titanium, molybdenum, indium, and vanadium) on the corrosion behaviour of 90 w% copper-10 w% nickel alloys in sea water are investigated. Experiments were performed at 298 K on a commercial copper-nickel alloy C70600 to serve as a reference point for the synthetic alloys. New copper-nickel alloys were prepared in an induction furnace, in an argon/7% vol. hydrogen atmosphere in cylindrical boron nitride crucibles. They were then homogenized at 950°C for 10 hours in the same protective atmosphere. The electrochemical behaviour was investigated by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), cyclic polarization (CP), cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel extrapolation (TE) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion product that formed on the surface was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The electrochemical behaviour of commercial alloy C70600 depends on the amount of sulphate in the solution. Increasing the amount of sulphate to more than 400 ppm in the electrolyte limits the ability of the passive film to protect the alloy. The behaviour of the commercial alloy in sea water was similar to that in a 2260 ppm sulphate artificial saline solution but was not exactly the same. The passive film formed on the surface was uniform in thickness and consisted of more than one layer. The passive film consisted mainly of chlorides in solutions with no sulphate. The presence of sulphate in the corrosive solutions produces a passive layer containing mainly chlorides with some sulphides (FeS, NiS, and CuS). The electrochemical behaviour of the synthetic Cu-Ni-Fe alloys

  10. Oxidation Behavior of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications (Technical Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J.; Humphrey, Donald H.; Barrett, Charles A.; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie (Technical Monitor); Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A rocket engine's combustion chamber is lined with material that is highly conductive to heat in order to dissipate the huge thermal load (evident in a white-hot exhaust plume). Because of its thermal conductivity copper is the best choice of liner material. However, the mechanical properties of pure copper are inadequate to withstand the high stresses, hence, copper alloys are needed in this application. But copper and its alloys are prone to oxidation and related damage, especially "blanching" (an oxidation-reduction mode of degradation). The space shuttle main engine combustion chamber is lined with a Cu-Ag-Zr alloy, "NARloy-Z", which exhibits blanching. A superior liner is being sought for the next generation of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) It should have improved mechanical properties and higher resistance to oxidation and blanching, but without substantial penalty in thermal conductivity. GRCop84, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy (Cr2Nb in Cu matrix), developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Case Western Reserve University, is a prime contender for RLV liner material. In this study, the oxidation resistance of GRCop-84 and other related/candidate copper alloys are investigated and compared

  11. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-07-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 deg. C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 deg. C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 deg. C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  12. Calculation of binodals and spinodals in multicomponent alloys by different statistical methods with application to iron-copper-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vaks, V. G. Zhuravlev, I. A.; Khromov, K. Yu.

    2010-11-15

    A generalization of the pair-cluster (PC) approximation in the theory of disordered systems to multicomponent alloys is proposed. It is shown that phase equilibrium boundaries (binodals) calculated in the mean-field (MF) approximation, which is used in standard calculations of phase diagrams by the CALPHAD method, coincide with the results of rigorous calculations for dilute alloys; however, the application of these methods to calculating the boundaries of the stability region with respect to the decomposition of an alloy (spinodals) leads to large errors. At the same time, in the PC approximation, the description of all statistical properties, including binodals and spinodals, turns out to be exact for dilute alloys. The methods developed are illustrated by an example of iron-copper-manganese ternary alloys.

  13. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-17

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  14. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  15. Acoustic emission characteristics of copper alloys under low-cycle fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Ono, K.; Green, A.

    1975-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of pure copper, zirconium-copper, and several copper alloys were determined to develop nondestructive evaluation schemes of thrust chambers through AE techniques. The AE counts rms voltages, frequency spectrum, and amplitude distribution analysis evaluated AE behavior under fatigue loading conditions. The results were interpreted with the evaluation of wave forms, crack propagation characteristics, as well as scanning electron fractographs of fatigue-tested samples. AE signals at the beginning of a fatigue test were produced by a sample of annealed alloys. A sample of zirconium-containing alloys annealed repeatedly after each fatigue loading cycle showed numerous surface cracks during the subsequent fatigue cycle, emitting strong-burst AE signals. Amplitude distribution analysis exhibits responses that are characteristic of certain types of AE signals.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-Cast Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar; Ganguli, Ashis Chandra

    2012-08-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the effect of manganese and copper addition, singly as well as in combination, on the microstructure, micro-segregation, and mechanical properties of ductile irons. Alloy A (3.18C, 2.64Si, 0.45Mn), alloy B (3.35C, 2.51Si, 0.82Mn), alloy C (3.16C, 2.80Si, 1.08Mn, 0.56Cu), and alloy D (3.18C, 3.00Si, 1.04Mn, 1.13Cu) were melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pieces. The cast microstructures varied from ferrito-pearlitic in alloys A, B, and C to pearlitic in alloy D. However, on XRD analysis and SEM examination, the presence of martensite patches was also detected. There was a marginal decrease in nodule count in alloy B. In alloys C and D, nodule counts were higher, but the proportion of ferrite decreased drastically. Alloy D was found to be the strongest (UTS ≈ 800 MPa, El = 5%) with alloys A and C coming next in strength; while alloy B was weakest of the four. The presence of martensite patches in association with pearlite appears to be responsible for low toughness of these alloys. Microprobe analysis shows some silicon segregation near the graphite nodules and practically little segregation of manganese. Elemental mapping by FE-SEM does not indicate any manganese segregation.

  17. Combined elemental and microstructural analysis of genuine and fake copper-alloy coins

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, L; Agresti, J; Mascalchi, M; Mencaglia, A; Cacciari, I; Siano, Salvatore

    2011-07-31

    Innovative noninvasive material analysis techniques are applied to determine archaeometallurgical characteristics of copper-alloy coins from Florence's National Museum of Archaeology. Three supposedly authentic Roman coins and three hypothetically fraudolent imitations are thoroughly investigated using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy and time of flight neutron diffraction along with 3D videomicroscopy and electron microscopy. Material analyses are aimed at collecting data allowing for objective discrimination between genuine Roman productions and late fakes. The results show the mentioned techniques provide quantitative compositional and textural data, which are strictly related to the manufacturing processes and aging of copper alloys. (laser applications)

  18. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  19. [Effect of casting techniques on castability of copper-aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Scaranelo, R M; Bombonatti, P E; de Barros, L E; Pellizzer, A J

    1990-01-01

    It was evaluated the castability of four copper-aluminium alloy according the melting casting method used. The specimens were made using polyester mesh screen, with 11 x 11 filaments of 0.26 mm thick, fixed along of two adjacent edges in wax bar, with the sprue attached at their junction. The alloys were in an electrical casting machine and a centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. The castability values were obtained by the percentage of completed segments of the resulting cast alloy screen. It was verified that the use of the electrical casting machine produced higher castability values to the copper-aluminium alloys than those produced by a centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. PMID:2099550

  20. Corrosion of iron, aluminum and copper-base alloys in glycols under simulated solar collector conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Diegle, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of iron, aluminum and copperbase alloys was studied in uninhibited glycol solutions under conditions that simulate those found in non-concentrating solar collectors. It was found that only Type 444 stainless steel exhibited adequate corrosion resistance; there was no evidence of pitting, crevice corrosion, or galvanic attack, and general corrosion rates were low. The general corrosion rate of CDA 122 copper was high (greater than 200 ..mu..m/y) under some test conditions, but copper was resistant to pitting and crevice attack. General corrosion rates of the aluminum alloys (1100, 3003 and 6061) were low, but these alloys were susceptible to pitting and crevice attack. The propensity for pitting was greatest in the presence of chlorides but it also was severe in the absence of chlorides following long exposures. The onset of pitting of the aluminum alloys in chloride-free solutions was attributed to degradation of the glycols.

  1. Properties of experimental copper-aluminium-nickel alloys for dental post-and-core applications

    PubMed Central

    Rittapai, Apiwat; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep; Harniratisai, Choltacha

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to develop a copper-aluminium-nickel alloy which has properties comparable to that of dental alloys used for dental post and core applications with the reasonable cost. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen groups of experimental copper alloys with variants of 3, 6, 9, 12 wt% Al and 0, 2, 4, 6 wt% Ni were prepared and casted. Their properties were tested and evaluated. The data of thermal, physical, and mechanical properties were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The alloy toxicity was evaluated according to the ISO standard. RESULTS The solidus and liquidus points of experimental alloys ranged from 1023℃ to 1113℃ and increased as the nickel content increased. The highest ultimate tensile strength (595.9 ± 14.2 MPa) was shown in the Cu-12Al-4Ni alloy. The tensile strength was increased as the both elements increased. Alloys with 3-6 wt% Al exhibited a small amount of 0.2% proof strength. Accordingly, the Cu-9Al-2Ni and Cu-9Al-4Ni alloys not only demonstrated an appropriate modulus of elasticity (113.9 ± 8.0 and 122.8 ± 11.3 GPa, respectively), but also had a value of 0.2% proof strength (190.8 ± 4.8 and 198.2 ± 3.4 MPa, respectively), which complied with the ISO standard requirement (>180 MPa). Alloys with the highest contents of nickel (6 wt% Ni) revealed a widespread decolourisation zone (5.0-5.9 mm), which correspondingly produced the largest cell response, equating positive control. CONCLUSION The copper alloys fused with 9 wt% Al and 2-4 wt% Ni can be considered for a potential use as dental post and core applications. PMID:25006386

  2. Tensile and toughness assessment of the procured advanced alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-09-11

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance by 2024 in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments

  3. Directional solidification of lead-copper immiscible alloys in a cyclic gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, S.; Grugel, R. N.; Lichter, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    Hypermonotectic copper-lead alloys were directionally solidified at unit gravity on earth and also in the cyclic gravitational environment attainable during flight of NASA's KC-135 aircraft. In both cases macrosegregation developed that consisted of an initial lead-rich phase above which an aligned composite structure of apparent monotectic composition grew. Differences within these regions are examined, and the suitability of the KC-135 environment for directional solidification of monotectic alloys is discussed.

  4. Directional solidification of lead-copper immiscible alloys in a cyclic gravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; Grugel, R. N.; Lichter, B. D.

    1988-11-01

    Hypermonotectic copper-lead alloys were directionally solidified at unit gravity on earth and also in the cyclic gravitational environment attainable during flight of NASA's KC-135 aircraft. In both cases macrosegregation developed that consisted of an initial lead-rich phase above which an aligned composite structure of apparent monotectic composition grew. Differences within these regions are examined, and the suitability of the KC-135 environment for directional solidification of monotectic alloys is discussed.

  5. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Junjun Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  6. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2014-05-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  7. Liquid-copper/zinc embrittlement in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.; King, J.; Raczkowski, C.

    1998-06-01

    Welding of Alloy 718 is known to cause intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). In this work, an Alloy 718 sample that exhibited HAZ cracking revealed high Cu/Zn concentrations on the fracture surface. Previous studies on HAZ cracking of Alloy 718 have not reported high Cu/Zn concentrations on the fracture surface. It is proposed here that the presence of liquid Cu/Zn can cause liquid-metal embrittlement (LME) and HAZ cracking in Alloy 718.

  8. Conventionally cast and forged copper alloy for high-heat-flux thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Repas, George A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion chamber liner of the space shuttle main engine is made of NARloy-Z, a copper-silver-zirconium alloy. This alloy was produced by vacuum melting and vacuum centrifugal casting; a production method that is currently now available. Using conventional melting, casting, and forging methods, NASA has produced an alloy of the same composition called NASA-Z. This report compares the composition, microstructure, tensile properties, low-cycle fatigue life, and hot-firing life of these two materials. The results show that the materials have similar characteristics.

  9. Recent advances and developments in refractory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-11-01

    Refractory metal alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Ta, and Nb (Cb) find applications in a wide range of aerospace applications because of their high melting points and high-temperature strength. This paper, presents recent progress in understanding and applications of these alloys. Recent studies to improve the oxidation and mechanical behavior of refractory metal alloys, and particularly Nb alloys, are also discussed. Some Re structures, for extremely high temperature applications (> 2000C), made by CVD and P/M processes, are also illustrated. Interesting work on the development of new W alloys (W-HfC-X) and the characterization of some commercial refractory metals, e.g., K-doped W, TZM, and Nb-1%Zr, continues. Finally, recent developments in high temperature composites reinforced with refractory metal filaments, and refractory metal-based intermetallics, e.g., Nb{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Be{sub 17}, and MoSi{sub 2}, are briefly described.

  10. The determination of the stacking fault energy in copper-nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for determining the stacking fault energies of a series of nickel-copper alloys to gain an insight into the embrittling effect of hydrogen are evaluated. Plans for employing weak beam dark field electron microscopy to determine stacking fault energies are outlined.

  11. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Stubbins, J. F.; Edwards, D. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop Al25), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop Al25 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface.

  12. Recent results for bonding S-65C grade Be to copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, D.W.

    1995-09-01

    Novel processes for bonding beryllium to copper alloys without the use of a silver bonding aid have been developed at Brush Wellman. Tensile strength results will be presented at room temperature and elevated temperatures. A comparison will be made between bond strengths derived from rectangular tensile specimens and reduced section tensile specimens. Failure modes of the specimens at various temperatures will be shown.

  13. Gold-Copper alloy "nano-dumplings" with tunable compositions and plasmonic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Manoj; Kedia, Abhitosh; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    The unique yet tunable optical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles have made them attractive targets for a wide range of applications including nanophotonics, molecular sensing, catalysis etc. Such diverse applications that require precisely stable / reproducible plasmonic properties depend sensitively on the particle morphology ie. the shape, size and constituents. Herein, we systematically study the size / shape controlled synthesis of gold-copper "dumpling" shaped alloy nanoparticles by simultaneous reduction of gold and copper salts in the PVP-methanol solute-solvent system, by effectively utilizing the efficient but mild reduction as well as capping abilities of Poly (N-vinylpyrrolidone). Introduction of copper salts not only yielded the alloy nanoparticles, but also slowed down the growth process to maintain high mono-dispersity of the new shapes evolved. Copper and gold has different lattice constants (0.361 and 0.408 nm respectively) and hence doping/addition/replacement of copper atoms to gold FCC unit cell introduces strain into the lattice which is key parameter to the shape evolution in anisotropic nanoparticles. Synthesized alloy nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, XRD and TEM imaging.

  14. Nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloy rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997. Published February 1998. Originally published as B581-73. Last previous edition B581-93.

  15. Spin-density-wave magnetism in dilute copper-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamelas, F.J.; Werner, S.A.; Shapiro, S.M.; Mydosh, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    Elastic neutron-scattering measurements on two samples of Cu alloyed with 1.3% Mn and 0.55% Mn show that the spin-density-wave (SDW) features found in more concentrated alloys persist in the limit of very dilute alloys. These features consist of temperature-dependent incommensurate peaks in magnetic neutron scattering, with positions and strengths which are fully consistent with those in the concentrated alloys. The implications of these measurements are twofold. First, it is clear from this data that SDW magnetic ordering occurs across the entire range of CuMn alloys which have typically been interpreted as spin glasses. Second, the more fundamental significance of this work is the suggestion via extrapolation that a peak in the magnetic susceptibility x(q) occurs in pure copper, at a value of q given by the Fermi-surface diameter 2k{sub F}.

  16. The Effects of Test Temperature, Temper, and Alloyed Copper on the Hydrogen-Controlled Crack Growth Rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young, Jr.; J.R. Scully

    2000-09-17

    The hydrogen embrittlement controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt.% Zn, 2.14 wt% Mg, 2.19 wt.% Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged, peak aged, and overaged conditions were tested in 90% relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 and 90 C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from underaged to overaged) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal copper and low copper alloys, the fracture path was predominantly intergranular at all test temperatures (25-90 C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II crack growth rates for normal (2.19 wt.%) and low (0.06 wt.%) copper alloys in the peak aged and overaged tempers showed the beneficial effect of copper additions on stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt.% copper alloy, the significant decrease ({approx} 10 times at 25 C) in stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. IN the 0.06 wt.% copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor, {nu}{sub 0}, resulting in a modest ({approx} 2.5 times at 25 C) decrease in crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II crack growth rate. Overaged, copper bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen environment assisted cracking but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

  17. Metallurgical evaluation of a copper-based alloy for dental castings.

    PubMed

    Guastaldi, A C; Lacefield, W R; Leinfelder, K F; Mondelli, J

    1991-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the metallurgical properties of an experimental, low-cost copper-zinc-aluminum-nickel alloy for dental castings. Some specimens were subjected to heat treatment after induction casting. The extent of corrosion was determined by measuring weight loss of specimens stored in a sodium sulfite solution. In the as-cast specimens, tests demonstrated the presence of three phases: the first consisted of copper-zinc-aluminum, the second was similar but lower in copper and aluminum, and the third consisted of an intermetallic compound of manganese-nickel-phosphorus. After heat treatment, the first phase remained relatively constant, the second was converted to Cu3Al, and the third increased in volume. The weight loss from the as-cast specimens was eight times that of the heat-treated specimens. It was concluded that the heat treatment substantially changed the microstructure and improved the corrosion resistance of the experimental alloy. PMID:1882060

  18. A promising structure for fabricating high strength and high electrical conductivity copper alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rengeng; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fan, Guohua; Zou, Cunlei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shaojian; Lu, Yiping; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Li, Tingju; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-01-01

    To address the trade-off between strength and electrical conductivity, we propose a strategy: introducing precipitated particles into a structure composed of deformation twins. A Cu-0.3%Zr alloy was designed to verify our strategy. Zirconium was dissolved into a copper matrix by solution treatment prior to cryorolling and precipitated in the form of Cu5Zr from copper matrix via a subsequent aging treatment. The microstructure evolutions of the processed samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, and the mechanical and physical behaviours were evaluated through tensile and electrical conductivity tests. The results demonstrated that superior tensile strength (602.04 MPa) and electrical conductivity (81.4% IACS) was achieved. This strategy provides a new route for balancing the strength and electrical conductivity of copper alloys, which can be developed for large-scale industrial application. PMID:26856764

  19. Laser cladding of stainless steel with a copper-silver alloy to generate surfaces of high antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Michael; Támara, Juan Carlos; Mathews, Salima; Bax, Benjamin; Hegetschweiler, Andreas; Kautenburger, Ralf; Solioz, Marc; Mücklich, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Copper and silver are used as antimicrobial agents in the healthcare sector in an effort to curb infections caused by bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics. While the bactericidal potential of copper and silver alone are well documented, not much is known about the antimicrobial properties of copper-silver alloys. This study focuses on the antibacterial activity and material aspects of a copper-silver model alloy with 10 wt% Ag. The alloy was generated as a coating with controlled intermixing of copper and silver on stainless steel by a laser cladding process. The microstructure of the clad was found to be two-phased and in thermal equilibrium with minor Cu2O inclusions. Ion release and killing of Escherichia coli under wet conditions were assessed with the alloy, pure silver, pure copper and stainless steel. It was found that the copper-silver alloy, compared to the pure elements, exhibited enhanced killing of E. coli, which correlated with an up to 28-fold increased release of copper ions. The results show that laser cladding with copper and silver allows the generation of surfaces with enhanced antimicrobial properties. The process is particularly attractive since it can be applied to existing surfaces.

  20. Method of preparing copper-dendritic composite alloys for mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Spitzig, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Copper-dendritic composite alloys are prepared for mechanical reduction to increase tensile strength by dispersing molten droplets of the composite alloy into an inert gas; solidifying the droplets in the form of minute spheres or platelets; and compacting a mass of the spheres or platelets into an integrated body. The spheres preferably have diameters of from 50 to 2000 .mu.m, and the platelets thicknesses of 100 to 2000 .mu.m. The resulting spheres or platelets will contain ultra-fine dendrites which produce higher strengths on mechanical reduction of the bodies formed therefrom, or comparable strengths at lower reduction values. The method is applicable to alloys of copper with vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and cobalt.

  1. Method of preparing copper-dendritic composite alloys for mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spitzig, W.A.

    1988-09-13

    Copper-dendritic composite alloys are prepared for mechanical reduction to increase tensile strength by dispersing molten droplets of the composite alloy into an inert gas; solidifying the droplets in the form of minute spheres or platelets; and compacting a mass of the spheres or platelets into an integrated body. The spheres preferably have diameters of from 50 to 2,000 [mu]m, and the platelets thicknesses of 100 to 2,000 [mu]m. The resulting spheres or platelets will contain ultra-fine dendrites which produce higher strengths on mechanical reduction of the bodies formed therefrom, or comparable strengths at lower reduction values. The method is applicable to alloys of copper with vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and cobalt. 3 figs.

  2. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  3. Examination of some high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dadras, M.M.; Morris, D.G.

    1997-12-22

    Copper alloys with high strength and high thermal and electrical conductivity have received a lot of attention over the last decades. Most of such efforts have concentrated on the development of alloys containing fine, dispersed particles, and using rapid solidification techniques to ensure a sufficient volume fraction and sufficient fineness of the dispersed phase. In a recent study, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy was developed which shows relatively good strength up to 700 C, a result which was explained by the resistance to coarsening of the fine Cr{sub 2}Nb intermetallic particles in this materials. The amount of intermetallic Cr{sub 2}Nb second phase in this alloy was about 14vol% and it was claimed that the special compound-nature of the intermetallic phase was responsible for the good stability and retention of strength to high temperature. In order to examine the influence of the nature of the fine particles present and their stability against coarsening, as well as to examine the influence of volume fraction of second phase on tensile strength, three different alloys have been chosen for study: Cu-2Nb and Cu-4Cr for examining the role of second phase chemistry (Nb or Cr) on structural and property stability; and a Cu-14Cr alloy, for comparison with the Cu-4Cr alloy, to examine the role of volume fraction of the second phase. The stability of these alloys will then be compared with that reported for the Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy.

  4. Advances in iridium alloy processing in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, R.L.; Ohriner, E.K.; Roche, T.K.

    1988-08-01

    A new process for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy blanks is being evaluated and optimized. The alloy is prepared by electron-beam (EB) melting of Ir-0.3% W powder compacts followed by doping with aluminum and thorium by arc melting. Drop-cast alloy rod segments are EB welded to produce an electrode that is consumable arc melted to produce an ingot for extrusion and subsequent rolling. Initial results showed rejections for ultrasonic indications of alloy blanks produced by this process to be very low. Subsequently, some ingots have exhibited delaminations in the sheet, leading to rejection rates similar to that obtained in the standard process. The increase in delaminations is related to near-surface porosity in the consumable arc-melted ingot. A number of modifications to the arc-melting process and plans for further experimental work are described. In addition, the tensile properties of the DOP-26 iridium alloys have been measured over a range of test temperatures and strain rates. A laboratory evaluation of alternative cleaning procedures indicates that electrolytic dissolution of DOP-26 iridium alloy in an HCl solution is a potential substitute to the KCN process now in use. 7 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Electrical conductivity in directionally solidified lead-9 and -20 wt pct copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwoo; Flanagan, W. F.; Lichter, B. D.; Grugel, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    Composites consisting of aligned copper dendrites in a lead matrix have been produced by directional solidification processing for potential application as grids in lead-acid batteries. To promote a uniform composite of aligned copper dendrites in a protective lead matrix, two alloy compositions, Pb-9 and -20 wt pct Cu, have been directionally solidified through a temperature gradient of 4.5 K/mm at constant growth velocities which ranged from 1 to 100 micron/s. With slow growth rates (below about 10 microns/s), the copper dendrites were generally columnar and continuous along the sample length; at higher velocities (above 60 microns/s), they assumed an intricate and equiaxed morphology. In accordance with copper content and growth rate, the electrical conductivity of the directionally solidified composites was found to be as much as a 2.5 times that of pure lead. The results are compared with that predicted by a model based on a geometrical dendrite.

  6. A Simplified Test for Blanching Susceptibility of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.; Humphrey, Donald; Setlock, John

    2003-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is a dispersion-strengthened alloy developed for space-launch rocket engine applications, as a liner for the combustion chamber and nozzle ramp. Its main advantage over rival alloys, particularly NARloy-Z (Cu-Ag-Zr), the current liner alloy, is in high temperature mechanical properties. Further validation required that the two alloys be compared with respect to service performance and durability. This has been done, under conditions resembling those expected in reusable launch engine applications. GRCop-84 was found to have a superior resistance to static and cyclic oxidation up to approx. 700 C. In order to improve its performance above 700 C, Cu-Cr coatings have also been developed and evaluated. The major oxidative issue with Cu alloys is blanching, a mode of degradation induced by oxidation-reduction fluctuations in hydrogen-fueled engines. That fluctuation cannot be addressed with conventional static or cyclic oxidation testing. Hence, a further evaluation of the alloy substrates and Cu-Cr coating material necessitated our devising a test protocol that involves oxidaton-reduction cycles. This paper describes the test protocols used and the results obtained.

  7. Preparation of a novel Ni/Co-based alloy gradient coating on surface of the crystallizer copper alloy by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Suiyuan; Liang, Jing; Liu, Changsheng; Sun, Kai; Mazumder, Jyoti

    2011-12-01

    A high wear-resistant gradient coating made of Ni/Co-based alloys on the surface of a Cu alloy substrate was synthesized using a YAG laser induced in situ reaction method. The coating consists of three layers: the first is a Ni-based alloy layer, the second and third are Co-based alloy layers. The microhardness increases gradually from 98 HV in the Cu alloy substrate to the highest level of 876 HV in the third layer. The main phase of the Co-based alloy layer is CoCr2(Ni,O)4, coexisting with the Fe13Mo2B5, Cr(Co(Mo, and FeCr0.29Ni0.16C0.06 phases. Wear tests indicate that the gradient coating has good bond strength and wear properties with a wear coefficient of 0.31 (0.50 for the Cu alloy substrate). Also, the wear loss of the coating is only 0.01 g after it has been abraded for 60 min, which is only one fifth of that of the Cu alloy of the crystallizer. Wear tests of the gradient coating reveal good adhesive friction and wear properties when sliding against steel under dry conditions. This novel technique may have good application to make an advanced coating on the surface of the Cu alloy crystallizer in a continuous casting process.

  8. Exploratory Investigation of Advanced-Temperature Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, John C.; Waters, William J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy with properties suitable for aircraft turbine blades as well as for possible space vehicle applications. An entire series of alloys that do not require vacuum melting techniques and that generally provide good stress-rupture and impact properties was evolved. The basic-alloy composition of 79 percent nickel, 8 percent molybdenum, 6 percent chromium, 6 percent aluminum, and 1 percent zirconium was modified by a series of element additions such as carbon, titanium, and boron, with the nickel content adjusted to account for the additives. Stress-rupture, impact, and swage tests were made with all the alloys. The strongest composition (basic alloy plus 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon) displayed 384- and 574-hour stress-rupture lives at 1800 F and 15,000 psi in the as-cast and homogenized conditions, respectively. All the alloys investigated demonstrated good impact resistance. Several could not be broken in a low-capacity Izod impact tester and, on this basis, all compared favorably with several high-strength high-temperature alloys. Swaging cracks were encountered with all the alloys. In several cases, however, these cracks were slight and could be detected only by zyglo examination. Some of these compositions may become amenable to hot working on further development. On the basis of the properties indicated, it appears that several of the alloys evolved, particularly the 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon basic-alloy modification, could be used for advanced- temperature turbine blades, as well as for possible space vehicle applications.

  9. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  10. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper Alloys Against Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Nosocomial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Eser, Ozgen Koseoglu; Ergin, Alper; Hascelik, Gulsen

    2015-08-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance demanded novel approaches for the prevention of nosocomial infections, and metallic copper surfaces have been suggested as an alternative for the control of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in surfaces in the hospital environment. This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of copper material for invasive MDR nosocomial pathogens isolated over time, in comparison to stainless steel. Clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n:4), OXA-23 and OXA-58 positive, MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (n:6) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n:4) were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of coupons containing 99 % copper and a brass alloy containing 63 % copper was assessed against stainless steel. All the materials demonstrated statistically significant differences within each other for the logarithmic reduction of microorganisms. Among the three materials, the highest reduction of microorganisms was seen in 99 % copper and the least in stainless steel. The result was statistically significant especially for 0, 2, and 4 h (P = 0.05). 99 % copper showed a bactericidal effect at less than 1 h for MRSA and at 2 h for P. aeruginosa. 63 % copper showed a bactericidal effect at 24 h for P. aeruginosa strains only. Stainless steel surfaces exhibited a bacteriostatic effect after 6 h for P. aeruginosa strains only. 99 % copper reduced the number of bacteria used significantly, produced a bactericidal effect and was more effective than 63 % copper. The use of metallic copper material could aid in reducing the concentration of bacteria, especially for invasive nosocomial pathogens on hard surfaces in the hospital environment. PMID:26044991

  12. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners

  13. On Heat-Treatable Copper-Chromium Alloy, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, S.; Isono, E.

    1984-01-01

    A mother alloy of 10% Cr and 90% Cu was prepared by sintering. This was alloyed with the Cu melt and Cu-Cr alloys containing about 0.5% Cr was obtained. These alloys could be deformed easily in both the hot and cold states. By measuring the hardness change, age-hardening properties of cast alloys were studied, which were quenched from 950 deg and aged at 300 to 700 deg for 1 hour. The maximum hardness was obtained with the tempering temperature of 500 deg. For the temperature of solution-treatment, 950 deg was insufficient and that above 1000 deg necessary. For the tempering time, a treatment at 500 deg for 1 hr. or at 450 deg for 3 hrs. yielded the maximum hardness. As for the properties for electrical conductors, 3 kinds of wires (diam. 2 mm.) were made: (1) after cold-drawn to 2 mm., solution-treated, quenched, and then tempered (500 deg, 1 hr.); (2) after quenching, cold-drawn (75% reduction) to 2 mm. and tempered (500 deg, 1 hr.); and (3) after quenching, cold-drawn (81%) to intermediate diameter, tempered (500 deg, 1 hr.) and then cold-drawn (88%) again. Properties obtained for the 3 kinds, respectively, were as follows: conductivity 91, 90, and 86%. Tensile strength and strength for electrical conductivity are given.

  14. Evaluation of advanced austenitic alloys relative to alloy design criteria for steam service

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1991-06-01

    The results are summarized for a task within a six-year activity to evaluate advanced austenitic alloys for heat recovery systems. Commercial, near-commercial, and development alloys were evaluated relative to criteria for metallurgical stability, fabricability, weldability, mechanical properties, and corrosion in fireside and steamside environments. Alloys that were given special attention in the study were 800HT{reg sign}, NF709{reg sign}, HR3C{reg sign}, and a group of 20/25% chromium-30% nickel-iron alloys identified as HT- UPS (high-temperature, ultrafine-precipitation strengthened) alloys. Excellent metallurgical stability and creep strength were observed in the NF709 and HR3C steels that contained niobium and nitrogen. One group of HT-UPS alloys was strengthened by solution treating to temperatures above 1150{degrees}C and subsequent cold or warm working. Test data to beyond 35,000 h were collected. The ability to clad some of the alloys for improved fireside corrosion resistance was demonstrated. Weldability of the alloys was a concern. Hot cracking and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) liquation cracking were potential problems in the HR3C stainless steel and HT-UPS alloys, and the use of dissimilar metal filler wire was required. By the reduction of phosphorous content and selection of either a nickel-base filler metal or alloy 556 filler metal, weldments were produced with minimum HAZ cracking. The major issues related to the development of the advanced alloys were identified and methods to resolve the issues suggested. 56 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Study on improved tribological properties by alloying copper to CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Ma, Zheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Song, Jian; Yang, Ke; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-12-01

    Copper alloying to titanium and its alloys is believed to show an antibacterial performance. However, the tribological properties of Cu alloyed titanium alloys were seldom studied. Ti-5Cu and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu alloys were fabricated in the present study in order to further study the friction and wear properties of titanium alloys with Cu additive. The microstructure, composition and hardness were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and hardness tester. The tribological behaviors were tested with ZrO2 counterface in 25% bovine serum using a ball-on-disc tribo-tester. The results revealed that precipitations of Ti2Cu intermetallic compounds appeared in both Ti-5Cu and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu alloys. The tribological results showed an improvement in friction and wear resistance for both Ti-5Cu and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu alloys due to the precipitation of Ti2Cu. The results also indicated that both CP-Ti and Ti-5Cu behaved better wear resistance than Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu due to different wear mechanisms when articulated with hard zirconia. Both CP-Ti and Ti-5Cu revealed dominant adhesive wear with secondary abrasive wear mechanism while both Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-4V-5Cu showed severe abrasive wear and cracks with secondary adhesive wear mechanism due to different surface hardness integrated by their microstructures and material types. PMID:26354247

  16. Intermetallic compounds, copper and palladium alloys in Au-Pd ore of the Skaergaard pluton, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudashevsky, N. S.; Rudashevsky, V. N.; Nielsen, T. F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Copper-palladium intermetallic compounds and alloys (2314 grains) from the Au-Pd ore of the Skaergaard layered gabbroic pluton have been studied. Skaergaardite PdCu, nielsenite PdCu3, (Cu,Pd)β, (Cu,Pd)α, (Pd,Cu,Au,Pt) alloys, and native palladium have been identified as a result of 1680 microprobe analyses. The average compositions and various chemical varieties of these minerals are characterized, as well as vertical and lateral zoning in distribution of noble metals. The primary Pd-Cu alloys were formed within a wide temperature interval broadly synchronously with cooling and crystallization of host gabbro and in close association with separation of Fe-Cu sulfide liquid. In the course of crystallization of residual gabbroic melt enriched in iron, noble and heavy metals and saturated with the supercritical aqueous fluid, PGE and Au are selectively concentrated in the Fe-Cu sulfide phase as Pd-Cu and Cu-Au alloys.

  17. The effect of copper doping on martensite shear stress in porous TiNi(Mo,Fe,Cu) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorenko, V. N.; Kaftaranova, M. I.; Gunther, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of alloys based on porous nickel-titanium (TiNi) with copper additives have been studied. It is established that the copper doping of porous TiNi(Mo,Fe,Cu) alloys fabricated by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis leads to a significant decrease in the martensite shear stress (below 30 MPa). Low values of the martensite shear stress (σmin) in copper-doped TiNi-based alloys allows medical implants of complex shapes to be manufactured for various purposes, including oral surgery. The optimum concentration of copper additives (within 3-6 at %) has been determined that ensures high performance characteristics of TiNi-based porous alloys for medical implants.

  18. The Structure and Properties of Cast Iron Alloyed with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumakov, A. A.; Stepanova, N. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Riapolova, Iu Iu; Emurlaev, K. I.

    2016-04-01

    Cast iron with 3 wt. % Cu was prepared by induction melting and casting in sand molds. The structure of the samples was studied using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of Cu promoted formation of pearlite and slightiy decreased the volume fraction of graphite. No Cu inclusions were found by LM and SEM. The nanoprecipitations of ε-Cu in lamellar pearlite were observed by TEM. The properties of the Cu-alloyed cast iron were compared with the properties of cast iron not alloyed with Cu. The hardness of cast iron after alloying with Cu increased and the friction coefficient decreased in comparison with the reference sample.

  19. Fabrication of the supersaturated solid solution of carbon in copper by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xueran; Liu Yongbing; Ran Xu; An Jian; Cao Zhanyi . E-mail: caozy@jlu.edu.cn

    2007-06-15

    Mechanical alloying of powder mixtures of copper and graphite was performed in a high energy ball mill. The as-milled powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. These investigations indicated that high energy ball milling could largely extend the solid solubility of carbon in copper and the 4 wt.% C was dissolved in Cu. It was ascribed to the decrease of the grain size and the increase of the lattice strain. Nanostructures, amorphous carbon and lamellar graphite were observed in the as-milled powder after milling for 24 h.

  20. Surface Electronic Structure of Palladium Alloyed on Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroum, Renata Maria

    The work in this dissertation comprises the development of a stable non linear convergence accelerator technique for self-consistent surface electronic structure calculations within the Surface Embedded Green Function (SEGF) formalism. Our results for the Cu < 001> c(2 x 2) Pd surface alloy were compared with normal emission photoemission spectra and were found to be in good quantitative agreement. Our studies have demonstrated that rapid self-consistency can be achieved in pure and alloyed surfaces by a modification of the Anderson mixing scheme wherein a weight function is introduced into integrals determining the relative proportions of the present and prior iterations.

  1. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I; Xu, J J

    2009-02-18

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 microm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 microm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique. PMID:19417426

  2. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I.; Xu, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 µm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 µm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  3. Formation of chromium carbides in copper matrix during mechanical alloying in carbon-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, M. A.; Lomaeva, S. F.; Elsukov, E. P.

    2013-11-01

    Structural and phase transformations that occur during mechanical alloying (MA) and subsequent annealing of nanocrystalline Cu-Cr-C alloys obtained from copper and chromium powders and graphite or xylene as the source of carbon have been studied. It is shown that, when using graphite, a supersaturated Cu(Cr) solid solution and an X-ray amorphous Cr-C phase are formed during MA. Heat treatment leads to their decomposition and the appearance of Cr3C2 in the nanocrystalline copper matrix. When xylene is used as the source of carbon, no strongly supersaturated Cu(Cr) solid solution and no X-ray amorphous Cr-C phase are formed, but the same volume fraction of chromium carbide, i.e., 20-24 vol %, appears. When graphite is used, the carbide is formed after shorter times of MA.

  4. Microsegregation studies of rapidly solidified binary aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arvind

    Most of the materials that we use in our day-to-day activities undergo solidification at some stage of manufacturing. Normal solidification of alloys can result in chemical inhomogeneity (microsegregation) and coarse structure that can make the material weak. Rapid solidification has been known to reduce microsegregation and produce materials with improved properties. To control the microstructure obtained from rapid solidification, and thus attain desired properties, requires an understanding of microstructure evolution and the resulting microsegregation. We have studied microsegregation in rapidly solidified Al-Cu alloys using a combination of experiments and modeling. Rapidly solidified Al-Cu alloys were produced using Impulse Atomization. Microsegregation studies were performed on the droplets for different alloy chemistry (Al-4.3%Cu, Al-5%Cu, Al-10%Cu and Al-17%Cu), droplet sizes and gas type. The droplets produced were characterized using X-Ray Tomography, Neutron Diffraction, Electron Microscopy and Stereology. Using these techniques, nucleation and microstructure formation were studied and eutectic amount measured within the droplets. Modeling involved developing a microsegregation model for a droplet solidifying during Impulse Atomization. Rappaz-Thevoz microsegregation model was used coupled with LKT dendrite kinetic model with modification for off-center nucleation. The results from the experiment and model show that the droplets undergo a nucleation undercooling of approximately 20K with a single, off-center, nucleation event. Individual droplets showed gradation in microstructure believed to be caused due to recalescence. The observed trend in microsegregation showed that the segregation decreases as the alloy composition is increased. Microsegregation also showed a slight decrease with increasing cooling rate, but the trend was not very clear. Based on the alloy composition, droplet size ranges studied and type of gas used (He or N2) the estimated

  5. Initial aging phenomena in copper-chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, H.; Motohiro, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of quenching and aging temperatures on the initial aging curves of Cu-Cr alloy were examined mainly by means of electrical resistivity measurements. Three Cu-Cr alloy specimens having 0.24, 0.74, and 1.0% Cr were solution-treated at 950-1050 C, quenched into ice-water, and subsequently aged at 300-500 C. The results were as follows: (1) At the very early stage of aging (within about 30 sec), an abrupt decrease of resistivity with lowering aging tempratures. (T sub A) and rising solution temperatures (T sub S) was observed at (T sub A) up to about 400 C. In contrast, a transient increase of resistivity with rising T sub A and lowering T sub S was observed at T sub A from about 450 to 500 C. These phenomena seem to be caused by a rapid formation of solute clusters and the reversion of clusters formed during quenching, which are enhanced by quenched-in vacancies, respectively. (2) The amount of precipitation increased at the latter stage of aging with rising T sub S and T sub A as generally expected, where T sub S was not so high as to form secondary defects. (3) As a result, the initial aging phenomena in Cr-Cr alloy were revealed to be complicated against expectations. This was considered to be due to the migration energy of vacancies so larger in Cu-base.

  6. Self-sustaining coatings for fusion applications - copper lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Brooks, J.N.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Mattas, R.F.; DeWald, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to monitor the surface composition of an alloy consisting of 3.0 at. % Li in Cu while sputtering with 1 to 3 keV Ar/sup +/ or He/sup +/ at a flux of 10/sup 12/ to 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ (corresponding to a gross erosion rate of several mm/yr) at temperatures up to 430/sup 0/C. It is found that the alloy is capable of reproducibly maintaining a complete lithium overlayer. The time-dependent thickness of the overlayer depends strongly on the mass and energy spectrum of the incident particle flux. It has been experimentally demonstrated that a significant fraction of the sputtered lithium is in the form Li/sup +/ and is returned to the surface by an electric field such as the sheath potential at the limiter, or a tangential magnetic field such as the toroidal field at the first wall; consequently, the overlayer lifetime is essentially unlimited. The TRIM computer code has been used to calculate the sputtering yield for pure metals and the partial sputtering yields of binary alloy components for various assumed solute concentration profiles.

  7. The characterization of copper alloys for the application of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, S.; Fukaya, K.; Eto, M.; Akiba, M.

    1995-12-31

    Three kinds of candidate copper alloys for divertor structural materials of fusion experimental reactors, that is, Oxygen Free High thermal conductivity Copper (OFHC), alumina disperse reinforced copper (DSC) and the composite of W and Cu (W/Cu), were prepared for strength and fatigue tests at temperatures ranging from R.T. to 500 C in a vacuum. High temperature strength of DSC and W/Cu with rapid fracture after peak loading at the temperatures is higher than that of OFHC by factor of 2, but fracture strains of DFC and W/Cu are smaller than that of OFHC. Fatigue life of DSC, which shows the same fatigue behavior of OFHC at room temperature, is longer than other materials at 400 C. Remarkable fatigue life reduction of OFHC found in this experiment is to be due to recrystallization of OFHC yielded above 400 C.

  8. Method For Creating Corrosion Resistant Surface On An Aluminum Copper Alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Wang, You; Lin, Simon H.

    1997-06-03

    A method for treating the surface of aluminum alloys hang a relatively high copper content is provided which includes the steps of removing substantially all of the copper from the surface, contacting the surface with a first solution containing cerium, electrically charging the surface while contacting the surface in an aqueous molybdate solution, and contacting the surface with a second solution containing cerium. The copper is substantially removed from the surface in the first step either by (i) contacting the surface with an acidic chromate solution or by (ii) contacting the surface with an acidic nitrate solution while subjecting the surface to an electric potential. The corrosion-resistant surface resulting from the invention is excellent, consistent and uniform throughout the surface. Surfaces treated by the invention may often be certified for use in salt-water services.

  9. An x-ray study of shock-loaded internally oxidized copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Teslenko, T.S.

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the microstresses in the initial internally oxidized specimens from the broadening of the copper diffraction lines. X-ray examination of a multiphase alloy has an advantage over microhardness measurement in that one can determine the microstress level independently for each phase, and without altering it during the measurements. The widths of the x-ray diffraction lines for copper were measured with a DRON-1 diffractometer. The line broadening for the copper matrix was determined at distances from the loading surface where the pressures were 330, 280, and 210 kbar. It is concluded that although microhardness and line broadening methods usually give similar relationships for a single-phase metal, they are sensitive to different features of the structure, so it is desirable to use x-ray methods in examining the causes of hardening in multiphase materials.

  10. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  11. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  12. Grain refinement of permanent mold cast copper base alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, M.; Thomson, J. P.; Elboujdaini, M.; Gu, G. Ping; Sahoo, M.

    2004-04-29

    Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys

  13. Aerospace applications of advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Langenbeck, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced metallic materials within the Al-base family are being developed for applications on current and future aerospace vehicles. These advanced materials offer significant improvements in density, strength, stiffness, fracture resistance, and/or higher use temperature which translates into improved vehicle performance. Aerospace applications of advanced metallic materials include space structures, fighters, military and commercial transport aircraft, and missiles. Structural design requirements, including not only static and durability/damage tolerance criteria but also environmental considerations, drive material selections. Often trade-offs must be made regarding strength, fracture resistance, cost, reliability, and maintainability in order to select the optimum material for a specific application. These trade studies not only include various metallic materials but also many times include advanced composite materials. Details of material comparisons, aerospace applications, and material trades will be presented.

  14. A New Copper Alloy Film for Barrierless Si Metallization and Solder Bump Flip-Chip Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chon-Hsin

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a copper alloy, Cu(MnNx), film is developed by cosputtering Cu and Mn on a barrierless Si substrate within an Ar/N2 gas atmosphere. The resulting alloy film exhibits good thermal stability and adhesion to the substrate with no noticeable interactions between the film and the substrate after annealing at 700 °C for 1 h, indicating that the film is thermally stable. The alloy film shall be able to replace both the wetting and diffusion layers for the flip-chip solder joints in conventional under bump metallurgy to reduce the manufacturing cost. We also observe that the Cu(MnNx) alloy exhibits a solder ability comparable to that of pure Cu and a dissolution rate lower than that of pure Cu by at least one order of magnitude. The alloy's consumption rate is comparable to that of Ni, rendering the alloy a candidate material in both barrierless Si metallization and solder bump flip-chip application.

  15. Effect of Cu content on the antibacterial activity of titanium-copper sintered alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Li, Fangbing; Liu, Cong; Wang, Hongying; Ren, Baorui; Yang, Ke; Zhang, Erlin

    2014-02-01

    The phase constitution and the microstructure Ti-x Cu (x=2, 5, 10 and 25 wt.%) sintered alloys were investigated by XRD and SEM and the antibacterial activity was assessed in order to investigate the effect of the Cu content on the antibacterial activity. The results have shown that Ti2Cu was synthesized as a main secondary phase in all Ti-Cu alloys while Cu-rich phase was formed in the alloys with 5 wt.% or more copper. Antibacterial tests have showed that the Cu content influences the antibacterial rate seriously and only the alloys with 5 wt.% or high Cu have a strong and stable antibacterial rate, which indicates that the Cu content in Ti-Cu alloys must be at least 5 wt.% to obtain strong and stable antibacterial property. The Cu content also influenced the Cu ion release behavior. High Cu ion release concentration and high Cu ion release rate were observed for Ti-Cu alloys with high Cu content. It was concluded that the Cu content affects the Cu existence and the Cu ion release behavior, which in turn influences the antibacterial property. It was thought that the Cu-rich phase should play an important role in the strong antibacterial activity. PMID:24411393

  16. Advances in Development of Vanadium Alloys and MHD Insulator Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Muroga, Takeo; Chen, J M; Chernov, V M; Fukumoto, K; Hoelzer, David T; Kurtz, Richard; Nagasaka, T; Pint, Bruce A; Satou, M; Suzuki, Akihiro; Watanabe, H

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of low activation vanadium alloys and MHD insulator coatings for a Li-self cooled blanket is reviewed. Research progress in vanadium alloys is highlighted by technology for fabricating creep tubes, comparison of thermal creep in vacuum and Li, understanding impurity transfer between vanadium alloys and Li and its impact on mechanical properties, behavior of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes, low dose irradiation effects on weld joints, and exploration for advanced vanadium alloys. Major remaining issues for vanadium alloys are thermal and irradiation creep, helium effects on high-temperature mechanical properties and radiation effects on low-temperature fracture properties. Er2O3 showed good compatibility with Li, and is promising as a MHD insulator coating on vanadium alloys. Significant progress in coating technology for this material has been made. Recent efforts are focused on multi-layer and in-situ coatings. Tests under flowing lithium conditions with a temperature gradient are necessary for quantitative examination of coating performance.

  17. Copper deficiency myelopathy in the setting of advanced degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Page, Paul S; Nazar, Ryan G; Park, Michael C; James, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    When presenting conjointly, degenerative cervical spondylosis and copper deficiency myelopathy may be difficult to differentiate providing the potential for mismanagement and unnecessary surgery. We present a case of a 69-year-old female with copper deficiency myelopathy secondary to previous bowel resection in the setting of advanced degenerative cervical spondylotic disease. PMID:26337459

  18. Environment enhanced fatigue of advanced aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, Donald C.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to characterize and understand the environmental fatigue crack propagation behavior of advanced, high stiffness and strength, aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites. Those gases and aqueous electrolytes which are capable of producing atomic hydrogen by reactions on clean crack surfaces are emphasized. Characterizations of the behavior of new materials are sought to provide data for damage tolerant component life prediction. Mechanistic models are sought for crack tip damage processes which are generally applicable to structural aluminum alloys. Such models will enable predictions of cracking behavior outside of the data, metallurgical improvements in material cracking resistance, and insight on hydrogen compatibility.

  19. Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Falsey, John

    2005-01-01

    The powder metallurgy disk alloy LSHR was designed with a relatively low gamma precipitate solvus temperature and high refractory element content to allow versatile heat treatment processing combined with high tensile, creep and fatigue properties. Grain size can be chiefly controlled through proper selection of solution heat treatment temperatures relative to the gamma precipitate solvus temperature. However, forging process conditions can also significantly influence solution heat treatment-grain size response. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the relationships between forging process conditions and the eventual grain size of solution heat treated material. A series of forging experiments were performed with subsequent subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments, in search of suitable forging conditions for producing uniform fine grain and coarse grain microstructures. Subsolvus, supersolvus, and combined subsolvus plus supersolvus heat treatments were then applied. Forging and subsequent heat treatment conditions were identified allowing uniform fine and coarse grain microstructures.

  20. Preparation of Copper and Chromium Alloyed Layers on Pure Titanium by Plasma Surface Alloying Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Wang, Huizhen; Zhang, Xiangyu; Tang, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Cu-Cr alloyed layers with different Cu and Cr contents on pure titanium were obtained by means of plasma surface alloying technology. The microstructure, chemical composition and phase composition of Cu-Cr alloyed layers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the alloyed layers are bonded strongly to pure titanium substrate and consist of unbound Ti, CuTi, Cu3Ti, CuTi3 and Cr2Ti. The thickness of Cu5Cr5 and Cu7Cr3 alloyed layer are about 18 μm and 28 μm, respectively. The antibacterial properties against gram-negative Escherichia coli (E.coli, ATCC10536) and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, ATCC6538) of untreated pure titanium and Cu-Cr alloyed specimen were investigated by live/dead fluorescence staining method. The study shows that Cu-Cr alloyed layers exhibit excellent antibacterial activities against both E.coli and S.aureus within 24 h, which may be attributed to the formation of Cu-containing phases.

  1. KEY COMPARISON: Report of the study CCQM-K64: Analysis of a copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recknagel, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    The CCQM-K64 study was performed to demonstrate and document the measurement capabilities of national metrology institutes in the determination of main and minor elements in copper alloys. The key comparison was coordinated by BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin, Germany as an activity of the Inorganic Analysis Working Group of CCQM. Elements to be determined were Cu, Pb, Sn, Fe and Ni in a lead-containing brass. Five national metrology institutes registered to participate in CCQM-K64. Three of them analysed all five elements requested, two of them did not perform analyses for tin. The participants used different analytical methods: all of them seem to be suitable, especially for Cu determination. The BAM reference material AKP 220/2 Special Brass (unknown to the participants) was used as a test sample in this study. CCQM-K64 demonstrates the abilities of metrological institutes to measure the mass fractions of main, minor and trace components of a copper alloy for copper (main element, >50% mass fraction), lead (minor element, 1% to 5% mass fraction) and iron, nickel and, with reservations, tin (as trace components, 0.01% to 0.5% mass fraction). Only three of the five participants determined tin. The analytical methods used were electrogravimetry (for copper and lead), flame-AAS and ICP-MS. The scope of the key comparison extends to other copper alloys comprising the same or similar constituents and other elements in the same mass fraction range when analysed using the technique(s) applied in CCQM-64. It extends also to other non-ferrous metal alloys if the sample preparation is similar. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  2. Autocatalysis and selective oxidative etching induced synthesis of platinum-copper bimetallic alloy nanodendrites electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mingxing; Fu, Gengtao; Chen, Yu; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong

    2014-05-28

    The controllable synthesis of noble metal alloy nanostructures with highly branched morphology has attracted much attention because of their specific physical and chemical properties. This article reports the synthesis of platinum-copper bimetallic alloy nanodendrites (Pt-Cu BANDs) by a facile, one-pot, templateless, and seedless hydrothermal method in the presence of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and formaldehyde (HCHO). The morphology, composition, and structure of Pt-Cu BANDs are fully characterized by various physical techniques, demonstrating Pt-Cu BANDs are highly alloying, porous, and self-supported nanostructures. The formation/growth mechanism of Pt-Cu BANDs is explored and discussed based on the experimental observations. The autocatalytic growth and interdiffusion are responsible for the formation of Pt-Cu alloy whereas selective oxidative etching results in dendritic morphology of Pt-Cu alloy nanostructures. In addition, the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pt-Cu BANDs for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are investigated by various electrochemical techniques. The synthesized Pt-Cu BANDs show higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pt black. PMID:24801265

  3. Microscopic mechanisms contributing to the synchronous improvement of strength and plasticity (SISP) for TWIP copper alloys

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R.; Zhang, Z. J.; Li, L. L.; An, X. H.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the concept of “twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) alloys” is broadened, and the underlying intrinsic microscopic mechanisms of the general TWIP effect are intensively explored. For the first aspect, “TWIP copper alloys” was proposed following the concept of “TWIP steels”, as they share essentially the same strengthening and toughening mechanisms. For the second aspect, three intrinsic features of twinning: i.e. “dynamic development”, “planarity”, as well as “orientation selectivity” were derived from the detailed exploration of the deformation behavior in TWIP copper alloys. These features can be considered the microscopic essences of the general “TWIP effect”. Moreover, the effective cooperation between deformation twinning and dislocation slipping in TWIP copper alloys leads to a desirable tendency: the synchronous improvement of strength and plasticity (SISP). This breakthrough against the traditional trade-off relationship, achieved by the general “TWIP effect”, may provide useful strategies for designing high-performance engineering materials. PMID:25828192

  4. Tensile and electrical properties of high-strength high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1998-09-01

    Electrical conductivity and tensile properties have been measured on an extruded and annealed CuCrNb dispersion strengthened copper alloy which has been developed for demanding aerospace high heat flux applications. The properties of this alloy are somewhat inferior to GlidCop dispersion strengthened copper and prime-aged CuCrZr over the temperature range of 20--500 C. However, if the property degradation in CuCrZr due to joining operations and the anisotropic properties of GlidCop in the short transverse direction are taken into consideration, CuCrNb may be a suitable alternative material for high heat flux structural applications in fusion energy devices. The electrical conductivity and tensile properties of CuCrZr that was solution annealed and then simultaneously aged and diffusion bonded are also summarized. A severe reduction in tensile elongation is observed in the diffusion bonded joint, particularly if a thin copper shim is not placed in the diffusion bondline.

  5. The effect of nickel addition on antimicrobial, physical, and mechanical properties of copper-nickel alloy against suspensions of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayani, Dinni; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection can cause serious illness. Humans can be infected by E. coli via contact with the contaminated food and water. Copper and copper alloys were known for their antimicrobial properties and were applied in several healthcare setting as antimicrobial material. However, the people preference in the appearance of stainless steel and aluminum contribute to the low application of copper and its alloy. In this study, the mechanical, physical, and antibacterial properties of copper and copper-nickel alloy compared with stainless steel 304 were tested. The antibacterial activity of stainless steel, copper, and copper-nickel alloy was evaluated by inoculating 7.5 × 106 - 2.5 × 107 CFU/ml suspensions of E. coli. The bacterial colonies were investigated after 0-4 hour incubation at 37°C. The result showed that on the observation time, copper and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloys have antibacterial activity while the bacteria in stainless steel remain existed. The appearance (color / shade) of Cu-Ni alloys in some composition is silvery which is stainless steel-like. For the mechanical properties, copper-nickel alloys have lower hardness than stainless steel (SS 304). This research proved that copper-nickel alloys have the ability to reduce the amount of E. col colonies. The copper content may affect the antibacterial activity but not directly linked. Cu-Ni alloys also have the appearance and mechanical properties that quite similar compared to SS304. Therefore, Cu-Ni alloys have the potential to be applied as substitution or complementary material of SS304 in various applications for preventing the bacterial contamination especially E. coli.

  6. The effect of copper, chromium, and zirconium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of the systematic variation of copper, chromium, and zirconium contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 7000-type aluminum alloy. Fracture toughness and tensile properties are evaluated for each alloy in both the peak aging, T8, and the overaging, T73, conditions. Results show that dimpled rupture essentially characterize the fracture process in these alloys. In the T8 condition, a significant loss of toughness is observed for alloys containing 2.5 pct Cu due to the increase in the quantity of Al-Cu-Mg-rich S-phase particles. An examination of T8 alloys at constant Cu levels shows that Zr-bearing alloys exhibit higher strength and toughness than the Cr-bearing alloys. In the T73 condition, Cr-bearing alloys are inherently tougher than Zr-bearing alloys. A void nucleation and growth mechanism accounts for the loss of toughness in these alloys with increasing copper content.

  7. Application of pressurized sample preparation methods for the analysis of steels and copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Borszéki, J; Halmos, P; Gegus, E; Kárpáti, P

    1994-07-01

    Pressurized sample preparation devices (High Pressure Asher, Pressurized Microwave Digestion system, compared with a PTFE decomposition vessel) were used to dissolve certified metal alloy samples (steel, copper) for ICP analysis. Based on the results of the analysis it was established that both up-to-date devices can be advantageously applied to quickly and quantitatively dissolve metal alloy samples. To dissolve the samples, two different kinds of acid mixtures (A: nitric and hydrochloric acid; B: nitric and hydrochloric and sulphuric and phosphoric acid) were used. The sample preparation is simpler and less time-consuming than the earlier commonly used methods, sample loss and degree of contamination are also reduced. Steel samples containing tungsten, titanium and niobium (less than 0.5%) can only be analyzed using a mixture of the four acids. By dissolving steel samples in the nitric and hydrochloric acid mixture, the concentration of their most common elements (Cr, Ni, Mn, V, Cu) as well as their S and P content can be determined. Copper alloy samples can be dissolved quickly by the pressurized microwave decomposition device using hydrochloric acid and diluted (1:1) nitric acid. PMID:18966041

  8. Recent advances in alloy design of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys for structural use

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; George, E.P.

    1996-12-31

    This is a comprehensive review of recent advances in R&D of Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys for structural use at elevated temperatures in hostile environments. Recent studies indicate that polycrystalline Ni{sub 3}Al is intrinsically quite ductile at ambient temperatures, and its poor tensile ductility and brittle grain-boundary fracture are caused mainly by moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement when the aluminide is tested in moisture- or hydrogen-containing environments. Tensile ductility is improved by alloying with substitutional and interstitial elements. Among these additives, B is most effective in suppressing environmental embrittlement and enhancing grain-boundary cohesion, resulting in a dramatic increase of tensile ductility at room temperature. Both B-doped and B-free Ni{sub 3}Al alloys exhibit brittle intergranular fracture and low ductility at intermediate temperatures (300-850 C) because of oxygen-induced embrittlement in oxidizing environments. Cr is found to be most effective in alleviating elevated-temperature embrittlement. Parallel efforts on alloy development using physical metallurgy principles have led to development of several Ni{sub 3}Al alloys for industrial use. The unique properties of these alloys are briefly discussed. 56 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. Electrochemical properties of silver-copper alloy microelectrodes for use in voltammetric field apparatus.

    PubMed

    Skogvold, Silje M; Mikkelsen, Oyvind; Billon, Gabriel; Garnier, Cedric; Lesven, Ludovic; Barthe, Jean-Francois

    2006-04-01

    Microelectrodes of silver-copper alloys have been evaluated for use in voltammetric analyses. Increased overpotential towards the hydrogen overvoltage reaction (HER) was found as a function of increased copper content in the silver. A study of oxidizing products by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in NaOH solution showed ten anodic and eight cathodic peaks which are described in the present paper. The behaviour of these alloy electrodes is somewhere between pure silver and pure copper electrodes. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) was used to measure zinc, cadmium and lead in ultrapure water only (18 MOmegacm), and good linearity was found for all metals (r (2)=0.998) in the range of 0.5 to 5 ppb with a 600- to 1,200-s plating time. It was additionally found that cadmium and lead were better separated on the alloy electrodes compared to pure silver electrodes. Measurements of nickel were carried out on alloy electrodes by use of adsorptive differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (Ad-DPCSV), and good linearity (r (2)=1.000) was found in the range from 0.5 to 5 ppb with an adsorption time of 120 s. The alloy electrodes were also found to be sensitive to nitrate, and good linearity (r (2)=0.997) was found in the range from 1 mg L(-1) to 100 mg L(-1) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) scanning from -450 mV to -1,500 mV. Addition of nitrate in ultrapure water afforded two different peaks related to the successive reductions of nitrate and nitrite. In ammonium buffer solution (pH 8.6) only one peak resulting from reduction of nitrate was observed. Furthermore, the use of alloy electrodes containing 17% Cu was tested in real samples, by installing it in a voltammetric system for monitoring of zinc and lead in a polluted river, the river Deûle, near the town of Douai in northern France. Results were found to be in agreement with parallel measurements carried out by ICP-MS. PMID:16550424

  10. Oxidation of alloys targeted for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-03-12

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  11. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-04-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  12. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  13. Tensile and electrical properties of copper alloys irradiated in a fission reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Postirradiation electrical sensitivity and tensile measurements have been completed on pure copper and copper alloy sheet tensile specimens irradiated in the SM-2 reactor to doses of {approx}0.5 to 5 dpa and temperatures between {approx}80 and 400{degrees}C. Considerable radiation hardening and accompanying embrittlement was observed in all of the specimens at irradiation temperature below 200{degrees}C. The radiation-induced electrical conductivity degradation consisted of two main components: solid transmutation effects and radiation damage (defect cluster and particle dissolution) effects. The radiation damage component was nearly constant for the doses in this study, with a value of {approx}1.2n{Omega}m for pure copper and {approx}1.6n{Omega}m for dispersion strengthened copper irradiated at {approx}100{degrees}C. The solid transmutation component was proportional to the thermal neutron flux, and became larger than the radiation damage component for fluences larger than {approx}5 10{sup 24} n.m{sup 2}. The radiation hardening and electrical conductivity degradation decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and became negligible for temperatures above {approx}300{degrees}C.

  14. Increasing the life of molds for casting copper and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. N.; Spiridonov, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    The work of the molds intended for casting copper and copper alloys in semicontinuous casters for producing flat billets is considered. It is shown that, to increase the resistance of mold plates, the inner space of the mold should have a taper shape toward the casting direction and take into account the shrinkage of the linear dimensions of the ingot during its motion in the mold. The taper shape increases the intensity and uniformity of heat removal due to close contact between the ingot and the mold inner surface. Testing of new design molds under industrial conditions demonstrates that their resistance increases by a factor of 4.0-4.5. The taper effect of the mold plates is much more pronounced in their narrow faces.

  15. TEM Examination of Advanced Alloys Irradiated in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan, PhD

    2007-09-01

    Successful development of materials is critical to the deployment of advanced nuclear power systems. Irradiation studies of candidate materials play a vital role for better understanding materials performance under various irradiation environments of advanced system designs. In many cases, new classes of materials have to be investigated to meet the requirements of these advanced systems. For applications in the temperature range of 500 800ºC which is relevant to the fast neutron spectrum burner reactors for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and ferritic martensitic steels (e.g., MA957 and others) are candidates for advanced cladding materials. In the low temperature regions of the core (<600ºC), alloy 800H, HCM12A (also called T 122) and HT 9 have been considered.

  16. Development and application of a portable LIPS system for characterising copper alloy artefacts.

    PubMed

    Agresti, J; Mencaglia, A A; Siano, S

    2009-12-01

    We report the development of a novel portable and low-cost laser induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) system and describe the application method for quantitative characterisation of quaternary copper alloy artefacts. The device was carefully calibrated and phenomenologically characterised using a set of reference samples. The reliability of the quantitative measurement of the depth profile and bulk compositions was assessed through crossed comparisons with traditional analytical techniques. Finally, the LIPS system was applied to investigate a museum figurine of unknown origin composed of several pieces, which is representative of a typical authentication problem. PMID:19711057

  17. —Part I. Interaction of Calcium and Copper-Calcium Alloy with Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikov, Yurii P.; Batukhtin, Victor P.; Shurov, Nikolay I.; Ivanovskii, Leonid E.; Suzdaltsev, Andrey V.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the interaction between calcium and molten CaCl2 and the solubility of calcium in this melt, depending on the calcium content in the copper-calcium alloy that comes in contact with the molten CaCl2. The negative influence of the dissolved calcium on the current efficiency was verified. The negative effects of moisture and CaO impurities on the calcium current efficiency were demonstrated. The dependence of the current efficiency and the purity of the metal obtained by the electrolysis conditions were studied in a laboratory electrolyzer (20 to 80 A).

  18. Copper-nickel superalloys as inert alloy anodes for aluminum electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Qiu, Zhuxian; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang

    2003-11-01

    The superalloys Cu-Ni-Al, Cu-Ni-Fe, and Cu-Ni-Cr were studied as anodes for aluminum electrolysis. The alloys were tested for corrosion in acidic electrolyte molten salt and for oxidation in both air and oxygen. The results showed that the Cu-Ni-Al anodes possess excellent resistance to oxidation and corrosion, and the oxidation rates of Cu-Ni-Fe and Cu-Ni-Al anodes were slower than those of pure copper or nickel. During electrolysis, the cell voltage of the Cu-Ni-Al anode was affected most by the concentration of alumina in cryolite molten salt. The Cu-Ni-Fe anode exhibited corrosion resistance in electrolyte molten salt. Comparatively, the Cu-Ni-Cr anode showed poor resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The testing found that further study is warranted on the use of Cu-Ni-Al and Cu-Ni-Fe as inert alloy anodes.

  19. Influence of archaeological environment factors in alteration processes of copper alloy artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Ioan Gabriel; Mircea, Otilia; Vasilache, Viorica; Sandu, Ion

    2012-12-01

    The article presents the experimental results obtained by combining noninvasive techniques (OM, SEM/EDX, XRF) to analyze three artifacts made of copper alloys discovered in a inhumation tomb (2) and in the soil profile (1) in archaeological sites from Neamt County Romania. To uncover the mechanism of alteration thereof during their longtime underground stay in specific chemical conditions and under the influence of other pedological factors, the corrosion products must be identified. The excess of the chloride ion, from burial site, disturbs the Liesegang effect, transforming the bulk in a stratified sponge structure with chlorapatite and hydroxyapatite. Some of the compounds from primary and secondary patina can be found on the surface of the bulk, as color stains. The presence of alloy components (Cu, Sn, Pb, Zn, Fe, etc.) and of the underground contamination components, allowed us to establish the origin of the ore, the manufacture technology and we identified other materials which affected the artifacts after abandonment. PMID:22865394

  20. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  1. Russian aluminum-lithium alloys for advanced reusable spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Charette, Ray O.; Leonard, Bruce G.; Bozich, William F.; Deamer, David A.

    1998-01-15

    Cryotanks that are cost-affordable, robust, fuel-compatible, and lighter weight than current aluminum design are needed to support next-generation launch system performance and operability goals. The Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-MDA) and NASA's Delta Clipper-Experimental Program (DC-XA) flight demonstrator test bed vehicle provided the opportunity for technology transfer of Russia's extensive experience base with weight-efficient, highly weldable aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys for cryogenic tank usage. As part of NASA's overall reusable launch vehicle (RLV) program to help provide technology and operations data for use in advanced RLVs, MDA contracted with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS/IMASH) for design, test, and delivery of 1460 Al-Li alloy liquid oxygen (LO{sub 2}) cryotanks: one for development, one for ground tests, and one for DC-XA flight tests. This paper describes the development of Al-Li 1460 alloy for reusable LO{sub 2} tanks, including alloy composition tailoring, mechanical properties database, forming, welding, chemical milling, dissimilar metal joining, corrosion protection, completed tanks proof, and qualification testing. Mechanical properties of the parent and welded materials exceeded expectations, particularly the fracture toughness, which promise excellent reuse potential. The LO{sub 2} cryotank was successfully demonstrated in DC-XA flight tests.

  2. Comparison of cathodic protection currents on 70/30 copper-nickel and alloy 625 piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.; Wheatfall, W.L.

    1995-12-01

    The question answered in this study is whether the demand on a cathodic protection system will change when the protected pipe material is changed from copper-nickel to alloy 625. Two piping mockups were designed to simulate a probable geometry for a cathodically-protected piping system. Each mockup consisted of a 20-foot (610-cm) length of nominal 2-inch (5-cm) diameter piping with a zinc anode for cathodic protection inserted in the discharge end of each. one mockup was made with 70-30 copper-nickel pipe and the other with alloy 625 pipe. Protection currents and potential profiles inside the pipes were measured over a six-month exposure period in natural seawater flowing at 7-ft/s (210-cm/s). The total protection current and sacrificial anode consumption for alloy 625 pipe was half that for copper-nickel pipe. This means that replacing copper-nickel pipe with alloy 625 pipe in areas close to cathodically-protected heat exchangers or hulls will result in a more conservative design for the cathodic protection system than was the case for the original copper-nickel piping.

  3. Inactivation of Murine Norovirus on a Range of Copper Alloy Surfaces Is Accompanied by Loss of Capsid Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Summersgill, Emma N.; Keevil, C. William

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus is one of the most common causes of acute viral gastroenteritis. The virus is spread via the fecal-oral route, most commonly from infected food and water, but several outbreaks have originated from contamination of surfaces with infectious virus. In this study, a close surrogate of human norovirus causing gastrointestinal disease in mice, murine norovirus type 1 (MNV-1), retained infectivity for more than 2 weeks following contact with a range of surface materials, including Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ceramic tiles, glass, silicone rubber, and stainless steel. Persistence was slightly prolonged on ceramic surfaces. A previous study in our laboratory observed that dry copper and copper alloy surfaces rapidly inactivated MNV-1 and destroyed the viral genome. In this new study, we have observed that a relatively small change in the percentage of copper, between 70 and 80% in copper nickels and 60 and 70% in brasses, had a significant influence on the ability of the alloy to inactivate norovirus. Nickel alone did not affect virus, but zinc did have some antiviral effect, which was synergistic with copper and resulted in an increased efficacy of brasses with lower percentages of copper. Electron microscopy of purified MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and stainless steel surfaces suggested that a massive breakdown of the viral capsid had occurred on copper. In addition, MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and treated with RNase demonstrated a reduction in viral gene copy number. This suggests that capsid integrity is compromised upon contact with copper, allowing copper ion access to the viral genome. PMID:25452290

  4. Bactericidal activity of copper and niobium-alloyed austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Baena, M I; Márquez, M C; Matres, V; Botella, J; Ventosa, A

    2006-12-01

    Biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion are processes of material deterioration that originate from the attachment of microorganisms as quickly as the material is immersed in a nonsterile environment. Stainless steels, despite their wide use in different industries and as appliances and implant materials, do not possess inherent antimicrobial properties. Changes in hygiene legislation and increased public awareness of product quality makes it necessary to devise control methods that inhibit biofilm formation or to act at an early stage of the biofouling process and provide the release of antimicrobial compounds on a sustainable basis and at effective level. These antibacterial stainless steels may find a wide range of applications in fields, such as kitchen appliances, medical equipment, home electronics, and tools and hardware. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibacterial stainless steel and thus mitigate the microbial colonization and bacterial infection. Copper is known as an antibacterial agent; in contrast, niobium has been demonstrated to improve the antimicrobial effect of copper by stimulating the formation of precipitated copper particles and its distribution in the matrix of the stainless steel. Thus, we obtained slides of 3.8% copper and 0.1% niobium alloyed stainless steel; subjected them to three different heat treatment protocols (550 degrees C, 700 degrees C, and 800 degrees C for 100, 200, 300, and 400 hours); and determined their antimicrobial activities by using different initial bacterial cell densities and suspending solutions to apply the bacteria to the stainless steels. The bacterial strain used in these experiments was Escherichia coli CCM 4517. The best antimicrobial effects were observed in the slides of stainless steel treated at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C using an initial cell density of approximately 10(5) cells ml(-1) and phosphate-buffered saline as the solution in which the bacteria came into contact with

  5. Erosion-corrosion performance of nickel-based and copper-based alloys in the Arabian Gulf seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashem, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Sayegh, A.

    1996-10-01

    The erosion-corrosion behavior of nickel-based (UNS N0 6022) and copper-based (UNS C71500) alloy tubes in water flowing seawater containing sulfide ions is investigated. Visual, optical and scanning electron microscopy examinations of the internal surfaces of the tubes were conducted to compare the susceptibilities to erosion-corrosion attack of these two alloys, taking into consideration the nature of the product films formed.

  6. Advanced titanium alloys and processes for minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, H. J.; Qazi, Javaid

    2005-11-01

    Major advances continue to be made in enhancing patient care while at the same time attempting to slow ever-rising health costs. Among the most innovative of these advances are minimally invasive surgical techniques, which allow patients to undergo life-saving and quality-of-life enhancing surgery with minimized risk and substantially reduced hospital stays. Recently this approach was introduced for orthopedic procedures (e.g., during total hip replacement surgery). In this instance, the implantable devices will bear the same loads and will therefore be subject to higher stress. This paper provides a brief overview of several potential approaches for developing new advanced titanium alloys and processes that should provide substantial benefit for this application in minimally invasive devices.

  7. Direct production of nanostructured copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Apaydin, Ramazan Oguzhan; Ebin, Burcak; Gurmen, Sebahattin

    2013-12-16

    Copper-Nickel (CuNi) nanostructured alloy particles were produced by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Hydrogen Reduction Method (USP-HR) from high purity copper and nickel nitrate aqueous solutions. The effect of the precursor solution in the range of 0.1 and 0.5 mol/L on the morphology and crystallite size of CuNi nanoparticles were investigated under 2 h running time, 700 °C operating temperature and 0.5 L/min H{sub 2} flow rate. Particle size, morphology, composition and crystallite structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Particle characterization studies show that nanostructured alloy particles have cubic crystal structure and they are in submicron size range with spherical morphology. The crystallite sizes of the particles calculated with Scherrer formula are 40 and 34 nm and average particles sizes observed from the SEM images are 300 and 510 nm for each experiment respectively.

  8. Low void swelling in dispersion strengthened copper alloys under single-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, M.; Watanabe, H.; Akiba, M.; Yoshida, N.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened copper (ODS-Cu) alloys GlidCop CuAl15 and CuAl25 were irradiated with Cu 2+ ions at 573-773 K up to doses of 30 dpa. Void swelling was observed in all specimens irradiated at temperatures ranging from 573 to 673 K. In CuAl15 brazed with graphite at 1083 K, mean grain size was about 800 nm. Voids were observed in grains larger than 1 μm but not in smaller than 500 nm in diameter. The CuAl25 joined with SUS316 by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1323 K had a mean grain size of 60 μm because of a large grain growth during the HIP process and showed large void swelling. Small grain size is effective in suppressing void swelling due to strong sink effects of grain boundaries for the point defects. The present results indicate that joining at high temperatures may reduce the void swelling resistance of GlidCop copper alloys.

  9. L α X-Ray Emission Spectra of Copper Compounds and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1994-05-01

    With a two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with beryl crystals,the Cu Lα emission spectra in fluorescence have been measuredfor selected copper compounds Cu2O, CuO, CuCl, CuBr, CuI,CuF2, CuCl2, CuBr2, CuF2·2H2O,CuCl2·2H2O and Cu3P, and alloysα-Cu+35%Zn and Cu+2%Be. The measured spectra aregrouped into three classes. The first class comprises the spectraof alloys, which consist of a single broad band similar to thatof Cu metal. The second class includes the spectra of monovalentcopper compounds, which are composed of a prominent peak and itshigh- and low-energy structures. To the third class belong thespectra of divalent copper compounds, which consist of a strongpeak accompanied with a characteristic dip and hump on thehigh-energy side. The Cu Lα emission bands of Cu2O,CuCl and CuBr are compared with available XPS spectra andtheoretical Cu-3d-DOS.

  10. A Model for Surface Induced Growth of Inert Gas Bubbles in Irradiated Copper-Boron Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, G.P.; Ramadasan, E.

    2006-07-01

    A matrix containing inert gas bubbles dilates in direct proportion to the growth experienced by the gas bubbles. This phenomenon is termed as swelling. A model for the swelling induced by the growth of the helium gas bubbles in irradiated copper-boron alloys is presented. The bubbles grow by acquiring vacancies from the external surface, which acts as a source of vacancies. The vacancies reach the surface of the bubbles mainly via lattice diffusion and to a limited extent via diffusion through short-circuiting paths such as grain boundaries and dislocation pipes. The model predicts that overall swelling of the matrix varies as 1.5 power of time. Another consequence of the present model is that the growth rate of a gas bubble varies inversely as the cube of its distance from the external surface. The model has been applied to the data on irradiated copper-boron alloys and found to be in accord with the experimental results. The model is general and can be applied to the growth of all kinds of stationary inert gas bubbles trapped within a crystalline matrix. (authors)

  11. Surface topographic characterization for polyamide composite injection molds made of aluminum and copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A; Hernández, P; Martinez, J; Pérez, J A; Mathia, T G

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure flexibility and rapid new product development, the mold industry made use of soft materials for cavity inserts in injection molds. However, materials of this kind are prone to wear. This article analyzes the topographic characterization of the surface and wear processes in injection molds cavities. Two materials have been used to produce the cavities: aluminum alloy EN AW‐6082 T4 and copper alloy Cu Zn39 Pb3. The surface topography was measured with the use of optical interferometry profiling technology; roughness and surface parameters were determined according to ISO 4287, ISO 25178, and EUR 15178N. In order to complete this research, an experimental part with different thicknesses and shapes was designed, and cavity inserts of aluminum and copper were made. Polyamide PA6, with 30% fiberglass reinforcement, was employed in the experimental procedure. Measurements of cavity mold surfaces were performed after 9,200 cycles on each mold and at different locations on the mold. The surface measurement was made with a white light vertical scanning interferometry, also known as coherence scanning interferometry (ISO DIS 25178‐604). The results are analyzed and differences between the two types of cavity inserts materials are discussed. PMID:23447356

  12. Laser cladding of nickel-based alloy coatings on copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Rea, Edward; Deng, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The wear resistance of high-value copper components used in the metal casting, automotive, aerospace and electrical equipment industries can be improved by applying nickel (Ni)-based coatings through laser cladding. A high-power diode laser array providing continuous power levels up to 10 kilowatts with beam-shaping optics providing a rectangular focal region of various dimensions was used to deposit Ni-based alloy coatings with controlled thickness ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm in a single pass on copper (Cu) substrates. Slotted powder feeding plates with various discrete widths delivered uniform streams of powdered metal particles entrained in a carrier gas, matching the selected focal spot dimensions. To enhance laser beam coupling with the substrate and to avoid defects such as cracks, delamination and porosity, Cu substrates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C. The effect of heat input on microstructure of the cladding and extent of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Excessive heat input with longer interaction time increased dilution, porosity and expanded HAZ that significantly reduced the hardness of both the clad and the Cu substrates. Average microhardness of the Ni-C-B-Si-W alloy coating was 572 HV, which was almost 7 times greater than the hardness of the Cu substrate (84 HV).

  13. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fengtao; Cai, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated) asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C-C, C-N, C-O and other carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C-C and carbon-heteroatom bonds. PMID:26734106

  14. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated) asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C–C, C–N, C–O and other carbon–heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C–C and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:26734106

  15. COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of current knowledge of the distribution of copper in the environment and living things. Metabolism and the effects of copper in the biosphere are also considered. Copper compounds are common and widely distributed in nature. They are also extensively mined...

  16. Examination of an alternative method for the pyrometallurgical production of copper-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenk, J.; Hassan-Pour, S.; Spiess, P.; Friedrich, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper an alternative to the usual route for the production of copper-chromium alloys by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) followed by Vacuum Arc Remelting (VAR) is investigated. Therefore the HIP is replaced by an aluminothermic reduction. As oxidizing agents for this aluminothermic reduction (ATR) chromium oxide (Cr2O3) and copper oxide (CuO) are used. These oxidants are mixed in a stoichiometric relation with aluminium (Al) to get the following aluminothermic reactions going: As ATRs always are exothermic reductions, it is important to control the heat output of the reaction. A common simplification for the heat calculation in the field of ATR is the “Shemshushny Factor” (Sh-Factor). This factor determines the rate of energy input per reactant mass: To avoid a secondary melt phase after ATR, inline casting is used to directly obtain vacuum arc remeltable electrodes out of the liquid melt of the ATR. The second part of this work deals with the remelting of these electrodes via VAR. The first VAR trials aim at finding process parameters for remelting a copper-chromium ingot. As demixing is to avoid, it is necessary to control process parameters within a small range to obtain a shallow melt pool.

  17. EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-21

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  18. Facile synthesis of pentacle gold-copper alloy nanocrystals and their plasmonic and catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rong; Wang, You-Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zhantong; Liu, Gang; Zhou, Wei; Wen, Longping; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zeng, Jie; Hou, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    The combination of gold and copper is a good way to pull down the cost of gold and ameliorate the instability of copper. Through shape control, the synergy of these two metals can be better exploited. Here, we report an aqueous phase route to the synthesis of pentacle gold-copper alloy nanocrystals with fivefold twinning, the size of which can be tuned in the range from 45 to 200 nm. The growth is found to start from a decahedral core, followed by protrusion of branches along twinning planes. Pentacle products display strong localized surface plasmon resonance peaks in the near-infrared region. Under irradiation by an 808-nm laser, 70-nm pentacle nanocrystals exhibit a notable photothermal effect to kill 4T1 murine breast tumours established on BALB/c mice. In addition, 70-nm pentacle nanocrystals show better catalytic activity than conventional citrate-coated 5-nm Au nanoparticles towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol by sodium borohydride.

  19. Dissimilar laser welding of NiTi shape memory alloy and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z.; Panton, B.; Oliveira, J. P.; Han, A.; Zhou, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    This work is the first investigation of joining NiTi and copper. The successful Nd:YAG laser welding of NiTi to copper achieved in this work enables new methods of connecting shape memory alloys to electro-mechanical systems. Joints made with an optimum peak power of 2.2 kW accommodated pseudoelastic deformation of NiTi, proving their use with high strength actuators. Fracture occurred through the cross section of these defect-free joints. A lower peak power of 1.8 kW created weak joints with limited weld penetration of the copper sheet. This lack of bonding resulted in fracture occurring across the small disconnected joint areas. Joints made with a higher peak power of 2.6 kW had significant cracking in the fusion zone. Two regions of distinct Cu composition were found in the fusion zone, and cracking occurred at the interface between these regions because of their different physical properties. Failure initiated at this cracking and propagated through the fusion zone that had been embrittled by mixing with over 20 at.% Cu.

  20. Facile synthesis of pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals and their plasmonic and catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong; Wang, You-Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zhantong; Liu, Gang; Zhou, Wei; Wen, Longping; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zeng, Jie; Hou, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of gold and copper is a good way to pull down the cost of gold and ameliorate the instability of copper. Through shape control, the synergy of these two metals can be better exploited. Here, we report an aqueous phase route to the synthesis of pentacle gold–copper alloy nanocrystals with fivefold twinning, the size of which can be tuned in the range from 45 to 200 nm. The growth is found to start from a decahedral core, followed by protrusion of branches along twinning planes. Pentacle products display strong localized surface plasmon resonance peaks in the near-infrared region. Under irradiation by an 808-nm laser, 70-nm pentacle nanocrystals exhibit a notable photothermal effect to kill 4T1 murine breast tumours established on BALB/c mice. In addition, 70-nm pentacle nanocrystals show better catalytic activity than conventional citrate-coated 5-nm Au nanoparticles towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:24999674

  1. Evaluation of galvanic and stray current corrosion in 70/30 copper-nickel/alloy 625 piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.; Wheatfall, W.L.

    1995-12-01

    Because of the difficulty in assuring full-time electrical isolation of dissimilar metal piping, alternate methods of coping with the galvanic corrosion must be used. Use of short, electrically-isolated piping sections between the dissimilar metals can reduce galvanic corrosion by increasing the electrical resistance of the seawater path through which the galvanic current must flow. This objective of this project was to determine the magnitude and distribution of galvanic corrosion of 70/30 copper-nickel piping when coupled to alloy 625 piping, to determine the efficacy of various lengths of isolated separator pipes made of either alloy, and to determine the amount of stray current corrosion that could occur on the separator piping as a function of pipe material. The presence of separators of any length in 2-inch pipe lowered the amount of galvanic corrosion between copper-nickel and alloy 625, with a 50--60% reduction in metal loss using 3-ft (1-m) separators. A further reduction of another 30--50% was achieved by increasing separator length to 10-ft (3-m). The use of copper-nickel separators generally resulted in higher metal losses than the use of alloy 625 separators. The effect of the separator was maximum under low flow conditions, and alloy 625 separators are more effective than copper-nickel separators. Smaller diameter copper-nickel pipe experienced higher corrosion rates than pipe of equal diameter to the alloy 625 pipe to which they were coupled. Linearity of potential profile through the separators was an accurate indicator of whether stray current corrosion was taking place.

  2. In situ oxidation studies on /001/ copper-nickel alloy thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Rao, D. B.; Douglass, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies are reported of (001)-oriented single crystalline thin films of Cu-3%Ni, Cu-4.6%Ni, and Cu-50%Ni alloy which were prepared by vapor deposition onto (001) NaCl substrates and subsequently annealed at around 1100 K and oxidized at 725 K at low oxygen partial pressure. At all alloy concentrations, Cu2O and NiO nucleated and grew independently without the formation of mixed oxides. The shape and growth rates of Cu2O nuclei were similar to rates found earlier. For low-nickel alloy concentrations, the NiO nuclei were larger and the number density of NiO was less than that of Cu-50%Ni films for which the shape and growth rates of NiO were identical to those for pure nickel films. Phenomena involving a reduced induction period, surface precipitation, and through-thickness growth are also described. The results are consistent with previously established oxidation mechanisms for pure copper and pure nickel films.

  3. Rapid solidification of high-conductivity copper alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Theodore Atlas

    1989-01-01

    The main objective was to develop improved copper alloys of high strength and high thermal and electric conductivity. Chill block melt spinning was used to produce binary alloys of Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr, and ternary alloys of Cu-Cr-Ag. By quenching from the liquid state, up to 5 atomic percent of Cr and Zr were retained in metastable extended solid solution during the rapid solidification process. Eutectic solidification was avoided and the full strengthening benefits of the large volume fraction of precipitates were realized by subsequent aging treatment. The very low solid solubility of Cr and Zr in Cu result in a high conductivity Cu matrix strengthened by second phase precipitates. Tensile properties on as-cast and aged ribbons were measured at room and elevated temperatures. Precipitate coarsening of Cr in Cu was studied by changes in electrical resistance during aging. X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameter and the degree of supersaturation of the matrix. The microstructures were characterized by optical and electron microscopy.

  4. Advanced austenitic alloys for fossil power systems. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Cole, N.C.; Canonico, D.A.; Henry, J.F.

    1998-08-01

    In 1993, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ABB Combustion Engineering t examine advanced alloys for fossil power systems. Specifically, the use of advanced austenitic stainless steels for superheater/reheater construction in supercritical boilers was examined. The strength of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels was reviewed and compared to the strength and ductility of advanced austenitic stainless steels. The advanced stainless steels were found to retain their strength to very long times at temperatures where cold-worked standard grades of austenitic stainless steels became weak. Further, the steels exhibited better long-time stability than the stabilized 300 series stainless steels in either the annealed or cold worked conditions. Type 304H mill-annealed tubing was provided to ORNL for testing of base metal and butt welds. The tubing was found to fall within range of expected strength for 304H stainless steel. The composite 304/308 stainless steel was found to be stronger than typical for the weldment. Boiler tubing was removed from a commercial boiler for replacement by newer steels, but restraints imposed by the boiler owners did not permit the installation of the advanced steels, so a standard 32 stainless steel was used as a replacement. The T91 removed from the boiler was characterized.

  5. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 2: Zirconium-copper at 482, 538 and 593 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Zirconium-copper (1/2 hard) was tested in argon over the temperature range from 482 to 593 C in an evaluation of short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties was evaluated at 538 C and in general it was found that the yield and ultimate strengths increased as the strain rate was increased from 0.0004 to 0.01/sec. Ductility was essentially insensitive to strain rate in the case of the zirconium-copper alloy. Strain-rate and hold-time effects on the low cycle fatigue behavior of zirconium-copper were evaluated in argon at 538 C. These effects were as expected in that decreased fatigue life was noted as the strain rate decreased and when hold times were introduced into the tension portion of the strain-cycle. Hold times in compression were much less detrimental than hold times in tension.

  6. EFFECT OF THERMAL PROCESSES ON COPPER-TIN ALLOYS FOR ZINC GETTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Golyski, M.

    2013-11-01

    A contamination mitigation plan was initiated to address the discovery of radioactive zinc‐65 in a glovebox. A near term solution was developed, installation of heated filters in the glovebox piping. This solution is effective at retaining the zinc in the currently contaminated area, but the gamma emitting contaminant is still present in a system designed for tritium beta. A project was initiated to develop a solution to contain the {sup 65}Zn in the furnace module. Copper and bronze (a Cu/Sn alloy) were found to be candidate materials to combine with zinc‐65 vapor, using thermodynamic calculations. A series of binary Cu/Sn alloys were developed (after determining that commercial alloys were unacceptable), that were found to be effective traps of zinc vapor. The task described in this report was undertaken to determine if the bronze substrates would retain their zinc gettering capability after being exposed to simulated extraction conditions with oxidizing and reducing gases. Pure copper and three bronze alloys were prepared, exposed to varying oxidation conditions from 250 to 450{degree}C, then exposed to varying reduction conditions in He-H{sub 2} from 250-450{degree}C, and finally exposed to zinc vapor at 350{degree}C for four hours. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass change, and visual observation. It was observed that the as fabricated samples and the reduced samples all retained their zinc gettering capacity while samples in the "as-oxidized" condition exhibited losses in zinc gettering capacity. Over the range of conditions tested, i.e., composition, oxidation temperature, and reduction temperature, no particular sample composition appeared better. Samples reduced at 350{degree}C exhibited the greatest zinc capacity, although there were some testing anomalies associated with these samples. This work clearly demonstrated that the zinc gettering was not adversely

  7. Direct Metal Deposition of H13 Tool Steel on Copper Alloy Substrate: Parametric Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M. Khalid; Masood, S. H.; Brandt, Milan

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated interest in tribology and prototyping by the laser aided material deposition process. Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) enables the formation of a uniform clad by melting the powder to form desired component from metal powder materials. In this research H13 tool steel has been used to clad on a copper alloy substrate using DMD. The effects of laser parameters on the quality of DMD deposited clad have been investigated and acceptable processing parameters have been determined largely through trial-and-error approaches. The relationships between DMD process parameters and the product characteristics such as porosity, micro-cracks and microhardness have been analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), image analysis software (ImageJ) and microhardness tester. It has been found that DMD parameters such as laser power, powder mass flow rate, feed rate and focus size have an important role in clad quality and crack formation.

  8. Cell structure in cold worked and creep deformed phosphorus alloyed copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rui; Pettersson, Niklas; Martinsson, Åsa; Sandström, Rolf

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations on as-received, cold worked, as well as cold worked and creep tested phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) have been carried out to study the role of the cell structure. The cell size decreased linearly with increasing plastic deformation in tension. The flow stress in the tests could also be correlated to the cell size. The observed relation between the flow stress and the cell size was in excellent agreement with previously published results. The dense dislocation walls that appeared after cold work in tension is likely to be the main reason for the dramatic increase in creep strength. The dense dislocation walls act as barriers against dislocation motion and their presence also reduces the recovery rate due to an unbalanced dislocation content.

  9. Laser shock compression of copper and copper-aluminum alloys: The slip to twinning transition in high-strain-rate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Matthew Scott

    Laser shock experiments are a relatively new approach to achieving extreme strain rates and pressures at time durations of nanoseconds. Copper and copper-aluminum alloys (2 and 6 weight percent) were subjected to laser pulses with durations of nanoseconds and energies between 70 J to 300 J. These conditions resulted in strain rates from 107--109 s -1 and pressures between 10--60 GPa. A quantitative, predictive understanding of plastic deformation (slip and twinning) and failure (void nucleation and growth) under these extreme regimes was developed through experiments, characterization and analysis. The mechanistic understanding this provided successfully incorporates effects of pressure, crystal orientation and stacking fault energy. There were four thrusts to this research: (1) Two orientations, [001] and [1¯34] were examined under various experimental conditions providing quantitative insight into the deformation behavior as a function of orientation, stacking-fault energy, and distance from impacted surface. Advanced characterization techniques were used to examine the lattice behavior and defects that form as a result of shock compression. The experimentally observed slip-twinning transition was quantified experimentally. (2) The formation of defects during the movement of the shock front through these specimens was analytically studied. Loop formation is explained in terms of thermal activation in shock loading. The dynamic yield strength at the shock front was determined by using data obtained by dynamic x-ray diffraction. Dislocation densities were calculated as a function of shock pressure and compared to experimentally obtained values. (3) The slip-twinning transition pressure was calculated using a modified Mechanical Threshold Stress (NITS) constitutive description and the Swegle-Grady equation relating pressure to strain rate. These analytical results were compared to the experimental results. Orientation, stacking fault energy, grain size, and

  10. Processing and response of aluminum-lithium alloy composites reinforced with copper-coated silicon carbide particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Khor, K.A.; Cao, Y.; Boey, F.Y.C.; Hanada, K.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sudarshan, T.S.; Srivatsan, T.S.

    1998-02-01

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys have shown promise for demanding aerospace applications because of their light weight, high strength, and good damage tolerance characteristics. Additions of ceramic reinforcements to an aluminum-lithium alloy can significantly enhance specific strength, and specific modulus while concurrently offering acceptable performance at elevated temperatures. The processing and fabrication of aluminum-lithium alloy-based composites are hampered by particulate agglomeration or clustering and the existence of poor interfacial relationships between the reinforcing phase and the matrix. The problem of distribution of the reinforcing phase in the metal matrix can be alleviated by mechanical alloying. This article presents the results of a study aimed at addressing and improving the interfacial relationship between the host matrix and the reinforcing phase. Copper-coated silicon carbide particulates are introduced as the particulate reinforcing phase, and the resultant composite mixture is processed by conventional milling followed by hot pressing and hot extrusion. The influence of extrusion ration and extrusion temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was established. Post extrusion processing by hot isostatic pressing was also examined. Results reveal the increase in elastic modulus of the aluminum-lithium alloy matrix reinforced with copper-coated SiC to be significantly more than the mechanically alloyed Al-Li/SiC counterpart. This suggests the possible contributions of interfacial strengthening on mechanical response in direct comparison with a uniform distribution of the reinforcing ceramic particulates.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Nitinol-Copper Shape Memory Alloy Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongweerayoot, E.; Srituravanich, W.; Pimpin, A.

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of annealing conditions on nitinol (NiTi) characteristics and applies this knowledge to fabricate a NiTi-copper shape memory alloy bimorph actuator. The effect of the annealing conditions was investigated at various temperatures, i.e., 500, 600, and 650 °C, for 30 min. With the characterizations using x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry techniques, the results showed that annealing temperatures at 600 and 650 °C were able to appropriately form the crystalline structure of NiTi. However, at these high annealing temperatures, the oxide on a surface was unavoidable. In the fabrication of actuator, the annealing at 650 °C for 30 min was chosen, and it was performed at two pre-stressing conditions, i.e., straight and curved molds. From static and dynamic response experiments, the results suggested that the annealing temperature significantly affected the deflection of the actuator. On the other hand, the effect of pre-stressing conditions was relatively small. Furthermore, the micro gripper consisting of two NiTi-copper bimorph actuators successfully demonstrated for the viability of small object manipulation as the gripper was able to grasp and hold a small plastic ball with its weight of around 0.5 mg.

  12. Material Characterization of Electrodeposited Copper-Nickel Nanolaminated Alloy by SEM, EDS, and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Irene Cheryl

    Electrodeposited nanolaminated copper-nickel alloys (Cu-Ni) exhibit excellent mechanical properties due to their modulated structure and nanocrystalline microstructure. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize the composition, grain size, phases, and laminate structure of a nanolaminated deposit to explore structure-process-property relationships. The processing method of interest was pulse current electrodeposition of Cu-Ni a rotating disk electrode (RDE) with increased rotation speed during deposition of Cu-rich layers. Although copper content was enhanced in this way, it also caused macroscopic swirls in the deposit's surface, which were reflected microstructurally as Cu-rich streaks, non-planar layers, and other inhomogeneous morphology in the nanolaminate coating. Bulk composition of the nanolaminate was calculated from XRD spectra as being over 67wt%Ni overall, with over 91wt% Ni in Ni-rich layers and over 43wt% Ni in Cu-rich layers. EDS data of the same deposit differed significantly from these values, suggesting an overall composition closer to 55 wt% Ni, with a Ni-rich layer composition of 81 wt% Ni and 8.4 wt% Ni in the Cu-rich layers. Grain sizes of 15.8--22.3 nm were calculated for the nanolaminated deposit compared to 13--19 nm grains in a monolithic Ni-rich deposit of Cu-Ni.

  13. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  14. New Screening Test Developed for the Blanching Resistance of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's extensive efforts towards more efficient, safer, and more affordable space transportation include the development of new thrust-cell liner materials with improved capabilities and longer lives. For rocket engines fueled with liquid hydrogen, an important metric of liner performance is resistance to blanching, a phenomenon of localized wastage by cycles of oxidation-reduction due to local imbalance in the oxygen-fuel ratio. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine combustion chamber, a Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr alloy (NARloy-Z) is degraded in service by blanching. Heretofore, evaluating a liner material for blanching resistance involved elaborate and expensive hot-fire tests performed on rocket test stands. To simplify that evaluation, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a screening test that uses simple, in situ oxidation-reduction cycling in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The principle behind this test is that resistance to oxidation or to the reduction of oxide, or both, implies resistance to blanching. Using this test as a preliminary tool to screen alloys for blanching resistance can improve reliability and save time and money. In this test a small polished coupon is hung in a TGA furnace at the desired (service) temperature. Oxidizing and reducing gases are introduced cyclically, in programmed amounts. Cycle durations are chosen by calibration, such that all copper oxides formed by oxidation are fully reduced in the next reduction interval. The sample weight is continuously acquired by the TGA as usual.

  15. New Cu(TiBN x ) copper alloy films for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chon-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, I explore a new type of copper alloy, Cu(TiBN x ), films by cosputtering Cu and TiB within an Ar/N2 gas atmosphere on Si substrates. The films are then annealed for 1 h in a vacuum environment at temperatures up to 700 °C. The annealed films exhibit not only excellent thermal stability and low resistivity but also little leakage current and strong adhesion to the substrates while no Cu/Si interfacial interactions are apparent. Within a Sn/Cu(TiBN x )/Si structure at 200 °C, the new alloy exhibits a minute dissolution rate, which is lower than that of pure Cu by at least one order of magnitude. Furthermore, the new alloy’s consumption rate is comparable to that of Ni commonly used in solder joints. The new films appear suitable for some industrial applications, such as barrierless Si metallization and new wetting and diffusion barrier layers required in flip-chip solder joints.

  16. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2004-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the first year of research funding from DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2004. Composite membranes, consisting of a thin Pd alloy film supported on a porous substrate have been investigated as a means of reducing the membrane cost and improving H{sub 2} flux. An electroless plating technique was utilized to deposit subsequent layers of palladium and copper over zirconia and alumina-based microfilters. The composite membranes thus made were annealed and tested at temperatures ranging from 250 to 500 C, under very high feed pressures (up to 450 psig) using pure gases and gaseous mixtures containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, with the purpose of determining the effects these variables had on the H{sub 2} permeation rate, selectivity and percent recovery. The inhibition caused by CO/CO{sub 2} gases on a 7 {micro}m thick Pd-Cu composite membrane was less than 17% over a wide range of compositions at 350 C. H{sub 2}S caused a strong inhibition of the H{sub 2} flux of the same Pd-Cu composite membrane, which is accentuated at levels of 100 ppm or higher. The membrane was exposed to 50 ppm three times without permanent damage. At higher H{sub 2}S levels, above 100 ppm the membrane suffered some physical degradation and its performances was severely affected. The use of sweep gases improved the hydrogen flux and recovery of a Pd-Cu composite membrane. Recently, we have been able to dramatically reduce the thickness of these Pd alloy membranes to approximately one micron. This is significant because at this thickness, it is the cost of the porous support that controls the materials cost of a composite Pd alloy membrane, not the palladium inventory. Very recent results show that the productivity of our membranes is very high, essentially meeting the DOE pure hydrogen flux target value set by the DOE Hydrogen

  17. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  18. Forming a perfect cubic texture in thin copper-yttrium alloy strips during cold rolling and annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Rodionov, D. P.; Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Akshentsev, Yu. N.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Suaridze, T. R.

    2016-03-01

    The structure of strips produced from the Cu-1 wt % Y binary alloy using cold deformation by rolling to the degree of deformation of 99%, followed by recrystallization annealing, as well as the process of texture formation in these strips, is studied. The possibility of forming a perfect cubic texture in a thin strip made of a binary yttrium-modified copper-based alloy has been shown in principle, which opens the prospect of the use of this alloy to produce substrates for strip high-temperature superconductors of the second generation. The optimum conditions of annealing have been determined, which make it possible to form a perfect biaxial texture in the Cu-1 wt % Y alloy with a content of cubic grains {001}<100> ± 10° on the surface of the textured strip of over 95%.

  19. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  20. Effects of specimen width and rolling direction on the mechanical properties of beryllium copper alloy C17200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Liu, Z. R.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the research was to study the effects of specimen width and rolling direction of beryllium copper alloy, C17200, on the mechanical properties of yield strength and Young's modulus. The experimental results showed that the reduction of the specimen width from 12.5 mm to 2.5 mm did not affect the yield strength but reduced the Young's modulus by 4%. Also, the change of rolling direction affected both the yield strength and the Young's modulus. When the tension direction is parallel to the rolling direction, the maximum yield strength was obtained. The results can help predict the behavior of small-scale beryllium copper products more accurately.

  1. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative functionalization via a single electron transfer (SET) process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Tang, Conghui; Jiao, Ning

    2012-05-01

    Copper salts have been developed as versatile catalysts for oxidative coupling reactions in organic synthesis. During these processes, Cu-catalysts are often proposed to serve as a one-electron oxidant to promote the single-electron transfer process. Recently, the transition-metal catalyzed direct dehydrogenative transformation has attracted considerable attention. This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative functionalization via a single electron transfer (SET) process achieving C-C, C-N, C-O, C-halogen atoms, C-P, and N-N bond formation. PMID:22349590

  2. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report for the period January through December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1997-03-01

    Centrifugal casting of Copper alloys containing graphite particles established the feasibility of making hollow cylindrical castings. In theses castings, the graphite particles are segregated to the inner periphery making them well suited for bearing applications because of the lubricity of the graphite particles. The recovery of graphite is found to be around 90%. Chemical analysis shows that the average concentration of graphite particles near the inner periphery is 13 vol.% (3.5 wt.%) and 16.3 vol.% (4.54 wt.%) for castings made from melts originally containing 7 vol.% (2 wt.%) and 13 vol.% (3.5 wt. %) graphite particles, respectively. Hardness tests show that as the volume fraction of graphite particles increases, the hardness values in the graphite rich zone is found to be widely scattered. The results indicate that it is feasible to centrifugally cast copper alloys containing dispersed graphite particles to produce cylindrical components with graphite rich inner periphery for bearing and plumbing applications.

  3. Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Triazole Derivatives on Copper-Nickel Alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.; Jiang, S. L.; Liu, X.; Ma, A. L.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the performance of three triazole derivatives with different molecular structures as corrosion inhibitors for the copper-nickel alloy CuNi 90/10 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Inhibition behavior was systematically determined through electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, adsorption behavior and the inhibition mechanism were investigated via quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic simulation. Experimental results indicate that the three inhibitors with triazole rings and heteroatoms exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition capabilities on the copper-nickel alloy surface through physisorption and chemisorption. In particular, 3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole showed the best inhibition capability according to the concentration ranges considered in the experiments. The results of quantum chemical calculation agreed with the experimental findings.

  4. Effect of carbon on copper precipitation in deformed Fe-based alloys studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Schut, H.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2013-06-01

    The role of deformation-induced defects and carbon addition on the copper precipitation during aging at 550 °C is investigated in high-purity Fe-Cu-B-N-C alloy samples by Coincidence Doppler Broadening. In samples with 0% and 8% cold pre-strain, the influence of tensile pre-deformation on the precipitation kinetics of copper is studied. The deformation-induced defects are found to enhance the Cu precipitation kinetics. A sharp reduction in open volume defects is accompanied with a strong increase of Cu signature during the initial stage of aging, implying that the open defects (mainly dislocations) act as nucleation sites for Cu precipitates. A comparison of the time evolution of S-W plots between Fe-Cu, Fe-Cu-B-N, and Fe-Cu-B-N-C alloys indicates that the addition of carbon does not alter the Cu precipitation mechanism but decelerates the kinetics.

  5. X-ray Microscopy Studies of Electromigration in Advanced Copper Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, G.; Rudolph, S.; Heim, S.; Rehbein, S.; Guttmann, P.

    2006-02-07

    X-rays have the advantage that they penetrate samples which are several micrometers thick without significant sample damage, and that they provide a chemical image contrast between different dielectric layers of the Cu/low-k on-chip interconnect stack. Therefore, x-ray microscopy is an ideal tool for quantitative 3-D investigations of void dynamics with high spatial resolution of 20 nm. Using the BESSY full-field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), we performed electromigration studies of advanced backend-of-line (BEoL) stacks of high-performance microprocessors containing copper interconnects and low-k materials. We observed void movement along the top copper/dielectric (SiNx) interface which is found to be the main pathway for electromigration-induced atomic copper transport.

  6. X-ray Microscopy Studies of Electromigration in Advanced Copper Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, G.; Guttmann, P.; Rudolph, S.; Heim, S.; Rehbein, S.; Meyer, M. A.; Zschech, E.

    2006-02-01

    X-rays have the advantage that they penetrate samples which are several micrometers thick without significant sample damage, and that they provide a chemical image contrast between different dielectric layers of the Cu/low-k on-chip interconnect stack. Therefore, x-ray microscopy is an ideal tool for quantitative 3-D investigations of void dynamics with high spatial resolution of 20 nm. Using the BESSY full-field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), we performed electromigration studies of advanced backend-of-line (BEoL) stacks of high-performance microprocessors containing copper interconnects and low-k materials. We observed void movement along the top copper/dielectric (SiNx) interface which is found to be the main pathway for electromigration-induced atomic copper transport.

  7. Fabrication of copper nanoparticles: advances in synthesis, morphology control, and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Benavente, Eglantina; Lozano, Harold; González, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    Metal nanoparticles have attracted great interest particularly because of the size dependence of physical and chemical properties and its enormous technological potential. Although most pioneering advancements refers to gold and silver, more recently there is growing interest in nanoparticles of copper, mostly due to its relatively low cost, which could allow the use of these small metal objects in large-scale nanotechnology applications, for example, antiseptics materials and metallic inks. However, the manufacture of copper nanoparticles stable in air with controlled size and shape has been a major challenge because of the relatively high reactivity of this element. Great efforts in getting the basic knowledge and synthesis know-how has gone into finding better ways to produce particles protected against oxidation and selfaggregation under normal conditions. In this review article, we briefly discuss a number of selected papers and recent patents on procedures and other issues related to the fabrication of copper nanoparticles. PMID:22974429

  8. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  9. Textured tape substrates from binary copper alloys with vanadium and yttrium for the epitaxial deposition of buffer and superconducting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Rodionov, D. P.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Suaridze, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    The structure of tapes of binary Cu-0.6 wt % V and Cu-1 wt % Y alloys and texturing process of them in the course of cold deformation by rolling to 99% and subsequent recrystallizing annealing have been studied. The possibility of achieving the perfect cube texture in thin tapes made from binary copper-based alloys with vanadium and yttrium additions has in principle been shown. This opens the prospect of using them as substrates when manufacturing tapes of second-generation high-temperature superconductors. Optimum annealing conditions for the studied alloys have been determined, which have made it possible to produce the perfect biaxial texture with a content of cube {001}<100> ± 10° grains on the surfaces of textured tapes of more than 95%.

  10. The deformation texture of rolled ribbons of copper-based alloys as a condition of producing a sharp cubic texture upon recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervas'eva, I. V.; Rodionov, D. P.; Khlebnikova, Yu. V.

    2015-07-01

    It has been shown that a specific quantitative relationship of main textural components after cold deformation (by rolling to 98.6-99%) of copper alloys determines the possibility of producing a sharp cubic texture in the ribbons after subsequent recrystallization annealing. The binary alloys of copper with nickel (up to 40 at %) and of copper with additions of iron and chromium correspond to this criterion. It has been found that the optimum deformation texture can be created in some ternary copper-nickel alloys with addition of Cr, Fe or Mn. It has been shown that the analysis of the component composition of deformation textures using the orientation distribution function can yield more precise predictions than the stacking fault energy values, as well as make it possible to obtain a cubic texture upon subsequent recrystallization.

  11. Advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloys for LWR fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Application of advanced oxidation-resistant iron alloys as light water reactor fuel cladding is proposed. The motivations are based on specific limitations associated with zirconium alloys, currently used as fuel cladding, under design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident scenarios. Using a simplified methodology, gains in safety margins under severe accidents upon transition to advanced oxidation-resistant iron alloys as fuel cladding are showcased. Oxidation behavior, mechanical properties, and irradiation effects of advanced iron alloys are briefly reviewed and compared to zirconium alloys as well as historic austenitic stainless steel cladding materials. Neutronic characteristics of iron-alloy-clad fuel bundles are determined and fed into a simple economic model to estimate the impact on nuclear electricity production cost. Prior experience with steel cladding is combined with the current understanding of the mechanical properties and irradiation behavior of advanced iron alloys to identify a combination of cladding thickness reduction and fuel enrichment increase (∼0.5%) as an efficient route to offset any penalties in cycle length, due to higher neutron absorption in the iron alloy cladding, with modest impact on the economics.

  12. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  13. The effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the final irradiation experiment in a series of screening experiments aimed at investigating the effects of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on irradiated copper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment. The post-irradiation tests at 100 C revealed the greatest loss of ductility occurred in the CuCrZr alloys, irrespective of the pre-irradiation heat treatment, with the uniform elongation dropping to levels of less than 1.5%. The yield and ultimate strengths for all of the individual heat treated samples increased substantially after irradiation. The same trend was observed for the CuNiBe alloys, which overall exhibited a factor of 3 higher uniform elongation after irradiation with almost double the strength. In both alloys irradiation-induced precipitation lead to a large increase in the strength of the solution annealed specimens with a noticeable decrease in uniform elongation. The Al25 alloy also experienced an increase in the overall strength of the alloy after irradiation, accompanied by approximately a 50% decrease in the uniform and total elongation. The additional bakeout treatments given to the CuCrZr and CuNiBe before irradiation served to increase the strength, but in terms of the ductility no improvement or degradation resulted from the additional thermal exposure. The results of this experiment confirm that the al25 possesses the most resistant microstructure to thermal and irradiation-induced changes, while the competing effects of ballistic dissolution and reprecipitation lead to important changes in the two precipitation strengthened alloys. This study and others have repeatedly shown that these materials can only be used if the very low uniform elongation (1% or less) can be accounted for in the design since pre-irradiation thermal processing cannot mitigate the irradiation embrittlement.

  14. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  15. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper in nickel-base alloys with various chemical modifiers*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Shiue, Chia-Chann; Chang, Shiow-Ing

    1997-07-01

    The analytical characteristics of copper in nickel-base alloys have been investigated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Deuterium background correction was employed. The effects of various chemical modifiers on the analysis of copper were investigated. Organic modifiers which included 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino-phenol) (Br-PADAP), ammonium citrate, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-naphthol, 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and Triton X-100 were studied. Inorganic modifiers palladium nitrate, magnesium nitrate, aluminum chloride, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen peroxide and potassium nitrate were also applied in this work. In addition, zirconium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide precipitation methods have also been studied. Interference effects were effectively reduced with Br-PADAP modifier. Aqueous standards were used to construct the calibration curves. The detection limit was 1.9 pg. Standard reference materials of nickel-base alloys were used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method. The copper contents determined with the proposed method agreed closely with the certified values of the reference materials. The recoveries were within the range 90-100% with relative standard deviation of less than 10%. Good precision was obtained.

  16. Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Shingledecker, John P; Brady, Michael P; Maziasz, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Materials selection for thin-walled recuperators has been extensively investigated over the past decade. In the latest generation of recuperated turbine engines, type 347 stainless steel has been replaced by higher alloyed steels and Ni-base chromia-forming alloys. However, high (linear) rates of chromia evaporation in exhaust gas fundamentally limits the oxidation lifetime of these chromia-forming alloys. One solution is to use alumina-forming alloys that are more resistant to this environment. The lower scale growth kinetics and resistance to evaporation in the presence of water vapor suggests an order of magnitude increase in lifetime for alumina-forming alloys. A significant problem with this strategy was the large drop in creep strength with the addition of sufficient Al to form an external alumina scale. However, new Fe-base austenitic compositions have been developed with sufficient strength for this application above 700 C.

  17. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  18. SU-E-T-10: A Dosimetric Comparison of Copper to Lead-Alloy Apertures for Electron Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusk, B; Hogstrom, K; Gibbons, J; Carver, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences of copper compared to conventional lead-alloy apertures for electron beam therapy. Methods: Copper apertures were manufactured by .decimal, Inc. and matching lead-alloy, Cerrobend, apertures were constructed for 32 square field sizes (2×2 – 20×20 cm{sup 2}) for five applicator sizes (6×6–25×25 cm{sup 2}). Percent depth-dose and off-axis-dose profiles were measured using an electron diode in water with copper and Cerrobend apertures for a subset of aperture sizes (6×6, 10×10, 25×25 cm{sup 2}) and energies (6, 12, 20 MeV). Dose outputs were measured for all field size-aperture combinations and available energies (6–20 MeV). Measurements were taken at 100 and 110 cm SSDs. Using this data, 2D planar absolute dose distributions were constructed and compared. Passing criteria were ±2% of maximum dose or 1-mm distance-to-agreement for 99% of points. Results: A gamma analysis of the beam dosimetry showed 93 of 96 aperture size, applicator, energy, and SSD combinations passed the 2%/1mm criteria. Failures were found for small field size-large applicator combinations at 20 MeV and 100-cm SSD. Copper apertures showed a decrease in bremsstrahlung production due to copper's lower atomic number compared to Cerrobend (greatest difference was 2.5% at 20 MeV). This effect was most prominent at the highest energies with large amounts of shielding material present (small field size-large applicator). Also, an increase in electrons scattered from the collimator edge of copper compared to Cerrobend resulted in an increased dose at the field edge for copper at shallow depths (greatest increase was 1% at 20 MeV). Conclusion: Apertures for field sizes ≥6×6 cm{sup 2} at any energy, or for small fields (≤4×4 cm{sup 2}) at energies <20 MeV, showed dosimetric differences less than 2%/1mm for more than 99% of points. All field size-applicator size-energy combinations passed 3%/1mm criteria for 100% of points. Work partially funded

  19. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  20. A study of aluminum-lithium alloys: Strength profile in 2090 aluminum-lithium-copper-magnesium-zirconium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Soepriyanto, S.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum-containing lithium alloys are undergoing intensive development as replacements for conventional aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 in aircraft structural applications. Lithium is a very reactive metal so that an elevated temperature heat treatments can cause lithium diffusion to the surface and reaction with the atmosphere. Solid state diffusion of lithium within the 2090 alloy and subsequent surface oxidation during solution heat treatment were investigated. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses were used to evaluate the alloy's thermal oxidation behavior. A mathematical model based on simultaneous diffusion and surface oxidation of lithium was developed to predict lithium concentration profiles across the specimen. Agreement was obtained between the predicted lithium concentration profiles and their corresponding experimental results. Microhardness and yield strength profiles were found also to follow the corresponding lithium concentration profiles. Various heat treatment procedures were studied on this 2090 alloy to give a greater understanding of precipitate strengthening.

  1. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    SciTech Connect

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  2. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum-copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum-copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C-C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  3. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum-copper alloys at the single-atom limit.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Felicia R; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum-copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C-C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions. PMID:26449766

  4. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    PubMed Central

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions. PMID:26449766

  5. Effect of copper addition at a rate of 4% weight on the machininability of ZA-21A1 cast alloy by CNC milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqawabah, S. M. A.; Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Little work is published on the effect of copper addition to zinc-aluminium ZA-21Al alloy on its surface quality machined by milling. In this paper, the effect of copper addition at a rate 4 % weight to the ZA-21Al alloy on its hardness and surface quality is investigated. It was found that the addition of 4% Cu resulted in 18.3% enhancement in microhardness whereas the mechanical characteristics were reduced (softening) about 14.5% at 0.2% strain. It was found that the best surface finish for this alloy before copper addition ZA21 was achieved at a feed rate of 100 mm/min and 1.25 mm depth of cut whereas the best surface finish for ZA21-4% Cu was achieved at feed rate 250 mm/min, 1600 rpm cutting velocity and 1.25 mm depth of cut.

  6. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    PubMed Central

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. PMID:26568442

  7. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials.

  8. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  9. An exploratory study of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-30 copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened alloy has been produced through minor additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. Comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the Zr-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  10. Influence of Nano-Alumina and Micro-Size Copper on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnesium Alloys AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau Bosley Nguyen, Quy; Khin Tun, Sandar; Gupta, Manoj

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, magnesium composites are synthesized through the addition of nano-alumina and micron size copper particulates in AZ31 magnesium alloy using the technique of disintegrated melt deposition. The simultaneous addition of Cu and nano-alumina particulates led to an overall improvement in physical, microstructural characteristics and mechanical response of AZ31. Small size and reasonably distributed second phases were formed. The 0.2% yield strength increased from 180 to 300 MPa (67%), while the ductility increased by almost 24%. The overall tensile properties assessed in terms of work of fracture improved by 66%. An attempt is made to correlate the tensile response of composites with their microstructural characteristics. The results suggest that these alloy composites have significant potential in diverse and wider engineering applications.

  11. Superthermostability of nanoscale TIC-reinforced copper alloys manufactured by a two-step ball-milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenglin; Li, Yunping; Xu, Xiandong; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Yamanaka, Kenta; Bian, Huakang; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    A Cu-TiC alloy, with nanoscale TiC particles highly dispersed in the submicron-grained Cu matrix, was manufactured by a self-developed two-step ball-milling process on Cu, Ti and C powders. The thermostability of the composite was evaluated by high-temperature isothermal annealing treatments, with temperatures ranging from 727 to 1273 K. The semicoherent nanoscale TiC particles with Cu matrix, mainly located along the grain boundaries, were found to exhibit the promising trait of blocking grain boundary migrations, which leads to a super-stabilized microstructures up to approximately the melting point of copper (1223 K). Furthermore, the Cu-TiC alloys after annealing at 1323 K showed a slight decrease in Vickers hardness as well as the duplex microstructure due to selective grain growth, which were discussed in terms of hardness contributions from various mechanisms.

  12. Recent advances in the deformation processing of titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamirisakandala, S.; Bhat, R. B.; Vedam, B. V.

    2003-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) alloys are special-purpose materials used for several critical applications in aerospace as well as non-aerospace industries, and extensive deformation processing is necessary to shape-form these materials, which poses many challenges due to the microstructural complexities. Some of the recent developments in the deformation processing of Ti alloys and usefulness of integrating the material behavior information with simulation schemes while designing and optimizing manufacturing process schedules are discussed in this paper. Discussions are primarily focused on the most important alloy, Ti-6Al-4V and on developing a clear understanding on the influence of key parameters (e.g., oxygen content, starting microstructure, temperature, and strain rate) on the deformation behavior during hot working. These studies are very useful not only for obtaining controlled microstructures but also to design complex multi-step processing sequences to produce defect-free components. Strain-induced porosity (SIP) has been a serious problem during titanium alloy processing, and improved scientific understanding helps in seeking elegant solutions to avoid SIP. A novel high-speed processing technique for microstructural conversion in titanium has been described, which provides several benefits over the conventional slow-speed practices. The hot working behavior of some of the affordable α+β and β titanium alloys being developed recently—namely, Ti-5.5Al-1Fe, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al, Ti-6.8Mo-4.5Fe-1.5Al, and Ti-10V-4.5Fe-1.5Al—has been analyzed, and the usefulness of the processing maps in optimizing the process parameters and design of hot working schedules in these alloys is demonstrated. Titanium alloys modified with small additions of boron are emerging as potential candidates for replacing structural components requiring high specific strength and stiffness. Efforts to understand the microstructural mechanisms during deformation processing of Ti-B alloys and the issues

  13. Gold-copper nanostars as photo-thermal agents: synthesis and advanced electron microscopy characterization.

    PubMed

    Bazán-Díaz, Lourdes; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Romeu, David; Reyes-Gasga, José; Herrera-Becerra, Raúl; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Guisbiers, Grégory

    2015-12-28

    Nanoalloys have emerged as multi-functional nanoparticles with applications in biomedicine and catalysis. This work reports the efficient production and the advanced transmission electron microscopy characterization of gold-copper pentagonal nanostars. The morphology of the branches is controlled by the adequate choice of the capping agent. When oleylamine is used rounded nanostars are produced, while pointed nanostars are obtained by using hexadecylamine. Both types of nanostars were proved to be thermally stable and could therefore be used as therapeutic agents in photo-thermal therapies as confirmed by the near-infrared absorption spectra. PMID:26602429

  14. [Determination of copper alloy hardness, in original form and after casting as a function of casting techniques].

    PubMed

    Bombonatti, P E; de Barros, L E; Scaranelo, R M; Pellizzer, A J; Feitosa, S A

    1990-01-01

    It was evaluated the Vickers hardness of five high-copper casting alloys, in their original package form and after casting, according to the casting method used. That way, ten ingots, supplied by the manufacturers of each alloy, were included in self-curing acrylic resin, polished, numerated and submitted to Vickers hardness test at load of 200 g during 30 seconds. Afterwards the numerated ingots were removed from the acrylic resin and five of those were cast in an electrical casting machine and the other five in a centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. The specimens obtained were included in self-curing acrylic resin, polished and submitted to Vickers hardness test. As a result it was verified that there is a variation of hardness among the alloys tested, and the use of the electrical casting machine produced lower hardness values than those produced when used the centrifugal casting machine with an air/gas torch. Also, there is a decrease of hardness of the cast alloys when they are tested in their original form and after casting. PMID:2099551

  15. Study of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and enzymatic bio-Fenton process-mediated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, U; Hocheng, H

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the corrosion behavior of the copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans) and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. In both the cases ferric ions played an important role in weight loss and thereby to carry out the corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy. A corrosion rate of 0.6 (±0.008), 2.11 (±0.05), 3.69 (±0.26), 0.7 (±0.006) and 0.08 (±0.002) mm/year was obtained in 72 h using 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, A. ferrooxidans culture supernatant, A. ferrooxidans cells, GOx enzyme and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution respectively. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that a variable extent of corrosion was caused by 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells. An arithmetic average surface roughness (Ra) of 174.78 nm was observed for the control work-piece using optical profilometer. The change in Ra was observed with the treatment of the Cu-Ni alloy using various systems. The Ra for 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells was 374.54, 607.32 and 799.48 nm, respectively, after 24 h. These results suggest that A. ferrooxidans cells were responsible for more corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy than other systems used. PMID:26930447

  16. Investigation of the influence of grain boundary chemistry, test temperatures, and strain rate on the fracture behavior of ITER copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leedy, K.; Stubbins, J.F.; Krus, D.

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanical behavior at elevated temperatures (>200{degrees}C) of the various copper alloys being considered for use in the ITER first wall, divertor, and limiter, a collaborative study has been initiated by the University of Illinois and PNNL with two industrial producers of copper alloys, Brush Wellman and OMG Americas. Details of the experimental matrix and test plans have been finalized and the appropriate specimens have already been fabricated and delivered to the University of Illinois and PNNL for testing and analysis. The experimental matrix and testing details are described in this report.

  17. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  18. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  19. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary The copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I) alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC’s catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I) catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates. PMID:24367437

  20. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Berg, Regina; Straub, Bernd F

    2013-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I) alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC's catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I) catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates. PMID:24367437

  1. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  2. Polyhydrido Copper Clusters: Synthetic Advances, Structural Diversity, and Nanocluster-to-Nanoparticle Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Rajendra S; van Zyl, Werner E; Liu, C W

    2016-01-19

    Metal hydride clusters have historically been studied to unravel their aesthetically pleasing molecular structures and interesting properties, especially toward hydrogen related applications. Central to this work is the hydride ligand, H¯, the smallest closed-shell spherical anion known. Two new developments in polyhydrido nanocluster chemistry include the determination of heretofore unknown hydride coordination modes and novel structural constructs, and conversion from the molecular entities to rhombus-shaped copper nanoparticles (CuNPs). These advances, together with hydrogen evolution and catalysis, have provided both experimentalists and theorists with a rich scientific directive to further explore. The isolation of hexameric [{(Ph3P)CuH}6] (Stryker reagent) could be regarded as the springboard for the recent emergence of polyhydrido copper cluster chemistry due to its utilization in a variety of organic chemical transformations. The stability of clusters of various nuclearity was improved through phosphine, pyridine, and carbene type ligands. Our focus lies with the isolation of novel copper (poly)hydride clusters using mostly the phosphor-1,1-dithiolato type ligands. We found such chalcogen-stabilized clusters to be exceptionally air and moisture stable over a wide range of nuclearities (Cu7 to Cu32). In this Account, we (i) report on state-of-the-art copper hydride cluster chemistry, especially with regards to the diverse and novel structural types generally, and newly discovered hydride coordination modes in particular, (ii) demonstrate the indispensable power of neutron diffraction for the unambiguous assignment and location of hydride ligand(s) within a cluster, and (iii) prove unique transformations that can occur not only between well characterized high nuclearity clusters, but also how such clusters can transform to uniquely shaped nanoparticles of several nanometers in diameter through copper hydride reduction. The increase in the number of low- to

  3. Advances in iridium alloy processing in FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Heestand, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    A new process for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy blanks is being evaluated and optimized. The alloy is prepared by electron-beam (EB) melting of Ir-0.3% W powder compacts followed by doping with aluminum and thorium by arc melting. Drop-cast alloy rod segments are EB welded together into an electrode that is arc melted to produce an ingot for extrusion and subsequent sheet rolling and blanking. Initial results showed rejections for ultrasonic indications for alloy blanks fabricated by this process to be very low. Subsequently, some ingots have exhibited delaminations in the sheet, leading to blank rejection rates similar to that obtained in the standard process. The occurrence of ultrasonic indications in the blanks are now shown to be associated with the presence of subsurface flaws in the arc-melted ingot that are not healed during extrusion or the subsequent rolling of the sheet. There is substantial evidence indicating that the occurrence of surface and subsurface flaws in the ingots are exacerbated by the relatively small clearances between the electrode and the side wall of the 51-mm-diam mold. These results obtained from experimental melts, with both stainless steel and scrap iridium alloy materials, have led to a recommendation for arc melting in a large 63-mm-diam mold. The fabrication of blanks from this larger diameter ingot is under way. The efficiency of iridium material utilization in the new process is also discussed. 2 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in advanced alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yanwen; Jin, Ke; Xue, Haizhou; Lu, Chenyang; Olsen, Raina J.; Beland, Laurent K.; Ullah, Mohammad W.; Zhao, Shijun; Bei, Hongbin; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; et al

    2016-08-01

    We report that historically, alloy development with better radiation performance has been focused on traditional alloys with one or two principal element(s) and minor alloying elements, where enhanced radiation resistance depends on microstructural or nanoscale features to mitigate displacement damage. In sharp contrast to traditional alloys, recent advances of single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs) have opened up new frontiers in materials research. In these alloys, a random arrangement of multiple elemental species on a crystalline lattice results in disordered local chemical environments and unique site-to-site lattice distortions. Based on closely integrated computational and experimental studies using a novel setmore » of SP-CSAs in a face-centered cubic structure, we have explicitly demonstrated that increasing chemical disorder can lead to a substantial reduction in electron mean free paths, as well as electrical and thermal conductivity, which results in slower heat dissipation in SP-CSAs. The chemical disorder also has a significant impact on defect evolution under ion irradiation. Considerable improvement in radiation resistance is observed with increasing chemical disorder at electronic and atomic levels. Finally, the insights into defect dynamics may provide a basis for understanding elemental effects on evolution of radiation damage in irradiated materials and may inspire new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for advanced energy systems.« less

  5. Diffusion bonding of an aluminum-copper alloy reinforced with silicon carbide particles (AA2014/SiC/13p) using metallic interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Urena, A.; Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Escalera, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    In this work, the application of solid state diffusion bonding to a SiC particulate reinforced aluminium-copper alloy (AA2014) has been studied. The use of metallic interlayers such as an aluminum-lithium alloy and pure silver, has been tested. Bonding interfaces were microstructural characterized using scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopies (TEM). Joint strengths were evaluated by shear mechanical tests, completed with fractographic studies to determine the failure mechanisms of each kind of joint.

  6. Gold-copper nanostars as photo-thermal agents: synthesis and advanced electron microscopy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazán-Díaz, Lourdes; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Velázquez-Salazar, J. Jesús; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Romeu, David; Reyes-Gasga, José; Herrera-Becerra, Raúl; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Guisbiers, Grégory

    2015-12-01

    Nanoalloys have emerged as multi-functional nanoparticles with applications in biomedicine and catalysis. This work reports the efficient production and the advanced transmission electron microscopy characterization of gold-copper pentagonal nanostars. The morphology of the branches is controlled by the adequate choice of the capping agent. When oleylamine is used rounded nanostars are produced, while pointed nanostars are obtained by using hexadecylamine. Both types of nanostars were proved to be thermally stable and could therefore be used as therapeutic agents in photo-thermal therapies as confirmed by the near-infrared absorption spectra.Nanoalloys have emerged as multi-functional nanoparticles with applications in biomedicine and catalysis. This work reports the efficient production and the advanced transmission electron microscopy characterization of gold-copper pentagonal nanostars. The morphology of the branches is controlled by the adequate choice of the capping agent. When oleylamine is used rounded nanostars are produced, while pointed nanostars are obtained by using hexadecylamine. Both types of nanostars were proved to be thermally stable and could therefore be used as therapeutic agents in photo-thermal therapies as confirmed by the near-infrared absorption spectra. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06491k

  7. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  8. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  9. Effects of thermal annealing and ion irradiation on the properties and microstructures of copper alloys. [AMZIRC(Cu-Zr) and AMAX-MZC(Cu-Cr-Zr-Mg)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    High strength, high conductivity copper alloys have recently been developed for a variety of technologically challenging applications, including proposed nuclear fusion reactors. The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of high temperatures and radiation levels on the microstructural stability of two commercial high-strength, high conductivity copper alloys, AMZIRC (Cu-Zr) and AMAX-MZC (Cu-Cr-Zr-Mg). The recrystallization temperature of both AMZIRC and AMAX-MZC was measured to be 475/sup 0/C for a 1 hour anneal, and was estimated to be 320/sup 0/C for a 20 year anneal which corresponds to a recrystallization energy of 3.0 eV. The yield strength of AMZIRC and AMAX-MZC decreased by at least a factor of two upon recrystallization. No significant void formation was observed in pure copper or in the AMZIRC and MZC copper alloys following ion irradiation at temperatures of 100-500/sup 0/C (0.28-0.59 T/sub M/) to peak damage levels of 40 dpa. Instead, stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) were detected. The absence of voids following ion irradiation is attributed to the low oxygen content of the copper and copper alloys (<5 ppm). Ion irradiation of cold-worked plus aged AMZIRC and AMAX-MZC caused an effective shift in the recrystallization temperature to a lower value by 75 to 150/sup 0/C compared with thermal anneal results. A simple model based on radiation-enhanced diffusion predicts a radiation-enhanced recrystallization temperature of 150/sup 0/C for these alloys for a 2 year neutron irradiation.

  10. Lead alloys past present future

    SciTech Connect

    Bagshaw, N.E.

    1995-03-01

    The most critical non-active component in the lead acid battery is the grid of substrate. A review of the work on and grid alloys in the period 1960-1993 has been carried out by by the Advanced Lead-Acid Consortium, (ALABC), and, in this paper, the results are analyzed in relation to the effort expended in different alloy systems. Lead-antimony alloys and the effects on them of additions of arsenic, tin, and grain-refining elements (selenium, sulfur, copper), together with lead-calcium alloys and the effect on them of tin additions have received the greatest attention in the past.

  11. Advanced copper/low-k IC devices: Packaging process development and materials integrtion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chungpaiboonpatana, Surasit

    Cu/low-k technology provides a number of key advantages including higher interconnect density, improved electrical performance, enhanced thermal performance, and reduced cost. Nevertheless, Cu/low-k IC technology poses many challenges to the packaging industry today. Specifically, low-k dielectric is much more fragile mechanically and copper surfaces are readily oxidized thereby weakening their adhesion to the ILD/metallization layers. The purpose of the study is to provide integrated and reliable materials and process solutions for the packaging of advanced Cu/low-k devices through fundamental materials science understanding. Novel solutions for advanced wirebond and flip-chip technologies are developed, along with resolutions for local and global material interaction issues. The zero-th packaging level study examines a novel direct gold wirebonding onto the Cu/low-k terminal pad structure. The first packaging level study attempts to eliminate the Cu/low-k wiresweeping issue through assembly material interactions with both bonding and transfer molding processes. The second packaging level study exams at the impact of Cu/low-k and processing material implementations on the copper trace cracking failures at the substrate level of a package. An integrated first and second level study on high performance flip chip technology using 8M Cu/low-k silicon chip is performed by the optimization of the underfill and substrate materials selections. Lastly, electromigration phenomena and corrosion mechanisms of copper metallization are developed for biased stressing assembly environment through the fundamental of electrochemistry. Throughout the experiment, the 90/130nm technology node of copper wafer fabrication using Black Diamond low-k dielectric is implemented in several large form-factor package assemblies. Functional test vehicles are assembled, reliability-stressed, and failure-analyzed according to the JEDEC standards for the validity of the integrated materials

  12. A Bright Future for copper electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moats, Michael; Free, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Over the past 40 years, the copper mining industry has undergone a dramatic shift toward hydrometallurgical extraction of copper at the mine site. This has increased the importance of recovering high-purity copper by electrowinning. High-purity cathode production was achieved by implementing numerous technologies including superior lead-alloy anodes, improved cathode handling and/or stainless steel blanks, better electrolyte control, and advanced tankhouse automation. In the future, it is projected that tankhouses will produce high-quality copper at lower costs using technologies that could include dimensionally stable anodes, alternative anode reactions, innovative cell designs, novel electrolyte circulation systems, and more. This paper reviews existing commercial copper electrowinning technologies and discusses advances that need to be made to implement future technologies.

  13. The study of marine corrosion of copper alloys in chlorinated condenser cooling circuits: the role of microbiological components.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria L; Doma, Jemimah; Sztyler, Magdalena; Beech, Iwona; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2014-06-01

    The present paper reports the on-line monitoring of corrosion behavior of the CuNi 70:30 and Al brass alloys exposed to seawater and complementary offline microbiological analyses. An electrochemical equipment with sensors specifically set for industrial application and suitable to estimate the corrosion (by linear polarization resistance technique), the biofilm growth (by the BIOX electrochemical probe), the chlorination treatment and other physical-chemical parameters of the water has been used for the on-line monitoring. In order to identify and better characterize the bacteria community present on copper alloys, tube samples were collected after a long period (1year) and short period (2days) of exposition to treated natural seawater (TNSW) and natural seawater (NSW). From the collected samples, molecular techniques such as DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and identification by sequencing were performed to better characterize and identify the microbial biodiversity present in the samples. The monitoring data confirmed the significant role played by biofouling deposition against the passivity of these Cu alloys in seawater and the positive influence of antifouling treatments based on low level dosages. Molecular analysis indicated biodiversity with the presence of Marinobacter, Alteromonas and Pseudomonas species. PMID:24411305

  14. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  15. Understanding of copper precipitation under electron or ion irradiations in FeCu0.1 wt% ferritic alloy by combination of experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, B.; Barbu, A.; Pareige, P.

    2007-02-01

    This work is dedicated to the understanding of the basic processes involved in the formation of copper enriched clusters in low alloyed FeCu binary system (FeCu0.1 wt%) under irradiation at temperature close to 300 °C. Such an alloy was irradiated with electrons or with ions (Fe+ or He+) in order to deconvolute the effect of displacement cascades and the associated generation of point defect clusters (ion irradiations), and the super-saturation of mono-vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (electron irradiation). The microstructure of this alloy was characterised by tomographic atom probe. Experimental results were compared with results obtained with cluster dynamic model giving an estimation of the evolution of point defects (free or agglomerated) under irradiation on the one hand and describing homogeneous enhanced precipitation of copper on the other hand. The comparison between the results obtained on the different irradiation conditions and the model suggests that the point defect clusters (dislocation loops and/or nano-voids) created in displacement cascades play a major role in copper clustering in low copper alloy irradiated at 573 K.

  16. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of end-chill cast Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeshvaghani, R. Arabi; Ghahvechian, H.; Pirnajmeddin, H.; Shahverdi, H. R.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content. In order to study the relationship between microstructure features and wear behavior, the alloys prepared by an end-chill cast apparatus and then heat treated. Heat treatment procedure involved solutionizing at temperature of 350 °C for 72 h followed by cooling within the furnace to room temperature. Microstructural characteristics of as-cast and heat-treated alloys at different distances from the chill were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests were performed using a pin-on-disk test machine. To determine the wear mechanisms, the worn surfaces of the samples were also examined by SEM and EDS. Results showed that heat treatment led to the complete dissolution of as-cast dendritic microstructure and formation of a fine lamellar structure with well-distributed microconstituents. Moreover, addition of copper up to 1 wt% had no significant change in the microstructure, while addition of 2 and 4 wt% copper resulted in formation of ɛ (CuZn4) particle in the interdendritic regions. The influence of copper content on the wear behavior of the alloys was explained in terms of microstructural characteristics. Delamination was proposed as the dominant wear mechanism.

  17. Standard specification for nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloy plate, sheet, and strip. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 582-73. Last previous edition was B 582-92.

  18. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  19. Advances in amorphous silicon alloy multijunction cells and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.; Banerjee, A.; Glatfelter, T.; Hoffman, K.; Xu, X.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the research directions taken to improve the stable efficiency of amorphous silicon alloy multijunction modules. Use of hydrogen dilution during deposition has resulted in improvement of initial efficiency and stability of the component cells in the triple-junction structure. An innovative laser-interconnected module design has resulted in the reduction of optical and electrical losses in the module down to 1{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  1. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  2. Polyphase alloys as rechargeable electrodes in advanced battery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The rechargeability of electrochemical cells is often limited by negative electrode problems. These may include loss of capacity, increased impedance, macroscopic shape change, dendrite growth, or a tendency for filamentary or whisker growth. In principle, these problems can be reduced or eliminated by the use of alloys that undergo either displacement or insertion reactions at reactant species activities less than unity, rather than pure elements. The fundamental reasons for some of these problems with elemental electrodes, as well as the basic principles involved in the different behavior of alloys, are briefly discussed. More information is now available concerning the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of a number of alloys of potential interest for use as electrodes in elevated temperature lithium battery systems. Recent results have extended these results down to ambient temperatures, indicating that some such materials may be of interest for use with new low temperature molten salt electrolytes, or with organic solvent electrolytes. The all solid mixed conductor matrix concept is also reviewed.

  3. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1993-07-01

    Commercial and developmental alloys were evaluated in support of advanced steam cycle and combined cycle technology. Working with industrial groups, Grade 91 steel, which is a candidate for main steam line piping and superheater tubing in advanced steam cycle plants, was re-evaluated to examine metallurgical factors that influence long-time performance to 600{degree}C. Deformation models and aging effect models were developed. Testing of corrosion-resistant filler metals for tubing was extended to times approaching 30,000 h. Good strengths were observed. Modified Type 310 stainless steels were examined to 927{degree}C. It was found that these steels had up to twice the strength of standard Type 310H stainless steel. The behavior of aluminum-bearing, alloys and high chromium alloys was examined for potential applications to 870{degree}C. Thermal cycling of clad tubing was undertaken, and good performance was found.

  4. A surface-analytical examination of stringer particles in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, L. A.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A surface analytical examination of powder metallurgy processed Al-Li-Cu alloys was conducted. The oxide stringer particles often found in these alloys are characterized. Particle characterization is important to more fully understand their impact on the stress corrosion and fracture properties of the alloy. The techniques used where SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy) and SAM (Scanning Auger Microscopy). The results indicate that the oxide stringer particles contain both Al and LI with relatively high Li content and the Li compounds may be associated with the stringer particles, thereby locally depleting the adjacent matrix of Li solute.

  5. Investigation of Advanced Processed Single-Crystal Turbine Blade Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. J.; Biondo, C. M.; DeLuca, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation studied the influence of thermal processing and microstructure on the mechanical properties of the single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys PWA 1482 and PWA 1484. The objective of the program was to develop an improved single-crystal turbine blade alloy that is specifically tailored for use in hydrogen fueled rocket engine turbopumps. High-gradient casting, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and alternate heat treatment (HT) processing parameters were developed to produce pore-free, eutectic-free microstructures with different (gamma)' precipitate morphologies. Test materials were cast in high thermal gradient solidification (greater than 30 C/cm (137 F/in.)) casting furnaces for reduced dendrite arm spacing, improved chemical homogeneity, and reduced interdendritic pore size. The HIP processing was conducted in 40 cm (15.7 in.) diameter production furnaces using a set of parameters selected from a trial matrix study. Metallography was conducted on test samples taken from each respective trial run to characterize the as-HIP microstructure. Post-HIP alternate HT processes were developed for each of the two alloys. The goal of the alternate HT processing was to fully solution the eutectic gamma/(gamma)' phase islands and to develop a series of modified (gamma)' morphologies for subsequent characterization testing. This was accomplished by slow cooling through the (gamma)' solvus at controlled rates to precipitate volume fractions of large (gamma)'. Post-solution alternate HT parameters were established for each alloy providing additional volume fractions of finer precipitates. Screening tests included tensile, high-cycle fatigue (HCF), smooth and notched low-cycle fatigue (LCF), creep, and fatigue crack growth evaluations performed in air and high pressure (34.5 MPa (5 ksi)) hydrogen at room and elevated temperature. Under the most severe embrittling conditions (HCF and smooth and notched LCF in 34.5 MPa (5 ksi) hydrogen at 20 C (68 F), screening test

  6. A tunable amorphous p-type ternary oxide system: The highly mismatched alloy of copper tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, Patrick J. M. Walls, John M.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-09-14

    The approach of combining two mismatched materials to form an amorphous alloy was used to synthesise ternary oxides of CuO and SnO{sub 2}. These materials were analysed across a range of compositions, and the electronic structure was modelled using density functional theory. In contrast to the gradual reduction in optical band gap, the films show a sharp reduction in both transparency and electrical resistivity with copper contents greater than 50%. Simulations indicate that this change is caused by a transition from a dominant Sn 5s to Cu 3d contribution to the upper valence band. A corresponding decrease in energetic disorder results in increased charge percolation pathways: a “compositional mobility edge.” Contributions from Cu(II) sub band-gap states are responsible for the reduction in optical transparency.

  7. Progress report on the influence of test temperature and grain boundary chemistry on the fracture behavior of ITER copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Stubbins, J.F.; Edwards, D.J.

    1998-09-01

    This collaborative study was initiated to determine mechanical properties at elevated temperatures of various copper alloys by University of Illinois and Pacific Northwestern National Lab (PNNL) with support of OMG Americas, Inc. and Brush Wellman, Inc. This report includes current experimental results on notch tensile tests and pre-cracked bend bar tests on these materials at room temperature, 200 and 300 C. The elevated temperature tests were performed in vacuum and indicate that a decrease in fracture resistance with increasing temperature, as seen in previous investigations. While the causes for the decreases in fracture resistance are still not clear, the current results indicate that environmental effects are likely less important in the process than formerly assumed.

  8. Thermal effects in equilibrium surface segregation in a copper/10-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1972-01-01

    Equilibrium surface segregation of aluminum in a copper-10-atomic-percent-aluminum single crystal alloy oriented in the /111/ direction was demonstrated by using Auger electron spectroscopy. This crystal was in the solid solution range of composition. Equilibrium surface segregation was verified by observing that the aluminum surface concentration varied reversibly with temperature in the range 550 to 850 K. These results were curve fitted to an expression for equilibrium grain boundary segregation and gave a retrieval energy of 5780 J/mole (1380 cal/mole) and a maximum frozen-in surface coverage three times the bulk layer concentration. Analyses concerning the relative merits of sputtering calibration and the effects of evaporation are also included.

  9. Thermodynamics of copper-nickel alloys containing aluminum, silicon, titanium, and chromium relative to their use in ceramic brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.O.

    1984-11-01

    By varying the copper-to-nickel ratio the activity coefficients of Al, Si, Ti, and Cr can be varied over a wide range. Thus to a degree one can tailor the behavior of such alloys for usefulness in brazing ceramics. Further, considerable amounts of these active elements can be present while the ability of carbon to reduce the surface oxide film in a high-vacuum system is retained. The critical aluminum concentrations required to prevent the formation of SiO/sub 2/, TiO, or Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ by reaction with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are calculated. The simultaneous presence of the four active additions will presumably promote wetting without making the surface deoxidation more difficult.

  10. Joining of SiC Fiber-Bonded Ceramics using Silver, Copper, Nickel, Palladium, and Silicon-Based Alloy Interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Asthana, Rajiv; Singh, Mrityunjay; Lin, Hua-Tay; Matsunaga, Kenji; Ishikawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    SiC fiber-bonded ceramics, SA-Tyrannohex, (SA-THX) with perpendicular and parallel fiber orientations were brazed using Ag-, Ni- and Pd-base brazes, and four Si X (X: Ti, Cr, Y, Ta) eutectics. Outcomes were variable, ranging from bonded joints through partially bonded to un-bonded joints. Prominent Ti- and Si-rich interfaces developed with Cusil-ABA, Ticusil, and Copper-ABA and Ni- and Si-rich layers with MBF-20. Stress rupture tests at 650 and 750 C on Cusil-ABA-bonded joints revealed a temperature-dependent behavior for the perpendicular joints but not for the parallel joints with failure occurring at brazed interface. Higher-use temperatures can be targeted with eutectic Si Ti and Si Cr alloys.

  11. Investigation of Cu-Fe-based coating produced on copper alloy substrate by laser induction hybrid rapid cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengfeng; Zhang, Tianyou; Xiong, Zheng; Dai, Xiaoqin; Wu, Chao; Shao, Zhishong

    2014-07-01

    The Cu-Fe-based coating was produced on copper alloy substrate by laser induction hybrid rapid cladding (LIHRC). The results showed that the maximum laser scanning speed and the maximum powder feeding rate can be increased to 3200 mm/min and 110 g/min, respectively. The coating was mainly composed of α-Fe and ɛ-Cu phases. At the bottom of coating, Cu-rich matrix took on planar growth and columnar dendritic morphology. In the center of coating, Fe-rich spherical particles containing a supersaturated Cu were embedded in Cu-rich matrix and many fine Cu-rich grains were precipitated inside the Fe-rich spherical particles. However, at the top of coating, the smaller Fe-rich spherical particles were embedded inside the larger Cu-rich spherical particles which were embedded in the dendritic Fe-rich matrix. The microhardness of coating was much three times higher than that of substrate.

  12. Characterization of the Temperature Capabilities of Advanced Disk Alloy ME3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.; OConnor, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    The successful development of an advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy, ME3, was initiated in the NASA High Speed Research/Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR/EPM) Compressor/Turbine Disk program in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. This alloy was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables to have extended durability at 1200 F in large disks. Disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of the program using a realistic scaled-up disk shape and processing to enable demonstration of these properties. The objective of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technologies disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. These disks were sectioned, machined into specimens, and extensively tested. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and selectively tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process can produce 1300 to 1350 F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements.

  13. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  14. Review of Advances in Development of Vanadium Alloys and MHD Insulator Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Muroga, T.; Chen, J. M.; Chernov, V. M.; Fukumoto, Kenichi; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Nagasaka, T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Satou, M.; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Watanabe, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, recent progress in the development of low activation vanadium alloys and MHD insulator coatings for Li-self cooled blanket is overviewed. The research progress in vanadium alloys is highlighted by technology of fabricating creep tubes, comparison of thermal creep in vacuum and Li, understanding on impurity transfer between vanadium alloys and Li and its impact on mechanical properties, behavior of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes, low dose irradiation effects on weld joints and exploration for advanced vanadium alloys. Major remaining issues of vanadium alloys are thermal and irradiation creep, helium effects on high temperature mechanical properties and radiation effects on low temperature fracture properties. A new promising candidate of Er2O3, which showed good compatibility with Li, was identified for MHD insulator coating on vanadium alloys. The coating technology has made a significant progressed for the new candidate material. Recent efforts are being focused on multi-layer coating and in-situ coating. Tests in flowing lithium conditions with temperature gradient are necessary for quantitative examination of the performance.

  15. Chemistry and electrochemistry of environment-assisted cracking of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kevin Richard

    2001-11-01

    The mechanism of environment-assisted cracking (EAC) of 7xxx-series alloys is unclear, involving uncertain contributions of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and anodic dissolution (AD). Fundamental understanding of the EAC mechanism is lacking in part because the role of the crack environment is not well understood. The objective of this research was to characterize and understand the role of the crack chemistry and electrochemistry during aqueous EAC of AA 7050. The crack environment can differ significantly from bulk conditions. Cations, produced by AD, hydrolyze causing local acidification; anions from the bulk electrolyte concentrate within the crack to maintain charge neutrality; ohmic potential drop results from ion migration and diffusion. A positive correlation exists between da/dt and [Al3+]Tip in chromate-chloride electrolyte wherein tip dissolution dominates flank corrosion in establishing the crack chemistry. Tip pH was 2 to 4 and determined by the reaction Al3+ + H 2O = AlOH2+ + H+. The tip potential (ETip) was approximately -0.90 VSCE and independent of EApp . The low ETip and pH promote H+ reduction, generating atomic and molecular H. Hydrogen bubbles restrict ion movement, substantially increasing the effective crack resistance over bulk conditions. Absorbed atomic hydrogen facilitates HE. The spontaneous transition from slow, incubation to high-rate da/dt coincides with the establishment of a critical aggressive tip chemistry and tip depolarization. Development of the critical occluded chemistry necessary for accelerated da/dt is a competitive process between opposing forces: AD, hydrolysis and migration promote an aggressive environment whereas diffusion reduces concentration gradients, thereby retarding the formation of an aggressive chemistry. Quantitative assessment of the contribution of tip dissolution to crack advance is hindered by a lack of knowledge of two key parameters: the tip corrosion front height and the effective crack conductivity

  16. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation.more » γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.« less

  17. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including titanium and its alloys. Thus solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding (FSWing) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSWing), are being pursued as alternatives to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Unlike the FSWing process where the tool is used to heat the workpiece, TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material prior to stirring thus minimizing the burden on the weld tool and thereby extending its life. This study reports on the initial results of using a hybrid (H)-TSW process to join commercially pure, 1.3cm thick panels of titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2.

  18. Advanced Chinese NiTi alloy wire and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Zhi, Y F; Arvystas, M G

    1992-01-01

    Chinese NiTi wire was studied on the bench with six other nickel-titanium-alloy wires. Bending and torsional tests were conducted and temperatures of phase transformation compared. The Chinese NiTi wire was found to have a low stiffness, high springback and constant bending and torsional moments on unloading, in a very large deformation region. It can produce a gentle, nearly constant force. These factors make it desirable for clinical application. Included in this paper are clinical observations of case selected from over 100 patients in current treatment with Chinese NiTi wires. Chinese NiTi wire reduced the leveling and alignment phase of treatment without discomfort to the patient. Chinese NiTi wire can be used in both children and adults. PMID:1445516

  19. Laser welding of an advanced rapidly-solidified titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeslack, W. A., III; Chiang, S.; Albright, C. A.

    1990-06-01

    The laser weldability of a complex RS titanium alloy containing yttrium is investigated by evaluating comparatively the microstructures, mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics of the base metal and the rapidly solidified weld fusion zone. To prevent atmospheric contamination the specimen was enclosed in a helium-purged plastic bag during the welding process. After welding, the coupons were sectioned transverse to the laser beam direction of traverse, epoxy mounted, polished down to 0.05 micron SiO2 and etched with Kroll's reagent for examination utilizing light and SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Results indicate that laser welding is effective in producing a fine fusion zone dispersoid structure in the RS Ti composite.

  20. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  1. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 2: Strainrange partitioning and low-cycle fatigue results at 538 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Low-cycle fatigue tests of 1/2 Hard AMZIRC Copper and NARloy Z were performed in argon at 538 C to determine partitioned strain range versus life relationships. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests of a Zr-Cr-Mg copper-base alloy were also performed. Strain ranges, lower than those employed in previous tests, were imposed in order to extend the fatigue life curve out to approximately 400,000 cycles. An experimental copper alloy and an experimental silver alloy were also studied. Tensile tests were performed in air at room temperature and in argon at 538 C. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were performed at 538 C in argon to define the fatigue life over the regime from 300 to 3,000 cycles. For the silver alloy, three additional heat treatments were introduced, and a limited evaluation of the short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior at 538 C was performed.

  2. The development and characterization of a novel aluminum-copper-magnesium P/M alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Christopher Daniel

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) is a metal fabrication process that is characterized by high yield and ability to be automated, as well as the resultant part complexity and reproducibility. This press and sinter process is favoured by the automotive industry. Aluminum alloy P/M parts are particularly attractive because they have a high strength to weight ratio and they can be made to have high corrosion and wear resistance. There are few commercial Al P/M alloys currently in use and they occupy a small portion of the market. To expand the use of aluminum in the industry a new alloy was created, modeled after the wrought AC2024 family of alloys. P/M 2324, with a nominal composition of Al-4.4Cu-1.5Mg, was assessed using physical, chemical and mechanical methods to help maximize alloy properties through processing. The objective of this work was to develop a viable industrial alloy. The investigation of 2324 included the evaluation of starting powders, starting composition, processing methods, secondary treatments, and industrial response. All blending and compacting was completed at Dalhousie University, while sintering was undertaken at Dalhousie and GKN Sinter Metals. The green alloy was assessed for best compaction pressure using green density and strength. The sintered alloy was assessed to determine the best press and sinter variables, using dimensional change, sintered density, apparent hardness, tensile properties and microscopy. These same sintered properties were tested to determine if sintering done on a laboratory scale could be replicated industrially. The viability of heat treatment was tested using differential scanning calorimetry, hardness and tensile properties. The alloy was also subject to modifications of Cu and Mg amounts, as well as to the addition of tin to the base composition. It was determined that compaction at 400MPa and sintering at 600°C for 20min produced the best properties for the sintered bodies. The resultant mechanical properties were

  3. The physical modeling of grain boundary liquation mechanisms within the heat-affected zone of an aluminum-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andre Lamont

    This dissertation describes the results of a research program which was conducted to physically model, weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation processes observed in Aluminum alloys during welding in the absence of an external strain. Three liquation processes were analyzed using a binary Al-3Cu alloy: (1) intergranular liquid infiltration from the fusion zone; (2) sub-solidus (below the equilibrium solidus temperature) grain boundary liquation due to non-equilibrium segregation during welding; and, (3) sub-solidus liquation (constitutional liquation) of undissolved precipitates in the matrix and along the grain boundary. Silicon, from an Al-Si filler metal, was observed at the base metal, HAZ grain boundaries, of a solution treated Al-3Cu alloy after gas-tungsten arc welding. With no evidence for crack-backfilling, the mechanism of transport of fusion zone material into the matrix was tentatively identified as liquid metal penetration of grain boundaries governed by liquid diffusion kinetics. Grain boundary regions in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of arc welds, in a solution treated Al-3Cu alloy, were examined for liquation susceptibility. The welding experiments showed that certain grain boundaries, adjacent to the fusion line, were depleted in solute (copper), but were not liquated. Investigation of the third mechanism, involved a comprehensive study of the solid-state, dissolution and liquation-dissolution of matrix and grain boundary precipitates. This represents the first complete study of its type, for any alloy system. The isothermal kinetics of solid-state and liquation-dissolution of theta (Al2Cu) precipitates, were fully quantified during salt bath annealing. The stability of the grain boundary precipitate dispersion was examined in order to determine the susceptibility of the grain boundary microstructure to liquation. These latter experiments were facilitated by a large, "static" grain structure, and this study may mark the first time that any grain

  4. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 1: Preliminary results for 12 alloys at 1000 F (538 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Short-term tensile evaluations at room temperature and 538 C and low-cycle fatigue evaluations at 538 C are presented for the following materials: Zirconium copper-annealed, Zirconium copper-1/4 hard, Zirconium copper-1/2 hard, Tellurium copper-1/2 hard, Chromium copper-SA and aged, OFHC copper-hard, OFHC copper-1/4 hard, OFHC copper-annealed, Silver-as drawn, Zr-Cr-Mg copper-SA, CW and aged, Electroformed copper-30-35 ksi, and Co-Be-Zr- copper-SA, aged. A total of 50 tensile tests and 76 low-cycle fatigue tests were performed using a strain rate of 0.2 percent per second.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of copper clustering in Fe-Cu alloys under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.; Kwon, S. C.; Hong, J. H.

    2004-10-01

    We present the computational approach for studying the microstructures of Cu clusters in Fe-Cu alloys by combining the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Monte Carlo methods. The MD simulation is used to characterize the primary damage resulting from the displacement cascade in Fe. Then, using the Metropolis Monte Carlo methods, the microstructure of the Cu clusters is predicted under the assumption that the system will evolve towards the equilibrium state. The formation of the Cu clusters is apparent for Fe-Cu alloys of a higher Cu content (1.0 w/o), whereas the degree of Cu clustering is not significant for the lower Cu content (0.1 w/o) alloys. The atomic configuration of the Cu-vacancy complex under irradiation, produced by this simulation, is in a fair agreement with the experiments. The simulation is expected to provide important information on the Cu-cluster morphology, which is useful for experimental data analysis.

  6. Copper Removal from Hypereutectic Cu-Si Alloys by Heavy Liquid Media Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrašinović, Aleksandar M.; Utigard, Torstein A.

    2012-04-01

    A high-capacity method for silicon refining is investigated. The biggest obstacle in Si refining using the alloying technique is the amount of solute element. In the current work, Cu is removed from two Cu-Si hypereutectic alloys by the heavy liquid media separation technique. The results indicated 86.0 pct silicon recovered, which is close to the theoretical limit. The chemical analysis showed a Cu concentration of 0.68 wt pct in the 50 Cu-Si alloy for a 75- μm average particle size after heavy liquid media separation. The optimal particle size was found in the range of 75 to 125 μm. Heavy liquid media separation is an efficient technique in the process of liberating Si dendrites that can be used as feedstock in solar cell applications.

  7. Understanding the Origins of Intergranular Corrosion in Copper-Containing Al-Mg-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairy, Shravan K.; Alam, Talukder; Rometsch, Paul A.; Davies, Chris H. J.; Banerjee, Raj; Birbilis, Nick

    2016-03-01

    A definitive understanding of the mechanism of intergranular corrosion (IGC) in under-aged (UA) Cu-containing Al-Mg-Si alloys has not been clear to date. The grain boundary microstructure and chemistry in an UA Cu-containing Al-Mg-Si alloy were characterized by coupling atom probe tomography and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The rapid formation of an ultra-thin wetting Cu layer and discrete Q-phase (Al4Cu2Mg8Si7) precipitates along the grain boundaries, and a precipitate-free zone adjacent to the grain boundaries in the UA condition contribute to IGC.

  8. Advancing alloy 718 vacuum arc remelting technology through developing model-based controls.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBarbadillo, John J; Beaman, Joseph Jefferson; Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2005-06-01

    The Specialty Metals Processing Consortium (SMPC) was established in 1990 with the goal of advancing the technology of melting and remelting nickel and titanium alloys. In recent years, the SMPC technical program has focused on developing technology to improve control over the final ingot remelting and solidification processes to alleviate conditions that lead to the formation of inclusions and positive and negative segregation. A primary objective is the development of advanced monitoring and control techniques for application to vacuum arc remelting (VAR), with special emphasis on VAR of Alloy 718. This has lead to the development of an accurate, low order electrode melting model for this alloy as well as an advanced process estimator that provides real-time estimates of important process variables such as electrode temperature distribution, instantaneous melt rate, process efficiency, fill ratio, and voltage bias. This, in turn, has enabled the development and industrial application of advanced VAR process monitoring and control systems. The technology is based on the simple idea that the set of variables describing the state of the process must be self-consistent as required by the dynamic process model. The output of the process estimator comprises the statistically optimal estimate of this self-consistent set. Process upsets such as those associated with glows and cracked electrodes are easily identified using estimator based methods.

  9. Effects of copper content on the shell characteristics of hollow steel spheres manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-04-01

    Metallic hollow spheres are used as base materials in the manufacture of hollow sphere structures and metallic foams. In this study, steel hollow spheres were successfully manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique. The spheres' shells were characterized by optical microscopy in conjunction with microstructural image analysis software, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microscopic evaluations revealed that the shells consist of sintered iron powder, sintered copper powder, sodium silicate, and porosity regions. In addition, the effects of copper content on various parameters such as shell defects, microcracks, thickness, and porosities were investigated. The results indicated that increasing the copper content results in decreases in the surface fraction of shell porosities and the number of microcracks and an increase in shell thickness.

  10. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. D. Jablonski, and P. Wang

    2010-10-01

    Develop advanced coal-based power systems capable of 45–50 % efficiency at <$1,000/kW (in 2002 dollars). Develop technologies for capture and sequestration of CO2 that result in: • <10% increase in the cost of electricity in an IGCC-based plant • <35% increase in the cost of electricity for pulverized coal boilers Demonstrate coal-based energy plants that offer near-zero emissions (including CO2) with multiproduct production

  11. Effect of copper on the structure-phase transformations and the properties of quasi-binary TiNi-TiCu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, V. G.; Kuranova, N. N.; Pushin, A. V.; Korolev, A. V.; Kourov, N. I.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper alloying up to 25 at % on the structure-phase transformations and the physicomechanical properties of ternary alloys from the quasi-binary TiNi-TiCu section is studied by measuring the physicomechanical properties, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The data of temperature measurements of the electrical resistivity and the magnetic susceptibility and XRD data are used to plot a general diagram for the thermoelastic B2 ↔ B19', B2 ↔ B19 ↔ B19', and B2 ↔ B19 martensitic transformations, which occur in the alloys upon cooling as the copper content increases in the ranges 0-8, 8-15, and 15-25 at % Cu, respectively. The experimental results are compared to the well-known data, including differential scanning calorimetry data, obtained for these alloys. The changes in the mechanical properties and the microstructure of the alloys in the state of B19 or B19' martensite are discussed.

  12. The anti-bacterial activity of titanium-copper sintered alloy against Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Zhang, Erlin; Liu, Junchao; Zhu, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the anti-bacterial property of Ti-Cu sintered alloys against Porphyromonas gingivalis. The anti-anaerobic property of Ti-Cu sintered alloys against P. gingivalis was investigated by antibacterial activity test, DNA measurement, DAPI staining and morphology observation. The antibacterial rates of the Ti-5Cu against P. gingivalis after 18 and 24 h incubation were 36.04 and 54.39%, and those of Ti-10Cu were 68.69 and 75.39%, which were lower than their anti-aerobic abilities. The concentration of P. gingivalis DNA gradually decreased with the increasing Cu content, which was nearly 50% after 24 h incubation on Ti-10Cu. SEM results showed that the shape of P. gingivalis changed and the bacteria broke apart with the addition of Cu and the extension of the culture time. Ti-Cu sintered alloys could not only kill anaerobic bacteria but also reduce the activity of the survived bacteria. The anti-anaerobic mechanism was thought to be in associated with the Cu ion released from Ti-Cu alloy. PMID:27477233

  13. Cavitation Erosion of Copper, Brass, Aluminum and Titanium Alloys in Mineral Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The variations of the mean depth of penetration, the mean depth rate of penetration, MDRP, the pit diameter 2a and depth h due to cavitation attack on Al 6061-T6, Cu, brass of composition Cu-35Zn-3Pb and Ti-5A1-2.5Sn are presented. The experiments are conducted in a mineral oil of viscosity 110 CS using a magnetostrictive oscillator of 20 kHz frequency. Based on MDRP on the materials, it is found that Ti-5Al-2.5Sn exhibits cavitation erosion resistance which is two orders of magnitude higher than the other three materials. The values of h/a are the largest for copper and decreased with brass, titanium, and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope studies show that extensive slip and cross slip occurred on the surface prior to pitting and erosion. Twinning is also observed on copper and brass.

  14. Effectiveness of nickel plating in inhibiting atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, T.; Sorensen, R.; Guilinger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A series of tests was run to determine the effect of Ni plating thickness on connector contact resistance. Copper coupons were plated with an electrolytic nickel strike followed by electroless nickel to produce Ni layers of 10, 20, 55 and 100 {micro}in. The coupons were then exposed to a simulated industrial environment. Pore corrosion was observed after the exposure, which correlated with Ni thickness. In a second series of tests, beryllium-copper four-tine contacts with 50 {micro}in of gold plate over electrolytic nickel strike/electroless-nickel plates of varying thickness were exposed the same corrosive environment. Contact resistance of mated pairs was monitored over a two-month period. The degradation in contact resistance correlated with the Ni thickness used in the connectors.

  15. Measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Douglas; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1991-01-01

    Summary information is included for electrochemical aspects of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 2090 and an introduction to the work to be initiated on the new X2095 (Weldalite) alloy system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied in both S-T and L-T orientations in alloy 2090. A constant load TTF test was performed in several environments with a potentiostatically applied potential. In the same environments the electrochemical behavior of phases found along subgrain boundaries was assessed. It was found that rapid failure due to SCC occurred when the following criteria was met: E(sub BR,T1) is less than E(sub applied) is less than E(sub Br, matrix phase). Although the L-T orientation is usually considered more resistant to SCC, failures in this orientation occurred when the stated criteria was met. This may be due to the relatively isotropic geometry of the subgrains which measure approximately 12 to 25 microns in diameters. Initial studies of alloy X2095 includes electrochemical characterization of three compositional variations each at three temperatures. The role of T(sub 1) dissolution in SCC behavior is addressed using techniques similar to those used in the research of 2090 described. SCC susceptibility is also studied using alternate immersion facilities at Reynolds Metals Corporation. Pitting is investigated in terms of stability, role of precipitate phases and constituent particles, and as initiation sites for SCC. In all research endeavors, attempts are made to link electrochemistry to microstructure. Previous work on 2090 provides a convenient basis for comparison since both alloys contain T(sub 1) precipitates but with different distributions. In 2090 T(sub 1) forms preferentially on subgrain boundaries whereas in X2095 the microstructure appears to be more homogeneous with finer T(sub 1) particles. Another point for comparison is the delta prime strengthening phase found in 2090 but absent in X2095.

  16. Advanced Gear Alloys for Ultra High Strength Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Tony; Krantz, Timothy; Sebastian, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Single tooth bending fatigue (STBF) test data of UHS Ferrium C61 and C64 alloys are presented in comparison with historical test data of conventional gear steels (9310 and Pyrowear 53) with comparable statistical analysis methods. Pitting and scoring tests of C61 and C64 are works in progress. Boeing statistical analysis of STBF test data for the four gear steels (C61, C64, 9310 and Pyrowear 53) indicates that the UHS grades exhibit increases in fatigue strength in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) regime. In the high cycle fatigue (HCF) regime, the UHS steels exhibit better mean fatigue strength endurance limit behavior (particularly as compared to Pyrowear 53). However, due to considerable scatter in the UHS test data, the anticipated overall benefits of the UHS grades in bending fatigue have not been fully demonstrated. Based on all the test data and on Boeing s analysis, C61 has been selected by Boeing as the gear steel for the final ERDS demonstrator test gearboxes. In terms of potential follow-up work, detailed physics-based, micromechanical analysis and modeling of the fatigue data would allow for a better understanding of the causes of the experimental scatter, and of the transition from high-stress LCF (surface-dominated) to low-stress HCF (subsurface-dominated) fatigue failure. Additional STBF test data and failure analysis work, particularly in the HCF regime and around the endurance limit stress, could allow for better statistical confidence and could reduce the observed effects of experimental test scatter. Finally, the need for further optimization of the residual compressive stress profiles of the UHS steels (resulting from carburization and peening) is noted, particularly for the case of the higher hardness C64 material.

  17. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  18. Migration protocol to estimate metal exposure from mouthing copper and tin alloy objects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low blood lead levels previously thought to pose no health risks may have an adverse impact on the cognitive development of children. This concern has given rise to new regulatory restrictions upon lead metal containing products intended for child use. However few reliable experimental testing methods to estimate exposure levels from these materials are available. Methods The present work describes a migration test using a mimetic saliva fluid to estimate the chronic exposure of children to metals such as lead while mouthing metallic objects. The surrogate saliva medium was composed of: 150 mM NaCl, 0.16% porcine Mucin and 5 mM buffer MOPS, adjusted to pH 7.2. Alloys samples, in the form of polished metallic disc of known surface area, were subjected to an eight hours test. Results Two whitemetal alloys Sn/Pb/Sb/Cu and three brass alloys Cu/Zn/Pb were tested using the saliva migration protocol. In the case of the whitemetal alloys, first order release kinetics resulting in the release of 0.03 and 0.51 μg lead/cm2 after 8 hours of tests were observed, for lead contents of 0.05-0.07% and 5.5%, respectively. Brasses exhibited linear incremental release rates of 0.043, 0.175 and 0.243 μg lead/cm2h for lead contents of 0.1-0.2%, 1.7-2.2% and 3.1-3.5%, respectively. The linear regression analysis of lead release rates relative to Pb content in brasses yielded a slope of 0.08 μg lead/cm2h%Pb (r2 = 0.92). Lead release rates were used to estimate the mean daily mouthing exposure of a child to lead, according to age-specific estimates of mouthing time behavior. Calculated daily intakes were used as oral inputs for the IEUBK toxicokinetic model, predicting only marginal changes in blood lead levels (0.2 μg lead/dL or less) for children aged 0.5 to 1 years old exposed to either class of alloy. Conclusions The results of this study as a whole support the use of migration data of metal ions, rather than total metal content, to estimate health risk

  19. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jie-Ping; Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C-N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C-H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  20. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C–H bond amidation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C–N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C–H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  1. Procurement and screening test data for advanced austenitic alloys for 650/degree/C steam service: Part 2, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Bolling, E.

    1988-08-01

    The results of screening tests on alloys from three compositional groups are summarized and compared to the alloy design and performance criteria identified as needed for austenitic alloys suitable as superheater/reheater tubing in advanced heat recovery systems. The three alloy groups included lean (nominally 14% Cr and 16% Ni) austenitic stainless steels that were modifications of type 316 stainless steel, 20Cr-30Ni-Fe alloys that were modifications of alloy 800H, and Ni-Cr aluminides, (Ni,Cr)/sub 3/Al. The screening tests covered fabricability, mechanical properties, weldability, and oxidation behavior. The lean stainless steels were found to possess excellent strength and ductility if cold-worked to an equivalent strain in the range 5 to 10% prior to testing. However, they possessed marginal weldability, poor oxidation resistance, and sensitivity to aging. The modified alloy 800H alloys also exhibited good strength and ductility in the cold-worked condition. The weldability was marginal, while the oxidation resistance was good. The aluminides were difficult to fabricate by methods typically used to produce superheater tubing alloys. The alloys that could be worked had marginal strength and ductility. An aluminide cast alloy, however, was found to be very strong and ductile. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Effect of Fluxes on 60Sn-40Bi Solder Alloy on Copper Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervina Efzan, M. N.; Ng, W. L.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigated the effect of different types of fluxes on the wettability of a type of low temperature lead-free solder, 60Sn-40Bi alloy. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of different types of fluxes on the wettability of 60Sn-40Bi solder (Tm : 138 -170 oC), so that the most compatible flux to be used with low temperature alloy can be determined.The results of this paper showed that the water soluble flux sample has the highest spread area and lowest contact angle. This meant that the solder has the highest wettability when water soluble flux is used, followed by RMA flux and low solids flux. Therefore, it was determined that water soluble flux is the most compatible to be used with the low temperature 60Sn-40Bi solder. The characteristic of this type of flux enables it to function well even at a low working temperature.

  3. Flow and fracture of particle hardened copper-titanium alloys: Interplay of slip and twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radetic, Tamara

    The flow and fracture behavior of Cu-rich Cu-Ti alloys hardened by ordered, metastable, coherent betasp' precipitates (Cusb4Ti,\\ D1sb{a} superstructure) are particularly interesting because these alloys show an unusual propensity to twin profusely after small amounts of plastic flow by slip. The mechanical behavior was studied using standard tensile testing along with modern electron optical techniques including CTEM, SEM and HREM. The deformation substructure in the early stages of aging and in samples aged for longer times is characterized by the coupled motion of five dislocations of the same Burgers vector (superdislocations in the D1sb{a} structure) after small degrees of deformation. Characterization of the fine-scale structure of the mechanical twins which form in the particle hardened Cu-Ti alloys is also reported in this study. The growth of deformation twins occurs via the motion of so-called G-ledges at twin/matrix interfaces and via a coalescence of fine twins. The atomic structure of the coherent twin/matrix interfaces and associated single and multiple layer ledges are also elucidated. Incoherent interfaces at the tip of deformation twins generated by 90sp° and 30sp° twinning dislocations have been investigated. The twin/twin and slip/twin interactions have been studied and analyzed as well as the effect of grain boundaries on deformation twinning. Deformation twins appear to nucleate at dislocation pile-ups serving as a stress relaxation mechanism. Shear transfer through obstacle twins is effected by slip and twining. The dominant strengthening mechanism is concluded to be coherency strain hardening and the interplay of particle strengthening and grain size hardening is analyzed. The particle dispersion was found to influence the Hall-Petch factor but a detailed understanding of these synergetic effects was not established. The fracture mode of the underaged Cu-Ti alloys was found to be dimpled ductile tearing.

  4. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  5. Microstructure and aging behavior of conventional and nanocrystalline aluminum-copper-magnesium alloys with scandium additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga, Alejandro

    The influence of small amounts of scandium (0.15 and 0.3 wt.%) on the microstructure, aging behavior and mechanical properties of 2618 (Al-Cu-Mg-Fe-Ni) and C416 (Al-Cu-Mg-Ag-Mn) alloys was studied. It was observed the overall precipitation sequence and the general morphology of the aging curve were not affected by the addition of small amounts of Sc. It was also observed that a separate population of small Al3Sc particles improved the aging response and mechanical properties of low-Cu, low-Sc Al-Cu-Mg alloys, while the formation of Al5-8Cu7-4Sc particles resulted in a decrease of the mechanical properties in high-Cu Sc-containing alloys. The Sc-modified with the best aging response (2618 + 0.15 % Sc) was cryomilled in order to produce Al-Cu-Mg-Fe-Ni-Sc nanocrystalline powders. Bulk nanocrystalline samples were consolidated from the cryomilled powder using three different techniques: hot isostatic pressing and extrusion, spark plasma sintering, cold spraying. The influence of consolidation technique on the microstructure, aging behavior and mechanical properties was analyzed. The extruded and spark plasma sintered Al-Cu-Mg-Fe-Ni-Sc nanocrystalline samples presented a bimodal grain structure consisting of coarse-grained regions located at the inter-particle region, and nanocrystalline regions at the particle interiors. The aging behavior of the nanocrystalline Al-Cu-Mg-Fe-Ni-Sc alloy was characterized by softening instead of hardening. This behavior was rationalized on the basis of changes in the precipitation processes that occur in the nanocrystalline state. On the other hand, the cold spray process promoted the formation of truly nanocrystalline coatings. The mechanisms influencing the coating formation of conventional and nanocrystalline Al-Cu-Mg-Fe-Ni-Sc samples were analyzed.

  6. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2005-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

  7. Copper segregated layer and oxide layer formed on the surface of an Fe-0.8 at% Cu alloy by angle resolved XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Waseda, Y.

    1997-04-15

    The influence of copper on the surface properties of steel is of great interest, since it is known as a tramp element in recycled steel produced from steel scrap. Since copper is sometimes detected on the surface of alloy steel, it may be considered to affect the surface properties. Moreover, it has been recognized that the surface reaction such as initial oxidation of iron and steel may be affected by the surface composition. For instance, it has been shown by angle resolved XPS (AR-XPS) that the chromium segregation reduces the initial oxidation occurring at room temperature. Thus, the surface reaction behaviors are considered to depend significantly on species of constituent elements, and also the surface composition which is determined by processing conditions, e.g., annealing and pickling, may modify the surface reaction. This prompts a study of the surface segregation of copper and its influence on the oxidation of an iron-copper alloy at room temperature. In the present work, it may also be stressed that the AR-XPS method enables one to investigate the segregated layers and oxide layers, of which thickness is comparable to the escape depth of X-ray photoelectrons, non-destructively.

  8. Inhibition of steam-condensate corrosion of copper-based alloys by hydrazine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Breeze, G.A.; Berry, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    An experimental evaluation was made of the potential inhibiting effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of CDA 687 (aluminium brass), and CDA 706 (90 copper - 10 nickel) in a simulated steam condensate containing ammonia under deaerated and partially aerated conditions. It was found that hydrazine inhibited the corrosion of CDA 687 under deaerated conditions, but increased corrosion rates somewhat under partially aerated (1 ppM oxygen) conditions. Corrosion rates of CDA 706 were more than an order of magnitude lower than CDA 687 and were not measurably influenced by hydrazine.

  9. Atomic structure and thermophysical properties of molten silver-copper oxide air braze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, John Steven

    The Ag-CuOx materials system is the basis for a family of filler alloys used in a recently developed ceramic-metal joining technique referred to as air brazing, which is a brazing process that can be carried out in ambient air rather than under the vacuum or inert to reducing gas conditions required for conventional brazing methods. This research was conducted to elucidate the atomic coordination and selected thermophysical properties of these materials as a function of temperature when they are in the salient liquid state in air, since this is when the critical steps of wetting and spreading occur in the joining process. A series of alloys was selected spanning the entire length of the phase diagram including the pure end members, Ag and CuOx; alloys that form the two constituent single phase liquids; and alloys for which the two liquid phases coexist in the miscibility gap of the phase diagram. The oxygen content of the liquid alloys in air was measured using thermogravimetry. The oxidative weight gain of 99.999% pure metallic precursors was measured while simultaneously accounting for the concurrent silver volatility using a method that was developed in the course of the study. The surface tension and mass density were measured using the maximum bubble pressure method. The number density was calculated based on the information gained from the oxygen content and mass density measurements. For compositions that were amenable to laser heating, containerless high energy x-ray scattering measurements of the liquid atomic coordination were performed using a synchrotron beamline, an aerodynamic levitator, and laser heating. For the remaining compositions x-ray scattering measurements were performed in a beamline-compatible furnace. The two liquid phases that form in this materials system have distinct atomic coordinations characterized by an average of nearly two-fold coordinated ionic metal-oxygen pairs in the CuOx-rich liquid and nearly eight-fold coordinated atomic

  10. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  11. Gold-copper nano-alloy, "Tumbaga", in the era of nano: phase diagram and segregation.

    PubMed

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Mejia-Rosales, Sergio; Khanal, Subarna; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Whetten, Robert L; José-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-11-12

    Gold-copper (Au-Cu) phases were employed already by pre-Columbian civilizations, essentially in decorative arts, whereas nowadays, they emerge in nanotechnology as an important catalyst. The knowledge of the phase diagram is critical to understanding the performance of a material. However, experimental determination of nanophase diagrams is rare because calorimetry remains quite challenging at the nanoscale; theoretical investigations, therefore, are welcomed. Using nanothermodynamics, this paper presents the phase diagrams of various polyhedral nanoparticles (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, decahedron, dodecahedron, rhombic dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, cuboctahedron, and icosahedron) at sizes 4 and 10 nm. One finds, for all the shapes investigated, that the congruent melting point of these nanoparticles is shifted with respect to both size and composition (copper enrichment). Segregation reveals a gold enrichment at the surface, leading to a kind of core-shell structure, reminiscent of the historical artifacts. Finally, the most stable structures were determined to be the dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, and icosahedron with a Cu-rich core/Au-rich surface. The results of the thermodynamic approach are compared and supported by molecular-dynamics simulations and by electron-microscopy (EDX) observations. PMID:25338111

  12. Investigation into the stress corrosion cracking properties of AA2099, an aluminum-lithium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Barbara Nicole

    Recently developed Al-Li-Cu alloys show great potential for implementation in the aerospace industry because of the attractive mix of good mechanical properties and low density. AA2099 is an Al-Li-Cu alloy with the following composition Al-2.69wt%Cu-1.8wt%Li-0.6wt%Zn-0.3wt%Mg-0.3wt%Mn-0.08wt%Zr. The environmental assisted cracking and localized corrosion behavior of the AA2099 was investigated in this thesis. The consequences of uncontrolled grain boundary precipitation via friction stir welding on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2099 was investigated first. Using constant extension rate testing, intergranular corrosion immersion experiments, and potentiodynamic scans, the heat-affected zone on the trailing edge of the weld (HTS) was determined to be most susceptible of the weld zones. The observed SCC behavior for the HTS was linked to the dissolution of an active phase (Al2CuLi, T1) populating the grain boundary. It should be stated that the SCC properties of AA2099 in the as-received condition were determined to be good. Focus was then given to the electrochemical behavior of precipitate phases that may occupy grain and sub-grain boundaries in AA2099. The grain boundary micro-chemistry and micro-electrochemistry have been alluded to within the literature as having significant influence on the SCC behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Major precipitates found in this alloy system are T1 (Al 2CuLi), T2 (Al7.5Cu4Li), T B (Al6CuLi3), and theta (Al2 Cu). These phases were produced in bulk form so that the electrochemical nature of each phase could be characterized. It was determined T1 was most active electrochemically and theta was least. When present on grain boundaries in the alloy, electrochemical behavior of the individual precipitates aligned with the observed corrosion behavior of the alloy (e.g. TB was accompanied by general pitting corrosion and T 1 was accompanied by intergranular corrosion attack). In addition to the electrochemical behavior of

  13. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the a three year University Coal Research grant (DEFG26-03NT41792) at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2006. We made excellent progress toward our goal of contributing to the development of high productivity, sulfur tolerant composite metal membranes for hydrogen production and membrane reactors. Composite Pd and Pd alloy metal membranes with thin metal films (1-7 {micro}m) were prepared on porous stainless steel and ceramic supports that meet or exceed the DOE 2010 and 2015 pure hydrogen flux targets at differential pressure of only 20 psi. For example, a 2 {micro}m pure Pd membrane on a Pall AccuSep{reg_sign} substrate achieved an ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor of over 6000, with a pure hydrogen flux of 210 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at only 20 psig feed pressure. Similar performance was achieved with a Pd{sub 80}Au{sub 20} composite membrane on a similar stainless steel substrate. Extrapolating the pure hydrogen flux of this PdAu membrane to the DOE Fossil Energy target conditions of 150 psia feed pressure and 50 psia permeate pressure gives a value of 508 SCFH/ft{sup 2}, exceeding the 2015 target. At these thicknesses, it is the support cost that will dominate the cost of a large scale module. In a direct comparison of FCC phase PdCu and PdAu alloys on identical supports, we showed that a Pd{sub 85}Au{sub 15} (mass %) alloy membrane is not inhibited by CO, CO{sub 2}, or steam present in a water-gas shift feed mixture at 400 C, has better resistance to sulfur than a Pd{sub 94}Cu{sub 6} membrane, and has over twice the hydrogen permeance.

  14. Micromechanical modeling of temperature-dependent initiation fracture toughness in advanced aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, M.J.; Somerday, B.P.; Gangloff, R.P.; Lach, C.L.

    1997-12-31

    The temperature dependence of the plane-strain initiation fracture toughness (K{sub JICi}) is modeled micromechanically for a variety of advanced aluminum alloys that fail by microvoid processes. Materials include precipitation-hardened ingot metallurgy, spray formed, submicron-grain-size powder metallurgy, and metal-matrix composite alloys. A critical-plastic-strain-controlled model, employing tensile yield strength, elastic modulus, work hardening, and reduction of area measurements, successfully predicts K{sub JICi} versus temperature for eight alloys, providing a strong confirmation of this approach. Modeling shows that K{sub JICi} is controlled by the interplay between the temperature dependencies of the intrinsic failure locus {bar {var_epsilon}}{sub f}{sup p}({sigma}{sub m}/{sigma}{sub fl}) and the crack-tip stress/strain fields governed by alloy flow properties. Uncertainties in {bar {var_epsilon}}{sub f}{sup p}({sigma}{sub m}/{sigma}{sub fl}), as well as the critical distance (volume) for crack-tip damage evolution, hinder absolute predictions of K{sub JICi}. Critical distance (calculated from the model) correlates with the nearest-neighbor spacing of void-nucleating particles and with the extent of primary void growth determined from quantitative fractography. These correlations suggest a means to predict absolute plane-strain fracture toughness.

  15. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  16. Novel phenol biosensor based on laccase immobilized on reduced graphene oxide supported palladium-copper alloyed nanocages.

    PubMed

    Mei, Li-Ping; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Wu, Liang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Chen, Jian-Rong; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2015-12-15

    Developing new nanomaterials is of key importance to improve the analytical performances of electrochemical biosensors. In this work, palladium-copper alloyed nanocages supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO-PdCu NCs) were facilely prepared by a simple one-pot solvothermal method. A novel phenol biosensor based on laccase has been constructed for rapid detection of catachol, using RGO-PdCu NCs as electrode material. The as-developed phenol biosensor greatly enhanced the electrochemical signals for catechol. Under the optimal conditions, the biosensor has two linear ranges from 0.005 to 1.155 mM and 1.655 to 5.155 mM for catachol detection at 0.6 V, the sensitivity of 12.65 µA mM(-1) and 5.51 µA mM(-1), respectively. This biosensor showed high selectivity, low detection limit, good reproducibility, and high anti-interference ability. PMID:26159155

  17. Quantification of zinc atoms in a surface alloy on copper in an industrial-type methanol synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kuld, Sebastian; Conradsen, Christian; Moses, Poul Georg; Chorkendorff, Ib; Sehested, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Methanol has recently attracted renewed interest because of its potential importance as a solar fuel. Methanol is also an important bulk chemical that is most efficiently formed over the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. The identity of the active site and, in particular, the role of ZnO as a promoter for this type of catalyst is still under intense debate. Structural changes that are strongly dependent on the pretreatment method have now been observed for an industrial-type methanol synthesis catalyst. A combination of chemisorption, reaction, and spectroscopic techniques provides a consistent picture of surface alloying between copper and zinc. This analysis enables a reinterpretation of the methods that have been used for the determination of the Cu surface area and provides an opportunity to independently quantify the specific Cu and Zn areas. This method may also be applied to other systems where metal-support interactions are important, and this work generally addresses the role of the carrier and the nature of the interactions between carrier and metal in heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:24764288

  18. Carrier scattering mechanisms in p-type transparent copper-alloyed ZnS: Crystalline vs. amorphous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods-Robinson, Rachel; Faghaninia, Alireza; Cooper, Jason K.; Pham, Hieu H.; Lo, Cynthia; Wang, Lin-Wang; Ager, Joel W.

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline (wurtzite and sphalerite) and amorphous forms of copper-alloyed ZnS (CuxZn1-xS) are p-type conducting transparent thin film materials with near-record figures of merit for applications in photovoltaics and optoelectronics. Remarkably, the conductivity of amorphous CuxZn1-xS, 42 S/cm at x = 0.30, is nearly as high as crystalline CuxZn1-xS (54 S/cm at x = 0.21). This contrasts with typical observations of poorer carrier transport in amorphous materials. By combining experiment and computation, we investigate the defect physics underlying hole transport in amorphous and crystalline CuxZn1-xS. Structural probes (EXAFS, TEM and wide-angle XRD) are used to determine bonding characteristics and lattice order, and serve as inputs to ab initio hybrid functional HSE calculations of the electronic band structure. Hall effect, temperature dependent conductivity (15K to 500K), and XPS valence band measurements and ab initio calculations show that hole conduction occurs in a hybridized S-3p and Cu-3d valence band for amorphous and crystalline films. The hole scattering mechanisms which limit the conductivity will be discussed in the context of theoretical carrier transport model based on Boltzmann transport equation, ab initio calculated band structure, and phonon dispersion.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Horizontal Continuous Casting Process of C194 Copper Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guojie; Xie, Shuisheng; Cheng, Lei; Cheng, Zhenkang

    2007-05-01

    Horizontal Continuous Casting (H.C.C) is an important method to cast C194 copper ingot. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the H.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1383K˜1463K, the casting speed is between 7.2m/h˜10.8m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 3.6m/s˜4.6m/s. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the subsequent experiments.

  20. DEFORMATION SUBSTRUCTURES AND THEIR TRANSITIONS IN LASER SHOCK-COMPRESSED COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M A; Schneider, M S; Jarmakani, H; Kad, B; Remington, B A; Kalantar, D H; McNaney, J; Cao, B; Wark, J

    2007-10-17

    It is shown that the short pulse durations (0.1-10 ns) in laser shock compression ensure a rapid decay of the pulse and quenching of the shocked sample in times that are orders of magnitude lower than in conventional explosively driven plate impact experiments. Thus, laser compression, by virtue of a much more rapid cooling, enables the retention of a deformation structure closer to the one existing during shock. The smaller pulse length also decreases the propensity for localization. Copper and copper aluminum (2 and 6 wt% Al) with orientations [001] and [{bar 1}34] were subjected to high intensity laser pulses with energy levels of 70 to 300 J delivered in an initial pulse duration of approximately 3 ns. The [001] and [{bar 1}34] orientations were chosen since they respectively maximize and minimize the number of slip systems with highest resolved shear stresses. Systematic differences of the defect substructure were observed as a function of pressure, stacking-fault energy and crystalline orientation. The changes in the mechanical properties for each condition were compared using micro- and nano-hardness measurements and correlated well with observations of the defect substructure. Three regimes of plastic deformation were identified and their transitions modeled: dislocation cells, stacking-faults, and twins. An existing constitutive description of the slip to twinning transition, based on the critical shear stress, was expanded to incorporate the effect of stacking-fault energy. A new physically-based criterion accounting for stacking-fault energy was developed that describes the transition from perfect loop to partial loop homogeneous nucleation, and consequently from cells to stacking-faults. These calculations predict transitions that are in qualitative agreement with the effect of SFE.

  1. Dissimilar friction welding of titanium alloys to alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, M.; Albright, C.E.; Baeslack, W.A. III

    1994-12-31

    The design of advanced, high-performance gas-turbine engines will require the utilization of elevated-temperature titanium-based materials, including conventional alloys, titanium aluminides, and titanium metal-matrix composites. The most efficient utilization of these materials in the engine compressor section would be achieved by directly joining these materials to existing nickel-base superalloys, such as Alloy 718. To date, the dissimilar welding of titanium alloys to nickel-based alloys has not been common practice because intermetallic compounds form in the weld and cause embrittlement. Special welding techniques must be developed to inhibit this compound formation and to provide high strength welds. In this investigation, a friction welding process was developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718. An interlayer system comprised of copper and niobium sheet layers was employed as a diffusion barrier and weld deformation enhancer. A postweld heat treatment (PWHT, 700{degrees}C for 20 min in vacuum) under axial pressure (Ksi) was used to improve the joint strength consistency. The following conclusions can be drawn from this investigation: (1) A friction welding technique has been developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to Alloy 718 using an interlayer system of niobium and copper. Joint strengths averaging approximately 50 Ksi were achieved. (2) Deformation was concentrated in the interlayers, especially the copper interlayer, during friction welding. Increased reduction in length (RIL) during friction welding resulted in a decrease in the interlayer thicknesses. (3) The EDS results showed that the niobium and copper interlayers prevent interdiffusion between the two parent metals, producing formation of detrimental phases.

  2. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Part 2: Scale-up investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Three experimental tantalum alloy compositions containing 14-16% W, 1% Re, 0.7% Hf, 0.025% C or 0.015% C and 0.015% N were prepared as two inch diameter ingots by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The as-cast ingots were processed by extrusion and swaging to one inch and 0.4 inch diameter rod and evaluated. Excellent high temperature forging behavior was exhibited by all three compositions. Creep strength at 2000 F to 2400 F was enhanced by higher tungsten additions as well as substitution of nitrogen for carbon. Weldability of all three compositions was determined to be adequate. Room temperature ductility was retained in the advanced tantalum alloy compositions as well as a notched/unnotched strength ratio of 1.4 for a notched bar having a K sub t = 2.9.

  3. Thermal and Mechanical Property Characterization of the Advanced Disk Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.

    2005-01-01

    A low solvus, high refractory (LSHR) powder metallurgy disk alloy was recently designed using experimental screening and statistical modeling of composition and processing variables on sub-scale disks to have versatile processing-property capabilities for advanced disk applications. The objective of the present study was to produce a scaled-up disk and apply varied heat treat processes to enable full-scale demonstration of LSHR properties. Scaled-up disks were produced, heat treated, sectioned, and then machined into specimens for mechanical testing. Results indicate the LSHR alloy can be processed to produce fine and coarse grain microstructures with differing combinations of strength and time-dependent mechanical properties, for application at temperatures exceeding 1300 F.

  4. High Temperature, Slow Strain Rate Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy ME3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; OConnor, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    The advanced disk alloy ME3 was designed in the HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 F in large disks. This was achieved by designing a disk alloy and process producing balanced monotonic, cyclic, and time-dependent mechanical properties. combined with robust processing and manufacturing characteristics. The resulting baseline alloy, processing, and supersolvus heat treatment produces a uniform, relatively fine mean grain size of about ASTM 7, with as-large-as (ALA) grain size of about ASTM 3. There is a long term need for disks with higher rim temperature capabilities than 1250 F. This would allow higher compressor exit (T3) temperatures and allow the full utilization of advanced combustor and airfoil concepts under development. Several approaches are being studied that modify the processing and chemistry of ME3, to possibly improve high temperature properties. Promising approaches would be applied to subscale material, for screening the resulting mechanical properties at these high temperatures. n obvious path traditionally employed to improve the high temperature and time-dependent capabilities of disk alloys is to coarsen the grain size. A coarser grain size than ASTM 7 could potentially be achieved by varying the forging conditions and supersolvus heat treatment. The objective of this study was to perform forging and heat treatment experiments ("thermomechanical processing experiments") on small compression test specimens of the baseline ME3 composition, to identify a viable forging process allowing significantly coarser grain size targeted at ASTM 3-5, than that of the baseline, ASTM 7.

  5. Thermomechanical characterization of nickel-titanium-copper shape memory alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, K P; Ramsey, P B; Krulevitch, P

    2000-10-31

    In an effort to develop a more extensive model for the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy (SMA) films, a novel characterization method has been developed. This automated test has been tailored to characterize films for use in micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) actuators. The shape memory effect in NiTiCu is seen in the solid-state phase transformation from an easily deformable low-temperature state to a 'shape remembering' high-temperature state. The accurate determination of engineering properties for these films necessitates measurements of both stress and strain in microfabricated test structures over the full range of desired deformation. Our various experimental methods (uniaxial tensile tests, bimorph curvature tests and diaphragm bulge tests) provide recoverable stress and strain data and the stress-strain relations for these films. Tests were performed over a range of temperatures by resistive heating or ambient heating. These measurements provide the results necessary for developing active SMA structural film design models.

  6. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  7. Corrosion protection of high-copper aluminum alloys using green technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The concept of surface modification as a new method of corrosion protection using chemicals without toxic problems is described for the Al alloys Al 6061, Al 7075-T6 and Al 2024-T3. In the Ce-Mo process Ce and Mo are incorporated into the original oxide film by chemical and electrochemical processes. The resulting surfaces are resistant to pitting in aggressive solutions such as 0.5 N NaCl. Surface modified Al 6013 has passed the salt spray test according to ASTM B 117. For Al 6061 and 7075, hot solutions of CeCl{sub 3} and Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} are used, while for Al 2024 CeCl{sub 3} is replaced by Ce acetate. For all alloys anodic polarization is carried out in Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. For Al 2024 and Al 7075 a Cu removal pre-treatment step is used in which Cu intermetallic compounds are removed from the outer surface layers. The resistance to localized corrosion has been evaluated by recording of impedance spectra in 0.5 N NaCl for 30 days. Surface analysis data suggest that Ce and Mo are concentrated at sites where local cathodes such as Cu intermetallic compounds are located. Polarization curves show that both the cathodic and the anodic reaction are inhibited on modified surfaces. The pitting potential E{sub pit} is increased for surface modified samples at constant corrosion potential E{sub corr}. This result could be due to a decrease of the amount of Cl adsorbed at a given potential for oxide layers containing Ce and Mo.

  8. A seed-mediated approach to the morphology-controlled synthesis of bimetallic copper-platinum alloy nanoparticles with enhanced electrocatalytic performance for the methanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Cui, Penglei; He, Hongyan; Liu, Hui; Peng, Zhijian; Yang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Mastery over the morphology of nanomaterials usually enables control of their properties and enhancement of their usefulness for a given application. Herein, we report a seed-mediated approach for the fabrication of bimetallic copper-platinum (CuPt) alloy nanoparticles with different morphologies. This strategy involves the first synthesis of Cu seed particles with multiple twins, and subsequent nucleation and growth of Pt metal. Then upon the Cu/Pt molar ratios in the synthesis, the rapid interdiffusion of Cu and Pt atoms results in the formation of bimetallic CuPt alloy nanoparticles with polyhedral, stellated, or dendritic morphologies. It has been found that both the morphology and electronic coupling effect between Cu and Pt components have significant effect on the electrochemical property of the alloy particles. In particular, the dendritic CuPt alloy nanoparticles display the highest specific activity for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) due to their abundant atomic steps, edges, and corner atoms in the dendritic structure, while the polyhedral CuPt alloy particles show best carbon monoxide (CO) tolerant behavior due to the strong electronic donation effect from Cu to Pt atoms.

  9. The strainrange partitioning behavior of an advanced gas turbine disk alloy, AF2-1DA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The low-cycle, creep-fatigue characteristics of the advanced gas turbine disk alloy, AF2-1DA have been determined at 1400 F and are presented in terms of the method of strainrange partitioning (SRP). The mean stresses which develop in the PC and CP type SRP cycles at the lowest inelastic strainrange were observed to influence the cyclic lives to a greater extent than the creep effects and hence interfered with a conventional interpretation of the results by SRP. A procedure is proposed for dealing with the mean stress effects on life which is compatible with SRP.

  10. Damping capacity measurements of degradation in advanced materials. [Rapidly solidified alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates that had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes to damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a non destructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. 17 references, 15 figures.

  11. Environment enhanced fatigue of advanced aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, Donald C.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The environmental fatigue crack propagation behavior of advanced Al-Li-Cu based alloys and metal matrix composites is being characterized. Aqueous NaCl and water vapor, which produce atomic hydrogen by reactions on clean crack surfaces, are emphasized. The effects of environment sensitive crack closure, stress ratio, and precipitate microstructure are assessed. Mechanistic models are sought for intrinsic crack tip damage processes to enable predictions of cracking behavior outside of the data, metallurgical improvements in material cracking resistance, and insight on hydrogen compatibility.

  12. On the synthesis of copper-nickel binary alloy nanoparticles and binding silane coupling agents to magnetic ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, Jeremy Scott

    This dissertation addresses the creation of a multifunctional nanoplatform for cancer targeting, imaging, and therapy. Magnetic oxide nanoparticles were labeled with silane coupling agents that could be used for targeting. The magnetic oxides have application as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Copper-nickel binary alloy nanoparticles were prepared for possible use in Curie temperature limited hyperthermia therapy. Spherical, single crystal iron oxide nanoparticles with average diameters of 4 nm, 6 nm, 8 nm, 11 nm, or 16 nm were prepared using published procedures. The iron oxide particle chemistry was extended to synthesize 13 nm diameter CoFe2O4, 9 nm diameter MnFe2O4, and 12 nm diameter NiFe2O4. The particles had a coating of oleic acid and oleylamine ligands. Silane coupling chemistry was used to displace these ligands with either beta-aminoethyl-gamma-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane, triethoxysilane-PEG, or triethoxysilane-biotin. The silane ligands would allow the particles to be conjugated with a targeting group. New chemistry was developed to synthesize fcc CuNi nanoparticles with the objective of finding methods that give particles with an average size less than 50 nm, a narrow distribution of particle sizes, and control of particle composition. The particle synthesis involves the reduction of a mixture of copper(II) and nickel(II) and the reduction conditions included diol reduction, polyol synthesis, seeding by diol reduction, and oleate reduction. One of the main issues is the formation of hcp nickel particles as a containment in the method. The factors that avoided the formation of hcp nickel particles and allow only fcc particles to form were the choice of reducing agent, ratio of surfactants, and heating time. Both the oleate reduction and diol reduction gave a mixture of the hcp and fcc phases. By controlling certain reaction conditions, such as keeping the ratio of oleic acid to oleylamine 1:1 and slowly heating to reflux for

  13. A calorimetric investigation of recrystallization in aluminum magnesium silicon copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Khatwa, Mohamed

    The recrystallization behavior of three Al--Mg--Si--Cu alloys with varying iron and manganese additions was studied by differential power scanning calorimetry under non-isothermal annealing conditions. The influence of cold deformation on the precipitation sequence and its interaction with recrystallization was also investigated. The DSC experiments were complemented by hardness measurements and microstructural studies by optical and electron microscopy. The DSC signals, after optimization of the baseline, were used for the calculation of the kinetic parameters of the recrystallization process. Two different modeling approaches based on global JMAK kinetics were implemented. The first approach utilizes the classical isothermal JMAK expression directly, while the second approach introduces a path variable related to the thermal history of the material in the JMAK description. Model-independent estimates of the activation energy were also evaluated using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa integral isoconversion method. The results show that the initial stages of recrystallization are not affected by the preceding precipitation processes and recrystallization always follows the precipitation of the Q' phase. However, during recrystallization enhanced coarsening of the Q' phase takes place leading to its transformation to the more stable Q phase. The Q phase exerts a Zener pinning pressures on the migrating boundaries preventing the formation of an equilibrium grain structure. Moreover, for high Fe and Mn additions, discontinuous precipitation of Mg2Si overlaps with the end of recrystallization and exerts an additional pinning pressure on the boundaries. Varying the Fe and Mn content significantly affects the recrystallization kinetics. PSN is promoted in alloys with the higher Fe and Mn content and the recrystallization temperature shifts to lower values. The modeling results show that the recrystallization process conforms to the classical JMAK type behavior. The course of the

  14. Reliability design and assessment of a micro-probe using the results of a tensile test of a beryllium-copper alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyub; Shin, Myung-Soo

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the results of tensile tests for a beryllium-copper (BeCu) alloy thin film and the application of the results to the design of a probe. The copper alloy films were fabricated by electroplating. To obtain the tensile characteristics of the film, the dog-bone type specimen was fabricated by the etching method. The tensile tests were performed with the specimen using a test machine developed by the authors. The BeCu alloy has an elastic modulus of 119 GPa and the 0.2% offset yield and ultimate tensile strengths of 1078 MPa and 1108 MPa, respectively. The design and manufacture of a smaller probe require higher pad density and smaller pad-pitch chips. It should be effective in high-frequency testing. For the design of a new micro-probe, we investigated several design parameters that may cause problems, such as the contact force and life, using the tensile properties and the design of experiment method in conjunction with finite element analysis. The optimal dimensions of the probe were found using the response surface method. The probe with optimal dimensions was manufactured by a precision press process. It was verified that the manufactured probe satisfied the life, the contact force and the over drive through the compression tests and the life tests of the probes.

  15. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  16. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Dissimilar Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Using Copper Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding with Cu3Si filler wire was employed to join dissimilar Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and AISI316 stainless steel (316SS). The effects of welding parameters on bead shape, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior were investigated in detail. The results show that cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 212 MPa. In the joint, obvious nonuniformity of the microstructure is found in the fusion zone (FZ) and at the interfaces from the top to the bottom, which could be improved by increasing heat input. For the homogeneous joint, the FZ is characterized by Fe67- x Si x Ti33 dendrites spreading on α-Cu matrix, and the two interfaces of 316SS/FZ and FZ/Ti6Al4V are characterized by a bamboo-like 316SS layer and a CuTi2 layer, respectively. All the tensile samples fractured in the hardest CuTi2 layer at Ti6Al4V side of the joints. The fracture surface is characterized by river pattern revealing brittle cleavage fracture. The bead formation mechanisms were discussed according to the melt flow and the thermodynamic calculation.

  17. Effect of Pre-Treatment on Copper Precipitation Characteristics in a Copper-Alloyed Interstitial Free Steel Studied by Thermoelectric Power Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Radhakanta; Massardier, Véronique; Singh, Shiv Brat; Mohanty, Omkar Nath

    2013-01-01

    Copper precipitation has been studied by thermoelectric power measurements in a high strength interstitial free steel processed under various conditions like batch annealing (BA) (4 hours at 973 K (700 °C)), continuous annealing (CA) (1 minute at 1093 K (820 °C)) and full annealing (FA) (2 hours at 1173 K (900 °C)). The results show that the kinetics of copper precipitation depend on the annealing pre-treatments which influence the amount of copper in solid solution before aging. Extensive copper precipitation associated with a marked increase in hardness was observed in the CA and FA material aged between 773 K and 873 K (500 °C and 600 °C), however, this precipitation was not detected when the steel was subjected to BA before aging.

  18. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  19. Electrochemical characterization and occluded environment analysis of localized corrosion in advanced aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, F.D.; Stoner, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    In order for advanced aluminum alloys to be used in structural applications it is necessary to understand and mitigate failures that can occur due to localized corrosion events. Mechanical and electrochemical stresses interacting with a microstructural heterogeneity can result in the rapid growth of a flaw in the material; this phenomenon is a form of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). One possible mechanism of EAC in Al-Li-X alloys is the preferential dissolution of an electrochemically active microstructural feature along a grain or sub-grain boundary. To examine this mechanism it is necessary to obtain information on the occluded environment that develops in a growing crack and the electrochemical behavior of boundary phases in the occluded environment. The electrochemistry of three relevant boundary phases (matrix phase (SHT 2095), T{sub 1} precipitate (Al{sub 2}CuLi) and Cu-depleted zone (99.99% Al)) in several model environments has been documented using a variety of electrochemical techniques including scratching and straining electrode experiments. The electrochemical behavior of these phases has been linked to the SCC behavior of several Al-Li-X alloys using constant load testing under applied potentials in NaCl/Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and NaCl/Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} environments. The occluded environment model is being evaluated and refined by analysis of occluded chemistries using pH measurements and capillary electrophoresis.

  20. Electrical and Magneto-Resistivity Measurements on Amorphous Copper-Titanium Alloys at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Renyong

    1992-01-01

    parameters of the theoretical fits to the data were similar for both rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50} and rm Cu_{60}Ti_ {40} alloys. The two important exceptions were the inelastic and spin-orbit lifetimes: their zero -field values were about an order of magnitude smaller than those from the magnetoresistances. Also the inelastic lifetimes tend to saturate for T<0.1K in non-zero magnetic fields. Finally, we were also able to estimate the expected superconducting transition temperatures of both rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50} and rm Cu_{60}Ti _{40} alloys: less than 15mK and 5mK, respectively. Our novel technique can, in principle, be used to make high precision resistance measurements down to 15mK on any ribbon or film-like high resistivity metal.

  1. Finite Element Analysis of a Copper Single Crystal Shape Memory Alloy-Based Endodontic Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Marin; Thiebaud, Frédéric; Bel Haj Khalifa, Saifeddine; Engels-Deutsch, Marc; Ben Zineb, Tarak

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is the development of endodontic Cu-based single crystal Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) instruments in order to eliminate the antimicrobial and mechanical deficiencies observed with the conventional Nickel-Titane (NiTi) SMA files. A thermomechanical constitutive law, already developed and implemented in a finite element code by our research group, is adopted for the simulation of the single crystal SMA behavior. The corresponding material parameters were identified starting from experimental results for a tensile test at room temperature. A computer-aided design geometry has been achieved and considered for a finite element structural analysis of the endodontic Cu-based single crystal SMA files. They are meshed with tetrahedral continuum elements to improve the computation time and the accuracy of results. The geometric parameters tested in this study are the length of the active blade, the rod length, the pitch, the taper, the tip diameter, and the rod diameter. For each set of adopted parameters, a finite element model is built and tested in a combined bending-torsion loading in accordance with ISO 3630-1 norm. The numerical analysis based on finite element procedure allowed purposing an optimal geometry suitable for Cu-based single crystal SMA endodontic files. The same analysis was carried out for the classical NiTi SMA files and a comparison was made between the two kinds of files. It showed that Cu-based single crystal SMA files are less stiff than the NiTi files. The Cu-based endodontic files could be used to improve the root canal treatments. However, the finite element analysis brought out the need for further investigation based on experiments.

  2. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

    2012-10-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

  3. Micro Raman spectroscopy used for the study of corrosion products on copper alloys: study of the chemical composition of artificial patinas used for restoration purposes.

    PubMed

    Hayez, Valerie; Costa, Virginia; Guillaume, Joseph; Terryn, Herman; Hubin, Annick

    2005-04-01

    Studying the atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy artifacts is important to acquire a better knowledge about the condition of the object and its possible conservation and restoration. The nature of the formed product, e.g. sulfate, carbonate or chloride, depends on factors such as the amount of polluting elements or humidity but may also depend on the nature of the underlying aesthetic patina, applied by the artist. The composition of the patination solution and the method of patination will both influence the nature of this aesthetic patina, i.e. its chemical composition and morphology. However, although a lot of patination recipes exist, little is known about these patinas as far as composition, structure and ageing is concerned. Therefore, a combination of several surface analytical techniques is required for the complete characterization of patina layers. In this paper, Raman spectroscopy is used to study the characteristics of several patinas obtained on copper following different traditional recipes. PMID:15776167

  4. Wear response of a Zn-base alloy in the presence of SiC particle reinforcement: A comparative study with a copper-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, B.K.; Das, S.; Modi, O.P.; Jha, A.K.; Dasgupta, R.; Yegneswaran, A.H.

    1999-12-01

    An attempt has been made in this study to examine the effects produced by the reinforcement of (10 wt%) SiC particles on the sliding wear behavior of a Zn-base alloy. The matrix alloy was also subjected to identical test conditions to assess the influence of the SiC dispersoid phase. The wear characteristics of the (Zn-base alloy) composite and the matrix alloy were also compared with those of a Cu-base alloy (i.e., an aluminum bronze) in order to understand the scope of exploiting the Zn-base alloy matrix/composite as a substitute material for the latter (Cu-base) alloy. It has been observed that low frictional heat generated at the lower sliding speed (0.42 m/s) enabled the Zn-base (matrix) alloy to perform better than the composite material, while the Cu-base alloy showed intermediate wear resistance. On the contrary, the trend changed at a higher sliding speed (4.62 m/s) when high frictional heating caused the wear behavior of the Cu-base alloy to be superior to that of the Zn-base (matrix) alloy. The composite in this case performed better than the matrix alloy. The wear behavior of the specimens has been explained in terms of factors like microcracking tendency and thermal stability introduced by the SiC dispersoid phase and lubricating, load bearing, and low melting characteristics of microconstituents like {alpha} and {eta} in the (Zn-base) alloy system and the thermal stability of the Cu-base alloy. It seems that the predominance of one set of parameters over the other actually controls the overall performance of a material. Once again, it is the test conditions that ultimately allow a particular set of factors to govern the other and influence the response of the specimens accordingly. The observed wear behavior of the samples has been substantiated further with their wear surface characteristics.

  5. Comparative study on the corrosion behavior of the cold rolled and hot rolled low-alloy steels containing copper and antimony in flue gas desulfurization environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. A.; Kim, J. G.; He, Y. S.; Shin, K. S.; Yoon, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between the corrosion and microstructual characteristics of cold rolled and hot rolled low-alloy steels containing copper and antimony was established. The corrosion behavior of the specimens used in flue gas desulfurization systems was examined by electrochemical and weight loss measurements in an aggressive solution of 16.9 vol % H2SO4 + 0.35 vol % HCl at 60°C, pH 0.3. It has been shown that the corrosion rate of hot rolled steel is lower than that of cold rolled steel. The corrosion rate of cold rolled steel was increased by grain refinement, inclusion formation, and preferred grain orientation.

  6. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  7. Mortality of copper cadmium alloy workers with special reference to lung cancer and non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system, 1946-92.

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; Lister, A; Gilthorpe, M S; Harrington, J M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To identify and quantify any relations between occupational exposure to cadmium oxide fume and mortalities from lung cancer and from chronic non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system. METHODS--The mortality experience of 347 copper cadmium alloy workers, 624 workers employed in the vicinity of copper cadmium alloy work (vicinity workers), and 521 iron and brass foundry workers (all men) was investigated for the period 1946-92. All subjects were first employed in these types of work in the period 1922-78 and for a minimum period of one year at one of two participating factories. Two analytical approaches were used, indirect standardisation and Poisson regression. RESULTS--Compared with the general population of England and Wales, mortality from lung cancer among copper cadmium alloy workers was close to expectation (observed deaths 18, expected deaths 17.8, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 101, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 60 to 159). A significant excess was shown for lung cancer among vicinity workers but not among iron and brass foundry workers (vicinity workers: observed 55, expected 34.3, SMR 160, 95% CI 121 to 209, P < 0.01; iron and brass foundry workers: observed 19, expected 17.8, SMR 107, 95% CI 64 to 167). Increased SMRs for non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system were shown for each of the three groups (alloy workers: observed 54, expected 23.5, SMR 230, 95% CI 172 to 300, P < 0.001; vicinity workers: observed 71, expected 43.0, SMR 165, 95% CI 129 to 208, P < 0.001; iron and brass foundry workers: observed 34, expected 17.1, SMR 199, 95% CI 137 to 278, P < 0.01). Work histories of the copper cadmium alloy workers were combined with independent assessments of cadmium exposures over time to develop individual estimates of cumulative exposure to cadmium; this being a time dependent variable. Poisson regression was used to investigate risks of lung cancer and risks of chronic non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system

  8. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  9. Copper-based alloys, crystallographic and crystallochemical parameters of alloys in binary systems Cu-Me (Me=Co, Rh, Ir, Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porobova, Svetlana; Markova, Tat'jana; Klopotov, Vladimir; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Loskutov, Oleg; Vlasov, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of the analysis of phase equilibrium of ordered phases in binary systems based on copper Cu- Me (where Me - Co, Rh, Ir, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt) to find correlations of crystallochemical and crystallographic factors. It is established that the packing index in disordered solid solutions in binary systems based on copper is close to the value of 0.74 against the background of an insignificant deviation of atomic volumes from the Zen's law.

  10. Feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment for vanadium alloys in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) for vanadium alloys in the water-cooled Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being investigated as part of the U.S./Monbusho collaboration. Preliminary findings suggest that such an experiment is feasible, with certain constraints. Creating a suitable irradiation position in the ATR, designing an effective thermal neutron filter, incorporating thermocouples for limited specimen temperature monitoring, and handling of tritium during various phases of the assembly and reactor operation all appear to be feasible. An issue that would require special attention, however, is tritium permeation loss through the capsule wall at the higher design temperatures (>{approx}600{degrees}C). If permeation is excessive, the reduced amount of tritium entering the test specimens would limit the helium generation rates in them. At the lower design temperatures (<{approx}425{degrees}C), sodium, instead of lithium, may have to be used as the bond material to overcome the tritium solubility limitation.

  11. Comparison of the sealing capabilities of Ketac-silver and extra high copper alloy amalgam when used as retrograde root canal filling.

    PubMed

    al-Ajam, A D; McGregor, A J

    1993-07-01

    Apical microleakage following reverse retrograde root filling with extra high copper amalgam alloy was compared with that following a silver-glass ionomer retrofilling. The root canals of 56 extracted, single-rooted anterior human teeth were instrumented and obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha and zinc oxide-eugenol sealer. Each tooth was apically resected at 45 degrees to its long axis and the root surface isolated with nail varnish. Teeth were divided into three groups. The first group received extra high copper amalgam retrograde fillings, the second group was retrofilled with a silver-glass ionomer, and the control group had no retrograde root filling placed. Following immersion in 1% methylene blue dye at 37 degrees C, the roots were sectioned and dye penetration was measured using an image analyzer. The sealing effectiveness of these materials was determined by their ability to inhibit dye penetration at 24 and 48 h. The results of this study show that a silver glass-ionomer is just as effective as extra high copper amalgam in terms of sealing capability. There was no statistically significant difference between the two materials. PMID:8245758

  12. Lead alloys: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagshaw, N. E.

    The most critical non-active component in the lead/acid battery is the grid or substrate. A review of the work on grids and grid alloys in the period 1960-1993 has been carried out by the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium and, in this paper, the results are analyzed in relation to the effort expended on different alloy systems. Lead-antimony alloys and the effects on them of additions of arsenic, tin, and grain-refining elements (selenium, sulfur, copper), together with lead-calcium alloys and the effect on them of tin additions, have received the greatest attention in the past. Proposals are made for future studies. Possible evolutionary developments include the addition of silver and higher amounts of tin to lead-calcium alloys, more detailed investigations of lead-strontium and lead-lithium alloys containing tin and/or silver, and further work on very-low-antimony alloys. More speculative projects are very rapidly cooled alloys, the use of aluminium as grids or spines, plastic/lead-coated copper negative grids, corrosion-resistant coatings of lead compounds on the grids and, finally, a substrate for a bipolar plate that is based on conductive inorganic compounds.

  13. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  14. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2001-07-31

    Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H2 separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({approx}1 mm) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. Based on preliminary results, thin Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films are expected to exhibit hydrogen flux up to ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H2 separation, and resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. The overall objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using sequential electroless plating to fabricate Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 4}0 alloy membranes on porous supports for H{sub 2} separation. These following advantages of these membranes for processing of coal-derived gas will be demonstrated: High H{sub 2} flux; Sulfur tolerant, even at very high total sulfur levels (1000 ppm); Operation at temperatures well above 500 C; and Resistance to embrittlement and degradation by thermal cycling. The proposed research plan is designed to providing a fundamental understanding of: Factors important in membrane fabrication; Optimization of membrane structure and composition; Effect of temperature, pressure, and gas composition on H{sub 2} flux and membrane selectivity; and How this membrane technology can be integrated in coal gasification-fuel cell systems.

  15. Radiation behavior of high-entropy alloys for advanced reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter K.; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-04-30

    In the first task, we have demonstrated the radiation damage and the recrystallization behaviors in multicomponent alloys through molecular-dynamics simulations. It is found that by alloying with atoms of different sizes, the atomic-level strain increases, and the propensity of the radiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition increases as the defects cluster in the cascade body. Recrystallization of the radiation induced supercooled or glass regions show that by tuning the composition and the equilibrium temperature, the multicomponent alloys can be healed. The crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transitions predict the potential high radiation resistance in multicomponent alloys. In the second task, three types of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were fabricated from AlCoCrFeNi and AlCuCrFeNi quinary alloys. Hardness and reduced contact modulus were measured using nanoindentation tests. Heavy ion irradiation were performed using 10 MeV gold and 5 MeV nickel to study radiation effects. Al0.5CrCuFeNi2 shows phase separation upon the presence of copper. Both hardness and contact modulus exhibit the same trend as increasing the applied load, and it indicates that excessive free volume may alter the growth rate of the plastic zone. The as-cast Al0.1CoCrFeNi specimen undergone the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process and steady cooling rate which mitigate the quenching effect. The swelling behavior was characterized by the atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the swelling rate is approximately 0.02% dpa. Selected area diffraction (SAD) patters show irradiation-induced amorphization throughout the ion projected range. Within the peak damage region, an amorpous ring is observed, and a mixture of amorphous/ crystalline structure at deeper depth is found. The Al0.3CoCrFeNi HEAs shows good radiation resistance up to 60 peak dpa. No voids or dislocations are observed. The crystal structures remain face-centered-cubic (FCC) before and

  16. The physical and mechanical metallurgy of advanced O+BCC titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, Christopher John

    This thesis comprises a systematic study of the microstructural evolution, phase transformation behavior, elevated-temperature creep behavior, room-temperature and elevated-temperature tensile behavior, and room-temperature fatigue behavior of advanced titanium-aluminum-niobium (Ti-Al-Nb) alloys with and without boron additions. The specific alloys studied were: Ti-5A1-45Nb (at%), Ti-15Al-33Nb (at%), Ti-15Al-33Nb-0.5B (at%), Ti-15Al-33Nb-5B (at%), Ti-21Al-29Nb (at%), Ti-22Al-26Nb (at%), and Ti-22Al-26Nb-5B (at%). The only alloy composition that had been previously studied before this thesis work began was Ti-22Al-26Nb (at%). Publication in peer-reviewed material science journals of the work performed in this thesis has made data available in the scientific literature that was previously non-existent. The knowledge gap for Ti-Al-Nb phase equilibria over the compositional range of Ti-23Al-27Nb (at%) to Ti-12Al-38Nb (at%) that existed before this work began was successfully filled. The addition of 5 at% boron to the Ti-15Al-33Nb alloy produced 5-9 volume percent boride phase needles within the microstructure. The chemical composition of the boride phase measured by electron microprobe was determined to be approximately B 2TiNb. The lattice parameters of the boride phase were simulated through density functional theory calculations by collaborators at the Air Force Research Laboratory based on the measured composition. Using the simulated lattice parameters, electron backscatter diffraction kikuchi patterns and selected area electron diffraction patterns obtained from the boride phase were successfully indexed according to the space group and site occupancies of the B27 orthorhombic crystal structure. This suggests that half the Ti (c) Wyckoff positions are occupied by Ti atoms and the other half are occupied by Nb atoms in the boride phase lattice. Creep deformation behavior is the main focus of this thesis and in particular understanding the dominant creep

  17. Fluorescent copper nanoparticles: recent advances in synthesis and applications for sensing metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongming; Cao, Fengpu; Lei, Xiaoling; Mang, Lianghong; Cheng, Shengjuan; Song, Jintong

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent copper nanoparticles (F-CuNPs) have received great attention due to their attractive features, such as water solubility, wide availability, ease of functionalization and good biocompatibility, and considerable efforts have been devoted to the preparation and applications of F-CuNPs. This review article comprises three main parts. In the first part, we briefly present the fluorescence properties of F-CuNPs. Then we cover the fabrication strategies of various F-CuNPs functionalized by different ligands. In the third part, we focus on the applications of F-CuNPs for sensing metal ions, including Hg2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe3+ and other metal ions. Lastly, we further discuss the opportunities and challenges of F-CuNPs in the synthetic strategies and applications for sensing metal ions.

  18. High Temperature Oxidation of Silicon Carbide and Advanced Iron-Based Alloys in Steam-Hydrogen Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Keiser, James R; Brady, Michael P; Cheng, Ting; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Pint, Bruce A; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    A side by side comparison of the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloys with SiC materials and advanced iron-based alloys is provided. Oxidation tests were conducted in steam and steam-hydrogen environments at 800-1350 C and 0.34-2MPa for durations up to 48 hours. Monolithic SiC specimens as well as SiC/SiC composites were examined during the study where the material recession mechanism appeared to be governed by silica layer volatilization at the surface for CVD SiC. A wide set of austenitic and ferritic steels were also examined where a critical Cr content (>20 wt.%) was shown to be necessary to achieve oxidation resistance at high temperatures. SiC materials and alumina-forming ferritic steels exhibited slowest oxidation kinetics; roughly two orders of magnitude lower than zirconium alloys.

  19. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  20. Vickers hardness, indentation creep and corrosion behaviour of Al-5Ti-1B alloy with copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said Gouda, El; Nassar, Amira

    2014-11-01

    The effects of 1, 3 and 5 wt.% Cu additions on structure, Vickers hardness, indentation creep and corrosion behaviour of Al-5Ti-1B ternary alloy were studied and analyzed. The Al-5Ti-1B alloy exhibited a mixture of Al3Ti and TiB2 intermetallic compounds (IMCs), and Al solid solution. Additions of 1 and 3 wt.% Cu showed the same phases, indicating a complete solubility of Cu atoms in Al matrix. In addition, the Al-5Ti-1B-5Cu alloy exhibited a precipitation of CuAl2 IMC. Furthermore, additions of Cu decreased the particle size of Al matrix. This structural behaviour increased rapidly the Vickers hardness number (HV) from 643 to 1395 MPa, increased the indentation creep resistance and improved corrosion behaviour of the Al-5Ti-1B alloy. Cu is anti-corrosion phase when completely dissolved or precipitated as IMC in Al matrix.

  1. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  2. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  3. Electrodeposition of SnSbCu Alloy on Copper from an Electrolyte with Varied Content of Antimony Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeeva, A. Kh.; Valeev, I. Sh.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure and chemical composition of electrodeposited alloys of the SnSbCu system with varied concentration of antimony chloride in the electrolyte have been investigated. It is shown that during electrodeposition mechanical-mixture alloys are not formed, but rather intermetallic compounds. It is found that increasing the concentration of antimony chloride in the electrolyte leads to a decrease in the tin content and cracking of the coating.

  4. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  5. Recent advances on the development of magnesium alloys for biodegradable implants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Zhigang; Smith, Christopher; Sankar, Jag

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made on the development of biodegradable magnesium alloys as "smart" implants in cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. Mg-based alloys as biodegradable implants have outstanding advantages over Fe-based and Zn-based ones. However, the extensive applications of Mg-based alloys are still inhibited mainly by their high degradation rates and consequent loss in mechanical integrity. Consequently, extensive studies have been conducted to develop Mg-based alloys with superior mechanical and corrosion performance. This review focuses on the following topics: (i) the design criteria of biodegradable materials; (ii) alloy development strategy; (iii) in vitro performances of currently developed Mg-based alloys; and (iv) in vivo performances of currently developed Mg-based implants, especially Mg-based alloys under clinical trials. PMID:25034646

  6. Evaluation of the corrosion behavior of nickel- and copper-base alloys in high-magnesium brine

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    The reference design of a package for containing high-level nuclear waste in a salt repository utilizes a mile steel container. An alternate material, selected from a group of six Ni- and Cu-base alloys, is being considered for this waste package application in the event that the mild steel proves inadequate as a corrosion barrier. The corrosion behavior of Ni-base alloys has been obtained, in the present study, by examining the behavior of seal-welded test vessels made of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys used to contain steel specimens in anoxic, two-phase salt/brine environments. In addition, an irradiation-corrosion scoping test of Ni-base alloy crevice corrosion specimens was performed. The only degradation noted of the Ni-base alloys occurred in the case of a leaky seal-welded vessel, in which air and brine simultaneously contacted the wall of the container, producing numerous small pits. Cu-base alloys were found to be highly corrosion resistant in anoxic brines. The potential effects of radiolysis products, air, or sulfides remains to be determined. 2 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  7. Interfacial characterization of SLM parts in multi-material processing: Metallurgical diffusion between 316L stainless steel and C18400 copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.H. Zhang, D.Q. Sing, S.L. Chua, C.K. Loh, L.E.

    2014-08-15

    Multi-material processing in selective laser melting using a novel approach, by the separation of two different materials within a single dispensing coating system was investigated. 316L stainless steel and UNS C18400 Cu alloy multi-material samples were produced using selective laser melting and their interfacial characteristics were analyzed using focused ion beam, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron back scattered diffraction techniques. A substantial amount of Fe and Cu element diffusion was observed at the bond interface suggesting good metallurgical bonding. Quantitative evidence of good bonding at the interface was also obtained from the tensile tests where the fracture was initiated at the copper region. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of steel/Cu SLM parts was evaluated to be 310 ± 18 MPa and the variation in microhardness values was found to be gradual along the bonding interface from the steel region (256 ± 7 HV{sub 0.1}) to the copper region (72 ± 3 HV{sub 0.1}). - Highlights: • Multi-material processing was successfully implemented and demonstrated in SLM. • Bi-metallic laminates of steel/Cu were successfully produced with the SLM process. • A substantial amount of Fe and Cu diffusion was observed at the bond interface. • Good metallurgical bonding was obtained at the interface of the steel/Cu laminates. • Highly refined microstructure was obtained due to rapid solidification in SLM.

  8. Multi-Pulse Excitation for Underwater Analysis of Copper-Based Alloys Using a Novel Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) System.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Salvador; Fortes, Francisco J; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of multi-pulse excitation has been evaluated as an effective solution to mitigate the preferential ablation of the most volatile elements, namely Sn, Pb, and Zn, observed during laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of copper-based alloys. The novel remote LIBS prototype used in this experiments featured both single-pulse (SP-LIBS) and multi-pulse excitation (MP-LIBS). The remote instrument is capable of performing chemical analysis of submersed materials up to a depth of 50 m. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis was performed at air pressure settings simulating the conditions during a real subsea analysis. A set of five certified bronze standards with variable concentration of Cu, As, Sn, Pb, and Zn were used. In SP-LIBS, signal emission is strongly sensitive to ambient pressure. In this case, fractionation effect was observed. Multi-pulse excitation circumvents the effect of pressure over the quantitative analysis, thus avoiding the fractionation phenomena observed in single pulse LIBS. The use of copper as internal standard minimizes matrix effects and discrepancies due to variation in ablated mass. PMID:26957105

  9. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  10. Alteration zone Mapping in the Meiduk and Sar Cheshmeh Porphyry Copper Mining Districts of Iran using Advanced Land Imager (ALI) Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand Pour, A.; Hashim, M.

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the capability of Earth Observing-1 (EO1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) data for hydrothermal alteration mapping in the Meiduk and Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mining districts, SE Iran. Feature-oriented principal components selection, 4/2, 8/9, 5/4 band ratioing were applied to ALI data for enhancing the hydrothermally altered rocks associated with porphyry copper mineralization, lithological units and vegetation. Mixture-tuned matched-filtering (MTMF) was tested to discriminate the hydrothermal alteration areas of porphyry copper mineralization from surrounding environment using the shortwave infrared bands of ALI. Results indicate that the tested methods are able to yield spectral information for identifying vegetation, iron oxide/hydroxide and clay minerals, lithological units and the discrimination of hydrothermally altered rocks from unaltered rocks using ALI data.

  11. New alloys for pressure vessels and piping

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, M.; Cantzler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes new alloys for pressure vessels and piping applications. Topics include: Cr-Mo-Si alloys, HAZ liquation cracking in lean 316 stainless steels, copper bearing stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-W-Mo alloys.

  12. Conducting water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-based nuclear power plant units constructed without using copper containing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkov, V. F.

    2014-07-01

    The secondary coolant circuit water chemistry with metering amines began to be put in use in Russia in 2005, and all nuclear power plant units equipped with VVER-1000 reactors have been shifted to operate with this water chemistry for the past seven years. Owing to the use of water chemistry with metering amines, the amount of products from corrosion of structural materials entering into the volume of steam generators has been reduced, and the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of pipelines and equipment has been slowed down. The article presents data on conducting water chemistry in nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 reactors for the secondary coolant system equipment made without using copper-containing alloys. Statistical data are presented on conducting ammonia-morpholine and ammonia-ethanolamine water chemistries in new-generation operating power units with VVER-1000 reactors with an increased level of pH. The values of cooling water leaks in turbine condensers the tube system of which is made of stainless steel or titanium alloy are given.

  13. Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals

    SciTech Connect

    P.Andreson

    2004-10-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

  14. Modulating fcc and hcp Ruthenium on the Surface of Palladium-Copper Alloy through Tunable Lattice Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yancai; He, Dong Sheng; Lin, Yue; Feng, Xiaoqian; Wang, Xin; Yin, Peiqun; Hong, Xun; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-25

    Herein, we report an epitaxial-growth-mediated method to grow face-centered cubic (fcc) Ru, which is thermodynamically unfavorable in the bulk form, on the surface of Pd-Cu alloy. Induced by the galvanic replacement between Ru and Pd-Cu alloy, a shape transformation from a Pd-Cu@Ru core-shell to a yolk-shell structure was observed during the epitaxial growth. The successful coating of the unconventional crystallographic structure is critically dependent on the moderate lattice mismatch between the fcc Ru overlayer and PdCu3 alloy substrate. Further, both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) Ru can be selectively grown through varying the lattice spacing of the Pd-Cu substrate. The presented findings provide a new synthetic pathway to control the crystallographic structure of metal nanomaterials. PMID:27010243

  15. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  16. Effects of Germanium, Copper, and Silver Substitutions on Hardness and Microstructure in Lean Al-Mg-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørtsell, Eva Anne; Marioara, Calin D.; Andersen, Sigmund J.; Røyset, Jostein; Reiso, Oddvin; Holmestad, Randi

    2015-09-01

    It is shown that strength loss in a 6060 Al-Mg-Si alloy caused by reduction in solute can be compensated by adding back smaller quantities of Ag, Ge, and Cu. Nine alloys were investigated. Ge was found to be the most effective addition, strongly refining the precipitation. The hardness is discussed in terms of statistics of the precipitates near a T6 condition, as acquired by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Precipitates in some conditions were also investigated by high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM. The added elements have strong influence on the main hardening precipitate, β″, changing its structure and promoting disorder.

  17. Mechanistic Studies Of Combustion And Structure Formation During Combustion Synthesis Of Advanced Materials: Phase Separation Mechanism For Bio-Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A.

    2003-01-01

    Among all implant materials, Co-Cr-Mo alloys demonstrate perhaps the most useful balance of resistance to corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with strength and biocompatibility [1]. Currently, these widely used alloys are produced by conventional furnace technology. Owing to high melting points of the main alloy elements (e.g. Tm.p.(Co) 1768 K), high-temperature furnaces and long process times (several hours) are required. Therefore, attempts to develop more efficient and flexible methods for production of such alloys with superior properties are of great interest. The synthesis of materials using combustion phenomena is an advanced approach in powder metallurgy [2]. The process is characterized by unique conditions involving extremely fast heating rates (up to 10(exp 6 K/s), high temperatures (up to 3500 K), and short reaction times (on the order of seconds). As a result, combustion synthesis (CS) offers several attractive advantages over conventional metallurgical processing and alloy development technologies. The foremost is that solely the heat of chemical reaction (instead of an external source) supplies the energy for the synthesis. Also, simple equipment, rather than energy-intensive high-temperature furnaces, is sufficient. This work was devoted to experiments on CS of Co-based alloys by utilizing thermite (metal oxide-reducing metal) reactions, where phase separation subsequently produces materials with tailored compositions and properties. Owing to high reaction exothermicity, the CS process results in a significant increase of temperature (up to 3000 C), which is higher than melting points of all products. Since the products differ in density, phase separation may be a gravitydriven process: the heavy (metallic phase) settles while the light (slag) phase floats. The goal was to determine if buoyancy is indeed the major mechanism that controls phase segregation.

  18. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  19. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  20. Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species

    DOEpatents

    Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

    2013-08-06

    A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

  1. Investigation of Hafnium oxide/Copper resistive memory for advanced encryption applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beland, Laurent Karim

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a widely used encryption algorithm to protect data and communications in today's digital age. Modern AES CMOS implementations require large amounts of dedicated logic and must be tuned for either performance or power consumption. A high throughput, low power, and low die area AES implementation is required in the growing mobile sector. An emerging non-volatile memory device known as resistive memory (ReRAM) is a simple metal-insulator-metal capacitor device structure with the ability to switch between two stable resistance states. Currently, ReRAM is targeted as a non-volatile memory replacement technology to eventually replace flash. Its advantages over flash include ease of fabrication, speed, and lower power consumption. In addition to memory, ReRAM can also be used in advanced logic implementations given its purely resistive behavior. The combination of a new non-volatile memory element ReRAM along with high performance, low power CMOS opens new avenues for logic implementations. This dissertation will cover the design and process implementation of a ReRAM-CMOS hybrid circuit, built using IBM's 10LPe process, for the improvement of hardware AES implementations. Further the device characteristics of ReRAM, specifically the HfO2/Cu memory system, and mechanisms for operation are not fully correlated. Of particular interest to this work is the role of material properties such as the stoichiometry, crystallinity, and doping of the HfO2 layer and their effect on the switching characteristics of resistive memory. Material properties were varied by a combination of atomic layer deposition and reactive sputtering of the HfO2 layer. Several studies will be discussed on how the above mentioned material properties influence switching parameters, and change the underlying physics of device operation.

  2. High temperature, low cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 3: Zirconium-copper; thermal-mechanical strain cycling, hold-time and notch fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue characteristics of smooth bar and notched bar specimens (hourglass shape) of zirconium-copper, 1/2 Hard, material (R-2 Series) were evaluated at room temperature in axial strain control. Over the fatigue life range from about 300 to 3000 cycles the ratio of fatigue life for smooth bar to fatigue life for notched bar remained constant at a value of about 6.0. Some additional hold-time data for the R-2 alloy tested in argon at 538 C are reported. An analysis of the relaxation data obtained in these hold-time tests is also reported and it is shown that these data yield a fairly consistent correlation in terms of instantaneous stress rate divided by instantaneous stress. Two thermal-mechanical strain cycling tests were also performed using a cyclic frequency of 4.5 cycles per hour and a temperature cycling interval from 260 to 538 C. The fatigue life values in these tests were noticeably lower than that observed in isothermal tests at 538 C.

  3. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process. PMID:17438808

  4. Evaluation of an advanced directionally solidified gamma/gamma'-alpha Mo eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, M. F.; Jackson, M. R.; Gigliotti, M. F. X.; Nelson, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve on the properties of the candidate jet engine turbine blade material AG-60, a gamma/gamma prime-alpha Mo eutectic composite. Alloy 38 (AG-170) was evaluated in the greatest detail. This alloy, Ni-5.88 A1-29.74 Mo-1.65 V-1.2C Re (weight percent), represents an improvement beyond AG-60, based on mechanical testing of the transverse and/or longitudinal orientations over a range of temperatures in tension, shear, rupture, and rupture after thermal exposure. It is likely that other alloys in the study represent a similar improvement.

  5. Inuence of Gold-Copper Alloy Catalyst Composition on Crystal Growth and Dopant Distribution in Silicon and Germanium Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Justin G.

    A combination of local electrode atom probe tomography (LEAP) and transmission electron microscopy characterization were used to investigate growth of and dopant incorporation in silicon and germanium nanowires (Si and GeNWs) via the vapor-liquid- solid (VLS) mechanism. A sample structure was developed that enabled isolation of the catalyst-mediated contribution to doping in individual nanowires during LEAP analysis. As a result, the distribution coefficient - a thermodynamic quantity describing axial junction abruptness - was measured in nanowires for the first time, providing a fundamental framework for comparison of junction abruptness in nanowires. These investigations also enabled the identification of a previously unknown radial anisotropy in dopant incorporation through the catalyst, with variations in dopant concentration across the VLS-defined diameter of the nanowire as large as two orders of magnitude. Finite element modeling of the doping process, coupled with in situ TEM observations reported in the literature, suggests that this radially inhomogeneous dopant distribution is a direct consequence of growth from a faceted liquid-solid interface, rather than the commonly assumed planar interface. Au-Cu alloy catalysts were explored as alternatives to Au-catalyzed VLS nanowire growth as a means to alleviate or eliminate axial and radial doping gradients in nanowires. Both an aqueous solution and electron beam lithographic method for creating Au-Cu alloy catalysts of controlled composition were developed, and GeNW growth was demonstrated from both types of catalyst. LEAP characterization of Au-Cu alloy catalyzed P-doped GeNWs revealed that alloying with Cu results in more abrupt axial doping junctions, as well as a more homogeneous radial distribution of dopants within the VLS-defined diameter of the nanowire.

  6. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Antibacterial Mechanism of Copper-Bearing Titanium Alloys against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Ma, Zheng; Zhu, Ye; Xia, Hong; Yao, Mengyu; Chu, Xiao; Wang, Xiaolan; Yang, Ke; Yang, Mingying; Zhang, Yu; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    The antibacterial mechanism of the Cu-containing materials has not been fully understood although such understanding is crucial for the sustained clinical use of Cu-containing antibacterial materials such as bone implants. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus is inactivated through Cu-bearing titanium alloys (Ti6Al4V5Cu). Cu ions released from the alloys are found to contribute to lethal damage of bacteria. They destroy the permeability of the bacterial membranes, resulting in the leakage of reducing sugars and proteins from the cells. They also promote the generation of bacteria-killing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS production is confirmed by several assays including fluorescent staining of intracellular oxidative stress, detection of respiratory chain activity, and measurement of the levels of lipid peroxidation, catalase, and glutathione. Furthermore, the released Cu ions show obvious genetic toxicity by interfering the replication of nuc (species-specific) and 16SrRNA genes, but with no effect on the genome integrity. All of these effects lead to the antibacterial effect of Ti6Al4V5Cu. Collectively, our work reconciles the conflicting antibacterial mechanisms of Cu-bearing metallic materials or nanoparticles reported in the literature and highlights the potential use of Ti6Al4V5Cu alloys in inhibiting bacterial infections. PMID:26692564

  7. Greatly improved electrochemical performance of lithium-oxygen batteries with a bimetallic platinum-copper alloy catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minwook; Hwang, Yubin; Yun, Kyung-Han; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2015-08-01

    Research on the cathode catalysts of lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries is one of the most important branches to commercialize these batteries to overcome the sluggish kinetics during both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In this study, a high performance catalyst based on a bimetallic Pt-Cu alloy is investigated for Li-O2 batteries using first-principles calculation. The theoretical prediction shows that the Pt-Cu alloy is much more effective than the pure Pt according to the electrochemical performance. In particular, the effectiveness of the catalytic property is maximized in the case of the PtCu (111) surface which greatly reduces the large overpotentials of the original Li-O2 batteries during the OER/ORR. It is identified for the first time that the charge overpotentials are affected mainly by the inherent surface charge character of the alloy catalyst. It is observed that the more negatively charged PtCu (111) surface can act as a weakly positively charged surface for the adsorption of Li-O intermediates and thus result in weak ionic bonding of the intermediates on the surface. As a result, the dominant factor improving the catalytic performance is clearly demonstrated, providing insight into the design of an efficient catalyst for Li-O2 battery technologies.

  8. Rheological behavior and microstructural evolution of semi-solid hypereutectic aluminum-silicon-magnesium-copper alloys using rheoforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebib, Mehand

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the rheological behavior and microstructural evolution of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg-Cu alloys using conventional and modified SEED process (Swirled Enthalpy Equilibration Device). In the first part; the feasibility of semi-solid processing of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu A390 alloys using a novel rheoforming process was investigated. A combination of the SEED process, isothermal holding using insulation and addition of solid alloy during swirling was introduced as a novel method to improve the processability of semi-solid A390 slurries. The effects of isothermal holding and the addition of solid alloy on the temperature gradient between the centre and the wall and on the formation of alpha-Al particles were examined. In addition, phosphorus and strontium were added to the molten metal to refine the primary and eutectic silicon structure to facilitate semi-solid processing. It was found that the combination of the SEED process with two additional processing steps can produce semisolid 390 alloys that can be rheoformed. In the second part, the effects of Mg additions ranging from 6 to 15% on the solidification behaviour of hypereutectic Al-155i-xMg-4Cu alloys was investigated using thermodynamic calculations, thermal analysis and extensive microstructural examination. The Mg level strongly influenced the microstructural evolution of the primary Mg2Si phase as well as the solidification behaviour. Thermodynamic predictions using ThermoCalc software reported the occurrence of six reactions, comprising the formation of primary Mg2 Si, two pre-eutectic binary reactions, forming either Mg2Si + Si or Mg2Si + alpha-Al phases, the main ternary eutectic reaction forming Mg2Si + Si + alpha-Al, and two post-eutectic reactions resulting in the precipitation of the Q-Al5Mg8Cu 2Si6 and theta-Al2Cu phases, respectively. Microstructures of the four alloys studied confirmed the presence of these phases, in addition to that of the pi

  9. Creep Strength and Microstructure of Al20-25+Nb Alloy Sheets and Foils for Advanced Microturbine Recurperators

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Philip J; Shingledecker, John P; Evans, Neal D; Yamamoto, Yukinori; More, Karren Leslie; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ATI Allegheny Ludlum worked together on a collaborative program for about two years to produce a wide range of commercial sheets and foils of the new AL20-25+Nb{trademark} (AL20-25+Nb) stainless alloy for advanced microturbine recuperator applications. There is a need for cost-effective sheets/foils with more performance and reliability at 650-750 C than 347 stainless steel, particularly for larger 200-250 kW microturbines. Phase 1 of this collaborative program produced the sheets and foils needed for manufacturing brazed plated-fin air cells, while Phase 2 provided foils for primary surface air cells, and did experiments on modified processing designed to change the microstructure of sheets and foils for improved creep-resistance. Phase 1 sheets and foils of AL20-25+Nb have much more creep-resistance than 347 steel at 700-750 C, and those foils are slightly stronger than HR120 and HR230. Results for Phase 2 showed nearly double the creep-rupture life of sheets at 750 C/100 MPa, and similar improvements in foils. Creep data show that Phase 2 foils of AL20-25+Nb alloy have creep resistance approaching that of alloy 625 foils. Testing at about 750 C in flowing turbine exhaust gas for 500 h in the ORNL Recuperator Test Facility shows that foils of AL20-25+Nb alloy have oxidation-resistance similar to HR120 alloy, and much better than 347 steel.

  10. Study of the Effect of Molten Copper Chloride Immersion Test on Alloys with High Nickel Content with and without Surface Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siantar, Edwin

    The demand for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier has increased greatly. The Cu-Cl cycle is a promising thermochemical cycle that is currently being developed to be the large-scale method of hydrogen production. The lifetime of materials for the pipes transporting molten CuCl is an important parameter for an economic design of a commercial thermochemical Cu-Cl hydrogen plant. This research is an examination of candidate materials following an immersion test in molten CuCl at 500 °C for 100 h. Two alloys, Ni based super-alloy (Inconel 625) and super austenitic stainless steel (AL6XN) were selected as the base metal. There were two types of coating applied to improve the corrosion resistance of the base metals during molten CuCl exposure. A metallic of Diamalloy 4006 and two ceramic of yttria stabilized zirconia and alumina coatings were applied to the base metal using thermal spray methods. An immersion apparatus was designed and constructed to perform an immersion test that has a condition similar to those in a hydrogen plant. After the immersion test, the materials were evaluated using an electrochemical method in combination with ex-situ surface analysis. The surface condition including elemental composition, film structure and resistivity of the materials were examined and compared. The majority of the coatings were damaged and fell off. Cracks were found in the original coated specimens indicating the sample geometry may have affected the integrity of the sprayed coating. When the coating cracked, it provided a pathway for the molten CuCl to go under the coating and react with the surface underneath the coating. Copper deposits and iron chloride that were found on the sample surfaces suggest that there were corrosion reactions that involved the metal dissolution and reduction of copper during immersion test. The results also suggest that Inconel 625 performed better than stainless steel AL6XN. Both Diamalloy 4006 and YSZ (ZrO2 18TiO2 10Y2O3) coatings seemed to

  11. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  12. Pumped lithium loop test to evaluate advanced refractory metal alloys and simulated nuclear fuel elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandenburf, G. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance was determined of refractory metal alloys and uranium nitride fuel element specimens in flowing 1900F (1083C) lithium. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected materials to perform satisfactorily from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  13. Computer Aided Design of Advanced Turbine Airfoil Alloys for Industrial Gas Turbines in Coal Fired Environments

    SciTech Connect

    G.E. Fuchs

    2007-12-31

    Recent initiatives for fuel flexibility, increased efficiency and decreased emissions in power generating industrial gas turbines (IGT's), have highlighted the need for the development of techniques to produce large single crystal or columnar grained, directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy turbine blades and vanes. In order to address the technical difficulties of producing large single crystal components, a program has been initiated to, using computational materials science, better understand how alloy composition in potential IGT alloys and solidification conditions during processing, effect castability, defect formation and environmental resistance. This program will help to identify potential routes for the development of high strength, corrosion resistant airfoil/vane alloys, which would be a benefit to all IGT's, including small IGT's and even aerospace gas turbines. During the first year, collaboration with Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Rolls-Royce, Howmet and Solar Turbines has identified and evaluated about 50 alloy compositions that are of interest for this potential application. In addition, alloy modifications to an existing alloy (CMSX-4) were also evaluated. Collaborating with SPC and using computational software at SPC to evaluate about 50 alloy compositions identified 5 candidate alloys for experimental evaluation. The results obtained from the experimentally determined phase transformation temperatures did not compare well to the calculated values in many cases. The effects of small additions of boundary strengtheners (i.e., C, B and N) to CMSX-4 were also examined. The calculated phase transformation temperatures were somewhat closer to the experimentally determined values than for the 5 candidate alloys, discussed above. The calculated partitioning coefficients were similar for all of the CMSX-4 alloys, similar to the experimentally determined segregation behavior. In general, it appears that computational materials science has become a

  14. Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium alloy with enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Si, Conghui; Gao, Yulai; Frenzel, Jan; Sun, Junzhe; Eggeler, Gunther; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium (np-PtRuCuOsIr) electrocatalyst has been facilely fabricated by chemical dealloying of mechanically alloyed AlCuPtRuOsIr precursor. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst exhibits a typical three-dimensional bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of ∼2.5 nm. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst reaches a higher level in the mass activity (857.5 mA mgPt-1) and specific activity (3.0 mA cm-2) towards methanol oxidation compared to the commercial PtC catalyst (229.5 mA mgPt-1 and 0.5 mA cm-2 respectively). Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.54 V (vs. SCE), 130 mV negative shift in comparison with the commercial PtC (0.67 V vs. SCE). The half-wave potential of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.900 V vs. RHE, 36 mV positive compared with that of the commercial PtC (0.864 V vs. RHE). The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst also shows 1.8 and 3.8 times enhancement in the mass and specific activity towards oxygen reduction than the commercial PtC. Moreover, the np-PtRuCuOsIr alloy exhibits superior oxygen reduction activities even after 15 K cycles, indicating its excellent long-term stability. The present np-PtRuCuOsIr can act as a promising candidate for the electrocatalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  15. Gold–Copper Nano-Alloy, “Tumbaga”, in the Era of Nano: Phase Diagram and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gold–copper (Au–Cu) phases were employed already by pre-Columbian civilizations, essentially in decorative arts, whereas nowadays, they emerge in nanotechnology as an important catalyst. The knowledge of the phase diagram is critical to understanding the performance of a material. However, experimental determination of nanophase diagrams is rare because calorimetry remains quite challenging at the nanoscale; theoretical investigations, therefore, are welcomed. Using nanothermodynamics, this paper presents the phase diagrams of various polyhedral nanoparticles (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, decahedron, dodecahedron, rhombic dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, cuboctahedron, and icosahedron) at sizes 4 and 10 nm. One finds, for all the shapes investigated, that the congruent melting point of these nanoparticles is shifted with respect to both size and composition (copper enrichment). Segregation reveals a gold enrichment at the surface, leading to a kind of core–shell structure, reminiscent of the historical artifacts. Finally, the most stable structures were determined to be the dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, and icosahedron with a Cu-rich core/Au-rich surface. The results of the thermodynamic approach are compared and supported by molecular-dynamics simulations and by electron-microscopy (EDX) observations. PMID:25338111

  16. An Investigation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nd:YAG Laser Beam Weld of Copper Beryllium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari Mousavi, S. A. A.; Niknejad, S. T.

    2009-06-01

    Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam welding is conducted on UNS-C17200 copper beryllium sheet. Welding is carried out in the as-annealed and as-aged conditions to investigate the effects of preweld condition on weld microstructure and mechanical properties. Two different heat treatments including direct age treating and solution annealing + subsequent age treating are considered after welding. The mechanical and microstructural characteristics of weld metal regions (WMs) and heat-affected zones (HAZ) of four different samples are considered using tensile tests, hardness measurements, optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results indicate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of the HAZ without postweld treatment are adversely affected by grain boundary liquation observed if welding is carried out in the as-aged condition. Tensile strength and hardness of the WM are improved after a postweld artificial age treatment at 315 °C for 3 hours. However, hardness of the WM is lower than that of the base metal (BM) and HAZ, because the precipitation mechanism in the fusion zone is not as effective as that is in the HAZ and BM. The CuBe secondary phase precipitates during solidification. The precipitates/matrix interface is incoherent, which does not significantly raise the hardness of the weld metal. Incoherent interdendritic precipitates are dissolved in the weld structure after postweld solution annealing. Having performed postweld solution treatment and aging, full strength and hardness throughout the copper beryllium material were observed.

  17. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  18. The structure and composition of chromate conversion coatings formed on aluminum-copper alloy AA2024-T3 and thin film analogs of constituent intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Marvin Jaime

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of spectroscopy have been used to study the composition and structure of Chromate Conversion Coatings (CCC) formed on Aluminum Copper (Al-Cu) alloy AA2024-T3 and constituent Intermetallic Compounds (IMCs). Based on previous work the CCC formed over the IMCs is expected to be thinner and therefore different in structure and composition than the CCC formed on the matrix. The formation of the CCC over the different IMCs is expected to be dependent on the chemistry and the interaction of the IMCs with accelerators such as ferricyanide. Surface chemical and structural data determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Secondary Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDAX) have been developed to refine an existing model for the CCC formed on the AA2024-T3 surface, an Al-Cu aircraft alloy, by considering the composition and structure of the CCC formed on constituent intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The limited corrosion behavior of AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy is generally attributed to the presence of a variety of constituent IMC. These IMC particles are of the order of 1--20 mum which makes their direct analysis exceedingly difficult and has lead to a limited understanding of their surface chemical properties relative to CCC formation. To overcome this limitation, it was necessary to develop for the first time large area samples composed of compositionally homogenous thin films of the various IMCs found on the AA2024-T3 surface, which were galvanically attached to thin films of Al-4.2wt%Cu (representative of the AA2024-T3 matrix). This was performed in a two-step process: Disks of IMC compositions were formed by Reactive Arc Melting (RAM), followed by ultra-fast laser ablation of the RAM IMCs resulting in the formation of homogenous thin films

  19. Advanced TEM characterization of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennour, M.; Laghoutaris, P.; Guerre, C.; Molins, R.

    2009-09-01

    Advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques were carried out in order to investigate stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 600 U-bend samples exposed in simulated PWR primary water at 330 °C. Using high-resolution imaging and fine-probe chemical analysis methods, ultrafine size oxides present inside cracks and intergranular attacks were nanoscale characterized. Results revealed predominance of Cr 2O 3 oxide and Ni-rich metal zones at the majority of encountered crack tip areas and at leading edge of intergranular attacks. However, NiO-structure oxide was predominant far from crack tip zones and within cracks propagating along twin boundaries and inside grains. These observations permit to suggest a mechanism for intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water. Indeed, the results suggest that stress corrosion cracking is depending on chromium oxide growth in the grain boundary. Oxide growth seems to be dependent on oxygen diffusion in porous oxide and chromium diffusion in strained alloy and in grain boundary beyond crack tip. Strain could promote transport kinetic and oxide formation by increasing defaults rate like dislocations.

  20. Identification of salt-alloy combinations for thermal energy storage applications in advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Misra, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations based on the available data for flouride salt systems reveal that a number of congruently melting compositions and eutectics exist which have the potential to meet the lightweight, high energy storage requirements imposed for advanced solar dynamic systems operating between about 1000 and 1400 K. Compatibility studies to determine suitable containment alloys to be used with NaF-22CaF2-13MgF2, NaF-32CaF2, and NaF-23MgF2 have been conducted at the eutectic temperature + 25 K for each system. For these three NaF-based eutectics, none of the common, commercially available high temperature alloys appear to offer adequate corrosion resistance for a long lifetime; however mild steel, pure nickel and Nb-1Zr could prove useful. These latter materials suggest the possibility that a strong, corrosion resistant, nonrefractory, elevated temperature alloy based on the Ni-Ni3Nb system could be developed.

  1. Selective dissolution in copper-tin alloys: Formation of corrosion- resistant patina on ancient Chinese bronze mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Taube, M. |; Davenport, A.J.; King, A.H.; Chase, T. III

    1996-07-01

    Many ancient Chinese bronze mirrors have survived with a patina that leaves the delicate relief surface decorations intact. The microstructure of these ancient mirrors is two-phase and consists of acicular {alpha}-phase (Cu-rich) regions encased in a {delta}-phase (Sn-rich) matrix. At the surface, there is evidence of selective dissolution of the ct phase; the cc-phase regions are replaced pseudomorphically by a mineral product with the {delta} phase remaining metallic. Electrochemical polarization has been used to drive the copper dealloying process in modem, cast bronze. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction was employed to compare the ancient samples with those that were prepared potentiostatically. Poorly crystallized tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) was found in the {alpha} replacement products of both sample types. The corrosion-resistance of the potentiostatically-treated bronze samples was tested by atmospheric exposure. Comparison with exposed, untreated samples indicated that the treatment was protective.

  2. Copper-zinc alloy nanopowder: a robust precious-metal-free catalyst for the conversion of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Giovanni; Kumalaputri, Angela J; Krawczyk, Krzysztof K; Feringa, Ben L; Heeres, Hero J; Barta, Katalin

    2015-04-24

    Noble-metal-free copper-zinc nanoalloy (<150 nm) is found to be uniquely suited for the highly selective catalytic conversion of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to potential biofuels or chemical building blocks. Clean mixtures of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran (DMTHF) with combined product yields up to 97 % were obtained at 200-220 °C using 20-30 bar H2 . It is also possible to convert 10 wt % HMF solutions in CPME, with an excellent DMF yield of 90 %. Milder temperatures favor selective (95 %) formation of 2,5-furandimethanol (FDM). The one-pot conversion of fructose to valuable furan-ethers was also explored. Recycling experiments for DMF production show remarkable catalyst stability. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization provides more insight into morphological changes of this intriguing class of materials during catalysis. PMID:25833148

  3. Ultrathin cobalt-alloyed barrier layers for copper metallization by a new seeding and electroless-deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Te; Liu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Giin-Shan

    2015-11-01

    Pioneering activation-seeding processes grow catalytic particles with sizes exceeding 10 nm due to agglomeration, and thus are unable to act as a template for electroless deposition of a barrier layer with a thickness of 10 nm or less, which is desperately needed for the incoming ULSI copper interconnecting technology. In this work, the capacity of a seeding process to grow a continuous Co-P barrier layer of 8-nm thickness on thermally oxidized SiO2 layers using electroless deposition will be demonstrated. The Co-P barrier layer works effectively in retarding (a) Cu agglomeration and (b) Cu diffusion into the dielectric layer subjected to thermal annealing. Evidently, thermal stability of the Cu film on SiO2 is markedly strengthened by interposing the 8-nm-thick barrier layer. The mechanism of the interposed barrier layer in enhancing thermal stability of the metallization layer is currently under investigation.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of the Unconventional Kondo Alloy System Uranium COPPER(5-X) Palladium(x)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Oscar Orlando

    The intermetallic Kondo alloy system UCu _{5-x}Pd_{x } is one of a number of recently-discovered Kondo materials which exhibit deviations from Fermi liquid behavior in their thermodynamic and transport properties down to micro-Kelvin temperatures. Studying local electronic structure by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques (NMR) in this unconventional system, we find anomalous behavior of NMR parameters versus magnetic susceptibility chi in UCu_4Pd and UCu_{3.5}Pd_ {1.5}. Metallic alloys containing magnetic impurities usually display a linear relation between the susceptibility and the Knight shift and its distribution, the magnetic broadening. In UCu_{5 -x}Pd_{x}, as the temperature is lowered, it is found that for both concentrations the magnetic broadening of the ^{63}Cu NMR spectra grows non-linearly with respect to chi, reaching enhancements at the lowest temperatures of ~100% over the values expected from a high-temperature linear relation. Enhancement of the linewidth over the susceptibility might indicate the possibility of U-spin freezing, as observed in some dilute Kondo alloys. The absence of any anomalies in either the specific heat or the magnetic susceptibility of these samples suggests, however, that spin freezing does not account for the observations, and that the enhancement is related to intrinsic behavior of the paramagnetic alloys. Smaller but similar anomalies are found for the isotropic and axial components of the Knight shift {cal K} as functions chi in the two materials. {cal K} presents a linear relation with chi only down to ~30 K. Below this temperature, the absolute value of the Knight-shift components grows more slowly than would be expected from extrapolating their high temperature behavior, suggesting temperature-dependent transferred-hyperfine fields at the Cu sites or a temperature-dependent lineshape asymmetry. We interpret these observations in terms of disorder of the density of conduction-electron states (DOS). A simple model of

  5. Long-Term Microturbine Exposure of an Advanced Alloy for Microturbine Primary Surface Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Wendy; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R

    2009-01-01

    Haynes alloy HR-120 (Haynes and HR-120 are trademarks of Haynes International, Inc.) forms a protective oxide scale when exposed to the harsh operating environment of a microturbine primary surface recuperator. Primary surface recuperators manufactured from HR-120 are currently in use on the Capstone C65 MicroTurbine (MicroTurbine is a registered trademark of Capstone Turbine Corporation). Long-term microturbine tests of this alloy are currently being conducted at an elevated turbine exit temperature ({approx}100 F higher than that in a normal operation) at Capstone Turbine Corporation. Alloy samples that have been tested under steady-state microturbine operating conditions are removed after predetermined exposure intervals for characterization by Capstone Turbine Corporation in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Such evaluations include the characterization of surface oxide scales and the associated alloy compositional changes following a steady-state operation ranging from 1800 h to 14,500 h. Results from the microstructural and compositional analyses of these long-term steady-state engine-tested HR-120 samples are used to illustrate the progression of alloy oxidation in the microturbine operating environment.

  6. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S.

    2013-12-16

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

  7. Brittle behavior of a dilute copper-beryllium alloy at 200 C in air. [Cu-0. 3Be-0. 5Co and Cu-0. 3Be-0. 5Co-0. 04Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, R.D.K.; McMahon, C.J. Jr.; Guha, A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Guha, A. )

    1994-12-01

    Intergranular cracking in a Cu-Be alloy tested in low-cycle fatigue at various partial pressures of oxygen was observed more than 20 years ago by Coffin. This phenomenon has also been observed in other copper alloys. Minute additions of zirconium were shown to improve the high temperature ductility of these alloys. This led to experiments to determine the effects of a zirconium addition to a cobalt-containing high strength, high conductivity Cu-Be alloy which showed intergranular cracking during hot-deformation processing. It is of interest to examine this phenomenon in the light of recent studies of dynamic embrittlement related to sulfur-induced intergranular cracking of low-alloy steels (stress-relief cracking) and to tin-induced intergranular cracking of Cu-Sn alloys. The dynamic embrittlement phenomenon involves the ingress of low-melting surface-adsorbed elements along grain boundaries under the influence of an applied tensile stress, in the manner of Coble creep. At any given temperature, the rate of ingress of low-melting surface-adsorbed elements along grain boundaries under the influence of an applied tensile stress, in the manner of Coble creep. At any given temperature, the rate of ingress, and thus the rate of cracking, varies with some power of the local stress. Because Cu-Be alloys can support very high stresses, one would anticipate that they could be susceptible to dynamic embrittlement in the presence of oxygen, a common embrittling element in metals. Accordingly, some preliminary experiments have been carried out on a dilute Cu-Be alloy with and without the presence of zirconium to see if its behavior is consistent with the dynamic embrittlement phenomenon.

  8. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  9. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  10. (Zn,H)-codoped copper oxide nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation on Cu-Zn alloy in water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanosized (5 to 10 nm) amorphous and crystalline nanocondensates, i.e., metallic α-phase of Zn-Cu alloy in face-centered cubic structure and (Zn,H)-codoped cuprite (Cu2O) with high-pressure-favored close-packed sublattice, were formed by pulsed laser ablation on bulk Cu65Zn35 in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffractions and optical spectroscopy. The as-fabricated hybrid nanocondensates are darkish and showed photoluminescence in the whole visible region. Further dwelling of such nanocondensates in water caused progressive formation of a rice-like assembly of (Zn,H)-codoped tenorite (CuO) nanoparticles with (001), (100), and {111} preferred orientations, (111) tilt boundary, yellowish color, and minimum bandgap narrowing down to ca. 2.7 eV for potential photocatalytic applications. PMID:22647312

  11. (Zn,H)-codoped copper oxide nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation on Cu-Zn alloy in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2012-05-01

    Nanosized (5 to 10 nm) amorphous and crystalline nanocondensates, i.e., metallic α-phase of Zn-Cu alloy in face-centered cubic structure and (Zn,H)-codoped cuprite (Cu2O) with high-pressure-favored close-packed sublattice, were formed by pulsed laser ablation on bulk Cu65Zn35 in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffractions and optical spectroscopy. The as-fabricated hybrid nanocondensates are darkish and showed photoluminescence in the whole visible region. Further dwelling of such nanocondensates in water caused progressive formation of a rice-like assembly of (Zn,H)-codoped tenorite (CuO) nanoparticles with (001), (100), and {111} preferred orientations, (111) tilt boundary, yellowish color, and minimum bandgap narrowing down to ca. 2.7 eV for potential photocatalytic applications.

  12. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  13. Advances in nanoscale alloys and intermetallics: low temperature solution chemistry synthesis and application in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Jana, Subhra

    2015-11-21

    Based on the bottom-up chemistry techniques, the size, shape, and composition controlled synthesis of nanoparticles can now be achieved uniformly, which is of great importance to the nanoscience community as well as in modern catalysis research. The low-temperature solution-phase synthesis approach represents one of the most attractive strategies and has been utilized to synthesize nanoscale metals, alloys and intermetallics, including a number of new metastable phases. This perspective will highlight the solution-based nanoparticle synthesis techniques, a low-temperature platform, for the synthesis of size and shape-tunable nanoscale transition metals, alloys, and intermetallics from the literature, keeping a focus on the utility of these nanomaterials in understanding the catalysis. For each solution-based nanoparticle synthesis technique, a comprehensive overview has been given for the reported nanoscale metals, alloys, and intermetallics, followed by critical comments. Finally, their enhanced catalytic activity and durability as novel catalysts have been discussed towards several hydrogenation/dehydrogenation reactions and also for different inorganic to organic reactions. Hence, the captivating advantages of this controllable low-temperature solution chemistry approach have several important implications and together with them this approach provides a promising route to the development of next-generation nanostructured metals, alloys, and intermetallics since they possess fascinating properties as well as outstanding catalytic activity. PMID:26477400

  14. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  15. Deuterium permeation through copper with trapping impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. J.; Harris, J. M.; Patrick, R. C.; Boespflug, E. P.; Beavis, L. C.

    1982-02-01

    The time dependence of the deuterium permeation rate through impurity-doped copper membranes was measured in the temperature range 300-700 °C. Copper membranes that were doped with Er, Zr, and Ti all exhibited permeabilities that were nearly equal to pure copper, but the apparent diffusivities were smaller than those for pure copper by factors of 10-100 over the experimental temperature range. The permeation characteristics of these alloys appear to be altered from those for pure copper due to trapping of deuterium at sites that are associated with the impurity atoms. It is shown that the deuterium permeation rate through the copper alloys can be expressed in an analytical form that is analogous to that for pure copper, except that the apparent diffusivity takes on a value which depends on the trap concentration and binding energy for deuterium. The binding energies that are calculated for the alloys are used to determine the lag time which is required for deuterium or hydrogen to permeate through initially evacuated membranes. The lag times for copper alloys containing about 1% Er, Zr, or Ti are many orders of magnitude longer than for pure copper at room temperature. Copper alloys containing Cr do not appear to exhibit deuterium trapping. Nuclear reaction and backscattering analyses were used to help determine the effect or surface oxides on the permeation measurements.

  16. Microstructure and Performance of Kovar/Alumina Joints Made with Silver-Copper Base Active Metal Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS, JOHN J.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HLAVA,PAUL F.; WALKER,CHARLES A.

    1999-12-15

    Poor hermeticity performance was observed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic-ceramic joints having a Kovar{trademark} alloy interlayer. The active Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal was used to braze the substrates together. The Ti active element was scavenged from the filler metal by the formation of a (Fe, Ni, Co){sub x}Ti phase (x= 2-3) that prevented development of a continuous Ti{sub x}O{sub y} layer at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. Altering the process parameters did not circumvent the scavenging of Ti. Molybdenum barrier layers 1000, 2500, or 5000 {angstrom} thick on the Kovar{trademark} surfaces successfully allowed Ti{sub x}O{sub y} formation at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface and hermetic joints. The problems with the Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal for Kovar{trademark}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} braze joints led to the evaluation of a Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal. The Zr (active element) in Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal was not susceptible to the scavenging problem.

  17. Radiation-Induced Segregation and Phase Stability in Candidate Alloys for the Advanced Burner Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was; Brian D. Wirth

    2011-05-29

    Major accomplishments of this project were the following: 1) Radiation induced depletion of Cr occurs in alloy D9, in agreement with that observed in austenitic alloys. 2) In F-M alloys, Cr enriches at PAG grain boundaries at low dose (<7 dpa) and at intermediate temperature (400°C) and the magnitude of the enrichment decreases with temperature. 3) Cr enrichment decreases with dose, remaining enriched in alloy T91 up to 10 dpa, but changing to depletion above 3 dpa in HT9 and HCM12A. 4) Cr has a higher diffusivity than Fe by a vacancy mechanism and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is larger than Fe in the opposite direction to the vacancy flux. 5) Cr concentration at grain boundaries decreases as a result of vacancy transport during electron or proton irradiation, consistent with Inverse Kirkendall models. 6) Inclusion of other point defect sinks into the KLMC simulation of vacancy-mediated diffusion only influences the results in the low temperature, recombination dominated regime, but does not change the conclusion that Cr depletes as a result of vacancy transport to the sink. 7) Cr segregation behavior is independent of Frenkel pair versus cascade production, as simulated for electron versus proton irradiation conditions, for the temperatures investigated. 8) The amount of Cr depletion at a simulated planar boundary with vacancy-mediated diffusion reaches an apparent saturation value by about 1 dpa, with the precise saturation concentration dependent on the ratio of Cr to Fe diffusivity. 9) Cr diffuses faster than Fe by an interstitial transport mechanism, and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is much larger than Fe in the same direction as the interstitial flux. 10) Observed experimental and computational results show that the radiation induced segregation behavior of Cr is consistent with an Inverse Kirkendall mechanism.

  18. Research Advances: Mechanism of Copper Acquisition by Methanotrophs; Honey Bees Use Pheromone To Delay Behavioral Maturation; Liquid Crystal Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Angela G.

    2005-06-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that a molecule used to accumulate copper has been identified; adult foraging bees keep young bees "down" with pheromone; and liquid crystals allow pentagons to tile a plane.

  19. Synthesis of a Photoluminescent and Triboluminescent Copper(I) Compound: An Experiment for an Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchetti, Fabio; Di Nicola, Corrado; Pettinari, Riccardo; Timokhin, Ivan; Pettinari, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    A simple synthesis is proposed from inexpensive reactants of a copper(I) derivative that exhibits strong photoluminescence and, in the crystalline form, exhibits strong triboluminescence. This laboratory provides an opportunity for introducing students to the phenomenon of triboluminescence. (Contains 1 scheme and 4 figures.)

  20. Process Optimization of Dual-Laser Beam Welding of Advanced Al-Li Alloys Through Hot Cracking Susceptibility Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yingtao; Robson, Joseph D.; Riekehr, Stefan; Kashaev, Nikolai; Wang, Li; Lowe, Tristan; Karanika, Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    Laser welding of advanced Al-Li alloys has been developed to meet the increasing demand for light-weight and high-strength aerospace structures. However, welding of high-strength Al-Li alloys can be problematic due to the tendency for hot cracking. Finding suitable welding parameters and filler material for this combination currently requires extensive and costly trial and error experimentation. The present work describes a novel coupled model to predict hot crack susceptibility (HCS) in Al-Li welds. Such a model can be used to shortcut the weld development process. The coupled model combines finite element process simulation with a two-level HCS model. The finite element process model predicts thermal field data for the subsequent HCS hot cracking prediction. The model can be used to predict the influences of filler wire composition and welding parameters on HCS. The modeling results have been validated by comparing predictions with results from fully instrumented laser welds performed under a range of process parameters and analyzed using high-resolution X-ray tomography to identify weld defects. It is shown that the model is capable of accurately predicting the thermal field around the weld and the trend of HCS as a function of process parameters.

  1. Process Optimization of Dual-Laser Beam Welding of Advanced Al-Li Alloys Through Hot Cracking Susceptibility Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yingtao; Robson, Joseph D.; Riekehr, Stefan; Kashaev, Nikolai; Wang, Li; Lowe, Tristan; Karanika, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Laser welding of advanced Al-Li alloys has been developed to meet the increasing demand for light-weight and high-strength aerospace structures. However, welding of high-strength Al-Li alloys can be problematic due to the tendency for hot cracking. Finding suitable welding parameters and filler material for this combination currently requires extensive and costly trial and error experimentation. The present work describes a novel coupled model to predict hot crack susceptibility (HCS) in Al-Li welds. Such a model can be used to shortcut the weld development process. The coupled model combines finite element process simulation with a two-level HCS model. The finite element process model predicts thermal field data for the subsequent HCS hot cracking prediction. The model can be used to predict the influences of filler wire composition and welding parameters on HCS. The modeling results have been validated by comparing predictions with results from fully instrumented laser welds performed under a range of process parameters and analyzed using high-resolution X-ray tomography to identify weld defects. It is shown that the model is capable of accurately predicting the thermal field around the weld and the trend of HCS as a function of process parameters.

  2. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  3. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  4. Advantages and challenges of increased antimicrobial copper use and copper mining.

    PubMed

    Elguindi, Jutta; Hao, Xiuli; Lin, Yanbing; Alwathnani, Hend A; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Copper is a highly utilized metal for electrical, automotive, household objects, and more recently as an effective antimicrobial surface. Copper-containing solutions applied to fruits and vegetables can prevent bacterial and fungal infections. Bacteria, such as Salmonellae and Cronobacter sakazakii, often found in food contamination, are rapidly killed on contact with copper alloys. The antimicrobial effectiveness of copper alloys in the healthcare environment against bacteria causing hospital-acquired infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Clostridium difficile has been described recently. The use of copper and copper-containing materials will continue to expand and may lead to an increase in copper mining and production. However, the copper mining and manufacturing industry and the consumer do not necessarily enjoy a favorable relationship. Open pit mining, copper mine tailings, leaching products, and deposits of toxic metals in the environment often raises concerns and sometimes public outrage. In addition, consumers may fear that copper alloys utilized as antimicrobial surfaces in food production will lead to copper toxicity in humans. Therefore, there is a need to mitigate some of the negative effects of increased copper use and copper mining. More thermo-tolerant, copper ion-resistant microorganisms could improve copper leaching and lessen copper groundwater contamination. Copper ion-resistant bacteria associated with plants might be useful in biostabilization and phytoremediation of copper-contaminated environments. In this review, recent progress in microbiological and biotechnological aspects of microorganisms in contact with copper will be presented and discussed, exploring their role in the improvement for the industries involved as well as providing better environmental outcomes. PMID:21656137

  5. High Pressure Steam Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2014-08-05

    A steam oxidation test was conducted at 267 ± 17 bar and 670°C for 293 hr. A comparison test was run at 1 bar. All of the alloys showed an increase in scale thickness and oxidation rate with pressure, and TP304H and IN625 had very large increases. Fine-grained TP304H at 267 bar behaved like a coarse grained alloy, indicative of high pressure increasing the critical Cr level needed to form and maintain a chromia scale. At 267 bar H230, H263, H282, IN617 and IN740 had kp values a factor of one–to-two orders of magnitude higher than at 1 bar. IN625 had a four order of magnitude increase in kp at 267 bar compared to 1 bar. Possible causes for increased oxidation rates with increased pressure were examined, including increased solid state diffusion within the oxide scale and increased critical Cr content to establish and maintain a chromia scale.

  6. Identification of an advanced constitutive model of Magnesium alloy AZ31B

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. G.; Massoni, E.

    2011-05-04

    The main aim of this paper is to study the flow behavior of the AZ31B magnesium alloy by means of tensile tests performed in extended ranges of temperature and strain rates. The flow stress-strain curves analyzed by power law type constitutive equation can only fit well with experimental curves at the work-hardening stage. A new mathematical model is studied to describe the softening behavior of material based on tensile experiments. The relative parameters are obtained by fitting the equation with the experimental data. The genetic algorithm has been used to obtain the global optimal fitting parameters. The comparison between the fitted and experimental data proves the effectiveness of the model. The results indicate that this model leads to a better simulation of the flow stress during the softening stage than that of the power law equation. Based on this model, the deep drawing process has been simulated with the commercial finite element code FORGE registered. The punch load and thickness distribution of AZ31 sheet have been studied. The study of the results is helpful to the application of the stamping technology for the magnesium alloy sheet.

  7. Identification of the Valence and Coordination Environment of the Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Copper Centers by Advanced EPR Characterization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As a copper-containing enzyme, pMMO has been investigated extensively by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, but the presence of multiple copper centers has precluded correlation of EPR signals with the crystallographically identified monocopper and dicopper centers. A soluble recombinant fragment of the pmoB subunit of pMMO, spmoB, like pMMO itself, contains two distinct copper centers and exhibits methane oxidation activity. The spmoB protein, spmoB variants designed to disrupt one or the other or both copper centers, as well as native pMMO have been investigated by EPR, ENDOR, and ESEEM spectroscopies in combination with metal content analysis. The data are remarkably similar for spmoB and pMMO, validating the use of spmoB as a model system. The results indicate that one EPR-active Cu(II) ion is present per pMMO and that it is associated with the active-site dicopper center in the form of a valence localized Cu(I)Cu(II) pair; the Cu(II), however, is scrambled between the two locations within the dicopper site. The monocopper site observed in the crystal structures of pMMO can be assigned as Cu(I). 14N ENDOR and ESEEM data are most consistent with one of these dicopper-site signals involving coordination of the Cu(II) ion by residues His137 and His139, the other with Cu(II) coordinated by His33 and the N-terminal amino group. 1H ENDOR measurements indicate there is no aqua (HxO) ligand bound to the Cu(II), either terminally or as a bridge to Cu(I). PMID:25059917

  8. Identification of the valence and coordination environment of the particulate methane monooxygenase copper centers by advanced EPR characterization.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, Megen A; Cutsail, George E; Gunderson, William A; Hoffman, Brian M; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2014-08-20

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As a copper-containing enzyme, pMMO has been investigated extensively by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, but the presence of multiple copper centers has precluded correlation of EPR signals with the crystallographically identified monocopper and dicopper centers. A soluble recombinant fragment of the pmoB subunit of pMMO, spmoB, like pMMO itself, contains two distinct copper centers and exhibits methane oxidation activity. The spmoB protein, spmoB variants designed to disrupt one or the other or both copper centers, as well as native pMMO have been investigated by EPR, ENDOR, and ESEEM spectroscopies in combination with metal content analysis. The data are remarkably similar for spmoB and pMMO, validating the use of spmoB as a model system. The results indicate that one EPR-active Cu(II) ion is present per pMMO and that it is associated with the active-site dicopper center in the form of a valence localized Cu(I)Cu(II) pair; the Cu(II), however, is scrambled between the two locations within the dicopper site. The monocopper site observed in the crystal structures of pMMO can be assigned as Cu(I). (14)N ENDOR and ESEEM data are most consistent with one of these dicopper-site signals involving coordination of the Cu(II) ion by residues His137 and His139, the other with Cu(II) coordinated by His33 and the N-terminal amino group. (1)H ENDOR measurements indicate there is no aqua (HxO) ligand bound to the Cu(II), either terminally or as a bridge to Cu(I). PMID:25059917

  9. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  10. Copper nanoparticles of well-controlled size and shape: a new advance in synthesis and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Aissa, Mohamed Ali; Tremblay, Benoît; Andrieux-Ledier, Amandine; Maisonhaute, Emmanuel; Raouafi, Noureddine; Courty, Alexa

    2015-02-01

    Here, we report a new synthetic route for spherical small copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with size ranging from 3.5 nm to 11 nm and with an unprecedented associated monodispersity (<10%). This synthesis is based on the reduction of an organometallic precursor (CuCl(PPh3)3) by tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecylamine (DDA) at a moderate temperature (50 to 100 °C). Because of their narrow size distribution, the CuNPs form long-range 2D organizations (several μm2). The wide range of CuNPs sizes is obtained by controlling the reaction temperature and DDA-to-copper phosphine salt ratio during the synthesis process. The addition of oleic acid (OA) after the synthesis stabilizes the CuNPs (no coalescence) for several weeks under a nitrogen atmosphere. The nature and the reactivity of the ligands were studied by IR and UV-visible spectroscopy. We thus show that just after synthesis the nanoparticles are coated by phosphine and DDA. After adding OA, a clear exchange between phosphine and OA is evidenced. This exchange is possible thanks to an acid-base reaction between the free alkylamine in excess in the solution and OA. OA is then adsorbed on the NPs surface in the form of carboxylate. Furthermore, the use of oleylamine (OYA) instead of DDA as the capping agent allows one to obtain other NP shapes (nanorods, triangles and nanodisks). We get evidence that OYA allows the selective adsorption of chloride ions derived from the copper precursor on the different crystallographic faces during the growth of CuNPs that induces the formation of anisotropic shapes such nanorods or triangles.Here, we report a new synthetic route for spherical small copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with size ranging from 3.5 nm to 11 nm and with an unprecedented associated monodispersity (<10%). This synthesis is based on the reduction of an organometallic precursor (CuCl(PPh3)3) by tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecylamine (DDA) at a moderate temperature (50 to 100

  11. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  12. Advancements in Ti Alloy Powder Production by Close-Coupled Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Heidloff, Andy; Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Byrd, David

    2011-04-01

    As the technology for titanium metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) becomes more readily available, efficient Ti alloy fine powder production methods are required. An update on a novel close-coupled gas atomization system has been given. Unique features of the melting apparatus are shown to have measurable effects on the efficiency and ability to fully melt within the induction skull melting system (ISM). The means to initiate the melt flow were also found to be dependent on melt apparatus. Starting oxygen contents of atomization feedstock are suggested based on oxygen pick up during the atomization and MIM processes and compared to a new ASTM specification. Forming of titanium by metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) has been extensively studied with regards to binders, particle shape, and size distribution and suitable de-binding methods have been discovered. As a result, the visibility of Ti-MIM has steadily increased as reviews of technology, acceptability, and availability have been released. In addition, new ASTM specification ASTM F2885-11 for Ti-MIM for biomedical implants was released in early 2011. As the general acceptance of Ti-MIM as a viable fabrication route increases, demand for economical production of high quality Ti alloy powder for the preparation of Ti-MIM feedstock correspondingly increases. The production of spherical powders from the liquid state has required extensive pre-processing into different shapes thereby increasing costs. This has prompted examination of Ti-MIM with non-spherical particle shape. These particles are produced by the hydride/de-hydride process and are equi-axed but fragmented and angular which is less than ideal. Current prices for MIM quality titanium powder range from $40-$220/kg. While it is ideal for the MIM process to utilize spherical powders within the size range of 0.5-20 {mu}m, titanium's high affinity for oxygen to date has prohibited the use of this powder size range. In order to meet oxygen requirements the top size

  13. Progress in bearing performance of advanced nitrogen alloyed stainless steel, Cronidur 30

    SciTech Connect

    Trojahn, W.; Streit, E.; Chin, H.A.; Ehlert, D.

    1998-12-31

    The bearing rig tests performed in this study demonstrate superior bearing performance of Cronidur 30 steel over conventional bearing steels. In these tests the L{sub 10} life of Cronidur 30 steel as calculated by the DIN/ISO 281 method was 80 times the unfactored L{sub 10} life under full lubrication conditions. In boundary lubrication conditions, the Cronidur 30 steel demonstrated the L{sub 10} life capability typical of EHD lubrication conditions, whereas the other steels showed drastically reduced lives. In tests with predamaged races and boundary lubrication conditions, Cronidur 30 demonstrated 8 times the calculated L{sub 10} life, whereas the conventional steels exhibited further reduction in lives. The improved performance of Cronidur 30 steel over conventional bearing steels is attributed to its unique compositional formulation and microstructure that results in provision of balanced properties in the alloy--hardness, toughness, and corrosion resistance.

  14. Microstructure-sensitive extreme value probabilities of fatigue in advanced engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyla, Craig P.

    A novel microstructure-sensitive extreme value probabilistic framework is introduced to evaluate material performance/variability for damage evolution processes (e.g., fatigue, fracture, creep). This framework employs newly developed extreme value marked correlation functions (EVMCF) to identify the coupled microstructure attributes (e.g., phase/grain size, grain orientation, grain misorientation) that have the greatest statistical relevance to the extreme value response variables (e.g., stress, elastic/plastic strain) that describe the damage evolution processes of interest. This is an improvement on previous approaches that account for distributed extreme value response variables that describe the damage evolution process of interest based only on the extreme value distributions of a single microstructure attribute; previous approaches have given no consideration of how coupled microstructure attributes affect the distributions of extreme value response. This framework also utilizes computational modeling techniques to identify correlations between microstructure attributes that significantly raise or lower the magnitudes of the damage response variables of interest through the simulation of multiple statistical volume elements (SVE). Each SVE for a given response is constructed to be a statistical sample of the entire microstructure ensemble (i.e., bulk material); therefore, the response of interest in each SVE is not expected to be the same. This is in contrast to computational simulation of a single representative volume element (RVE), which often is untenably large for response variables dependent on the extreme value microstructure attributes. This framework has been demonstrated in the context of characterizing microstructure-sensitive high cycle fatigue (HCF) variability due to the processes of fatigue crack formation (nucleation and microstructurally small crack growth) in polycrystalline metallic alloys. Specifically, the framework is exercised to

  15. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  16. Advances in amorphous silicon alloy-based multijunction cells and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.; Banerjee, A.; Glatfelter, T.; Xu, X. )

    1992-12-01

    Multijunction amorphous silicon alloy-based solar cells and modules offer the potential of obtaining high efficiency with long-term stability against light-induced degradation. We have studied the stability of the component cells of the multijunction devices prepared under different deposition conditions. We observe a definite correlation between the microstructure of the intrinsic material and initial and light-degraded performance of the cells. Using suitable deposition conditions and optimum matching of the component cells, we have fabricated double-junction dual-bandgap cells which show stabilized active-area efficiency of 11% after 600 hours of one-sun illumination at 50 [degree]C. Double-junction and triple-junction modules of 900 cm[sup 2] area have been fabricated, and the performance of these panels will be discussed.

  17. Contribution of Copper Ion Resistance to Survival of Escherichia coli on Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Taudte, Nadine; Nies, Dietrich H.; Grass, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of touch surfaces poses a serious threat for public health. The use of bactericidal surface materials, such as copper and its alloys, might constitute a way to aid the use of antibiotics and disinfectants, thus minimizing the risk of emergence and spread of multiresistant germs. The survival of Escherichia coli on metallic copper surfaces has been studied previously; however, the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation on copper surfaces have not been elucidated. Data presented in this study suggest that bacteria are killed rapidly on dry copper surfaces. Several factors, such as copper ion toxicity, copper chelators, cold, osmotic stress, and reactive oxygen species, but not anaerobiosis, influenced killing rates. Strains deleted in copper detoxification systems were slightly more sensitive than was the wild type. Preadaptation to copper enhanced survival rates upon copper surface exposure. This study constitutes a first step toward understanding the reasons for metallic copper surface-mediated killing of bacteria. PMID:18156321

  18. Advances in Solid State Joining of Haynes 230 High Temperature Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X engine is being designed for NASA s new class of crew and launch vehicles, the Ares I and Ares V. The J-2X is a LOX/Hydrogen upper stage engine with 294,000 lbs of thrust and a minimum Isp of 448 seconds. As part of the design criteria to meet the performance requirements a large film-cooled nozzle extension is being designed to further expand the hot gases and increases the specific impulse. The nozzle extension is designed using Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum superalloy. The alloy was selected for its high strength at elevated temperatures and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The nozzle extension is manufactured from Haynes 230 plate spun-forged to form the contour and chemically-milled pockets for weight reduction. Currently fusion welding is being evaluated for joining the panels which are then mechanically etched and thinned to required dimensions for the nozzle extension blank. This blank is then spun formed into the parabolic geometry required for the nozzle. After forming the nozzle extension, weight reduction pockets are chemically milled into the nozzle. Fusion welding of Haynes results in columnar grains which are prone to hot cracking during forming processes. This restricts the ability to use spin forging to produce the nozzle contour. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce a structure more amenable to spin forming. Solid state processes have been shown to produce a refined grain structure within the joint regions as illustrated in Figure 1. Solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining the Haynes 230

  19. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaydos, P.A.; Dufrane, K.F.

    1993-06-01

    Advanced materials and coatings for low heat rejection engines have been investigated for almost a decade. Much of the work has concentrated on the critical wear interface between the piston ring and cylinder liner. Simplified bench tests have identified families of coatings with high temperature wear performance that could meet or exceed that of conventional engine materials at today`s operating temperatures. More recently, engine manufacturers have begun to optimize material combinations and manufacturing processes so that the materials not only have promising friction and wear performance but are practical replacements for current materials from a materials and manufacturing cost standpoint. In this study, the advanced materials supplied by major diesel engine manufacturers were evaluated in an experimental apparatus that simulates many of the in-cylinder conditions of a low heat rejection diesel engine. Results include ring wear factors and average dynamic friction coefficients measured at intervals during the test. These results are compared with other advanced materials tested in the past as well as the baseline wear of current engines. Both fabricated specimens and sections of actual ring and cylinder liners were used in the testing. Observations and relative friction and wear performance of the individual materials are provided.

  20. Three-dimensional hierarchical porous platinum-copper alloy networks with enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Zhang, Zong-Wen; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Porous Pt-Cu alloy networks are synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal process, with ethylene glycol as the reducing agent and the block copolymer Pluronic F127 as structure-directing agent. The structure, porosity and surface chemical state of as-prepared Pt-Cu alloy with different composition are characterized. The formation mechanism of the porous structure is investigated by time sequential experiments. The obtained Pt53Cu47 alloy possesses a unique 3D hierarchical porous network structure assembled by interconnected nanodendrites as building blocks. Because of the high surface area, concave surface topology and open porous structure, the Pt53Cu47 alloy catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation in comparison with commercial Pt black and the Pt73Cu27 alloy synthesized following the same process as Pt53Cu47.

  1. Nuclear material investigations by advanced analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Martin, M.; Froideval, A.; Cammelli, S.; Orlov, A.; Bertsch, J.; Pouchon, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Advanced analytical techniques have been used to characterize nuclear materials at the Paul Scherrer Institute during the last decade. The analysed materials ranged from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, Zircaloy claddings to fuel samples. The processes studied included copper cluster build up in RPV steels, corrosion, mechanical and irradiation damage behaviour of PWR and BWR cladding materials as well as fuel defect development. The used advanced techniques included muon spin resonance spectroscopy for zirconium alloy defect characterization while fuel element materials were analysed by techniques derived from neutron and X-ray scattering and absorption spectroscopy.

  2. Advanced Engine Cycles Analyzed for Turbofans With Variable-Area Fan Nozzles Actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced, large commercial turbofan engines using low-fan-pressure-ratio, very high bypass ratio thermodynamic cycles can offer significant fuel savings over engines currently in operation. Several technological challenges must be addressed, however, before these engines can be designed. To name a few, the high-diameter fans associated with these engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge, and a large, heavy gearbox is often necessary to address the differences in ideal operating speeds between the fan and the low-pressure turbine. Also, the large nacelles contribute aerodynamic drag penalties and require long, heavy landing gear when mounted on conventional, low wing aircraft. Nevertheless, the reduced fuel consumption rates of these engines are a compelling economic incentive, and fans designed with low pressure ratios and low tip speeds offer attractive noise-reduction benefits. Another complication associated with low-pressure-ratio fans is their need for variable flow-path geometry. As the design fan pressure ratio is reduced below about 1.4, an operational disparity is set up in the fan between high and low flight speeds. In other words, between takeoff and cruise there is too large a swing in several key fan parameters-- such as speed, flow, and pressure--for a fan to accommodate. One solution to this problem is to make use of a variable-area fan nozzle (VAFN). However, conventional, hydraulically actuated variable nozzles have weight, cost, maintenance, and reliability issues that discourage their use with low-fan-pressure-ratio engine cycles. United Technologies Research, in cooperation with NASA, is developing a revolutionary, lightweight, and reliable shape memory alloy actuator system that can change the on-demand nozzle exit area by up to 20 percent. This "smart material" actuation technology, being studied under NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program and Revolutionary Concepts in Aeronautics (Rev

  3. The Use of Explosive Energy for Joining Advanced High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbánek, Miroslav; Mašek, Bohuslav; Hronek, Pavel; Nesvadba, Petr

    2013-03-01

    This article deals with an alternative method of joining advanced steels for frame structures. These steels cannot be joined by a conventional process due to the impact of temperature on the base material. Therefore, a simple and cost-effective method of forming a high-strength joint, intended for advanced high-strength materials, was designed using explosive forming. One of its key advantages is that it preserves the microstructure of the high-strength material being joined. At the same time, the design of the joint allows it to undergo further plastic deformation if the yield stress is exceeded, thus preventing the step change in load-carrying capacity and the instability of the structure. The alternative joint was intended for materials with yield stress above 1000 MPa and elongation of 10%, under quasi-static conditions. However, the design is also suitable for materials with ultimate tensile strength higher than 2000 MPa. Testing of the load-carrying capacity of the joint in a mechanical testing shop showed that the larger the flow stress of the material, the higher the load-carrying capacity of the joint. The selected joint designs with good load-bearing capacity values were manufactured by forming using products of detonation of the SEMTEX industrial blasting explosive. In a compression test, the demonstration joints showed the axial load-bearing capacity of 200 kN with up to 20-mm displacement to failure.

  4. The Effect of Alloying on Topologically Close Packed Phase Instability in Advanced Nickel-Based Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Arenas, David; Keller, Dennis; Vasudevan, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to describe topologically close packed (TCP) phase instability as a function of composition in the advanced Ni-base superalloy Rene N6. TCP phases are detrimental to overall high-temperature performance of Ni-base superalloys because of their brittle nature and because they deplete the Ni-rich matrix of potent solid solution strengthening elements. Thirty-four variations of polycrystalline Rene N6 determined from a design-of-experiments approach were cast and homogenized at 1315"C for 80 hours followed by exposure at 10930C for 400 hours to promote TCP formation. The alloys had the following composition ranges in atomic percent: Co 10.61 to 16.73%, Mo 0.32 to 1.34%, W 1.85 to 2.52%, Re 1.80 to 2.1 1 %, Ta 2.36 to 3.02%, Al 11.90 to 14.75%, and Cr 3.57 to 6.23%. Physical and chemical characteristics of all n-ticrostructures obtained were described using various analytical techniques. From these observations, a mathematical description of TCP occurrence (omega and P phase) was generated for polycrystalline Rene N6.

  5. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  6. Effect of multiaxial stresses on the high-temperature behavior and rupture of advanced alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nancy Louise

    1998-05-01

    The evolution and effect of multiaxial stress states on the high temperature deformation and rupture behavior of materials with non-uniform microstructures has been investigated. Through a detailed description of the role that multiaxial stresses play on damage evolution and rupture, the abundant existing data for uniaxial rupture can be used to more successfully design for the life of high temperature components. Three dimensional finite element calculations of primary creep deformation were performed for particulate reinforced metal matrix composites under a variety of multiaxial loading conditions. A quasi-steady state stress distribution develops during primary creep for each of the conditions considered. The results indicate that higher stresses exist in regions above and below the particles and accommodate the development of creep damage. The nature of the stress state within these regions is not significantly altered by the presence of the particles. The strain fields show a distribution similar to the stress fields. Despite significantly large regions of enhanced stress, the overall creep strain rates for all models are decreased by the presence of the particles. The applied effective stress does not have a unique relationship with overall effective strain rate for particulate reinforced composites under different applied stress states. The failure of sections of turbine rotor disks formed from the superalloy V-57 which operate under highly multiaxial stresses has been investigated. Optical microscopy of a turbine rotor disk removed from service after 30,000 hrs showed an intergranular crack that initiated at the root of a fir-tree turbine rotor blade attachment. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed heavy grain boundary oxidation that could account for the cracking and failure of the rotor disks. Heat treatments of a TiAl alloy have been established for producing a microstructure suitable for high temperature multiaxial rupture testing. The

  7. Copper-acrylic enamel serves as lubricant for cold drawing of refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beane, C.; Karasek, F.

    1966-01-01

    Acrylic enamel spray containing metallic copper pigment lubricates refractory metal tubing during cold drawing operations so that the tubing surface remains free from scratches and nicks and does not seize in the die. Zirconium alloys, zirconium, tantalum alloys, niobium alloys, vanandium alloys and titanium alloys have been drawn using this lubricant.

  8. Effect of iron-intermetallics and porosity on tensile and impact properties of aluminum-silicon-copper and aluminum-silicon-magnesium cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheyuan

    Aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are an important class of materials that constitute the majority of aluminum cast parts produced, due to their superior properties and excellent casting characteristics. Within this family of alloys, Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg cast alloys are frequently employed in automotive applications. The commercially popular 319 and 356 alloys, representing these two alloy systems, were selected for study in the present work, with the aim of investigating the effect of iron intermetallics and porosity on the alloy performance. This was carried out through a study of the tensile and impact properties, these being two of the important mechanical properties used in design calculations. Iron, through the precipitation of second phase intermetallic constituents, in particular the platelike beta-Al5FeSi phase, is harmful to the alloy properties. Likewise, gas- or shrinkage porosity in castings is also detrimental to the mechanical properties. By determining the optimum alloying, melt processing and solidification parameters (viz., Fe content, Sr modification and cooling rate) required to minimize the harmful effects of porosity and iron intermetallics, and studying their role on the fracture behavior, the fracture mechanism in the alloys could be determined. Castings were prepared from both industrial and experimental 319.2, B319.2 and A356.2 alloy melts, containing Fe levels of 0.2--1.0 wt%. Sr-modified (˜200 ppm) melts were also prepared for each alloy Fe level. The end-chilled refractory mold used provided directional solidification and a range of cooling rates (or dendrite arm spacings, DAS) within the same casting. Tensile and impact test samples machined from specimen blanks sectioned from the castings at various heights above the chill end provided DASs of 23--85mum. All samples were T6-heat-treated before testing. Tests were carried out employing Instron Universal and Instrumented Charpy testing machines. Optical microscopy, image analysis, SEM

  9. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  10. Cu-Mn-Fe alloys and Mn-rich amphiboles in ancient copper slags from the Jabal Samran area, Saudi Arabia: With synopsis on chemistry of Fe-Mn(III) oxyhydroxides in alteration zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surour, Adel A.

    2015-01-01

    In the Jabal Samran area (western Saudi Arabia), secondary copper mineralization in a NE-trending shear zone in which the arc metavolcanic host rocks (dacite-rhyodacite) show conjugate fractures and extensive hydrothermal alteration and bleaching. The zones contain frequent Fe-Mn(III) oxyhydroxides (FeOH-MnOH) that resulted from oxidation of pyrite and Mn-bearing silicates. In the bleached part, the groundmass is represented by Fe-bearing interstratified illite-smectite with up to 4.02 wt% FeOt. FeOH-MnOH are pre-weathering phases formed by hydrothermal alteration in a submarine environment prior to uplifting. Five varieties of FeOH are distinguished, four of them are exclusively hydrothermal with ∼20 wt% H2O whereas the fifth contains ∼31-33 wt% H2O and might represent reworking of earlier hydrothermal FeOH phases by weathering. FeOH fills thin fractures in the form of veinlets and crenulated laminae or as a pseudomorph for pyrite, goethite and finally ferrihydrite, and this oxyhydroxide is characterized by positive correlation of Fe2O3 with SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, MOH shows positive correlation between MnO2 and Al2O3 whereas it is negative between Fe2O3 and SiO2. Paratacamite is the most common secondary copper mineral that fills fractures and post-dates FeOH and MnOH. It is believed that Cl- in the structure of paratacamite represents inherited marine storage rather than from surfacial evaporates or meteoric water. The mineralogy of slags suggests a complicated mineral assemblage that includes native Cu prills, synthetic spinifixed Mn-rich amphiboles with 16.73 wt% MnO, brown glass and Ca-Mn-Fe phase close to the olivine structure. EMPA indicate that the some Cu prills have either grey discontinuous boarder zone of S-rich Mn-Cu alloy (with up to 21.95 wt% S and 19.45 wt% Mn) or grey Cu-Mn-Fe alloy (with up to 15.9 wt% Cu, 39. 12 wt% Mn and 61.64 wt% Fe). Mn in the Cu prills is expelled inward as Cu-Mn-Fe alloy inclusions whereas S is expelled

  11. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dufrane, K.F.; Glaeser, W.A.; Rosenfield, A.R.

    1988-03-01

    In support of the efforts to apply ceramics in advanced heat engines, a study was made of the sliding performance of ceramics at the ring/cylinder interface of low heat rejection engines. The objective was to understand the basic mechanisms controlling the wear of candidate ceramics and thereby identify means for applying these ceramics effectively. Attempts to operate three different zirconias, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and several plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings without lubrication were unsuccessful because of high friction and high wear rates. Experiments using a polyalphaolefin lubricant at temperatures to 260 C identified several combinations having wear rates in the general range likely to be acceptable for engines. Plasma-sprayed coatings of chromium oxide and hypersonic powder flame sprayed coatings of cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide performed particularly well as ring coatings. Similar performance was obtained with these ring coatings operating against silicon carbide, silicon nitride, silicon carbide whisker-reinforced alumina, and chromium oxide coatings. Zirconia experienced high wear rates because of thermal-shock-induced surface cracking. Low thermal conductivity of zirconia allows local areas to heat excessively from friction. Periodic heating induces thermal shock cracking and subsequent spalling. The study demonstrated the importance of lubrication to successful sliding of ceramics and the need for lubricants capable of operating at temperatures in the range of 250 to 650 C. 42 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Advanced purification strategy for CueR, a cysteine containing copper(I) and DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Ria K; Gyurcsik, Béla; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Christensen, Hans E M; Jancsó, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Metal ion regulation is essential for living organisms. In prokaryotes metal ion dependent transcriptional factors, the so-called metalloregulatory proteins play a fundamental role in controlling the concentration of metal ions. These proteins recognize metal ions with an outstanding selectivity. A detailed understanding of their function may be exploited in potential health, environmental and analytical applications. Members of the MerR protein family sense a broad range of mostly late transition and heavy metal ions through their cysteine thiolates. The air sensitivity of latter groups makes the expression and purification of such proteins challenging. Here we describe a method for the purification of the copper-regulatory CueR protein under optimized conditions. In order to avoid protein precipitation and/or eventual aggregation and to get rid of the co-purifying Escherichia coli elongation factor, our procedure consisted of four steps supplemented by DNA digestion. Subsequent anion exchange on Sepharose FF Q 16/10, affinity chromatography on Heparin FF 16/10, second anion exchange on Source 30 Q 16/13 and gel filtration on Superdex 75 26/60 resulted in large amounts of pure CueR protein without any affinity tag. Structure and functionality tests performed with mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays approved the success of the purification procedure. PMID:27038857

  13. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  14. Diagnosis of Copper Transport Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Lisbeth B.; Hicks, Julia D.; Holmes, Courtney S.; Goldstein, David S.; Brendl, Cornelia; Huppke, Peter; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques for the diagnosis of copper transport disorders are increasingly important due to recent recognition of previously unappreciated clinical phenotypes and emerging advances in the treatment of these conditions. Here, we collate the diagnostic approaches and techniques currently employed for biochemical and molecular assessment of at-risk individuals in whom abnormal copper metabolism is suspected. PMID:21735378

  15. Recent Advances in Recoverable Systems for the Copper-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reaction (CuAAC).

    PubMed

    Mandoli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The explosively-growing applications of the Cu-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between organic azides and alkynes (CuAAC) have stimulated an impressive number of reports, in the last years, focusing on recoverable variants of the homogeneous or quasi-homogeneous catalysts. Recent advances in the field are reviewed, with particular emphasis on systems immobilized onto polymeric organic or inorganic supports. PMID:27607998

  16. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  17. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction performance of ultrafine nanoporous platinum-copper alloy: Experiment and density functional theory calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junzhe; Shi, Jun; Xu, Junling; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peng, Zhangquan

    2015-04-01

    Novel ultrafine nanoporous Pt-Cu alloy with a Pt:Cu stoichiometric ratio of 3:1 (np-Pt3Cu) has been prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent two-step chemical dealloying. The obtained np-Pt3Cu has uniform and bicontinuous ligament(metal)-channel(void) structure with the ligament size of 3.3 ± 0.7 nm. To explore its potential application in energy conversion reactions, the np-Pt3Cu alloy has been examined as electrocatalyst for the operating reactions in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Compared with the commercial JM Pt/C, a benchmark catalyst extensively used in fuel cell research, the np-Pt3Cu alloy demonstrates better performance in both the methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in acidic medium. Theoretical calculations reveal that the electronic structure of Pt has been modified with the shift of Pt d-band center due to alloying with Cu, which can decrease CO poisoning and enhance the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction activities.

  18. Properties of copper?stainless steel HIP joints before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Laukkanen, A.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2002-12-01

    The tensile and fracture behaviour of CuCrZr and CuAl25 IG0 alloys joint to 316L(N) stainless steel by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) have been determined in unirradiated and neutron-irradiated conditions. The tensile and fracture behaviour of copper alloy HIP joint specimens are dominated by the properties of the copper alloys, and particularly, by the strength mismatch and mismatch in strain hardening capacities between copper alloys and stainless steel. The test temperature, neutron irradiation and thermal cycles primarily affect the copper alloy HIP joint properties through changing the strength mismatch between the base alloys. Changes in the loading conditions i.e. tensile, bend ( JI) and mixed-mode bend ( JI/ JII) lead to different fracture modes in the copper alloy HIP joint specimens.

  19. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure and hardness of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy with nickel additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Haider T.; Mohammed, Kahtan S.; Ahmad, Khairel R.

    2015-10-01

    The main object of this study is to investigate the effect of friction stir processing (FSP) on the microstructure and hardness of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys that were produced via casting with the addition of 5 wt % nickel. Furthermore, a single-pass FSP with a rotational speed of 1500 rpm and a traveling speed of 40 mm/min was performed on the alloys. The FSP-treated cast alloys were homogenized, aged at 120°C for 24 h, retrogressed at 180°C for 30 min, and then re-aged at 120°C for 24 h. Microstructural evaluations via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, as well as with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were conducted. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to detect the intermetallics and phases of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloys. Before FSP, the microstructural observations indicated the presence of coarse Ni dispersed particles with a precipitate phase within the matrix. After FSP treatment, the grain refinement led to the uniform space distribution of Ni dispersed particles in the stir zone. The Vickers hardness values for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy increased after age tempering at T6 and retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment because of the increased precipitation and particles dispersity. The hardness of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy was enhanced after FSP and a series of heat treatments, especially the RRA process, because of the stirring action of the FSP tool, the grain refinement, the appearance of additional precipitates, and the refinement of dispersed Ni particles.

  20. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  1. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  2. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  3. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  4. The influence of copper on Zircaloy spent fuel cladding degradation under a potential tuff repository condition

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1987-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment designed to detect the influence of copper on Zircaloy spent fuel cladding degradation in one possible repository environment. Copper and copper alloys are being considered for use in a tuff repository. The compatibility of a copper waste package container and the Zircaloy cladding on spent fuel has been questioned essentially because copper ion has been observed to accelerate zirconium alloy corrosion in acid environments, as does ferric iron, and a phenomenon called "crud-induced localized corrosion" is observed in some Boiling Water Reactors where thorugh-the-wall corrosion pits develop beneath copper-rich crud deposits. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    In order to produce passenger vehicles with improved fuel economy and increased passenger safety, car manufacturers are in need of steels with enhanced strength levels and good formability. Recently, promising combinations of strength and ductility have been reported for several, so-called third generation advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels are increasingly being recognized as a promising third generation AHSS candidate. Early Q research used conventional TRIP steel chemistries and richer alloying strategies have been explored in more recent studies. However, systematic investigations of the effects of alloying elements on tensile properties and retained austenite fractions of Q&P steels are sparse. The objective of the present research was to investigate the alloying effects of carbon, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, copper and nickel on tensile properties and microstructural evolution of Q&P heat treated sheet steels. Seven alloys were investigated with 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si (wt pct) and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys used to study carbon effects, a 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy to study manganese effects, 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo and 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloys to study molybdenum and aluminum effects and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu-1.5Ni alloys to study copper and nickel effects. Increasing alloy carbon content was observed to mainly increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1865 MPa without significantly affecting total elongation (TE) levels. Increasing alloy carbon content also increased the resulting retained austenite (RA) fractions up to 22 vol pct. Measured maximum RA fractions were significantly lower than the predicted maximum RA levels in the 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys, likely resulting from transition carbide formation. Increasing alloy manganese content increased UTS, TE and RA levels, and decreased yield strength (YS) and austenite carbon content (Cgamma) levels

  6. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  7. Recent results on the neutron irradiation of ITER candidate copper alloys irradiated in DR-3 at 250{degrees}C to 0.3 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1997-04-01

    Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment with additional specimens re-aged and given a reactor bakeout treatment at 350{degrees}C for 100 h. CuAl-25 was also heat treated to simulate the effects of a bonding thermal cycle on the material. A number of heat treated specimens were neutron irradiated at 250{degrees}C to a dose level of {approximately}0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor as Riso. The main effect of the bonding thermal cycle heat treatment was a slight decrease in strength of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. The strength of CuAl-25, on the other hand, remained almost unaltered. The post irradiation tests at 250{degrees}C showed a severe loss of ductility in the case of the CuNiBe alloy. The irradiated CuAl-25 and CuCrZr specimens exhibited a reasonable amount of uniform elongation, with CuCrZr possessing a lower strength.

  8. Zinc alloy enhances strength and creep resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Machler, M.

    1996-10-01

    A family of high-performance ternary zinc-copper-aluminum alloys has been developed that provides higher strength, hardness, and creep resistance than the traditional zinc-aluminum alloys Zamak 3, Zamak 5, and ZA-8. Designated ACuZinc, mechanical properties comparable to those of more expensive materials make it suitable for high-load applications and those at elevated temperatures. This article describes the alloy`s composition, properties, and historical development.

  9. Copper: a metal for the ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Copper was one of the first metals ever extracted and used by humans, and it has made vital contributions to sustaining and improving society since the dawn of civilization. Copper was first used in coins and ornaments starting about 8000 B.C., and at about 5500 B.C., copper tools helped civilization emerge from the Stone Age. The discovery that copper alloyed with tin produces bronze marked the beginning of the Bronze Age at about 3000 B.C. Copper is easily stretched, molded, and shaped; is resistant to corrosion; and conducts heat and electricity efficiently. As a result, copper was important to early humans and continues to be a material of choice for a variety of domestic, industrial, and high-technology applications today.

  10. Role(s) of pretreatment, inhibitors, and other process steps that effect surface composition on the under-paint corrosion of an aluminum-copper-magnesium alloy 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Daryl A.

    2006-12-01

    Under-paint corrosion is a surface corrosion that grows under a coating. The composition of an aluminum alloy, particularly Cu and Fe content, has a direct and dominant effect on the growth rate of filiform corrosion (FFC) and scribe-creep. The Cu and Fe content leads to formation of galvanic cells between intermetallic compounds (IMCs) or replated Cu and the aluminum-rich matrix. However, there is no model which describes scribe-creep behavior and can be used to predict the effect of material and surface pretreatment parameters such as inhibitors, chemical surface pretreatment, and alloy microstructure. Surface pretreatments and aging which control the amount of surface copper and alter IMC distributions decrease the growth rate of scribe-creep. Scribe-creep was observed to be enhanced by temperature, regardless of surface pretreatment, as well as by artificial aging and surface pretreatments. Scribe-creep was accelerated by pretreatments that increased surface copper or left a high capacity for Cu-replating such as Cu-containing IMCs. Pretreatment was rationalized to decrease the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) rate, which supports anodic undercutting at the head of the corrosion front. In this galvanic corrosion mechanism, the scribe-creep rate will be proportional to the rate of the anodic dissolution at the head. This, in turn, is proportional to the galvanic corrosion rate. Both charge transfer controlled and mass transport controlled cathodic reaction rates occurred at the fastest rates at the scratch and tail. The charge transfer controlled cathodic reaction rate was directly proportional to the surface coverage of Cu (thetaCu) while the mass transport limited rate was a complex nonlinear function of thetaCu . Based on enhanced understanding a galvanic couple model that describes scribe-creep rates in terms of the relevant processes at the tail and head as well as ohmic voltage between the head and tail was developed in order to explain scribe

  11. Studies of Splat Formation of Copper and Copper Aluminium on Ceramic Substrate in Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, A. T. T.; Hyland, M. M.; Fukumoto, M.; Munroe, P.

    2016-01-01

    Of the substrate-related factors that will influence splat formation, alloying elements has been little studied. In the present work, we have examined the role of alloying elements in controlling the extent of splashing of plasma-sprayed splats. Splats of copper (Cu) and copper alloyed with Al and Zr were deposited by plasma spray or as free-falling droplets. The splat formation and splat-substrate interfaces were characterized using SEM and FIB. It was found that the presence of aluminium in plasma-sprayed Cu-10%Al increased the portion of favorable disk-shaped splats compared to pure copper. It was also found that the disk-shaped splat proportion of Cu-10%Al at room temperature is nearly identical to that of Cu splat at 300 °C, indicating that the addition of Al in the alloy leads to the improvement of splat formation, correlating with the improvement in the interface bonding with the substrate.

  12. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  13. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  14. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  15. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  16. Copper Recycling in the United States in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of copper from production through distribution and use, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap1) and used products (old scrap) in the year 2004. This materials flow study includes a description of copper supply and demand for the United States to illustrate the extent of copper recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding how materials flow from a source through disposition can aid in improving the management of natural resource delivery systems. In 2004, the U.S. refined copper supply was 2.53 million metric tons (Mt) of refined unalloyed copper. With adjustment for refined copper exports of 127,000 metric tons (t) of copper, the net U.S. refined copper supply was 2.14 Mt of copper. With this net supply and a consumer inventory decrease of 9,000 t of refined copper, 2.42 Mt of refined copper was consumed by U.S. semifabricators (brass mills, wire rod mills, ingot makers, and foundries and others) in 2004. In addition to the 2.42 Mt of refined copper consumed in 2004, U.S. copper semifabricators consumed 853,000 t of copper contained in recycled scrap. Furthermore, 61,000 t of copper contained in scrap was consumed by noncopper alloy makers, for example, steelmakers and aluminum alloy makers. Old scrap recycling efficiency for copper was estimated to be 43 percent of theoretical old scrap supply, the recycling rate for copper was 30 percent of apparent supply, and the new-scrap-to-old-scrap ratio for U.S. copper product production was 3.2 (76:24).

  17. Effect of rolling technologies on the properties of Pb-0.06wt%Ca-1.2wt%Sn alloy anodes during copper electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Chen, Bu-ming; Hang, Hui; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Wang, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of different rolling technologies on the properties of Pb-0.06wt%Ca-1.2wt%Sn anodes during copper electrowinning and to determine the relationship between the properties of the anodes and rolling techniques during copper electrowinning. The anode process was investigated via anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry curves, electrochemical impedance spectra, and corrosion tests. The microscopic morphology and phase composition of the anodic oxide layers were observed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Observable variations in the electrocatalytic activity and reaction kinetics of anodes during electrowinning indicated that the electrochemical behavior of the anodes was strongly affected by the rolling technology. An increase in the rolling number tended to decrease the oxygen evolution overpotential and the corrosion rate of the anodes. These trends are contrary to that of the apparent exchange current density. Furthermore, the intensities of diffraction peaks associated with PbO, PbOx, and α-PbO2 tended to increase with increasing rolling number. In addition, the rolled anodes exhibited a more uniform microstructure. Compared with one-way rolled anodes, the eight-time cross rolled anodes exhibited better electrocatalytic activity and improved corrosion resistance.

  18. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  19. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  20. High performance alloy electroforming. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, G.A.; Winkelman, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.