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Sample records for advanced detection isolation

  1. Operations management system advanced automation: Fault detection isolation and recovery prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Matt

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to address the global fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) requirements for Operation's Management System (OMS) automation within the Space Station Freedom program. This shall be accomplished by developing a selected FDIR prototype for the Space Station Freedom distributed processing systems. The prototype shall be based on advanced automation methodologies in addition to traditional software methods to meet the requirements for automation. A secondary objective is to expand the scope of the prototyping to encompass multiple aspects of station-wide fault management (SWFM) as discussed in OMS requirements documentation.

  2. A real-time implementation of an advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaat, J. C.; Merrill, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    A sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation algorithm was developed which incorporates analytic sensor redundancy through software. This algorithm was implemented in a high level language on a microprocessor based controls computer. Parallel processing and state-of-the-art 16-bit microprocessors are used along with efficient programming practices to achieve real-time operation.

  3. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  4. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1993-01-01

    Erroneous measurements in multisensor navigation systems must be detected and isolated. A recursive estimator can find fast growing errors; a least squares batch estimator can find slow growing errors. This process is called fault detection. A protection radius can be calculated as a function of time for a given location. This protection radius can be used to guarantee the integrity of the navigation data. Fault isolation can be accomplished using either a snapshot method or by examining the history of the fault detection statistics.

  5. Visual and efficient immunosensor technique for advancing biomedical applications of quantum dots on Salmonella detection and isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Feng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Chen, Zhi; Shao, Jian-Bo; Xiong, Ling-Hong; Xiang, Yan-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Wu, Kai; Ai, Hong-Wu; Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Xiao-Li; Lv, Jing-Rui; Liu, Wei-Yong; Hu, Hong-Bing; Mei, Hong; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Hong; Xiang, Yun; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-02-01

    It is a great challenge in nanotechnology for fluorescent nanobioprobes to be applied to visually detect and directly isolate pathogens in situ. A novel and visual immunosensor technique for efficient detection and isolation of Salmonella was established here by applying fluorescent nanobioprobes on a specially-designed cellulose-based swab (a solid-phase enrichment system). The selective and chromogenic medium used on this swab can achieve the ultrasensitive amplification of target bacteria and form chromogenic colonies in situ based on a simple biochemical reaction. More importantly, because this swab can serve as an attachment site for the targeted pathogens to immobilize and immunologically capture nanobioprobes, our mAb-conjugated QD bioprobes were successfully applied on the solid-phase enrichment system to capture the fluorescence of targeted colonies under a designed excitation light instrument based on blue light-emitting diodes combined with stereomicroscopy or laser scanning confocal microscopy. Compared with the traditional methods using 4-7 days to isolate Salmonella from the bacterial mixture, this method took only 2 days to do this, and the process of initial screening and preliminary diagnosis can be completed in only one and a half days. Furthermore, the limit of detection can reach as low as 101 cells per mL Salmonella on the background of 105 cells per mL non-Salmonella (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis or Citrobacter freundii, respectively) in experimental samples, and even in human anal ones. The visual and efficient immunosensor technique may be proved to be a favorable alternative for screening and isolating Salmonella in a large number of samples related to public health surveillance.It is a great challenge in nanotechnology for fluorescent nanobioprobes to be applied to visually detect and directly isolate pathogens in situ. A novel and visual immunosensor technique for efficient detection and isolation of Salmonella was established here

  6. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    patient reported outcomes. The technology that makes this possible is a PC card that accepts tone-dial (push-button) sounds and can playback pre- recorded ...then be recorded : The video resolution is adequate for many clinical applications. While not precise enough for pathological diagnosis, it is...appropriate samples at frequent intervals. State-of-the-art techniques must be used for sensitive and specific detection of candidate infectious

  7. Recent advances in micro-vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunchuan; Jing, Xingjian; Daley, Steve; Li, Fengming

    2015-05-01

    Micro-vibration caused by disturbance sources onboard spacecraft can severely degrade the working environment of sensitive payloads. Some notable vibration control methods have been developed particularly for the suppression or isolation of micro-vibration over recent decades. Usually, passive isolation techniques are deployed in aerospace engineering. Active isolators, however, are often proposed to deal with the low frequency vibration that is common in spacecraft. Active/passive hybrid isolation has also been effectively used in some spacecraft structures for a number of years. In semi-active isolation systems, the inherent structural performance can be adjusted to deal with variation in the aerospace environment. This latter approach is potentially one of the most practical isolation techniques for micro-vibration isolation tasks. Some emerging advanced vibration isolation methods that exploit the benefits of nonlinearity have also been reported in the literature. This represents an interesting and highly promising approach for solving some challenging problems in the area. This paper serves as a state-of-the-art review of the vibration isolation theory and/or methods which were developed, mainly over the last decade, specifically for or potentially could be used for, micro-vibration control.

  8. Advanced Technology for Isolating Payloads in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.

    1997-01-01

    advances in isolation technology for that particular component. The final section presents some concluding thoughts and a summary of anticipated advances in research and development for isolating microgravity experiments.

  9. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  10. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema

    Atkinson, David

    2016-07-12

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  11. Recent advances in mycotoxins detection.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ruchika; Singh, Jay; Sachdev, Tushar; Basu, T; Malhotra, B D

    2016-07-15

    Mycotoxins contamination in both food and feed is inevitable. Mycotoxin toxicity in foodstuff can occur at very low concentrations necessitating early availability of sensitive and reliable methods for their detection. The present research thrust is towards the development of a user friendly biosensor for mycotoxin detection at both academic and industrial levels to replace conventional expensive chromatographic and ELISA techniques. This review critically analyzes the recent research trend towards the construction of immunosensor, aptasensor, enzymatic sensors and others for mycotoxin detection with a reference to label and label free methods, synthesis of new materials including nano dimension, and transuding techniques. Technological aspects in the development of biosensors for mycotoxin detection, current challenges and future prospects are also included to provide a overview and suggestions for future research directions.

  12. AIDE - Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cathy L.

    2013-04-28

    Would you like to know when someone has dropped an undesirable executable binary on our system? What about something less malicious such as a software installation by a user? What about the user who decides to install a newer version of mod_perl or PHP on your web server without letting you know beforehand? Or even something as simple as when an undocumented config file change is made by another member of the admin group? Do you even want to know about all the changes that happen on a daily basis on your server? The purpose of an intrusion detection system (IDS) is to detect unauthorized, possibly malicious activity. The purpose of a host-based IDS, or file integrity checker, is check for unauthorized changes to key system files, binaries, libraries, and directories on the system. AIDE is an Open Source file and directory integrity checker. AIDE will let you know when a file or directory has been added, deleted, modified. It is included with the Red Hat Enterprise 6. It is available for other Linux distros. This is a case study describing the process of configuring AIDE on an out of the box RHEL6 installation. Its goal is to illustrate the thinking and the process by which a useful AIDE configuration is built.

  13. Detection, Isolation, and Identification of Vibrio cholerae from the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Huq, Anwar; Haley, Bradd J.; Taviani, Elisa; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent molecular advances in microbiology have greatly improved the detection of bacterial pathogens in the environment. Improvement and a downward trend in the cost of molecular detection methods have contributed to increased frequency of detection of pathogenic microorganisms where traditional culture-based detection methods have failed. Culture methods also have been greatly improved and the confluence of the two suites of methods provides a powerful tool for detection, isolation, and characterization of pathogens. While molecular detection provides data on the presence and type of pathogens, culturing methods allow a researcher to preserve the organism of interest for “–omics” studies, such as genomic, metabolomic, secretomic, and transcriptomic analysis, which are rapidly becoming more affordable. This has yielded a clearer understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of microorganisms that cause disease. Specifically, important advances have been made over the past several years on isolation, detection, and identification of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera in humans. In this unit, we present commonly accepted methods for isolation, detection, and characterization of V. cholerae, providing more extensive knowledge of the ecology and epidemiology of this organism. This unit has been fully revised and updated from the earlier unit (Huq, Grim et al. 2006) with the latest knowledge and additional information not previously included. We have also taken into account of cost of reagents and equipment that may be prohibitive for many researchers and have, therefore, included protocols for all laboratories, including those with limited resources, likely to be located in regions of cholera endemicity. PMID:22875567

  14. Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor DIAL Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; DeYoung, Russell J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The remote sensing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method to perform such measurement from aircraft and space. This thesis describes a new advanced detection system, which incorporates major improvements regarding sensitivity and size. These improvements include a low noise advanced avalanche photodiode detector, a custom analog circuit, a 14-bit digitizer, a microcontroller for on board averaging and finally a fast computer interface. This thesis describes the design and validation of this new water vapor DIAL detection system which was integrated onto a small Printed Circuit Board (PCB) with minimal weight and power consumption. Comparing its measurements to an existing DIAL system for aerosol and water vapor profiling validated the detection system.

  15. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  16. Advances in neutron based bulk explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Strellis, Dan

    2007-08-01

    Neutron based explosive inspection systems can detect a wide variety of national security threats. The inspection is founded on the detection of characteristic gamma rays emitted as the result of neutron interactions with materials. Generally these are gamma rays resulting from thermal neutron capture and inelastic scattering reactions in most materials and fast and thermal neutron fission in fissile (e.g.235U and 239Pu) and fertile (e.g.238U) materials. Cars or trucks laden with explosives, drugs, chemical agents and hazardous materials can be detected. Cargo material classification via its main elements and nuclear materials detection can also be accomplished with such neutron based platforms, when appropriate neutron sources, gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron detectors and suitable decision algorithms are employed. Neutron based techniques can be used in a variety of scenarios and operational modes. They can be used as stand alones for complete scan of objects such as vehicles, or for spot-checks to clear (or validate) alarms indicated by another inspection system such as X-ray radiography. The technologies developed over the last two decades are now being implemented with good results. Further advances have been made over the last few years that increase the sensitivity, applicability and robustness of these systems. The advances range from the synchronous inspection of two sides of vehicles, increasing throughput and sensitivity and reducing imparted dose to the inspected object and its occupants (if any), to taking advantage of the neutron kinetic behavior of cargo to remove systematic errors, reducing background effects and improving fast neutron signals.

  17. Advanced glycation end-products inhibitors isolated from Schisandra grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Poornima, B; Kumar, D Anand; Siva, Bandi; Venkanna, A; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Kumar, K; Tiwari, Ashok K; Babu, K Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Free radicals scavenging and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) inhibitory potentials in crude chloroform extract of Schisandra grandiflora were evaluated. Bioassay-guided isolation of the chloroform extract led to the identification of 24 compounds. Among the isolates, ( ± ) gomisin M1, arisantetralone C and D, macelignan, saurulignan B and SZ-MO displayed potent-free radical scavenging as well as AGEs inhibitory potentials. This is the first report identifying the presence of AGEs inhibitory activity and assigning AGEs inhibitory activity to these compounds. Therefore, our research finds new application of traditional medicinal plant S. grandiflora having capacity to reduce formation and accumulation of AGEs in diabetes.

  18. Isolation and analysis of ginseng: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng occupies a prominent position in the list of best-selling natural products in the world. Because of its complex constituents, multidisciplinary techniques are needed to validate the analytical methods that support ginseng’s use worldwide. In the past decade, rapid development of technology has advanced many aspects of ginseng research. The aim of this review is to illustrate the recent advances in the isolation and analysis of ginseng, and to highlight their new applications and challenges. Emphasis is placed on recent trends and emerging techniques. The current article reviews the literature between January 2000 and September 2010. PMID:21258738

  19. Advanced kick detection systems improve HPHT operations

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.W.R.; Hendriks, P.; Surewaard, J.H.G.

    1995-09-01

    Many high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) wells are often characterized by the small margins that can exist between pore pressure and formation strength. Therefore, it is not surprising that kicks are far more likely to occur in HPHT wells and that a greater risk of internal blowout exists. The development and application of advanced kick detection systems for HPHT wells can help manage risks and improve drilling efficiency. Such systems enable earlier well shut-in, minimizing both the influx volume and the subsequent well bore pressures. This in turn lowers the risk, time and cost required for well control operations. Carefully considered application of these systems can also justify favorable economic benefits by optimization of the HPHT preliminary casing design. Minimizing kick volume can be important for the critical HPHT hole sections, where a reduced operating margin between pore pressure and fracture gradient exists, defining small design kick tolerance limits to permit safe drilling ahead to reach specified objectives. Kick detection for HPHT wells equivalent to less than 5 bbl of gas influx are often necessary to adequately minimize the risk of internal blowout and obtain the same levels of safety which are applied to conventional wells. This paper reviews these systems for both on-shore and off-shore operations.

  20. Robust Fault Detection and Isolation for Stochastic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jemin; Gregory, Irene M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the formulation of a robust fault detection and isolation scheme that can precisely detect and isolate simultaneous actuator and sensor faults for uncertain linear stochastic systems. The given robust fault detection scheme based on the discontinuous robust observer approach would be able to distinguish between model uncertainties and actuator failures and therefore eliminate the problem of false alarms. Since the proposed approach involves precise reconstruction of sensor faults, it can also be used for sensor fault identification and the reconstruction of true outputs from faulty sensor outputs. Simulation results presented here validate the effectiveness of the robust fault detection and isolation system.

  1. Fault detection and isolation for linear time-invariant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Si, J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the problem of detecting and isolating faults by an observer. If the initial error of state estimation is zero, we show that faults can be isolated if and only if the system has a left-invertible detectability matrix which is defined in the present paper. For the more realistic case of nonzero initial error of state estimation, we develop fault isolation filters such that failures to be detected can be asymptotically isolated. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such filters. We provide a method to design a fault isolation filter. This design procedure guarantees to isolate up to n faults, where n is the dimension of the system.

  2. Robust detection, isolation and accommodation for sensor failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emami-Naeini, A.; Akhter, M. M.; Rock, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to extend the recent advances in robust control system design of multivariable systems to sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (DIA), and estimator design. This effort provides analysis tools to quantify the trade-off between performance robustness and DIA sensitivity, which are to be used to achieve higher levels of performance robustness for given levels of DIA sensitivity. An innovations-based DIA scheme is used. Estimators, which depend upon a model of the process and process inputs and outputs, are used to generate these innovations. Thresholds used to determine failure detection are computed based on bounds on modeling errors, noise properties, and the class of failures. The applicability of the newly developed tools are demonstrated on a multivariable aircraft turbojet engine example. A new concept call the threshold selector was developed. It represents a significant and innovative tool for the analysis and synthesis of DiA algorithms. The estimators were made robust by introduction of an internal model and by frequency shaping. The internal mode provides asymptotically unbiased filter estimates.The incorporation of frequency shaping of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian cost functional modifies the estimator design to make it suitable for sensor failure DIA. The results are compared with previous studies which used thresholds that were selcted empirically. Comparison of these two techniques on a nonlinear dynamic engine simulation shows improved performance of the new method compared to previous techniques

  3. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  4. Recent advances in biosensor based endotoxin detection.

    PubMed

    Das, A P; Kumar, P S; Swain, S

    2014-01-15

    Endotoxins also referred to as pyrogens are chemically lipopolysaccharides habitually found in food, environment and clinical products of bacterial origin and are unavoidable ubiquitous microbiological contaminants. Pernicious issues of its contamination result in high mortality and severe morbidities. Standard traditional techniques are slow and cumbersome, highlighting the pressing need for evoking agile endotoxin detection system. The early and prompt detection of endotoxin assumes prime importance in health care, pharmacological and biomedical sectors. The unparalleled recognition abilities of LAL biosensors perched with remarkable sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility have bestowed it with persistent reliability and their possible fabrication for commercial applicability. This review paper entails an overview of various trends in current techniques available and other possible alternatives in biosensor based endotoxin detection together with its classification, epidemiological aspects, thrust areas demanding endotoxin control, commercially available detection sensors and a revolutionary unprecedented approach narrating the influence of omics for endotoxin detection.

  5. Robust fault detection and isolation in stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jemin

    2012-07-01

    This article outlines the formulation of a robust fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme that can precisely detect and isolate simultaneous actuator and sensor faults for uncertain linear stochastic systems. The given robust fault detection scheme based on the discontinuous robust observer approach would be able to distinguish between model uncertainties and actuator failures and therefore eliminate the problem of false alarms. Since the proposed approach involves estimating sensor faults, it can also be used for sensor fault identification and the reconstruction of true outputs from faulty sensor outputs. Simulation results presented here validate the effectiveness of the proposed robust FDI system.

  6. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge. PMID:18266413

  7. Advanced UXO Detection/Discrimination Technology Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    sovereign entity not later than November 2003. The island’s geology consists predominantly of basalt , hardpan, and sand. The magnetite - containing...Island is rich in basalt , which results in a high magnetic background, making the detection of unexploded ordnance difficult. It is expected that... basaltic rocks and soils have precluded the use of magnetometers for UXO detection and have been the source of a significant number of false alarms

  8. Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shirui; Meshot, Eric R.; Kuykendall, Tevye; Cabrini, Stefano; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2015-06-02

    Owing to their simple chemistry and structure, controllable geometry, and a plethora of unusual yet exciting transport properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as exceptional channels for fundamental nanofluidic studies, as well as building blocks for future fluidic devices that can outperform current technology in many applications. Leveraging the unique fluidic properties of CNTs in advanced systems requires a full understanding of their physical origin. Recent advancements in nanofabrication technology enable nanofluidic devices to be built with a single, nanometer-wide CNT as a fluidic pathway. These novel platforms with isolated CNT nanochannels offer distinct advantages for establishing quantitative structure–transport correlations in comparison with membranes containing many CNT pores. In addition, they are promising components for single-molecule sensors as well as for building nanotube-based circuits wherein fluidics and electronics can be coupled. With such advanced device architecture, molecular and ionic transport can be manipulated with vastly enhanced control for applications in sensing, separation, detection, and therapeutic delivery. Recent achievements in fabricating isolated-CNT nanofluidic platforms are highlighted, along with the most-significant findings each platform enables for water, ion, and molecular transport. Furthermore, the implications of these findings and remaining open questions on the exceptional fluidic properties of CNTs are also discussed.

  9. Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Shirui; Meshot, Eric R.; Kuykendall, Tevye; ...

    2015-06-02

    Owing to their simple chemistry and structure, controllable geometry, and a plethora of unusual yet exciting transport properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as exceptional channels for fundamental nanofluidic studies, as well as building blocks for future fluidic devices that can outperform current technology in many applications. Leveraging the unique fluidic properties of CNTs in advanced systems requires a full understanding of their physical origin. Recent advancements in nanofabrication technology enable nanofluidic devices to be built with a single, nanometer-wide CNT as a fluidic pathway. These novel platforms with isolated CNT nanochannels offer distinct advantages for establishing quantitative structure–transport correlationsmore » in comparison with membranes containing many CNT pores. In addition, they are promising components for single-molecule sensors as well as for building nanotube-based circuits wherein fluidics and electronics can be coupled. With such advanced device architecture, molecular and ionic transport can be manipulated with vastly enhanced control for applications in sensing, separation, detection, and therapeutic delivery. Recent achievements in fabricating isolated-CNT nanofluidic platforms are highlighted, along with the most-significant findings each platform enables for water, ion, and molecular transport. Furthermore, the implications of these findings and remaining open questions on the exceptional fluidic properties of CNTs are also discussed.« less

  10. MPI Runtime Error Detection with MUST: Advances in Deadlock Detection

    DOE PAGES

    Hilbrich, Tobias; Protze, Joachim; Schulz, Martin; ...

    2013-01-01

    The widely used Message Passing Interface (MPI) is complex and rich. As a result, application developers require automated tools to avoid and to detect MPI programming errors. We present the Marmot Umpire Scalable Tool (MUST) that detects such errors with significantly increased scalability. We present improvements to our graph-based deadlock detection approach for MPI, which cover future MPI extensions. Our enhancements also check complex MPI constructs that no previous graph-based detection approach handled correctly. Finally, we present optimizations for the processing of MPI operations that reduce runtime deadlock detection overheads. Existing approaches often require 𝒪( p ) analysis timemore » per MPI operation, for p processes. We empirically observe that our improvements lead to sub-linear or better analysis time per operation for a wide range of real world applications.« less

  11. Advances in Significance Testing for Cluster Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Deidra Andrea

    Over the past two decades, much attention has been given to data driven project goals such as the Human Genome Project and the development of syndromic surveillance systems. A major component of these types of projects is analyzing the abundance of data. Detecting clusters within the data can be beneficial as it can lead to the identification of specified sequences of DNA nucleotides that are related to important biological functions or the locations of epidemics such as disease outbreaks or bioterrorism attacks. Cluster detection techniques require efficient and accurate hypothesis testing procedures. In this dissertation, we improve upon the hypothesis testing procedures for cluster detection by enhancing distributional theory and providing an alternative method for spatial cluster detection using syndromic surveillance data. In Chapter 2, we provide an efficient method to compute the exact distribution of the number and coverage of h-clumps of a collection of words. This method involves defining a Markov chain using a minimal deterministic automaton to reduce the number of states needed for computation. We allow words of the collection to contain other words of the collection making the method more general. We use our method to compute the distributions of the number and coverage of h-clumps in the Chi motif of H. influenza.. In Chapter 3, we provide an efficient algorithm to compute the exact distribution of multiple window discrete scan statistics for higher-order, multi-state Markovian sequences. This algorithm involves defining a Markov chain to efficiently keep track of probabilities needed to compute p-values of the statistic. We use our algorithm to identify cases where the available approximation does not perform well. We also use our algorithm to detect unusual clusters of made free throw shots by National Basketball Association players during the 2009-2010 regular season. In Chapter 4, we give a procedure to detect outbreaks using syndromic

  12. Flow cytometry in environmental microbiology: a rapid approach for the isolation of single cells for advanced molecular biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Belinda C; Winsley, Tristrom J; Bergquist, Peter L; Van Dorst, Josie

    2012-01-01

    The isolation and subsequent characterization of microbial cells from within environmental samples is a difficult process. Flow cytometry and cell sorting, when combined with the application of fluorescent probes, have the capability for the detection and separation of diverse microbial populations from within complex mixtures. The isolation of single cells allows for downstream investigations towards system-level characterization of unknown Bacterial Phyla to occur. We describe here the combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization and cell sorting for the detection and isolation of Candidate Division TM7 bacteria from an enriched soil sample. The result is the isolation of rare cells suitable for advanced molecular analysis including whole genome amplification and high-throughput pyrosequencing.

  13. Advanced Molecular Detection of Malarone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Plucinski, Mateusz M.; Biliya, Shweta; Silva-Flannery, Luciana M.; Arguin, Paul M.; Halsey, Eric S.; Barnwell, John W.; Vannberg, Fredrik; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites during the course of an infection remains a major challenge for providing accurate treatment guidelines. This is particularly important in cases of malaria treatment failure. Using a previously well-characterized case of malaria treatment failure, we show the utility of using next-generation sequencing for early detection of the rise and selection of a previously reported atovaquone-proguanil (malarone) drug resistance-associated mutation. PMID:27001821

  14. Microfluidic approaches for isolation, detection, and characterization of extracellular vesicles: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Shima; Shehata Draz, Mohamed; Zarghooni, Maryam; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir; Ghavami, Saeid; Shafiee, Hadi; Akbari, Mohsen

    2017-05-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles present in body fluids that play an essential role in various cellular processes, such as intercellular communication, inflammation, cellular homeostasis, survival, transport, and regeneration. Their isolation and analysis from body fluids have a great clinical potential to provide information on a variety of disease states such as cancer, cardiovascular complications and inflammatory disorders. Despite increasing scientific and clinical interest in this field, there are still no standardized procedures available for the purification, detection, and characterization of EVs. Advances in microfluidics allow for chemical sampling with increasingly high spatial resolution and under precise manipulation down to single molecule level. In this review, our objective is to give a brief overview on the working principle and examples of the isolation and detection methods with the potential to be used for extracellular vesicles. This review will also highlight the integrated on-chip systems for isolation and characterization of EVs.

  15. Towards Certification of a Space System Application of Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) software is being investigated at NASA as a means to the improve reliability and availability of its space systems. Certification is a critical step in the acceptance of such software. Its attainment hinges on performing the necessary verification and validation to show that the software will fulfill its requirements in the intended setting. Presented herein is our ongoing work to plan for the certification of a pilot application of advanced FDIR software in a NASA setting. We describe the application, and the key challenges and opportunities it offers for certification.

  16. Fault detection and isolation for multisensor navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Paul A.; Vangraas, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to the problem of erroneous measurement data for multisensor navigation systems. A recursive estimator can be used in conjunction with a 'snapshot' batch estimator to provide fault detection and isolation (FDI) for these systems. A recursive estimator uses past system states to form a new state estimate and compares it to the calculated state based on a new set of measurements. A 'snapshot' batch estimator uses a set of measurements collected simultaneously and compares solutions based on subsets of measurements. The 'snapshot' approach requires redundant measurements in order to detect and isolate faults. FDI is also referred to as Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM).

  17. Disturbance detection and isolation in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Yoo, C K; Choi, S W; Lee, I

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a new fault detection and isolation (FDI) method. This method monitors the distribution of process data and detects changes in this distribution, which reflect changes in the corresponding operating condition. A modified dissimilarity index and a FDI technique are defined to quantitatively evaluate the difference between data sets. This technique considers the importance of each transformed variable in the multivariate system. The FDI technique is applied to a benchmark simulation and to data from a real wastewater treatment plant. Simulation results show that it immediately detects disturbances and automatically distinguishes between serious and minor anomalies for various types of fault. The method not only detects the disturbances, but also isolates the scale of the disturbance, facilitating the interpretation of the disturbance source. The proposed monitoring technique is found to be appropriate for analyzing the biological wastewater treatment process, which is characterized by a variety of fault and disturbance sources and non-stationary characteristics.

  18. Advanced Water Vapor Lidar Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    In the present water vapor lidar system, the detected signal is sent over long cables to a waveform digitizer in a CAMAC crate. This has the disadvantage of transmitting analog signals for a relatively long distance, which is subjected to pickup noise, leading to a decrease in the signal to noise ratio. Generally, errors in the measurement of water vapor with the DIAL method arise from both random and systematic sources. Systematic errors in DIAL measurements are caused by both atmospheric and instrumentation effects. The selection of the on-line alexandrite laser with a narrow linewidth, suitable intensity and high spectral purity, and its operation at the center of the water vapor lines, ensures minimum influence in the DIAL measurement that are caused by the laser spectral distribution and avoid system overloads. Random errors are caused by noise in the detected signal. Variability of the photon statistics in the lidar return signal, noise resulting from detector dark current, and noise in the background signal are the main sources of random error. This type of error can be minimized by maximizing the signal to noise ratio. The increase in the signal to noise ratio can be achieved by several ways. One way is to increase the laser pulse energy, by increasing its amplitude or the pulse repetition rate. Another way, is to use a detector system with higher quantum efficiency and lower noise, on the other hand, the selection of a narrow band optical filter that rejects most of the day background light and retains high optical efficiency is an important issue. Following acquisition of the lidar data, we minimize random errors in the DIAL measurement by averaging the data, but this will result in the reduction of the vertical and horizontal resolutions. Thus, a trade off is necessary to achieve a balance between the spatial resolution and the measurement precision. Therefore, the main goal of this research effort is to increase the signal to noise ratio by a factor of

  19. Molecular detection and isolation of avian metapneumovirus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Ríos-Cambre, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal study to detect and isolate avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) in two highly productive poultry areas in Mexico. A total of 968 breeder hens and pullets from 2 to 73 weeks of age were analysed. Serology was performed to detect aMPV antibodies and 105 samples of tracheal tissue were collected, pooled by age, and used for attempted virus isolation and aMPV nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR). The serological analysis indicated that 100% of the sampled chickens showed aMPV antibodies by 12 weeks of age. Five pools of pullet samples collected at 3 to 8 weeks of age were positive by nRT-PCR and the sequences obtained indicated 98 to 99% similarity with the reported sequences for aMPV subtype A. Virus isolation of nRT-PCR-positive samples was successfully attempted using chicken embryo lung and trachea mixed cultures with subsequent adaptation to Vero cells. This is the first report of detection and isolation of aMPV in Mexico.

  20. Advanced Virus Detection Technologies Interest Group (AVDTIG): Efforts on High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) for Virus Detection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arifa S; Vacante, Dominick A; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Ng, Siemon H S; Lambert, Christophe; Charlebois, Robert L; King, Kathryn E

    Several nucleic-acid based technologies have recently emerged with capabilities for broad virus detection. One of these, high throughput sequencing, has the potential for novel virus detection because this method does not depend upon prior viral sequence knowledge. However, the use of high throughput sequencing for testing biologicals poses greater challenges as compared to other newly introduced tests due to its technical complexities and big data bioinformatics. Thus, the Advanced Virus Detection Technologies Users Group was formed as a joint effort by regulatory and industry scientists to facilitate discussions and provide a forum for sharing data and experiences using advanced new virus detection technologies, with a focus on high throughput sequencing technologies. The group was initiated as a task force that was coordinated by the Parenteral Drug Association and subsequently became the Advanced Virus Detection Technologies Interest Group to continue efforts for using new technologies for detection of adventitious viruses with broader participation, including international government agencies, academia, and technology service providers.

  1. Multiple Pathogen Detection Using Biosensors: Advancements and Challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advancements in biosensor research have considerably impacted clinical diagnostics for human health. Efforts in capitalizing on the sensitivity of biosensors for food pathogen detection are evident in the food safety/security research community. For practical application with foods that normally h...

  2. Seismic isolation of Advanced LIGO: Review of strategy, instrumentation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matichard, F.; Lantz, B.; Mittleman, R.; Mason, K.; Kissel, J.; Abbott, B.; Biscans, S.; McIver, J.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, S.; Allwine, E.; Barnum, S.; Birch, J.; Celerier, C.; Clark, D.; Coyne, D.; DeBra, D.; DeRosa, R.; Evans, M.; Foley, S.; Fritschel, P.; Giaime, J. A.; Gray, C.; Grabeel, G.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Hillard, M.; Hua, W.; Kucharczyk, C.; Landry, M.; Le Roux, A.; Lhuillier, V.; Macleod, D.; Macinnis, M.; Mitchell, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D.; Paris, H.; Pele, A.; Puma, M.; Radkins, H.; Ramet, C.; Robinson, M.; Ruet, L.; Sarin, P.; Shoemaker, D.; Stein, A.; Thomas, J.; Vargas, M.; Venkateswara, K.; Warner, J.; Wen, S.

    2015-09-01

    The new generation of gravitational waves detectors require unprecedented levels of isolation from seismic noise. This article reviews the seismic isolation strategy and instrumentation developed for the Advanced LIGO observatories. It summarizes over a decade of research on active inertial isolation and shows the performance recently achieved at the Advanced LIGO observatories. The paper emphasizes the scientific and technical challenges of this endeavor and how they have been addressed. An overview of the isolation strategy is given. It combines multiple layers of passive and active inertial isolation to provide suitable rejection of seismic noise at all frequencies. A detailed presentation of the three active platforms that have been developed is given. They are the hydraulic pre-isolator, the single-stage internal isolator and the two-stage internal isolator. The architecture, instrumentation, control scheme and isolation results are presented for each of the three systems. Results show that the seismic isolation sub-system meets Advanced LIGO’s stringent requirements and robustly supports the operation of the two detectors.

  3. Isolation and detection of small RNAs from plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Smith, Neil A; Eamens, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    In plants, several classes of non-coding small RNA (sRNA) have been shown to be important regulators of gene expression in a wide variety of biological processes. The two main classes of sRNA, the small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) classes, are well documented and several experimental approaches have been developed to allow for their routine isolation and detection from plant tissues. Here, we describe the current methods used for the isolation of total RNA and the subsequent enrichment of low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA species, as well as to outline how sRNAs are detected from such nucleic acid preparations.

  4. Incipient fault detection study for advanced spacecraft systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, G. Martin; Black, Michael C.; Hovenga, J. Mike; Mcclure, Paul F.

    1986-01-01

    A feasibility study to investigate the application of vibration monitoring to the rotating machinery of planned NASA advanced spacecraft components is described. Factors investigated include: (1) special problems associated with small, high RPM machines; (2) application across multiple component types; (3) microgravity; (4) multiple fault types; (5) eight different analysis techniques including signature analysis, high frequency demodulation, cepstrum, clustering, amplitude analysis, and pattern recognition are compared; and (6) small sample statistical analysis is used to compare performance by computation of probability of detection and false alarm for an ensemble of repeated baseline and faulted tests. Both detection and classification performance are quantified. Vibration monitoring is shown to be an effective means of detecting the most important problem types for small, high RPM fans and pumps typical of those planned for the advanced spacecraft. A preliminary monitoring system design and implementation plan is presented.

  5. Advances in nucleic acid-based detection methods.

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, M J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory techniques based on nucleic acid methods have increased in popularity over the last decade with clinical microbiologists and other laboratory scientists who are concerned with the diagnosis of infectious agents. This increase in popularity is a result primarily of advances made in nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques. Polymerase chain reaction, the original nucleic acid amplification technique, changed the way many people viewed and used nucleic acid techniques in clinical settings. After the potential of polymerase chain reaction became apparent, other methods of nucleic acid amplification and detection were developed. These alternative nucleic acid amplification methods may become serious contenders for application to routine laboratory analyses. This review presents some background information on nucleic acid analyses that might be used in clinical and anatomical laboratories and describes some recent advances in the amplification and detection of nucleic acids. PMID:1423216

  6. Fault Detection and Isolation using Viability Theory and Interval Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaniee Zarch, Majid; Puig, Vicenç; Poshtan, Javad

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of interval observers and viability theory in fault detection and isolation (FDI). Viability theory develops mathematical and algorithmic methods for investigating the adaptation to viability constraints of evolutions governed by complex systems under uncertainty. These methods can be used for checking the consistency between observed and predicted behavior by using simple sets that approximate the exact set of possible behavior (in the parameter or state space). In this paper, fault detection is based on checking for an inconsistency between the measured and predicted behaviors using viability theory concepts and sets. Finally, an example is provided in order to show the usefulness of the proposed approach.

  7. Detecting and isolating abrupt changes in linear switching systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Sohail; Zhao, Qing; Huang, Biao

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a novel fault detection and isolation (FDI) method for switching linear systems is developed. All input and output signals are assumed to be corrupted with measurement noises. In the proposed method, a 'lifted' linear model named as stochastic hybrid decoupling polynomial (SHDP) is introduced. The SHDP model governs the dynamics of the switching linear system with all different modes, and is independent of the switching sequence. The error-in-variable (EIV) representation of SHDP is derived, and is used for the fault residual generation and isolation following the well-adopted local approach. The proposed FDI method can detect and isolate the fault-induced abrupt changes in switching models' parameters without estimating the switching modes. Furthermore, in this paper, the analytical expressions of the gradient vector and Hessian matrix are obtained based on the EIV SHDP formulation, so that they can be used to implement the online fault detection scheme. The performance of the proposed method is then illustrated by simulation examples.

  8. Detection and isolation of circulating tumor cells: principles and methods.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilsabzali, Hadi; Beischlag, Timothy V; Cox, Michael E; Parameswaran, Ash M; Park, Edward J

    2013-11-15

    Efforts to improve the clinical management of several cancers include finding better methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). However, detection and isolation of CTCs from the blood circulation is not a trivial task given their scarcity and the lack of reliable markers to identify these cells. With a variety of emerging technologies, a thorough review of the exploited principles and techniques as well as the trends observed in the development of these technologies can assist researchers to recognize the potential improvements and alternative approaches. To help better understand the related biological concepts, a simplified framework explaining cancer formation and its spread to other organs as well as how CTCs contribute to this process has been presented first. Then, based on their basic working-principles, the existing methods for detection and isolation of CTCs have been classified and reviewed as nucleic acid-based, physical properties-based and antibody-based methods. The review of literature suggests that antibody-based methods, particularly in conjunction with a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip setting, offer the highest overall performance for detection and isolation of CTCs. Further biological and engineering-related research is required to improve the existing methods. These include finding more specific markers for CTCs as well as enhancing the throughput, sensitivity, and analytic functionality of current devices.

  9. Advances in pancreatic cancer research: moving towards early detection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-Yi; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patient management have been significant. However, most patients (nearly 80%) who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease have an extremely poor prognosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localized to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Therefore, the early detection of pancreatic cancer may benefit patients with PDAC. However, its low rate of incidence and the limitations of current screening strategies make early detection difficult. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of PDAC suggest that it is possible to detect PDAC in early stages and even identify precursor lesions. The presence of new-onset diabetes mellitus in the early phase of pancreatic cancer may provide clues for its early diagnosis. Advances in the identification of novel circulating biomarkers including serological signatures, autoantibodies, epigenetic markers, circulating tumor cells and microRNAs suggest that they can be used as potential tools for the screening of precursors and early stage PDAC in the future. However, proper screening strategies based on effective screening methodologies need to be tested for clinical application.

  10. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  11. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  12. Structural Change Can Be Detected in Advanced-Glaucoma Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Belghith, Akram; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Bowd, Christopher; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) standard structural measures and a new three-dimensional (3D) volume optic nerve head (ONH) change detection method for detecting change over time in severely advanced-glaucoma (open-angle glaucoma [OAG]) patients. Methods Thirty-five eyes of 35 patients with very advanced glaucoma (defined as a visual field mean deviation < −21 dB) and 46 eyes of 30 healthy subjects to estimate aging changes were included. Circumpapillary retinal fiber layer thickness (cpRNFL), minimum rim width (MRW), and macular retinal ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thicknesses were measured using the San Diego Automated Layer Segmentation Algorithm (SALSA). Progression was defined as structural loss faster than 95th percentile of healthy eyes. Three-dimensional volume ONH change was estimated using the Bayesian-kernel detection scheme (BKDS), which does not require extensive retinal layer segmentation. Results The number of progressing glaucoma eyes identified was highest for 3D volume BKDS (13, 37%), followed by GCPIL (11, 31%), cpRNFL (4, 11%), and MRW (2, 6%). In advanced-OAG eyes, only the mean rate of GCIPL change reached statistical significance, −0.18 μm/y (P = 0.02); the mean rates of cpRNFL and MRW change were not statistically different from zero. In healthy eyes, the mean rates of cpRNFL, MRW, and GCIPL change were significantly different from zero. (all P < 0.001). Conclusions Ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer and 3D volume BKDS show promise for identifying change in severely advanced glaucoma. These results suggest that structural change can be detected in very advanced disease. Longer follow-up is needed to determine whether changes identified are false positives or true progression. PMID:27454660

  13. Isolated heart models: cardiovascular system studies and technological advances.

    PubMed

    Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie; Provaznik, Ivo

    2015-07-01

    Isolated heart model is a relevant tool for cardiovascular system studies. It represents a highly reproducible model for studying broad spectrum of biochemical, physiological, morphological, and pharmaceutical parameters, including analysis of intrinsic heart mechanics, metabolism, and coronary vascular response. Results obtained in this model are under no influence of other organ systems, plasma concentration of hormones or ions and influence of autonomic nervous system. The review describes various isolated heart models, the modes of heart perfusion, and advantages and limitations of various experimental setups. It reports the improvements of perfusion setup according to Langendorff introduced by the authors.

  14. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  15. Detection of dengue virus in platelets isolated from dengue patients.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Gibbons, Robert V; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Jairungsri, Aroonroong; Ajariyakhajorn, Chuanpis; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G; Malasit, Prida; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2009-03-01

    Though thrombocytopenia or dysfunction of platelets is common in dengue virus infection, the role of platelets has not been established. We enrolled 33 hospitalized children with serologically confirmed dengue virus infection. Blood specimens were collected during hospitalization. Platelets and plasma were isolated from the whole blood. Detection of dengue virus in plasma and platelets was carried out by RT-PCR with primers that can differentiate different dengue serotypes simultaneously, and by electron transmission microscopy (EM). Dengue viral RNA was detected in the platelets and plasma by conventional RT-PCR. A significantly higher percentage of dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets than in plasma (p = 0.03). Platelets isolated 5 days after onset of fever were most likely positive for viral RNA. Concurrent infection or co-circulation with multiple dengue serotypes was observed in 12% of patients. Infrequently, negative-stranded dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets and in plasma. Importantly, EM confirmed the presence of dengue viral-like particles inside platelets prepared from dengue patients. Our findings suggest the presence of dengue virus in platelets may be associated with the dysfunction of platelets observed in dengue patients.

  16. Recent Advances In Science Support For Isolated Droplet Combustion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, F. L.; Kazakov, A.; Urban, B. D.; Kroenlein, K.

    2003-01-01

    In a joint program involving Prof. F.A. Williams of the University of California, San Diego and Dr. V. Nayagam of the National Center for Microgravity Research, the combustion characteristics of isolated liquid fuel droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, methanol-water, ethanol and ethanol-water having initial diameters between about 1 mm and 6 mm continues to be investigated. The objectives of the work are to improve fundamental knowledge of droplet combustion dynamics for pure fuels and fuel-water mixtures through microgravity experiments and theoretical analyses. The Princeton contributions support the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies through experiments and numerical modeling. UCSD contributions are described in a companion communication in this conference. The Princeton effort also addresses the analyses of Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) experiments conducted with the above fuels and collaborative work with others who are investigating droplet combustion in the presence of steady convection. A thorough interpretation of droplet burning behavior for n-heptane and n-decane over a relatively wide range of conditions also involves the influences of sooting on the combustion behavior, and this particular aspect on isolated burning of droplets is under consideration in a collaborative program underway with Drexel University. This collaboration is addressed in another communication at this conference. The one-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical modeling approach that we have continued to evolve for analyzing isolated, quiescent droplet combustion data has been further applied to investigate several facets of isolated droplet burning of simple alcohols, n-heptane, and n-decane. Some of the new results are described below.

  17. Edge Detection to Isolate Motion in Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C W

    2003-07-11

    Adaptive optics uses signal processing techniques and deformable mirrors to minimize image degradation caused by phase aberrations. In the case of telescope imaging, the atmosphere causes phase aberrations. In the case of satellite imaging, errors due to the ultra-light-weight characteristics of the primary mirror cause phase aberrations. Scene-based Shack-Hartmann Wave Front Sensing takes the correlation between successive wavelets to determine these phase aberrations. A large problem with the scene-based approach is that motion, such as a moving car, can cause the correlation of two lenslets to peak, not where the scenes align, but where the moving object in each frame aligns. As such, the continued use of scene-based Wave Front Sensing necessitates successful isolation of moving objects from a stationary background scene. With the knowledge of which pixels are immobile, one should avoid the problem of locking onto a moving object when taking the correlation of two successive frames in time. Two main requirements of isolation are consistency and efficiency. In this document I will discuss the different edge detection algorithms explored for moving object isolation and how I came to the conclusion that, for our purposes of scene-based Shack-Hartmann WFS, edge detection is too inconsistent to be of any use. Because the Shack-Hartmann lenslets limits us to low resolutions, edge detection that works on higher resolution images will not work on our images. The results of each algorithm will show that with so few pixels per subaperature, edge detection is a poor method of identifying moving objects.

  18. Recent Advances in Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sollip

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease that occurs most often in female cancer patients. Early detection can significantly reduce the mortality rate. Microwave breast imaging, which is noninvasive and harmless to human, offers a promising alternative method to mammography. This paper presents a review of recent advances in microwave imaging for breast cancer detection. We conclude by introducing new research on a microwave imaging system with time-domain measurement that achieves short measurement time and low system cost. In the time-domain measurement system, scan time would take less than 1 sec, and it does not require very expensive equipment such as VNA. PMID:28096808

  19. Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Tonsils and Posterior Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, D. M.; Lee, D. M.; Snow, A. F.; Fairley, C. K.; Peel, J.; Bradshaw, C. S.; Hocking, J. S.; Lahra, M. M.; Chen, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the factors influencing gonorrhea detection at the pharynx. One hundred men infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were swabbed from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx. N. gonorrhoeae was reisolated from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx in 62% and 52%, respectively (P = 0.041). Culture positivity was greater with higher gonococcal DNA loads at the tonsils (P = 0.001) and oropharynx (P < 0.001). N. gonorrhoeae can be cultured from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx with greater isolation rates where gonococcal loads are higher. PMID:26292303

  20. Guaranteed robust fault detection and isolation techniques for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valavani, L.; Tantouris, N.

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents two generic fault detection and isolation (FDI) techniques which have shown remarkable robustness when applied to the SIMULINK model of a small satellite for thruster failures. While fundamentally different in their design approach, they both generate ʽstructured residuals' which accurately capture the failure mode. The diagnosis criterion in both methods relies on residuals direction rather than magnitude, which avoids the delays and expense of setting accurate thresholds for residuals magnitudes. Most importantly, this fact can account for the enhanced robustness to disturbances and sensor noise, as well as to significant parametric variations. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are presented validating the robust performance of the two algorithms.

  1. Advanced Strain-Isolation-Pad Material with Bonded Fibrous Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibold, R. W.; Saito, C. A.; Buller, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing air lay and liquid lay felt deposition techniques to fabricate strain isolation pad (SIP) materials for the Space Shuttle Orbiter was demonstrated. These materials were developed as candidate replacements for the present needled felt SIP used between the ceramic tiles and the aluminum skin on the undersurface of the Orbiter. The SIP materials that were developed consisted of high temperature aramid fibers deposited by controlled fluid (air or liquid) carriers to form low density unbonded felts. The deposited felts were then bonded at the fiber intersections with a small amount of high temperature polyimide resin. This type of bonded felt construction can potentially eliminate two of the problems associated with the present SIP, viz., transmittal of localized stresses into the tiles and load history dependent mechanical response. However, further work is needed to achieve adequate through thickness tensile strength in the bonded felts.

  2. Distributed fault detection and isolation resilient to network model uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Andre; Shames, Iman; Sandberg, Henrik; Johansson, Karl H

    2014-11-01

    The ability to maintain state awareness in the face of unexpected and unmodeled errors and threats is a defining feature of a resilient control system. Therefore, in this paper, we study the problem of distributed fault detection and isolation (FDI) in large networked systems with uncertain system models. The linear networked system is composed of interconnected subsystems and may be represented as a graph. The subsystems are represented by nodes, while the edges correspond to the interconnections between subsystems. Considering faults that may occur on the interconnections and subsystems, as our first contribution, we propose a distributed scheme to jointly detect and isolate faults occurring in nodes and edges of the system. As our second contribution, we analyze the behavior of the proposed scheme under model uncertainties caused by the addition or removal of edges. Additionally, we propose a novel distributed FDI scheme based on local models and measurements that is resilient to changes outside of the local subsystem and achieves FDI. Our third contribution addresses the complexity reduction of the distributed FDI method, by characterizing the minimum amount of model information and measurements needed to achieve FDI and by reducing the number of monitoring nodes. The proposed methods can be fused to design a scalable and resilient distributed FDI architecture that achieves local FDI despite unknown changes outside the local subsystem. The proposed approach is illustrated by numerical experiments on the IEEE 118-bus power network benchmark.

  3. Advances in molecular imaging for breast cancer detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our ability to assay molecular processes, including gene expression, protein expression, and molecular and cellular biochemistry, have fueled advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology and have led to the identification of new treatments for patients with breast cancer. The ability to measure biologic processes without perturbing them in vivo allows the opportunity to better characterize tumor biology and to assess how biologic and cytotoxic therapies alter critical pathways of tumor response and resistance. By accurately characterizing tumor properties and biologic processes, molecular imaging plays an increasing role in breast cancer science, clinical care in diagnosis and staging, assessment of therapeutic targets, and evaluation of responses to therapies. This review describes the current role and potential of molecular imaging modalities for detection and characterization of breast cancer and focuses primarily on radionuclide-based methods. PMID:22423895

  4. Advanced Ship Detection For Spaceborne Based Maritime Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radius, Andrea; Ferreira, Joao; Carmo, Paulo; Marques, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    In the last years the increase in marine traffic generated the necessity of global monitoring for marine environment management in terms of safety, security and fisheries. The increasing number of new satellite-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems, and the intrinsic capability of the transmitted electromagnetic pulses to interact with the ships and to retrieve its cinematic characteristics, made this instrument particularly fit to improve global maritime awareness through the fusion with cooperative data (AIS, VMS, LRIT). The growing need of global maritime awareness gave a push to the realization of different projects in the European context, each one focused on a different particular objective. Particularly useful is the synergy between the operational and research aspects, being the goal of the last to improve the state of the art in the field of ship detection. Two European projects are the key to strive this synergy: the project MARitime Security Service (MARISS), which implements the operational capability, and the R&D Dolphin projects, which is focused on the deep exploitation of remote sensing data and on the technological development of advanced techniques for ship detection and classification purposes, and Seabilla project, which is also dedicated to improve the current ship detection capability and to fuse all the available information from different data sources for border surveillance optimization. This paper introduces the multipurpose Edisoft Vessel Detection software (EdiVDC) implemented by the EDISOFT company, which comes from the necessity to respect increasingly stringent requirements in terms of ship detection. The EdiVDC software is being operationally used in the framework of the MARISS project and it integrates advanced processing algorithms, developed in the scope of the Dolphin project with the cooperation of ISEL-IT (Instituto de Telecomunicações), and data simulators, developed in the context of the Seabilla project, improving

  5. Detection of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus isolates in domestic dairy products

    PubMed Central

    Imani Fooladi, AA; Tavakoli, HR; Naderi, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Staphylococcus aureusis a one of THE most frequent causes of food poisoning (FP) in dairy products. The main etiologic agents of FP are staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE). There are different types of SE; types A (SEA) and B (SEB) are the most clinically important enterotoxins. Traditional dairy products are still produced in small batches and sold by some vendors without a permit from the Ministry of Health. This study focuses on the molecular and serological detection of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus SEA and SEB genes and its products, respectively from samples of such traditional products. Materials and Methods 100 samples from dairy products were produced under sterile conditions via traditional methods and were transported to the laboratory. The samples were cultured and identified by routine bacteriological methods. The isolated bacteria were evaluated by PCR tests for detection of the genes encoding SEA and SEB. Subsequently, the ability of these strains to produce enterotoxin was examined by Sac's culture method and was confirmed by Sigel Radial Immounodiffussion (SRID). Results The results indicated that 32% of the dairy products were contaminated by S. aureus (cream 18%, cheese 10%, milk 4%). The PCR results showed that 15.6% of the S. aureus isolates possessed the SEA gene, 9.3% had the SEB gene, and 6.2% possessed both genes. The evaluation of enterotoxin production indicated that 80% of SEA and 33% of SEB genes were expressed. Conclusion Enterotoxins SEA and SEB are heat stable and consequently; heating has no effect on dairy products contaminated by entertoxins. Subsequently, gastritis may occur within several hours after consumption. Our findings suggest that PCR is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and inexpensive method for detecting SE and can replace the traditional assays. PMID:22347562

  6. Non-adherence in difficult asthma and advances in detection.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, John T; Heaney, Liam G

    2013-12-01

    Non-adherence to anti-inflammatory therapies is common in patients referred for specialist assessment at difficult-to-treat asthma services. In the difficult asthma setting, non-adherence to treatment is associated with poor baseline asthma control, increased frequency of exacerbations and asthma-related hospitalizations, as well as increased risk of death. Here, we present a review of the current literature surrounding the prevalence and risks of non-adherence in difficult asthma and we report on current methods of measuring treatment adherence and advances in the detection of non-adherence. We will also explore methods by which non-adherence in difficult asthma can be addressed.

  7. Distress detection, location, and communications using advanced space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces a concept for low-cost, global, day-night, all-weather disaster warning and assistance. Evolving, advanced space technology with passive radio frequency reflectors in conjunction with an imaging synthetic aperture radar is employed to detect, identify, locate, and provide passive communication with earth users in distress. This concept evolved from a broad NASA research on new global search and rescue techniques. Appropriate airborne radar test results from this research are reviewed and related to potential disaster applications. The analysis indicates the approach has promise for disaster communications relative to floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe storms.

  8. A low loss Faraday isolator for squeezed vacuum injection in Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Ryan; Tanner, David; Mueller, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Using conventional interferometry, the strain sensitivity of Advanced LIGO is limited by a quantum noise floor known as the standard quantum limit (SQL). Injecting squeezed vacuum states into the output port of the interferometer allows for detector sensitivities below the SQL at frequencies within a band of observational interest. The effectiveness of squeezing in reducing quantum noise is strongly dependent upon the optical loss in the squeezed path. Thus, to combine the squeezed vacuum state with the interferometer output we require a Faraday isolator with both high power-throughput efficiency and high isolation ratio. A prototype isolator is currently being developed, and we will discuss the design goals and current status.

  9. Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T; Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2007-02-09

    The principal objective of this two-year study is to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection/location using array processing. We address a strategy to obtain significantly improved precision in the location of low-magnitude events compared with current fully-automatic approaches, combined with a low false alarm rate. We have developed and evaluated a prototype automatic system which uses as a basis regional array processing with fixed, carefully calibrated, site-specific parameters in conjuction with improved automatic phase onset time estimation. We have in parallel developed tools for Matched Field Processing for optimized detection and source-region identification of seismic signals. This narrow-band procedure aims to mitigate some of the causes of difficulty encountered using the standard array processing system, specifically complicated source-time histories of seismic events and shortcomings in the plane-wave approximation for seismic phase arrivals at regional arrays.

  10. Recent advances in immunosensor for narcotic drug detection

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sonu; Suman, Pankaj; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena; Suri, C. Raman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Immunosensor for illicit drugs have gained immense interest and have found several applications for drug abuse monitoring. This technology has offered a low cost detection of narcotics; thereby, providing a confirmatory platform to compliment the existing analytical methods. Methods: In this minireview, we define the basic concept of transducer for immunosensor development that utilizes antibodies and low molecular mass hapten (opiate) molecules. Results: This article emphasizes on recent advances in immunoanalytical techniques for monitoring of opiate drugs. Our results demonstrate that high quality antibodies can be used for immunosensor development against target analyte with greater sensitivity, specificity and precision than other available analytical methods. Conclusion: In this review we highlight the fundamentals of different transducer technologies and its applications for immunosensor development currently being developed in our laboratory using rapid screening via immunochromatographic kit, label free optical detection via enzyme, fluorescence, gold nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes based immunosensing for sensitive and specific monitoring of opiates. PMID:26929925

  11. Optimal Sensor Allocation for Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Pattipati, Krishna; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2004-01-01

    Automatic fault diagnostic schemes rely on various types of sensors (e.g., temperature, pressure, vibration, etc) to measure the system parameters. Efficacy of a diagnostic scheme is largely dependent on the amount and quality of information available from these sensors. The reliability of sensors, as well as the weight, volume, power, and cost constraints, often makes it impractical to monitor a large number of system parameters. An optimized sensor allocation that maximizes the fault diagnosibility, subject to specified weight, volume, power, and cost constraints is required. Use of optimal sensor allocation strategies during the design phase can ensure better diagnostics at a reduced cost for a system incorporating a high degree of built-in testing. In this paper, we propose an approach that employs multiple fault diagnosis (MFD) and optimization techniques for optimal sensor placement for fault detection and isolation (FDI) in complex systems. Keywords: sensor allocation, multiple fault diagnosis, Lagrangian relaxation, approximate belief revision, multidimensional knapsack problem.

  12. Fault detection and isolation in motion monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Jin; Suk, Myoung Hoon; Prabhakaran, B

    2012-01-01

    Pervasive computing becomes very active research field these days. A watch that can trace human movement to record motion boundary as well as to study of finding social life pattern by one's localized visiting area. Pervasive computing also helps patient monitoring. A daily monitoring system helps longitudinal study of patient monitoring such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's or obesity monitoring. Due to the nature of monitoring sensor (on-body wireless sensor), however, signal noise or faulty sensors errors can be present at any time. Many research works have addressed these problems any with a large amount of sensor deployment. In this paper, we present the faulty sensor detection and isolation using only two on-body sensors. We have been investigating three different types of sensor errors: the SHORT error, the CONSTANT error, and the NOISY SENSOR error (see more details on section V). Our experimental results show that the success rate of isolating faulty signals are an average of over 91.5% on fault type 1, over 92% on fault type 2, and over 99% on fault type 3 with the fault prior of 30% sensor errors.

  13. Current Advances in Detection and Treatment of Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, J; Olvera-Ramírez, A; Aguilar-Tipacamú, G; Cantó, GJ

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is a disease with a world-wide distribution affecting many species of mammals principally cattle and man. The major impact occurs in the cattle industry where bovine babesiosis has had a huge economic effect due to loss of meat and beef production of infected animals and death. Nowadays to those costs there must be added the high cost of tick control, disease detection, prevention and treatment. In almost a century and a quarter since the first report of the disease, the truth is: there is no a safe and efficient vaccine available, there are limited chemotherapeutic choices and few low-cost, reliable and fast detection methods. Detection and treatment of babesiosis are important tools to control babesiosis. Microscopy detection methods are still the cheapest and fastest methods used to identify Babesia parasites although their sensitivity and specificity are limited. Newer immunological methods are being developed and they offer faster, more sensitive and more specific options to conventional methods, although the direct immunological diagnoses of parasite antigens in host tissues are still missing. Detection methods based on nucleic acid identification and their amplification are the most sensitive and reliable techniques available today; importantly, most of those methodologies were developed before the genomics and bioinformatics era, which leaves ample room for optimization. For years, babesiosis treatment has been based on the use of very few drugs like imidocarb or diminazene aceturate. Recently, several pharmacological compounds were developed and evaluated, offering new options to control the disease. With the complete sequence of the Babesia bovis genome and the B. bigemina genome project in progress, the post-genomic era brings a new light on the development of diagnosis methods and new chemotherapy targets. In this review, we will present the current advances in detection and treatment of babesiosis in cattle and other animals, with additional

  14. Immunological detection of a novel advanced glycation end-product.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, M.; Yanase, Y.; Matsuura, N.; Yamagishi Si, S.; Kameda, Y.; Bucala, R.; Makita, Z.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advanced stage of the Maillard reaction that leads to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of angiopathy in diabetic patients and in the aging process. Recently, it has been proposed that the intermediates contributing to AGE formation include dicarbonyl intermediates such as glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG). In the present study, we developed a novel, non-carboxymethyllysine (CML) anti-AGE antibody that recognizes serum proteins and peptides modified by 3-DG in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: AGE-modified serum albumins were prepared by incubation of rabbit serum albumin with 3-DG or D-glucose. After immunization of rabbits, anti-AGE antisera were subjected to affinity chromatography on a Sepharose 4B column coupled with CML-BSA, or AGE-BSA created by incubation with 3-DG (AGE-6) or D-glucose (AGE-1). The AGE-Ab-6 and AGE-Ab-1 thus obtained was used to investigate AGEs in serum from diabetic patients on hemodialysis. RESULTS: Characterization of the novel AGE-Ab-6 obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography was performed with a competitive ELISA and immunoblot analysis. This antibody specifically cross-reacted with proteins modified by 3-DG. AGE-6 was detected in diabetic serum as three peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200, 1.15, and 0.85 kD, while AGE-1 was detected as four peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200, 65, 1.15, and 0.85 kD. CONCLUSION: This study provides new data on the pathways of AGE formation from 3-DG and methods for the immunochemical detection of AGEs. We also provide immunochemical evidence for the existence of six distinct AGEs in vivo among the AGE-modified proteins and peptides in the serum of diabetic patients on hemodialysis. PMID:11788793

  15. Costas loop lock detection in the advanced receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1989-01-01

    The advanced receiver currently being developed uses a Costas digital loop to demodulate the subcarrier. Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between the samples of the phase-error process. Accounting for this correlation is necessary to achieve the desired lock-detection probability for a given false-alarm rate. Both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the square-law and the absolute-value type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock-detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false-alarm rate. The mathematical model and computer simulation show that the square-law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute-value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for square-wave than for sine-wave signals.

  16. Detection and isolation of circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; DeSouza, Thiago; Cook, Aaron; Viator, John A

    2011-11-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that have separated from a macroscopic tumor and spread through the blood and lymph systems to seed secondary tumors(1,2,3). CTCs are indicators of metastatic disease and their detection in blood samples may be used to diagnose cancer and monitor a patient's response to therapy. Since CTCs are rare, comprising about one tumor cell among billions of normal blood cells in advanced cancer patients, their detection and enumeration is a difficult task. We exploit the presence of pigment in most melanoma cells to generate photoacoustic, or laser induced ultrasonic waves in a custom flow cytometer for detection of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs)(4,5). This process entails separating a whole blood sample using centrifugation and obtaining the white blood cell layer. If present in whole blood, CMCs will separate with the white blood cells due to similar density. These cells are resuspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and introduced into the flowmeter. Rather than a continuous flow of the blood cell suspension, we induced two phase flow in order to capture these cells for further study. In two phase flow, two immiscible liquids in a microfluidic system meet at a junction and form alternating slugs of liquid(6,7). PBS suspended white blood cells and air form microliter slugs that are sequentially irradiated with laser light. The addition of a surfactant to the liquid phase allows uniform slug formation and the user can create different sized slugs by altering the flow rates of the two phases. Slugs of air and slugs of PBS with white blood cells contain no light absorbers and hence, do not produce photoacoustic waves. However, slugs of white blood cells that contain even single CMCs absorb laser light and produce high frequency acoustic waves. These slugs that generate photoacoustic waves are sequestered and collected for cytochemical staining for verification of CMCs.

  17. Recent advances in nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lingyi; Yao, Yao; Ping, Jianfeng; Ying, Yibin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are able to be accumulated in human body by food chain and may induce severe influence to human health and safety. Hence, the development of sensitive and simple methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotic levels is highly desirable. Nanomaterials with excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties have been recognized as one of the most promising materials for opening new gates in the development of next-generation biosensors. This review highlights the current advances in the nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection. Different kinds of nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, metal nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, up-conversion nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been applied to the construction of biosensors with two main signal-transducing mechanisms, i.e. optical and electrochemical. Furthermore, the current challenges and future prospects in this field are also included to provide an overview for future research directions.

  18. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jena N.; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P.; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  19. An Expert System Approach to Global Fault Detection and Isolation Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation Design S. M. Allen and A. K. Cagavan Charles River...ELEMENT 90. no, no PCW o WAB1945433-6553 65502P 3005 40 1 50 11. TITLE Odo ~~ v~~n An Expert System Approach to Global Fault Detection and isolation Design...identify by bkod number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Fault Detection and Isolation , Global PDI, Erpert Systems 01 03 Neural Networks, Computer-Aided Design

  20. Development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebuhr, Jason H.; Hagen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device from conceptual design to lessons learned. Maintaining a micro-g environment on the International Space Station requires that experiment racks and major vibration sources be isolated. The challenge in characterizing exercise loads and testing the system in the presence of gravity led to a decision to qualify the system by analysis. Available data suggests that the system is successful in attenuating loads, yet there has been a major component failure and several procedural issues during its 3 years of operational use.

  1. Advances in Electrostatic Dust Detection on Remote Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Voinier, C; Skinner, C H; Roquemore, A L

    2005-02-09

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Two grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125 mu m to 25 mu m are biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the result current pulse is recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 mu m grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 mu m grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5 30 mu m) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125 250 mu m) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 mu g/cm^2.

  2. An anomaly detection and isolation scheme with instance-based learning and sequential analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, T. S.; Garcia, H. E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an online anomaly detection and isolation (FDI) technique using an instance-based learning method combined with a sequential change detection and isolation algorithm. The proposed method uses kernel density estimation techniques to build statistical models of the given empirical data (null hypothesis). The null hypothesis is associated with the set of alternative hypotheses modeling the abnormalities of the systems. A decision procedure involves a sequential change detection and isolation algorithm. Notably, the proposed method enjoys asymptotic optimality as the applied change detection and isolation algorithm is optimal in minimizing the worst mean detection/isolation delay for a given mean time before a false alarm or a false isolation. Applicability of this methodology is illustrated with redundant sensor data set and its performance. (authors)

  3. Bringing isolated dark matter out of isolation: Late-time reheating and indirect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2016-09-01

    In standard cosmology, the growth of structure becomes significant following matter-radiation equality. In nonthermal histories, where an effectively matter-dominated phase occurs due to scalar oscillations prior to big bang nucleosynthesis, a new scale at smaller wavelengths appears in the matter power spectrum. Density perturbations that enter the horizon during the early matter-dominated era (EMDE) grow linearly with the scale factor prior to the onset of radiation domination, which leads to enhanced inhomogeneity on small scales if dark matter (DM) thermally and kinetically decouples during the EMDE. The microhalos that form from these enhanced perturbations significantly boost the self-annihilation rate for dark matter. This has important implications for indirect detection experiments: the larger annihilation rate may result in observable signals from dark matter candidates that are usually deemed untestable. As a proof of principle, we consider binos in heavy supersymmetry with an intermediate extended Higgs sector and all other superpartners decoupled. We find that these isolated binos, which lie under the neutrino floor, can account for the dark matter relic density and decouple from the standard model early enough to preserve the enhanced small-scale inhomogeneity generated during the EMDE. If early forming microhalos survive as subhalos within larger microhalos, the resulting boost to the annihilation rate for bino dark matter near the pseudoscalar resonance exceeds the upper limit established by Fermi-LAT's observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. These DM candidates motivate the N -body simulations required to eliminate uncertainties in the microhalos' internal structure by exemplifying how an EMDE can enable Fermi-LAT to probe isolated dark matter.

  4. Detection of genetically diverse human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group M and O isolates by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Respess, R A; Butcher, A; Wang, H; Chaowanachan, T; Young, N; Shaffer, N; Mastro, T D; Biryahwaho, B; Downing, R; Tanuri, A; Schechter, M; Pascu, R; Zekeng, L; Kaptué, L; Gürtler, L; Eberle, J; Ellenberger, D; Fridlund, C; Rayfield, M; Kwok, S

    1997-01-01

    A panel of 136 genetically diverse group M and 5 group O adult isolates from outside the United States and Europe were evaluated by PCR with the Roche AMPLICOR HIV-1 test, a modified version of the AMPLICOR HIV-1 test, and a new primer pair/probe system. Detection of some of these isolates was less efficient with the AMPLICOR HIV-1 test; however, the assay was significantly improved by reducing the sample input and lowering the annealing temperature. The new primer pair/probe set detected 140 of 141 isolates, including the 5 group O isolates that were not detected with either of the AMPLICOR HIV-1 test formats. PMID:9114428

  5. Safe, Advanced, Adaptable Isolation System Eliminates the Need for Critical Lifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginn, Starr

    2011-01-01

    The Starr Soft Support isolation system incorporates an automatically reconfigurable aircraft jack into NASA's existing 1-Hertz isolators. This enables an aircraft to float in mid-air without the need for a critical lift during ground vibration testing (GVT), significantly reducing testing risk, time, and costs. Currently incorporating the most advanced technology available, the 60,000-poundcapacity (27-metric-ton) isolation system is used for weight and measurement tests, control-surface free-play tests, and structural mode interaction tests without the need for any major reconfiguration, often saving days of time and significantly reducing labor costs. The Starr Soft Support isolation system consists of an aircraft-jacking device with three jacking points, each of which has an individual motor and accommodates up to 20,000 pounds (9 metric tons) for a total 60,000-pound (27-metric-ton) capacity. The system can be transported to the aircraft by forklift and placed at its jacking points using a pallet jack. The motors power the electric actuators, raising the aircraft above the ground until the landing gear can retract. Inflatable isolators then deploy, enabling the aircraft to float in mid-air, simulating a 1-Hertz free-free boundary condition. Inflatable isolators have been in use at NASA for years, enabling aircraft to literally float unsupported for highly accurate GVT. These isolators must be placed underneath the aircraft for this to occur. Traditionally, this is achieved by a critical lift a high-risk procedure in which a crane and flexible cord system are used to lift the aircraft. In contrast, the Starr Soft Support isolation system eliminates the need for critical lift by integrating the inflatable isolators into an aircraft jacking system. The system maintains vertical and horizontal isolating capabilities. The aircraft can be rolled onto the system, jacked up, and then the isolators can be inflated and positioned without any personnel needing to work

  6. Advanced defect detection algorithm using clustering in ultrasonic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongzhang, Rui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    A range of materials used in industry exhibit scattering properties which limits ultrasonic NDE. Many algorithms have been proposed to enhance defect detection ability, such as the well-known Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) technique. Scattering noise usually cannot be fully removed and the remaining noise can be easily confused with real feature signals, hence becoming artefacts during the image interpretation stage. This paper presents an advanced algorithm to further reduce the influence of artefacts remaining in A-scan data after processing using a conventional defect detection algorithm. The raw A-scan data can be acquired from either traditional single transducer or phased array configurations. The proposed algorithm uses the concept of unsupervised machine learning to cluster segmental defect signals from pre-processed A-scans into different classes. The distinction and similarity between each class and the ensemble of randomly selected noise segments can be observed by applying a classification algorithm. Each class will then be labelled as `legitimate reflector' or `artefacts' based on this observation and the expected probability of defection (PoD) and probability of false alarm (PFA) determined. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, a 5MHz linear array transducer is used to collect A-scans from both austenitic steel and Inconel samples. Each pulse-echo A-scan is pre-processed using SSP and the subsequent application of the proposed clustering algorithm has provided an additional reduction to PFA while maintaining PoD for both samples compared with SSP results alone.

  7. Advances in detection of antipsychotics in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Patteet, Lisbeth; Cappelle, Delphine; Maudens, Kristof E; Crunelle, Cleo L; Sabbe, Bernard; Neels, Hugo

    2015-02-20

    Measuring antipsychotic concentrations in human matrices is important for both therapeutic drug monitoring and forensic toxicology. This review provides a critical overview of the analytical methods for detection and quantification of antipsychotics published in the last four years. Focus lies on advances in sample preparation, analytical techniques and alternative matrices. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is used most often for quantification of antipsychotics. This sensitive technique makes it possible to determine low concentrations not only in serum, plasma or whole blood, but also in alternative matrices like oral fluid, dried blood spots, hair, nails and other body tissues. Current literature on analytical techniques for alternative matrices is still limited and often requires a more thorough validation including a comparison between conventional and alternative results to determine their actual value. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) makes it possible to quantify a high amount of compounds within a shorter run time. This technique is widely used for multi-analyte methods. Only recently, high-resolution mass spectrometry has gained importance when a combination of screening of (un)known metabolites, and quantification is required.

  8. Advanced Cytologic Techniques for the Detection of Malignant Pancreatobiliary Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Luna, Laura E.; Kipp, Benjamin; Halling, Kevin C.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Kremers., Walter K.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Levy, Michael J.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims Two advanced cytologic techniques for detecting aneuploidy, digital image analysis (DIA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have recently been developed to help identify malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of cytology, DIA, and FISH for the identification of malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. Methods Brush cytologic specimens from 233 consecutive patients undergoing ERCP for pancreatobiliary strictures were examined by all three techniques. Strictures were stratified as proximal (n=33) or distal (n=114) based on whether they occurred above or below the cystic duct, respectively. Strictures in patients with PSC (n=86) were analyzed separately. Results Despite the stratification, the performances of the tests were similar. Routine cytology has a low sensitivity (5–20%) but 100% specificity. Because of the high specificity for cytology, we assessed the performance of the other tests when routine cytology was negative. In this clinical context, FISH had an increased sensitivity (35–60%) when assessing for chromosomal gains (polysomy) while preserving the specificity of cytology. The sensitivity and specificity of DIA was intermediate as compared to routine cytology and FISH, but was additive to FISH values demonstrating only trisomy of chromosome 7 or chromosome 3. Conclusions These findings suggest that FISH and DIA increase the sensitivity for the diagnosis of malignant pancreatobiliary tract strictures over that obtained by conventional cytology while maintaining an acceptable specificity. PMID:17030177

  9. Using Machine Learning for Advanced Anomaly Detection and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B.; Poole, M.; Camp, M.; Murray-Krezan, J.

    2016-09-01

    Machine Learning (ML) techniques have successfully been used in a wide variety of applications to automatically detect and potentially classify changes in activity, or a series of activities by utilizing large amounts data, sometimes even seemingly-unrelated data. The amount of data being collected, processed, and stored in the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) domain has grown at an exponential rate and is now better suited for ML. This paper describes development of advanced algorithms to deliver significant improvements in characterization of deep space objects and indication and warning (I&W) using a global network of telescopes that are collecting photometric data on a multitude of space-based objects. The Phase II Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project Autonomous Characterization Algorithms for Change Detection and Characterization (ACDC), contracted to ExoAnalytic Solutions Inc. is providing the ability to detect and identify photometric signature changes due to potential space object changes (e.g. stability, tumble rate, aspect ratio), and correlate observed changes to potential behavioral changes using a variety of techniques, including supervised learning. Furthermore, these algorithms run in real-time on data being collected and processed by the ExoAnalytic Space Operations Center (EspOC), providing timely alerts and warnings while dynamically creating collection requirements to the EspOC for the algorithms that generate higher fidelity I&W. This paper will discuss the recently implemented ACDC algorithms, including the general design approach and results to date. The usage of supervised algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors, etc., and unsupervised algorithms, for example k-means, Principle Component Analysis, Hierarchical Clustering, etc., and the implementations of these algorithms is explored. Results of applying these algorithms to EspOC data both in an off

  10. Detection, isolation, and characterization of acidophilic methanotrophs from Sphagnum mosses.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; Ouyang, Wenjing; van Winden, Julia; Raghoebarsing, Ashna; van Niftrik, Laura; Pol, Arjan; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente; van Donselaar, Elly G; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Jetten, Mike S M; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2011-08-15

    Sphagnum peatlands are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane-oxidizing bacteria in these ecosystems serve as a methane filter and limit methane emissions. Yet little is known about the diversity and identity of the methanotrophs present in and on Sphagnum mosses of peatlands, and only a few isolates are known. The methanotrophic community in Sphagnum mosses, originating from a Dutch peat bog, was investigated using a pmoA microarray. A high biodiversity of both gamma- and alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs was found. With Sphagnum mosses as the inoculum, alpha- and gammaproteobacterial acidophilic methanotrophs were isolated using established and newly designed media. The 16S rRNA, pmoA, pxmA, and mmoX gene sequences showed that the alphaproteobacterial isolates belonged to the Methylocystis and Methylosinus genera. The Methylosinus species isolated are the first acid-tolerant members of this genus. Of the acidophilic gammaproteobacterial strains isolated, strain M5 was affiliated with the Methylomonas genus, and the other strain, M200, may represent a novel genus, most closely related to the genera Methylosoma and Methylovulum. So far, no acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs in the Gammaproteobacteria class are known. All strains showed the typical features of either type I or II methanotrophs and are, to the best of our knowledge, the first isolated (acidophilic or acid-tolerant) methanotrophs from Sphagnum mosses.

  11. Experimental equipment for an advanced ISOL facility[Isotope Separation On-Line Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.; Rehm, K.E.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the Workshop on the Experimental Equipment for an Advanced ISOL Facility which was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on July 22--25, 1998. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the performance requirements, manpower and cost estimates, as well as a schedule of the experimental equipment needed to fully exploit the new physics which can be studied at an advanced ISOL facility. An overview of the new physics opportunities that would be provided by such a facility has been presented in the White Paper that was issued following the Columbus Meeting. The reactions and experimental techniques discussed in the Columbus White Paper served as a guideline for the formulation of the detector needs at the Berkeley Workshop. As outlined a new ISOL facility with intense, high-quality beams of radioactive nuclei would provide exciting new research opportunities in the areas of: the nature of nucleonic matter; the origin of the elements; and tests of the Standard Model. After an introductory section, the following equipment is discussed: gamma-ray detectors; recoil separators; magnetic spectrographs; particle detectors; targets; and apparatus using non-accelerated beams.

  12. Detection of biofilm production and antibiotic resistance pattern in clinical isolates from indwelling medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Basukala, Prashant; Basukala, Om; Parajuli, Keshab; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Rijal, Basista Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms pose great threat for patients requiring indwelling medical devices (IMDs) as it is difficult to remove them. It is, therefore, crucial to follow an appropriate method for the detection of biofilms. The present study focuses on detection of biofilm formation among the isolates from IMDs. We also aimed to explore the antibiogram of biofilm producers. This prospective analysis included 65 prosthetic samples. After isolation and identification of bacteria following standard methodology, antibiogram of the isolates were produced following Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Detection of biofilms was done by tube adherence (TA), Congo red agar and tissue culture plate (TCP) methods. Out of 67 clinical isolates from IMDs, TCP detected 31 (46.3 %) biofilm producers and 36 (53.7 %) biofilm non-producers. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex were found to be the most frequent biofilm producers. The TA method correlated well with the TCP method for biofilm detection. Higher antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm producers than in biofilm non-producers. The most effective antibiotics for biofilm producing Gram-positive isolates were Vancomycin and Tigecycline, and that for biofilm producing Gram-negative isolates were Polymyxin-B, Colistin Sulphate and Tigecycline. Nearly 46 % of the isolates were found to be biofilm producers. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern in the present study showed Amoxicillin to be an ineffective drug for isolates from the IMDs. For the detection of biofilm production, TA method can be an economical and effective alternative to TCP method.

  13. Model-based fault detection and isolation for intermittently active faults with application to motion-based thruster fault detection and isolation for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is a method for detecting and isolating fault modes in a system having a model describing its behavior and regularly sampled measurements. The models are used to calculate past and present deviations from measurements that would result with no faults present, as well as with one or more potential fault modes present. Algorithms that calculate and store these deviations, along with memory of when said faults, if present, would have an effect on the said actual measurements, are used to detect when a fault is present. Related algorithms are used to exonerate false fault modes and finally to isolate the true fault mode. This invention is presented with application to detection and isolation of thruster faults for a thruster-controlled spacecraft. As a supporting aspect of the invention, a novel, effective, and efficient filtering method for estimating the derivative of a noisy signal is presented.

  14. High-throughput DNA isolation method for detection of Xylella fastidiosa in plant and insect samples.

    PubMed

    Brady, Jeff A; Faske, Jennifer B; Castañeda-Gill, Jessica M; King, Jonathan L; Mitchell, Forrest L

    2011-09-01

    We report an inexpensive, high-throughput method for isolating DNA from insect and plant samples for the purpose of detecting Xylella fastidiosa infection. Existing methods often copurify inhibitors of DNA polymerases, limiting their usefulness for PCR-based detection assays. When compared to commercially available kits, the method provides enhanced pathogen detection at a fraction of the cost.

  15. Detection and spread of oxa-48-producing Klebsiella oxytoca isolates in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Hasan; Aydin, Selda; Albayrak, Rüveyda; Bilgi, Esma A; Yildiz, Ismail; Kuvat, Nuray; Kelesoglu, Fatih M; Kelesoglu, Fatih M; Pakaştiçali, Nagehan; Yilmaz, Fadime; Ongen, Betigül

    2014-01-01

    Five OXA-48 producing Klebsiella oxytoca strains isolated in April-July 2010 were analyzed. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using disc diffusion method and VITEK 2 system. Carbapenemase activity was investigated using the Modified Hodge test. Beta-lactamase genes were detected by PCR and blaOXA-48 was sequenced. Genetic relatedness between K. oxytoca isolates was investigated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Carbapenemase activity was detected in 5 isolates by Modified Hodge test. Although all strains were resistant to ertapenem and imipenem, only one strain was also resistant to meropenem. BlaOXA-48 in 4 isolates harbored 2 or 3 other ESBL types, namely, blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, or blaVEB. PFGE revealed 3 different pulso-types among the K. oxytoca isolates. The presence of OXA-48 carbapenemase in other species of clinical isolates should also be considered.

  16. UIO design for singular delayed LPV systems with application to actuator fault detection and isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanabadi, Amir Hossein; Shafiee, Masoud; Puig, Vicenc

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the unknown input observer (UIO) design for singular delayed linear parameter varying (LPV) systems is considered regarding its application to actuator fault detection and isolation. The design procedure assumes that the LPV system is represented in the polytopic framework. Existence and convergence conditions for the UIO are established. The design procedure is formulated by means of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Actuator fault detection and isolation is based on using the UIO approach for designing a residual generator that is completely decoupled from unknown inputs and exclusively sensitive to faults. Fault isolation is addressed considering two different strategies: dedicated and generalised bank of observers' schemes. The applicability of these two schemes for the fault isolation is discussed. An open flow canal system is considered as a case study to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed fault detection and isolation method in different fault scenarios.

  17. Advanced Statistical Signal Processing Techniques for Landmine Detection Using GPR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-12

    based ground penetrating radars for the detection of subsurface objects that are low in metal content and hard to detect. The derived techniques...penetrating radars for the detection of subsurface objects that are low in metal content and hard to detect. The derived techniques include the exploitation...5.00 4.00 3.00 9.00 T. Glenn, J. Wilson, D. Ho. A MULTIMODAL MATCHING PURSUITS DISSIMILARITY MEASURE APPLIED TO LANDMINE/CLUTTER DISCRIMINATION

  18. An Intelligent Fault Detection and Isolation Architecture for Antenna Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnamai, K.; Arabshahi, P.; Yan, T.-Y.; Pham, T.; Finley, S. G.

    1997-10-01

    This article describes a general architecture for fault modeling, diagnosis, and isolation of the DSN antenna array based on computationally intelligent techniques(neural networks and fuzzy logic). It encompasses a suite of intelligent test and diagnosis algorithms in software. By continuously monitoring the health of the highly complex and nonlinear array observables, the automated diagnosis software will be able to identify and isolate the most likely causes of system failure in cases of faulty operation. Furthermore, it will be able to recommend a series of corresponding corrective actions and effectively act as an automated real-time and interactive system supervisor. In so doing, it will enhance the array capability by reducing the operational workload, increasing science information availability, reducing the overall cost of operation by reducing system downtimes, improving risk management, and making mission planning much more reliable. Operation of this architecture is illustrated using examples from observables available from the 34-meter arraying task.

  19. A hybrid fault detection and isolation strategy for a team of cooperating unmanned vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tousi, M. M.; Khorasani, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid fault detection and isolation (FDI) methodology is developed for a team of cooperating unmanned vehicles. The proposed approach takes advantage of the cooperative nature of the team to detect and isolate relatively low-severity actuator faults that are otherwise not detectable and isolable by the vehicles themselves individually. The approach is hybrid and consists of both low-level (agent/team level) and high-level [discrete-event systems (DES) level] FDI modules. The high-level FDI module is formulated in the DES supervisory control framework, whereas the low-level FDI module invokes classical FDI techniques. By properly integrating the two FDI modules, a larger class of faults can be detected and isolated as compared to the existing techniques in the literature that rely on each level separately. Simulation results for a team of five unmanned aerial vehicles are also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and capabilities of our proposed methodology.

  20. Turbine Engine Fault Detection and Isolation Program. Phase I. Requirements Definition for an Integrated Engine Monitoring System. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    FAULT DETECTION AND ISOLATION PROGRAM PHASE I - Requirements Definition Study for an Integrated Engine Monitoring System DTIC SYSTEMS CONTROL...performance monitoring on-condition maintenance performance trending engine fault detection and isolation 20 ABSTRACT (Continue an rsierse aide If...operational units and organizations actively participated in this study effort. Their technical input to the Turbine Engine Fault Detection and Isolation

  1. Inverted pendulum as low-frequency pre-isolation for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamori, A.; Raffai, P.; Márka, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Sannibale, V.; Tariq, H.; Bertolini, A.; Cella, G.; Viboud, N.; Numata, K.; Takahashi, R.; Fukushima, M.

    2007-11-01

    We have developed advanced seismic attenuation systems for Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors. The design consists of an Inverted Pendulum (IP) holding stages of Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF) and pendula, which isolate the test mass suspension from ground noise. The ultra-low-frequency IP suppresses the horizontal seismic noise, while the GASF suppresses the vertical ground vibrations. The three legs of the IP are supported by cylindrical maraging steel flexural joints. The IP can be tuned to very low frequencies by carefully adjusting its load. As a best result, we have achieved an ultra low, ˜12 mHz pendulum frequency for the system prototype made for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory). The measured quality factor, Q, of this IP, ranging from Q˜2500 (at 0.45 Hz) to Q˜2 (at 12 mHz), is compatible with structural damping, and is proportional to the square of the pendulum frequency. Tunable counterweights allow for precise center-of-percussion tuning to achieve the required attenuation up to the first leg internal resonance (˜60 Hz for advanced LIGO prototype). All measurements are in good agreement with our analytical models. We therefore expect good attenuation in the low-frequency region, from ˜0.1to ˜50 Hz, covering the micro-seismic peak. The extremely soft IP requires minimal control force, which simplifies any needed actuation.

  2. QPSK loop lock detection in the advanced receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Receiver (ARX 2) currently being developed uses a Costas crossover loop to acquire and track the phase of an incoming quadrature phase-shift-keyed (QPSK) signal. The performance is described for the QPSK lock detector to be implemented, taking into account the phase jitter in the tracking loop. Simulations are used to verify the results of the analysis.

  3. Recent Advances for the Detection of Ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tai Hwan

    2015-12-04

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the mycotoxins secreted by Aspersillus and Penicillium that can easily colonize various grains like coffee, peanut, rice, and maize. Since OTA is a chemically stable compound that can endure the physicochemical conditions of modern food processing, additional research efforts have been devoted to develop sensitive and cost-effective surveillance solutions. Although traditional chromatographic and immunoassays appear to be mature enough to attain sensitivity up to the regulation levels, alternative detection schemes are still being enthusiastically pursued in an attempt to meet the requirements of rapid and cost-effective detections. Herein, this review presents recent progresses in OTA detections with minimal instrumental usage, which have been facilitated by the development of OTA aptamers and by the innovations in functional nanomaterials. In addition to the introduction of aptamer-based OTA detection techniques, OTA-specific detection principles are also presented, which exclusively take advantage of the unique chemical structure and related physicochemical characteristics.

  4. Recent Advances for the Detection of Ochratoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tai Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus and Penicillium that can easily colonize various grains like coffee, peanut, rice, and maize. Since OTA is a chemically stable compound that can endure the physicochemical conditions of modern food processing, additional research efforts have been devoted to develop sensitive and cost-effective surveillance solutions. Although traditional chromatographic and immunoassays appear to be mature enough to attain sensitivity up to the regulation levels, alternative detection schemes are still being enthusiastically pursued in an attempt to meet the requirements of rapid and cost-effective detections. Herein, this review presents recent progresses in OTA detections with minimal instrumental usage, which have been facilitated by the development of OTA aptamers and by the innovations in functional nanomaterials. In addition to the introduction of aptamer-based OTA detection techniques, OTA-specific detection principles are also presented, which exclusively take advantage of the unique chemical structure and related physicochemical characteristics. PMID:26690216

  5. Methods and apparatus using commutative error detection values for fault isolation in multiple node computers

    DOEpatents

    Almasi, Gheorghe [Ardsley, NY; Blumrich, Matthias Augustin [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong [Croton-On-Hudson, NY; Coteus, Paul [Yorktown, NY; Gara, Alan [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Hoenicke, Dirk I [Ossining, NY; Singh, Sarabjeet [Mississauga, CA; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D [Wernau, DE; Takken, Todd [Brewster, NY; Vranas, Pavlos [Bedford Hills, NY

    2008-06-03

    Methods and apparatus perform fault isolation in multiple node computing systems using commutative error detection values for--example, checksums--to identify and to isolate faulty nodes. When information associated with a reproducible portion of a computer program is injected into a network by a node, a commutative error detection value is calculated. At intervals, node fault detection apparatus associated with the multiple node computer system retrieve commutative error detection values associated with the node and stores them in memory. When the computer program is executed again by the multiple node computer system, new commutative error detection values are created and stored in memory. The node fault detection apparatus identifies faulty nodes by comparing commutative error detection values associated with reproducible portions of the application program generated by a particular node from different runs of the application program. Differences in values indicate a possible faulty node.

  6. Detection, isolation, and persistence of viruses within bivalve mollusks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and other virus transmission by molluscan shellfish is a significant issue. Research at the ARS-Dover DE laboratory has led to the development of improved methods for detecting these viruses. To identify pathogenic viruses within mollusks, a rapid highly-se...

  7. Plant viroids: Isolation, Characterization/Detection, and Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When T.O. Diener discovered Potato spindle tuber viroid in 1971, only a limited number of techniques were available for plant virus detection and purification. Biological assays using indicator hosts showing strong (and characteristic) symptoms of infection and able to support high levels of viroid...

  8. Advances in Anthrax Detection: Overview of Bioprobes and Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Gedi, Vinayakumar; Lee, Sang-Choon; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Moon, Ji-Young; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2015-06-01

    Anthrax is an infectious disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Although anthrax commonly affects domestic and wild animals, it causes a rare but lethal infection in humans. A variety of techniques have been introduced and evaluated to detect anthrax using cultures, polymerase chain reaction, and immunoassays to address the potential threat of anthrax being used as a bioweapon. The high-potential harm of anthrax in bioterrorism requires sensitive and specific detection systems that are rapid, field-ready, and real-time monitoring. Here, we provide a systematic overview of anthrax detection probes with their potential applications in various ultra-sensitive diagnostic systems.

  9. Advances in rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xihong; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wang, Jun; Oh, Deog Hwan

    2014-03-28

    Food safety is increasingly becoming an important public health issue, as foodborne diseases present a widespread and growing public health problem in both developed and developing countries. The rapid and precise monitoring and detection of foodborne pathogens are some of the most effective ways to control and prevent human foodborne infections. Traditional microbiological detection and identification methods for foodborne pathogens are well known to be time consuming and laborious as they are increasingly being perceived as insufficient to meet the demands of rapid food testing. Recently, various kinds of rapid detection, identification, and monitoring methods have been developed for foodborne pathogens, including nucleic-acid-based methods, immunological methods, and biosensor-based methods, etc. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, and applications of recent rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens.

  10. Advanced Concepts in Multi-Dimensional Radiation Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Kai; Haefner, Andy; Barnowski, Ross; Pavlovsky, Ryan; Torii, Tatsuo; Sanada, Yukihisa; Shikaze, Yoshiaki

    Recent developments in the detector fabrication, signal readout, and data processing enable new concepts in radiation detection that are relevant for applications ranging from fundamental physics to medicine as well as nuclear security and safety. We present recent progress in multi-dimensional radiation detection and imaging in the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics program. It is based on the ability to reconstruct scenes in three dimensions and fuse it with gamma-ray image information. We are using the High-Efficiency Multimode Imager HEMI in its Compton imaging mode and combining it with contextual sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect or visual cameras. This new concept of volumetric imaging or scene data fusion provides unprecedented capabilities in radiation detection and imaging relevant for the detection and mapping of radiological and nuclear materials. This concept brings us one step closer to the seeing the world with gamma-ray eyes.

  11. Evaluation of advanced and current leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guide 1.45 recommends the use of at least three different detection methods in reactors to detect leakage. Monitoring of both sump-flow and airborne particulate radioactivity is mandatory. A third method can involve either monitoring of condensate flow rate from air coolers or monitoring of airborne gaseous radioactivity. Although the methods currently used for leak detection reflect the state of the art, other techniques may be developed and used. Since the recommendations of Regulatory Guide 1.45 are not mandatory, Licensee Event Report Compilations have been reviewed to help establish actual capabilities for leak detection. The review of reports which had previously covered the period June 1985 to August 1986, has been extended. The total number of events of significance is now 83. These reports have provided documented, sometimes detailed summaries of reactor leaks.

  12. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  13. Circulating tumor cells: advances in isolation and analysis, and challenges for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Harouaka, Ramdane; Kang, Zhigang; Zheng, Siyang; Cao, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cancer cells released from tumors into the bloodstream that are thought to have a key role in cancer metastasis. The presence of CTCs has been associated with worse prognosis in several major cancer types, including breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. There is considerable interest in CTC research and technologies for their potential use as cancer biomarkers that may enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis, facilitate drug development, and improve the treatment of cancer patients. This review provides an update on recent progress in CTC isolation and molecular characterization technologies. Furthermore, the review covers significant advances and limitations in the clinical applications of CTC-based assays for cancer prognosis, response to anti-cancer therapies, and exploratory studies in biomarkers predictive of sensitivity and resistance to cancer therapies. PMID:24134902

  14. Usage of Fault Detection Isolation & Recovery (FDIR) in Constellation (CxP) Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Rob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Spirkovska, Lilly; Hall, David; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper will explore the usage of Fault Detection Isolation & Recovery (FDIR) in the Constellation Exploration Program (CxP), in particular Launch Operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) is currently funding a project that is developing a prototype FDIR to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating FDIR into the CxP Ground Operations Launch Control System (LCS). An architecture that supports multiple FDIR tools has been formulated that will support integration into the CxP Ground Operation's Launch Control System (LCS). In addition, tools have been selected that provide fault detection, fault isolation, and anomaly detection along with integration between Flight and Ground elements.

  15. Advanced terahertz techniques for quality control and counterfeit detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports our invented methods for detection of counterfeit electronic. These versatile techniques are also handy in quality control applications. Terahertz pulsed laser systems are capable of giving the material characteristics and thus make it possible to distinguish between the materials used in authentic components and their counterfeit clones. Components with material defects can also be distinguished in section in this manner. In this work different refractive indices and absorption coefficients were observed for counterfeit components compared to their authentic counterparts. Existence of unexpected ingredient materials was detected in counterfeit components by Fourier Transform analysis of the transmitted terahertz pulse. Thicknesses of different layers are obtainable by analyzing the reflected terahertz pulse. Existence of unexpected layers is also detectable in this manner. Recycled, sanded and blacktopped counterfeit electronic components were detected as a result of these analyses. Counterfeit ICs with die dislocations were detected by depicting the terahertz raster scanning data in a coordinate plane which gives terahertz images. In the same manner, raster scanning of the reflected pulse gives terahertz images of the surfaces of the components which were used to investigate contaminant materials and sanded points on the surfaces. The results of the later technique, reveals the recycled counterfeit components.

  16. Prospects and advancements in C-reactive protein detection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Pranjal; Suman, Pankaj; Airon, Himangi; Mukherjee, Monalisa; Kumar, Prabhanshu

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the earliest proteins that appear in the blood circulation in most systemic inflammatory conditions and this is the reason for its significance, even after identification of many organ specific inflammatory markers which appear relatively late during the course of disease. Earlier methods of CRP detection were based on the classical methods of antigen-antibody interaction through precipitation and agglutination reactions. Later on, CRP based enzymatic assays came into the picture which were further modified by integration of an antigen-antibody detection system with surface plasma spectroscopy. Then came the time for the development of electrochemical biosensors where nanomaterials were used to make a highly sensitive and portable detection system based on silicon nanowire, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor/bipolar junction transistor, ZnS nanoparticle, aptamer, field emission transmitter, vertical flow immunoassay etc. This editorial attempts to summarize developments in the field of CRP detection, with a special emphasis on biosensor technology. This would help in translating the latest development in CRP detection in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory conditions at an early onset of the diseases. PMID:25237625

  17. Prospects and advancements in C-reactive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pranjal; Suman, Pankaj; Airon, Himangi; Mukherjee, Monalisa; Kumar, Prabhanshu

    2014-03-26

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the earliest proteins that appear in the blood circulation in most systemic inflammatory conditions and this is the reason for its significance, even after identification of many organ specific inflammatory markers which appear relatively late during the course of disease. Earlier methods of CRP detection were based on the classical methods of antigen-antibody interaction through precipitation and agglutination reactions. Later on, CRP based enzymatic assays came into the picture which were further modified by integration of an antigen-antibody detection system with surface plasma spectroscopy. Then came the time for the development of electrochemical biosensors where nanomaterials were used to make a highly sensitive and portable detection system based on silicon nanowire, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor/bipolar junction transistor, ZnS nanoparticle, aptamer, field emission transmitter, vertical flow immunoassay etc. This editorial attempts to summarize developments in the field of CRP detection, with a special emphasis on biosensor technology. This would help in translating the latest development in CRP detection in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory conditions at an early onset of the diseases.

  18. Detecting and isolating malicious nodes in wireless ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fanzhi; Jassim, Sabah

    2007-04-01

    Malicious nodes can seriously impair the performance of wireless ad hoc networks as a result of different actions such as packet dropping. Secure routes are shortest paths on which every node on the route is trusted even if unknown. Secure route discovery requires the adoption of mechanisms of associating trust to nodes. Most existing secure route discovery mechanisms rely on shared keys and digital signature. In the absence of central nodes that act as certification authority, such protocols suffer from heavy computational burden and are vulnerable to malicious attacks. In this paper we shall review existing techniques for secure routing and propose to complement route finding with creditability scores. Each node would have a credit list for its neighbors. Each node monitors its neighbors' pattern of delivering packets and regularly credits are reviewed and updated accordingly. Unlike most existing schemes the focus of our work is based on post route discovery stage, i.e. when packets are transmitted on discovered routes. The level of trust in any route will be based on the credits associated with the neighbors belonging to the discovered route. We shall evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme by modifying our simulation system so that each node has a dynamic changing "credit list" for its neighbors' behavior. We shall conduct a series of simulations with and without the proposed scheme and compare the results. We will demonstrate that the proposed mechanism is capable of isolating malicious nodes and thereby counteracting black hole attacks.

  19. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  20. Advances and Challenges in Viability Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dexin; Chen, Zi; Jiang, Yuan; Xue, Feng; Li, Baoguang

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne outbreaks are a serious public health and food safety concern worldwide. There is a great demand for rapid, sensitive, specific, and accurate methods to detect microbial pathogens in foods. Conventional methods based on cultivation of pathogens have been the gold standard protocols; however, they take up to a week to complete. Molecular assays such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, microarray technologies have been widely used in detection of foodborne pathogens. Among molecular assays, PCR technology [conventional and real-time PCR (qPCR)] is most commonly used in the foodborne pathogen detection because of its high sensitivity and specificity. However, a major drawback of PCR is its inability to differentiate the DNA from dead and viable cells, and this is a critical factor for the food industry, regulatory agencies and the consumer. To remedy this shortcoming, researchers have used biological dyes such as ethidium monoazide and propidium monoazide (PMA) to pretreat samples before DNA extraction to intercalate the DNA of dead cells in food samples, and then proceed with regular DNA preparation and qPCR. By combining PMA treatment with qPCR (PMA-qPCR), scientists have applied this technology to detect viable cells of various bacterial pathogens in foods. The incorporation of PMA into PCR-based assays for viability detection of pathogens in foods has increased significantly in the last decade. On the other hand, some downsides with this approach have been noted, particularly to achieve complete suppression of signal of DNA from the dead cells present in some particular food matrix. Nowadays, there is a tendency of more and more researchers adapting this approach for viability detection; and a few commercial kits based on PMA are available in the market. As time goes on, more scientists apply this approach to a broader range of pathogen detections, this viability approach (PMA or other chemicals such as platinum compound) may eventually

  1. Advances in Assays and Analytical Approaches for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-04

    Methods to detect botulinum toxin, the most poisonous substance known, are reviewed. Current assays are being developed with two main objectives in mind: 1) to obtain sufficiently low detection limits to replace the mouse bioassay with an in vitro assay, and 2) to develop rapid assays for screening purposes that are as sensitive as possible while requiring an hour or less to process the sample an obtain the result. This review emphasizes the diverse analytical approaches and devices that have been developed over the last decade, while also briefly reviewing representative older immunoassays to provide background and context.

  2. Advances and Challenges in Viability Detection of Foodborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dexin; Chen, Zi; Jiang, Yuan; Xue, Feng; Li, Baoguang

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne outbreaks are a serious public health and food safety concern worldwide. There is a great demand for rapid, sensitive, specific, and accurate methods to detect microbial pathogens in foods. Conventional methods based on cultivation of pathogens have been the gold standard protocols; however, they take up to a week to complete. Molecular assays such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, microarray technologies have been widely used in detection of foodborne pathogens. Among molecular assays, PCR technology [conventional and real-time PCR (qPCR)] is most commonly used in the foodborne pathogen detection because of its high sensitivity and specificity. However, a major drawback of PCR is its inability to differentiate the DNA from dead and viable cells, and this is a critical factor for the food industry, regulatory agencies and the consumer. To remedy this shortcoming, researchers have used biological dyes such as ethidium monoazide and propidium monoazide (PMA) to pretreat samples before DNA extraction to intercalate the DNA of dead cells in food samples, and then proceed with regular DNA preparation and qPCR. By combining PMA treatment with qPCR (PMA-qPCR), scientists have applied this technology to detect viable cells of various bacterial pathogens in foods. The incorporation of PMA into PCR-based assays for viability detection of pathogens in foods has increased significantly in the last decade. On the other hand, some downsides with this approach have been noted, particularly to achieve complete suppression of signal of DNA from the dead cells present in some particular food matrix. Nowadays, there is a tendency of more and more researchers adapting this approach for viability detection; and a few commercial kits based on PMA are available in the market. As time goes on, more scientists apply this approach to a broader range of pathogen detections, this viability approach (PMA or other chemicals such as platinum compound) may eventually

  3. LEADERS: Lightweight Epidemiology Advanced Detection and Emergency Response System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Todd A.

    2002-06-01

    Technological advancements in molecular biology now offer a wide-range of applications for bio-warfare defense, medical surveillance, agricultural surveillance and pure research. Idaho Technology has designed and produced the world's fastest DNA-based identifiers. The R.A.P.I.D. TM (Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device) provides several options for using sensitive and specific molecular biology-based technology One of the key features of the RAPID is a software package called Detector*. Detector* allows Minimally Trained Care Providers (MTCP) to operate the instrument by automating the steps of running PCR and automatically analyzing the sample data. Pathogen identification is carried out automatically using positive and negative controls to protect against false positive and false negative results. As part of the LEADER system, the Remote RAPID Viewer (RRV) component allows for real-time remote monitoring of PCR reactions run on the RAPID, thus giving the Subject Matter Expert (SME) the ability to request specific tests when triggered by the auto-analysis system. In addition the RRV component facilitates in result verification of tests run by MTCP, assists in tracking outbreaks, and helps coordinate large scale real-time crisis management. The system will allow access to epidemiological data from thin client (i.e. web browser), thus allowing the SME to connect from anywhere with an internet connection. In addition the LEADER system will automatically contact and alert SME when threshold criteria are met, helping reduce the time to first response.

  4. The advance of non-invasive detection methods in osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiao; Chen, Yanping

    2011-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases which badly affected the patients' living quality and economy. Detection and evaluation technology can provide basic information for early treatment. A variety of imaging methods in OA were reviewed, such as conventional X-ray, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Among the existing imaging modalities, the spatial resolution of X-ray is extremely high; CT is a three-dimensional method, which has high density resolution; US as an evaluation method of knee OA discriminates lesions sensitively between normal cartilage and degenerative one; as a sensitive and nonionizing method, MRI is suitable for the detection of early OA, but the cost is too expensive for routine use; NIRS is a safe, low cost modality, and is also good at detecting early stage OA. In a word, each method has its own advantages, but NIRS is provided with broader application prospect, and it is likely to be used in clinical daily routine and become the golden standard for diagnostic detection.

  5. Detection and tracking of drones using advanced acoustic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busset, Joël.; Perrodin, Florian; Wellig, Peter; Ott, Beat; Heutschi, Kurt; Rühl, Torben; Nussbaumer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Recent events of drones flying over city centers, official buildings and nuclear installations stressed the growing threat of uncontrolled drone proliferation and the lack of real countermeasure. Indeed, detecting and tracking them can be difficult with traditional techniques. A system to acoustically detect and track small moving objects, such as drones or ground robots, using acoustic cameras is presented. The described sensor, is completely passive, and composed of a 120-element microphone array and a video camera. The acoustic imaging algorithm determines in real-time the sound power level coming from all directions, using the phase of the sound signals. A tracking algorithm is then able to follow the sound sources. Additionally, a beamforming algorithm selectively extracts the sound coming from each tracked sound source. This extracted sound signal can be used to identify sound signatures and determine the type of object. The described techniques can detect and track any object that produces noise (engines, propellers, tires, etc). It is a good complementary approach to more traditional techniques such as (i) optical and infrared cameras, for which the object may only represent few pixels and may be hidden by the blooming of a bright background, and (ii) radar or other echo-localization techniques, suffering from the weakness of the echo signal coming back to the sensor. The distance of detection depends on the type (frequency range) and volume of the noise emitted by the object, and on the background noise of the environment. Detection range and resilience to background noise were tested in both, laboratory environments and outdoor conditions. It was determined that drones can be tracked up to 160 to 250 meters, depending on their type. Speech extraction was also experimentally investigated: the speech signal of a person being 80 to 100 meters away can be captured with acceptable speech intelligibility.

  6. Robust detection-isolation-accommodation for sensor failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. L.; Pattipati, K. R.; Willsky, A. S.; Eterno, J. S.; Crawford, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one year study to: (1) develop a theory for Robust Failure Detection and Identification (FDI) in the presence of model uncertainty, (2) develop a design methodology which utilizes the robust FDI ththeory, (3) apply the methodology to a sensor FDI problem for the F-100 jet engine, and (4) demonstrate the application of the theory to the evaluation of alternative FDI schemes are presented. Theoretical results in statistical discrimination are used to evaluate the robustness of residual signals (or parity relations) in terms of their usefulness for FDI. Furthermore, optimally robust parity relations are derived through the optimization of robustness metrics. The result is viewed as decentralization of the FDI process. A general structure for decentralized FDI is proposed and robustness metrics are used for determining various parameters of the algorithm.

  7. Continuing issues with Lead: Recent Advances in Detection

    PubMed Central

    Deibler, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    In the past Pb2+ has been used in many industries, including gasoline, piping, toys, paints, and more. The use of lead has led to a natural increase of lead concentration in the environment especially in air and water. According to the U.S. CDC “no level of lead in blood is considered safe.” Exposure to very low amounts of lead can cause several health complications including developmental and neurological disorders. Over the past several years an emphasis has been placed in developing systems that can detect lead at a very low concentration. A great deal of work has been accomplished in the development of Pb2+ sensors that can not only detect but also quantify the amount and in some cases in the presence of other metal ions. Herein, we describe current regulations, mode of exposure and recent development of sensing techniques. PMID:25089117

  8. Rapid identification of mycobacteria and rapid detection of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cultured isolates and in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Yam, Wing-Cheong; Siu, Kit-Hang Gilman

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology and better understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance have allowed rapid identification of mycobacteria and rapid detection of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in cultured isolates or in respiratory specimens. In this chapter, several simple nucleic acid amplification-based techniques are introduced as molecular approach for clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis. A one-tube nested IS6110-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used for M. tuberculosis complex identification; the use of a multiplex allele-specific PCR is demonstrated to detect the isoniazid resistance; PCR-sequencing assays are applied for rifampicin and ofloxacin resistance detection and 16S rDNA sequencing is utilized for identification of mycobacterial species from cultures of acid fast bacilli (AFB). Despite the high specificity and sensitivity of the molecular techniques, mycobacterial culture remains the "Gold Standard" for tuberculosis diagnosis. Negative results of molecular tests never preclude the infection or the presence of drug resistance. These technological advancements are, therefore, not intended to replace the conventional tests, but rather have major complementary roles in tuberculosis diagnosis.

  9. Flight test results of failure detection and isolation algorithms for a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, F. R.; Motyka, P. R.; Bailey, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Flight test results for two sensor fault-tolerant algorithms developed for a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit are presented. The inertial measurement unit (IMU) consists of four two-degrees-of-freedom gyros and accelerometers mounted on the faces of a semi-octahedron. Fault tolerance is provided by edge vector test and generalized likelihood test algorithms, each of which can provide dual fail-operational capability for the IMU. To detect the wide range of failure magnitudes in inertial sensors, which provide flight crucial information for flight control and navigation, failure detection and isolation are developed in terms of a multi level structure. Threshold compensation techniques, developed to enhance the sensitivity of the failure detection process to navigation level failures, are presented. Four flight tests were conducted in a commercial transport-type environment to compare and determine the performance of the failure detection and isolation methods. Dual flight processors enabled concurrent tests for the algorithms. Failure signals such as hard-over, null, or bias shift, were added to the sensor outputs as simple or multiple failures during the flights. Both algorithms provided timely detection and isolation of flight control level failures. The generalized likelihood test algorithm provided more timely detection of low-level sensor failures, but it produced one false isolation. Both algorithms demonstrated the capability to provide dual fail-operational performance for the skewed array of inertial sensors.

  10. Merging Black Hole Binaries in Galactic Nuclei: Implications for Advanced-LIGO Detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Fabio; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of gravitational waves from the black hole binary merger GW150914, we study the dynamical evolution of (stellar-mass) black holes in galactic nuclei, where massive star clusters reside. With masses of ˜ {10}7 {M}⊙ and sizes of only a few parsecs, nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are the densest stellar systems observed in the local universe and represent a robust environment where black hole binaries can dynamically form, harden, and merge. We show that due to their large escape speeds, NSCs can retain a large fraction of their merger remnants. Successive mergers can then lead to significant growth and produce black hole mergers of several tens of solar masses similar to GW150914 and up to a few hundreds of solar masses, without the need to invoke extremely low metallicity environments. We use a semi-analytical approach to describe the dynamics of black holes in massive star clusters. Our models give a black hole binary merger rate of ≈ 1.5 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1 from NSCs, implying up to a few tens of possible detections per year with Advanced LIGO. Moreover, we find a local merger rate of ˜ 1 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1 for high mass black hole binaries similar to GW150914; a merger rate comparable to or higher than that of similar binaries assembled dynamically in globular clusters (GCs). Finally, we show that if all black holes receive high natal kicks, ≳ 50 {km} {{{s}}}-1, then NSCs will dominate the local merger rate of binary black holes compared to either GCs or isolated binary evolution.

  11. Detection and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio Isolates in Aquaculture Environments: Implications for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Vibrio isolates recovered from four different fish pond facilities in Benin City, Nigeria, determine their antibiogram profiles, and evaluate the public health implications of these findings. Fish pond water samples were collected from four sampling sites between March and September 2014. A total of 56 samples were collected and screened for the isolation of Vibrio species using standard culture-based methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the identities of the Vibrio species using the genus-specific and species-specific primers. Vibrio species were detected at all the study sites at a concentration on the order of 10(3) and 10(6) CFU/100 ml. A total of 550 presumptive Vibrio isolates were subjected to PCR confirmation. Of these isolates, 334 isolates tested positive, giving an overall Vibrio prevalence rate of 60.7%. The speciation of the 334 Vibrio isolates from fish ponds yielded 32.63% Vibrio fluvialis, 20.65% Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 18.26% Vibrio vulnificus, and 28.44% other Vibrio species. In all, 167 confirmed Vibrio isolates were selected from a pool of 334 confirmed Vibrio isolates for antibiogram profiling. The susceptibility profiles of 20 antimicrobial agents on the isolates revealed a high level of resistance for AMP(R), ERY(R), NAL(R), SUL(R), TMP(R), SXT(R), TET(R), OTC(R), and CHL(R). The percentage of multiple drug resistance Vibrio isolates was 67.6%. The multiple antibiotic resistance index mean value of 0.365 for the Vibrio isolates found in this study indicated that the Vibrio isolates were exposed to high-risk sources of contamination when antibiotics were frequently used. The resistant Vibrio strains could be transmitted through the food chain to humans and therefore constitutes a risk to public health.

  12. Detection of Carbapenemases in Clinical Enterobacteriaceae Isolates Using the VITEK AST-N202 Card

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Il Kwon; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Jang, In-Ho; Lee, Woonhyoung; Kim, Keonhan; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Background The rapid and accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in clinical microbiology laboratories is essential for the treatment and control of infections caused by these microorganisms. This study was performed to evaluate the ability of the VITEK AST-N202 card to detect CPE isolates. Materials and Methods A total of 43 (Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 37; Escherichia coli, n = 3; and Enterobacter cloacae, n = 3) CPE isolates and 79 carbapenemase-non-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CNE) isolates were included in this study. The CPE isolates harbored KPC-2 (n = 11), KPC-3 (n = 20), GES-5 (n = 5), VIM-2 (n = 2), IMP-1 (n = 1), NDM-1 (n = 2), or OXA-232 (n = 2). Of the 79 CNE isolates, eight K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem, while the remaining 71 isolates were susceptible to the carbapenems. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested using the VITEK AST-N202 card, and the results were interpreted as positive when the isolates showed resistant or intermediate results. Modified-Hodge tests (MHTs) were performed using ertapenem or meropenem disks for the screening of carbapenemase production. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were used to identify β-lactamase genes. Results Sensitivity of MHT with ertapenem and meropenem disks for the detection of carbapenemase was 81.4% (35/43) and 81.4% (35/43), respectively, and a combination with both antibiotic disks increased the sensitivity to 88.4% (38/43). Specificity of the MHT was 100% (79/79) for the CNE isolates. Sensitivity of ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem as assessed by the VITEK AST-N202 card was 100% (43/43), 93% (40/43), and 95.3% (41/43), respectively. Specificity (89.8%, 71/79) of the test with each carbapenem was improved to 100% (71/71) when eight carbapenem-resistant CNE isolates were excluded from the testing. Conclusion The VITEK AST-N202 card showed high sensitivity for the detection of carbapenemases in

  13. Mycoplasma detection and isolation from one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Mederos-Iriarte, Lidia E; Poveda, José B; Poveda, Carlos G; Vega-Orellana, Orestes M; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Corbera, Juan A; Ramírez, Ana S

    2014-10-01

    In scientific literature, a small amount of information is found concerning mycoplasmosis in camel species. Mycoplasma (M.) arginini, Acholeplasma (A.) laidlawii, and Acholeplasma oculi have been reported to be isolated from these host species. Serologically positive results have been reported for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC type, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, and M. mycoides subsp. capri. The aims of this study were to detect, isolate, and identify mycoplasmas from camels (Camelus dromedarius). Initially, saliva and ear smears plus conjunctival and vaginal secretions were taken from five female animals, but only conjunctival secretions in three male animals, all belonging to the same farm. An unknown mycoplasma was isolated from one of the vagina samples. Additionally, another unknown and uncultured mycoplasma was detected with molecular biology in the same sample. In the second stage, 23 vaginal secretions were taken from the same farm plus another secretion from a different one. Ten isolates of the same unknown and previously isolated mycoplasma were detected, nine of them recovered from the vagina of female camels. Some mycoplasmas have been related to reproductive disorders; however, there is no evidence that the isolated mycoplasmas are related to such disorders.

  14. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bordetella bronchiseptica Isolates from Swine and Companion Animals and Detection of Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Prüller, Sandra; Rensch, Ulrike; Meemken, Diana; Kaspar, Heike; Kopp, Peter A.; Klein, Günter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica causes infections of the respiratory tract in swine and other mammals and is a precursor for secondary infections with Pasteurella multocida. Treatment of B. bronchiseptica infections is conducted primarily with antimicrobial agents. Therefore it is essential to get an overview of the susceptibility status of these bacteria. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyse broth microdilution susceptibility testing according to CLSI recommendations with an incubation time of 16 to 20 hours and a longer incubation time of 24 hours, as recently proposed to obtain more homogenous MICs. Susceptibility testing against a panel of 22 antimicrobial agents and two fixed combinations was performed with 107 porcine isolates from different farms and regions in Germany and 43 isolates obtained from companion animals in Germany and other European countries. Isolates with increased MICs were investigated by PCR assays for the presence of resistance genes. For ampicillin, all 107 porcine isolates were classified as resistant, whereas only a single isolate was resistant to florfenicol. All isolates obtained from companion animals showed elevated MICs for β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrated an overall low susceptibility to cephalosporines. Extension of the incubation time resulted in 1–2 dilution steps higher MIC50 values of porcine isolates for seven antimicrobial agents tested, while isolates from companion animals exhibited twofold higher MIC50/90 values only for tetracycline and cefotaxime. For three antimicrobial agents, lower MIC50 and MIC90 values were detected for both, porcine and companion animal isolates. Among the 150 isolates tested, the resistance genes blaBOR-1 (n = 147), blaOXA-2, (n = 4), strA and strB (n = 17), sul1 (n = 10), sul2 (n = 73), dfrA7 (n = 3) and tet(A) (n = 8) were detected and a plasmid localisation was identified for several of the resistance genes. PMID:26275219

  15. Advances in Laboratory Methods for Detection and Typing of Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic and sporadic gastroenteritis across all age groups. Although the disease is usually self-limiting, in the United States norovirus gastroenteritis causes an estimated 56,000 to 71,000 hospitalizations and 570 to 800 deaths each year. This minireview describes the latest data on laboratory methods (molecular, immunological) for norovirus detection, including real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and commercially available immunological assays as well as the latest FDA-cleared multi-gastrointestinal-pathogen platforms. In addition, an overview is provided on the latest nomenclature and molecular epidemiology of human noroviruses. PMID:24989606

  16. An advanced algorithm for highway pavement fissure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bei; Cao, Wenlun; He, Yuyao

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents image detection method of pavement crack based on fractal dimension feature and designs self-adapting algorithm of fractal dimension interval of pavement region. Through image pretreatment, calculation of fractal dimension, self-adapting calculation of dimension interval, we obtain the location image of damage pavement. The experimental results of transverse crack, longitudinal crack, net-shaped crack, pit slot are contrast with that of Sobel operator. The results show that they have the similar capability on the representation of crack, but the proposed method is more flexible on the aspect of representation of crack size and calculation of damage ratio.

  17. Recommended advanced techniques for waterborne pathogen detection in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Alhamlan, Fatimah S; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N

    2015-02-19

    The effect of human activities on water resources has expanded dramatically during the past few decades, leading to the spread of waterborne microbial pathogens. The total global health impact of human infectious diseases associated with pathogenic microorganisms from land-based wastewater pollution was estimated to be approximately three million disability-adjusted life years (DALY), with an estimated economic loss of nearly 12 billion US dollars per year. Although clean water is essential for healthy living, it is not equally granted to all humans. Indeed, people who live in developing countries are challenged every day by an inadequate supply of clean water. Polluted water can lead to health crises that in turn spread waterborne pathogens. Taking measures to assess the water quality can prevent these potential risks. Thus, a pressing need has emerged in developing countries for comprehensive and accurate assessments of water quality. This review presents current and emerging advanced techniques for assessing water quality that can be adopted by authorities in developing countries.

  18. Advanced infrared detection and image processing for automated bat censusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Jeffery D.; Kunz, Tomas H.; Horn, Jason; Cleveland, Cutler; Petronio, Susan M.

    2003-09-01

    The Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) forms some of the largest aggregations of mammals known to mankind. However, little is known about population sizes and nightly foraging activities. An advanced infrared (IR) thermal imaging system with a real time imaging and data acquisition system is described for censusing Brazilian free-tailed bats during nightly emergences at selected Texas caves. We developed a statistically-based algorithm suitable for counting emerging bats in columns with relative constant trajectories and velocities. Individual bats are not identified and tracked, but instead column density is calculated at intervals of 1/30th of a second and counts are accumulated based upon column velocity. Preliminary evaluation has shown this method to be far more accurate than those previously used to census large bat populations. This real-time automated censusing system allows us to make accurate and repeatable estimates of the number of bats present independent of colony size, ambient light, or weather conditions, and without causing disturbance to the colony.

  19. Recent Advances in Model-Assisted Probability of Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. Bruce; Brasche, Lisa J.; Lindgren, Eric; Swindell, Paul; Winfree, William P.

    2009-01-01

    The increased role played by probability of detection (POD) in structural integrity programs, combined with the significant time and cost associated with the purely empirical determination of POD, provides motivation for alternate means to estimate this important metric of NDE techniques. One approach to make the process of POD estimation more efficient is to complement limited empirical experiments with information from physics-based models of the inspection process or controlled laboratory experiments. The Model-Assisted Probability of Detection (MAPOD) Working Group was formed by the Air Force Research Laboratory, the FAA Technical Center, and NASA to explore these possibilities. Since the 2004 inception of the MAPOD Working Group, 11 meetings have been held in conjunction with major NDE conferences. This paper will review the accomplishments of this group, which includes over 90 members from around the world. Included will be a discussion of strategies developed to combine physics-based and empirical understanding, draft protocols that have been developed to guide application of the strategies, and demonstrations that have been or are being carried out in a number of countries. The talk will conclude with a discussion of future directions, which will include documentation of benefits via case studies, development of formal protocols for engineering practice, as well as a number of specific technical issues.

  20. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  1. In-channel amperometric detection for microchip electrophoresis using a wireless isolated potentiostat

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekara, Dulan B.; Hulvey, Matthew K.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of microchip electrophoresis (ME) with amperometric detection leads to a number of analytical challenges that are associated with isolating the detector from the high voltages used for the separation. While methods such as end-channel alignment and the use of decouplers have been employed, they have limitations. A less common method has been to utilize an electrically isolated potentiostat. This approach allows placement of the working electrode directly in the separation channel without using a decoupler. This paper explores the use of microchip electrophoresis and electrochemical detection (ME-EC) with an electrically isolated potentiostat for the separation and in-channel detection of several biologically important anions. The separation employed negative polarity voltages and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB, as a buffer modifier) for the separation of nitrite (NO2-), glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (AA), and tyrosine (Tyr). A half-wave potential (E½) shift of approximately negative 500 mV was observed for NO2- and H2O2 standards in the in-channel configuration compared to end channel. Higher separation efficiencies were observed for both NO2- and H2O2 with the in-channel detection configuration. The limits of detection were approximately two-fold lower and the sensitivity was approximately two-fold higher for in-channel detection of nitrite when compared to end-channel. The application of this microfluidic device for the separation and detection of biomarkers related to oxidative stress is described. PMID:21437918

  2. In-channel amperometric detection for microchip electrophoresis using a wireless isolated potentiostat.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, Dulan B; Hulvey, Matthew K; Lunte, Susan M

    2011-04-01

    The combination of microchip electrophoresis with amperometric detection leads to a number of analytical challenges that are associated with isolating the detector from the high voltages used for the separation. While methods such as end-channel alignment and the use of decouplers have been employed, they have limitations. A less common method has been to utilize an electrically isolated potentiostat. This approach allows placement of the working electrode directly in the separation channel without using a decoupler. This paper explores the use of microchip electrophoresis and electrochemical detection with an electrically isolated potentiostat for the separation and in-channel detection of several biologically important anions. The separation employed negative polarity voltages and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (as a buffer modifier) for the separation of nitrite (NO₂⁻), glutathione, ascorbic acid, and tyrosine. A half-wave potential shift of approximately negative 500 mV was observed for NO₂⁻ and H₂O₂ standards in the in-channel configuration compared to end-channel. Higher separation efficiencies were observed for both NO₂⁻ and H₂O₂ with the in-channel detection configuration. The limits of detection were approximately two-fold lower and the sensitivity was approximately two-fold higher for in-channel detection of nitrite when compared to end-channel. The application of this microfluidic device for the separation and detection of biomarkers related to oxidative stress is described.

  3. Improved Detection by Next-Generation Sequencing of Pyrazinamide Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates.

    PubMed

    Maningi, Nontuthuko E; Daum, Luke T; Rodriguez, John D; Mphahlele, Matsie; Peters, Remco P H; Fischer, Gerald W; Chambers, James P; Fourie, P Bernard

    2015-12-01

    The technical limitations of common tests used for detecting pyrazinamide (PZA) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates pose challenges for comprehensive and accurate descriptions of drug resistance in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). In this study, a 606-bp fragment (comprising the pncA coding region plus the promoter) was sequenced using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect associated PZA resistance mutations in 88 recultured MDR-TB isolates from an archived series collected in 2001. These 88 isolates were previously Sanger sequenced, with 55 (61%) designated as carrying the wild-type pncA gene and 33 (37%) showing mutations. PZA susceptibility of the isolates was also determined using the Bactec 460 TB system and the Wayne test. In this study, isolates were recultured and susceptibility testing was performed in Bactec 960 MGIT. Concordance between NGS and MGIT results was 93% (n = 88), and concordance values between the Bactec 460, the Wayne test, or pncA gene Sanger sequencing and NGS results were 82% (n = 88), 83% (n = 88), and 89% (n = 88), respectively. NGS confirmed the majority of pncA mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but revealed several new and mixed-strain mutations that resolved discordancy in other phenotypic results. Importantly, in 53% (18/34) of these isolates, pncA mutations were located in the 151 to 360 region and warrant further exploration. In these isolates, with their known resistance to rifampin, NGS of pncA improved PZA resistance detection sensitivity to 97% and specificity to 94% using NGS as the gold standard and helped to resolve discordant results from conventional methodologies.

  4. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  5. An Ensemble Approach for Cognitive Fault Detection and Isolation in Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Roveri, Manuel; Trovò, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive fault detection and diagnosis systems are systems able to provide timely information about possibly occurring faults without requiring any a priori knowledge about the process generating the data or the possible faults. This ability is crucial in sensor network scenarios where a priori information about the data generating process, the noise level or the dictionary of the possibly occurring faults is generally hard to obtain. We here present a novel cognitive fault detection and isolation system for sensor networks. The proposed solution relies on the modeling of spatial and temporal relationships present in the acquired datastreams and an ensemble of Hidden Markov Model change-detection tests working in the space of estimated parameters for fault detection and isolation purposes. The effectiveness of the proposed solution has been evaluated on both synthetically generated and real datasets.

  6. The effect of different isolation protocols on detection and molecular characterization of Campylobacter from poultry.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Ruiz, M; Wassenaar, T M; Gómez-Barrero, S; Porrero, M C; Navarro-Gonzalez, N; Domínguez, L

    2013-11-01

    We determined whether different methods to isolate Campylobacter (including the ISO standard 10272:2006-1) affected the genotypes detectable from poultry, at three points during slaughter: caecal content, neck skin and meat. Carcasses from 28 independent flocks were thus sampled (subset A). In addition, ten neck skin samples from four flocks, ten caecal samples from ten different flocks and ten unrelated meat samples obtained from local supermarkets were collected (subset B). Campylobacter was isolated using eight different protocols: with and without enrichment using Bolton broth, Preston broth or Campyfood broth (CFB), followed by culture on either modified Charcoal Cefoperazone Deoxycholate Agar (mCCDA) or Campyfood agar (CFA). All obtained isolates were genotyped for flaA-SVR, and over half of the isolates were also typed by MLST. The strain richness, as a measure of number of detected fla-genotypes, obtained from subset A neck skin and caecal samples was higher than that of meat samples. In half of the cases, within a flock, at least one identical fla-genotype was obtained at all three slaughter stages, suggestive of autologous contamination of carcasses. Enrichment reduced the observed richness of isolates, while CFA plates increased richness compared to mCCDA plates, irrespective of inclusion of an enrichment step. Because the isolation protocol used influences both the yield and the fla-genotype richness obtained from poultry, this variable should be taken into account when different studies are being compared.

  7. Detection and quantification of human adenovirus genomes in Acanthamoeba isolated from swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Arantes, Thalita; Caumo, Karin S; Rott, Marilise B; Spilki, Fernando R

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is the most common free-living environmental amoeba, it may serve as an important vehicle for various microorganisms living in the same environment, such as viruses, being pathogenic to humans. This study aimed to detect and quantify human adenoviruses (HAdV) in Acanthamoebas isolated from water samples collected from swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba were isolated from water samples, and isolates (n=16) were used to investigate the occurrence of HAdVs. HAdV detection was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). HAdVs were detected in 62.5% (10/16) of Acanthamoeba isolates, ranging from 3.24x103 to 5.14x105 DNA copies per milliliter of isolate. HAdV viral loads found in this study are not negligible, especially because HAdV infections are associated with several human diseases, including gastroenteritis, respiratory distress, and ocular diseases. These findings reinforce the concept that Acanthamoeba may act as a reservoir and promote HAdV transmission through water.

  8. Taqman real-time PCR assays for rapid detection of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Nilo; De Oliveira Solla Sobral, Fabiana; Lehmann, Fernanda Kieling Moreira; da Silveira, Proença Vinicius; de Carli, Silvia; Casanova, Yara Silva; Celmer, Álvaro José; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) isolates are currently differentiated from nonpathogenic strains by classical PCR of virulence genes. This study improves the detection of the five main virulence genes used for APEC detection with the development of duplex and single Taqman real-time PCR to these targets. Primers and probes targeted to ompT, hlyF, iroN, iutA, and iss genes were designed and used in the implementation of single (iss) and duplex (hlyF/ompT and iroN/iutA) Taqman PCR assays. All five virulence genes of E coli strains were successfully detected by classical and Taqman real-time (single and duplex) PCR. A panel of 111 E coli isolates, obtained from avian samples collected in different Brazilian regions between 2010 and 2011, were further tested by both assays. Complete agreement was observed in the detection of four genes, ompT, hlyF, iron, iutA, but not for iss. This issue was addressed by combining the forward primer of the classical PCR to the new iss reverse primer and probe, resulting in complete agreement for all five genes. In total, 61 (55%) Brazilian E. coli isolates were detected as APEC, and the remaining 50 (45%) as avian fecal E. coli (AFEC). In conclusion, classical and Taqman real-time PCR presented exactly the same analytical performance for the differentiation of APEC and AFEC isolates. The developed real-time Taqman PCR assays could be used for the detection and differentiation of APEC isolates.

  9. Using HST to Detect Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bond, H. E.; Bond, I.; Brown, T. M.; Casertano, S.; Dominik, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fryer, C.; Livio, M.; Mao, S.; Perrott, Y.; Udalski, A.; Yock, P.

    2012-05-01

    To date, Black Hole (BH) and Neutron Star (NS) masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated stellar-mass BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. We have underway a large, 3-year HST program (192 orbits) designed to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated BHs and NSs in the direction of the Galactic bulge. Our program consists of monitoring of 12 fields in the Sagittarius window of the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our observations have a typical cadence of one observation every two weeks, and are primarily targeted towards detecting microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated BHs and NSs in the Galactic disk and bulge. The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, which can be determined from the light curve as measured by HST (and supplemented by GEMINI) observations, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. Our program is optimized to detect long-duration events, which are more likely to be caused by massive lenses. We expect to detect a few dozen long-duration microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses.

  10. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, M. Ananda; Jayanthy, C.; Nagarajan, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP) is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr) locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59%) SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28%) were confirmed to be methicillin-resistant SP (MRSP) with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP). Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF) based on the putative AIP produced by each strain. The AIP of

  11. Extending lock-in methods: term isolation detection of nonlinear signals.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Thomas W

    2016-08-01

    We show that components of a nonlinear signal can be measured using phase-sensitive detection at unconventional demodulation frequencies, allowing us to isolate individual terms from the signal. To demonstrate this technique, autocorrelation measurements of an ultrafast pulsed laser were performed using two-photon absorption. In this example, the isolation of individual autocorrelation terms may provide internal consistency checks to improve the precision and accuracy of pulse characterization. More generally, this scheme can be extended to a range of nonlinear measurements. As a demonstration, we analyze a three-photon autocorrelation model, showing that many nonlinear signals can be studied with this method. We anticipate that term isolation detection will find application in a broad range of experiments, such as multidimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy or coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Detection of proteases from Sporosarcina aquimarina and Algoriphagus antarcticus isolated from Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Anderson F; Pires, Fabiano; Jesus, Hugo E; Santos, André L S; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S; D'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H

    2015-03-01

    Two psychrophilic bacterial samples were isolated from King George Island soil, in Antarctica. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA (rrs) gene led to the correlation with the closest related isolates as Sporosarcina aquimarina (99%) and Algoriphagus antarcticus (99%), with query coverage of 99% and 98%, respectively. The spent culture media from both isolates displayed proteolytic activities detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing gelatin as protein substrate. Under the employed conditions, S. aquimarina showed a 55 kDa protease with the best activity detected at pH 7.0 and at 27°C. A. antarcticus also showed a single extracellular protease, however its molecular mass was around 90kDa and its best activity was detected at pH 9.0 and at 37°C. The proteases from both isolates were inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA, two metalloprotease inhibitors. This is the first record of protease detection in both species, and our results may contribute to broaden the basic knowledge of proteases from the Antarctica environment and may help prospecting future biotechnological applications of these enzymes.

  13. Sensor fault detection and isolation over wireless sensor network based on hardware redundancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jingjing; Kinnaert, Michel

    2017-01-01

    In order to diagnose sensor faults with small magnitude in wireless sensor networks, distinguishability measures are defined to indicate the performance for fault detection and isolation (FDI) at each node. A systematic method is then proposed to determine the information to be exchanged between nodes to achieve FDI specifications while limiting the computation complexity and communication cost.

  14. Detection of Florfenicol Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Sick Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Kathleen; Hudson, Charlene; Maurer, John J.; Thayer, Stephan; White, David G.; Lee, Margie D.

    2000-01-01

    Florfenicol is an antibiotic approved for veterinary use in cattle in the United States in 1996. Although this drug is not used in poultry, we have detected resistance to florfenicol in clinical isolates of avian Escherichia coli. Molecular typing demonstrated that the florfenicol resistance gene, flo, was independently acquired and is plasmid encoded. PMID:10639375

  15. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Dağı, Hatice Türk; Fındık, Duygu; Demirel, Gamze; Arslan, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA). Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3%) nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1%) S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9%) were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%), and 3 (2.9%) isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers. PMID:26167341

  16. Fault detection and isolation in manufacturing systems with an identified discrete event model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Matthias; Schneider, Stefan; Lesage, Jean-Jacques; Litz, Lothar

    2012-10-01

    In this article a generic method for fault detection and isolation (FDI) in manufacturing systems considered as discrete event systems (DES) is presented. The method uses an identified model of the closed-loop of plant and controller built on the basis of observed fault-free system behaviour. An identification algorithm known from literature is used to determine the fault detection model in form of a non-deterministic automaton. New results of how to parameterise this algorithm are reported. To assess the fault detection capability of an identified automaton, probabilistic measures are proposed. For fault isolation, the concept of residuals adapted for DES is used by defining appropriate set operations representing generic fault symptoms. The method is applied to a case study system.

  17. Failure detection and isolation of redundant inertial systems for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. E.; Dove, R. W.; Mckern, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A failure detection and isolation technique is presented for application to 'off-the-shelf' type four-gimbaled inertial measurement units (IMUs) such as the KT-70 or Carousel IV. This study concentrates initially upon actual four-gimbaled IMU performance requirements for current Space Shuttle booster and orbiter mission phases. When this information is obtained for a simplex system, the remaining area of study necessary to attain redundant IMU capabilities is the establishment of mission-dependent performance failure detection thresholds. These thresholds, then, permit a careful evaluation of the capabilities of various 'off-the-shelf' four gimbaled IMUs to satisfy the Shuttle mission performance requirements with various failure detection and isolation methods.

  18. Molecular detection and characterization of goat isolate of Taenia hydatigena in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Utuk, Armagan Erdem; Piskin, Fatma Cigdem

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide molecular detection and characterization of the goat isolate of Taenia hydatigena from Ankara province of Turkey. For this purpose, PCR amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rrnS) and partial sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (mt-CO1) genes were performed in a one-month-old dead goat. According to rrnS-PCR results, parasites were identified as Taenia spp., and partial sequence of mt-CO1 gene was corresponding to T. hydatigena. At the end of the study, we concluded that molecular tools can be used to define species of parasites in cases where the key morphologic features cannot be detected. Nucleotide sequence data of Turkish goat isolate of T. hydatigena was submitted to GenBank for other researchers interested in this subject. By this study, molecular detection and characterization of T. hydatigena was done for the first time in Turkey.

  19. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Goat Isolate of Taenia hydatigena in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Utuk, Armagan Erdem; Piskin, Fatma Cigdem

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide molecular detection and characterization of the goat isolate of Taenia hydatigena from Ankara province of Turkey. For this purpose, PCR amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rrnS) and partial sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (mt-CO1) genes were performed in a one-month-old dead goat. According to rrnS-PCR results, parasites were identified as Taenia spp., and partial sequence of mt-CO1 gene was corresponding to T. hydatigena. At the end of the study, we concluded that molecular tools can be used to define species of parasites in cases where the key morphologic features cannot be detected. Nucleotide sequence data of Turkish goat isolate of T. hydatigena was submitted to GenBank for other researchers interested in this subject. By this study, molecular detection and characterization of T. hydatigena was done for the first time in Turkey. PMID:22500144

  20. Glyco-biosensors: recent advances and applications for the detection of free and bound carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Stephen; Gerlach, Jared Q; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh

    2010-10-01

    The field of biosensor development now encompasses several areas specifically geared toward the rapid and sensitive detection, identification, and quantification of target analytes. In contrast to the more mature research and development of nucleic acid and protein biosensors, the development of 'glyco-biosensors' for detecting carbohydrates and conjugates of carbohydrates (glycoconjugates) is at a relatively nascent stage. The application of glyco-biosensors aims to open novel analytical and diagnostic avenues, encompassing industrial bioprocesses, biomedical and clinical applications. This area of research has been greatly aided by advancement brought by interdisciplinary mergers of engineering, biology, chemistry and physical sciences and enabling the miniaturization of detection platforms. In this review, we briefly introduce the need for glyco-biosensors, discuss current analytical technologies, and examine advances in glyco-biosensor approaches aimed at the detection and/or quantification of glycoconjugates or carbohydrates derived from glycoconjugates since 2005.

  1. Recent advances in nanotechnology-based detection and separation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Myung, Ja Hye; Tam, Kevin A; Park, Sin-jung; Cha, Ashley; Hong, Seungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood have been widely investigated as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of metastatic cancer, their inherent rarity and heterogeneity bring tremendous challenges to develop a CTC detection method with clinically significant specificity and sensitivity. With advances in nanotechnology, a series of new methods that are highly promising have emerged to enable or enhance detection and separation of CTCs from blood. In this review, we systematically categorize nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots, graphenes/graphene oxides, and dendrimers and stimuli-responsive polymers, used in the newly developed CTC detection methods. This will provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the CTC detection achieved through application of nanotechnology as well as the challenges that these existing technologies must overcome to be directly impactful on human health.

  2. Detection of metallo-β-lactamase genes in clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hidetsugu; Yasuhara, Tsutomu; Sugano, Emi; Tahara, Sachiko; Ugajin, Kazuhisa; Fukuchi, Kunihiko

    2014-12-01

    We detected and characterized metallo-β-lactamase genes (blaIMP-1 and blaIMP-11) in third generation cephalosporin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca isolated at Showa University Hospital between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. The cephalosporin-resistant K pneumoniae strains were frequently isolated from the urine, while one strain of K. pneumoniae, which was resistant to carbapenem, was isolated from the stool. We analyzed the phenotypes and genotypes of the metallo-β-lactamase genes from the 16 strains of cephalosporin-resistant-K pneumoniae and 6 strains of -K. oxytoca isolated from the same ward. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem were below 4 µg/ml in 21 out of the 22 isolated strains. The double disc synergy test using ceftazidime and sodium mercaptoacetic acid revealed enlargements in the inhibitory zones of 14 of the 16 strains of K. pneumoniae and all 6 strains of K. oxytoca. Metallo-β-lactamase genes were detected in all of the tested strains, with blaIMP-1 in 3 K. pneumoniae and 1 K. oxytoca, blaIMP-11 in 13 K pneumoniae and 4 K. oxytoca, and both blaIMP-1 and blaIMP-11 in one K. oxytoca. Our results indicate that third generation cephalosporin-resistant and imipenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca possess the metallo-β-lactamase gene. The active surveillance of metallo-β-lactamase genes should be performed in clinical laboratories. (Original).

  3. A Unified Nonlinear Adaptive Approach for Detection and Isolation of Engine Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Liang; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Farfan-Ramos, Luis; Simon, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    A challenging problem in aircraft engine health management (EHM) system development is to detect and isolate faults in system components (i.e., compressor, turbine), actuators, and sensors. Existing nonlinear EHM methods often deal with component faults, actuator faults, and sensor faults separately, which may potentially lead to incorrect diagnostic decisions and unnecessary maintenance. Therefore, it would be ideal to address sensor faults, actuator faults, and component faults under one unified framework. This paper presents a systematic and unified nonlinear adaptive framework for detecting and isolating sensor faults, actuator faults, and component faults for aircraft engines. The fault detection and isolation (FDI) architecture consists of a parallel bank of nonlinear adaptive estimators. Adaptive thresholds are appropriately designed such that, in the presence of a particular fault, all components of the residual generated by the adaptive estimator corresponding to the actual fault type remain below their thresholds. If the faults are sufficiently different, then at least one component of the residual generated by each remaining adaptive estimator should exceed its threshold. Therefore, based on the specific response of the residuals, sensor faults, actuator faults, and component faults can be isolated. The effectiveness of the approach was evaluated using the NASA C-MAPSS turbofan engine model, and simulation results are presented.

  4. Set-theoretic methods in robust detection and isolation of sensor faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Puig, Vicenç; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Olaru, Sorin; Stoican, Florin

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a sensorfault detection and isolation (FDI) approach based on interval observers and invariant sets. In fault detection (FD), both interval observer-based and invariant set-based mechanisms are used to provide real-time fault alarms. In fault isolation (FI), the proposed approach also uses these two different mechanisms. The former, based on interval observers, aims to isolate faults during the transient-state operation induced by faults. If the former does not succeed, the latter, based on both interval observers and invariant sets, is started to guarantee FI after the system enters into steady state. Besides, a collection of invariant set-based FDI conditions are established by using all available system-operating information provided by all interval observers. In order to reduce computational complexity, a method to remove all available but redundant/unnecessary system-operating information is incorporated into this approach. If the considered faults satisfy the proposed FDI conditions, it can be guaranteed that they are detectable and isolable after their occurrences. This paper concludes with a case study based on a subsystem of a wind turbine benchmark, which can illustrate the effectiveness of this FDI technique.

  5. Detecting Genetic Isolation in Human Populations: A Study of European Language Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Capocasa, Marco; Battaggia, Cinzia; Anagnostou, Paolo; Montinaro, Francesco; Boschi, Ilaria; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Coia, Valentina; Crivellaro, Federica; Bisol, Giovanni Destro

    2013-01-01

    The identification of isolation signatures is fundamental to better understand the genetic structure of human populations and to test the relations between cultural factors and genetic variation. However, with current approaches, it is not possible to distinguish between the consequences of long-term isolation and the effects of reduced sample size, selection and differential gene flow. To overcome these limitations, we have integrated the analysis of classical genetic diversity measures with a Bayesian method to estimate gene flow and have carried out simulations based on the coalescent. Combining these approaches, we first tested whether the relatively short history of cultural and geographical isolation of four “linguistic islands” of the Eastern Alps (Lessinia, Sauris, Sappada and Timau) had left detectable signatures in their genetic structure. We then compared our findings to previous studies of European population isolates. Finally, we explored the importance of demographic and cultural factors in shaping genetic diversity among the groups under study. A combination of small initial effective size and continued genetic isolation from surrounding populations seems to provide a coherent explanation for the diversity observed among Sauris, Sappada and Timau, which was found to be substantially greater than in other groups of European isolated populations. Simulations of micro-evolutionary scenarios indicate that ethnicity might have been important in increasing genetic diversity among these culturally related and spatially close populations. PMID:23418562

  6. Development of cost effective fenceline monitoring approaches to support advanced leak detection and repair strategies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cost-effective fence line and process monitoring systems to support advanced leak detection and repair (LDAR) strategies can enhance protection of public health, facilitate worker safety, and help companies realize cost savings by reducing lost product. The U.S. EPA Office of Re...

  7. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Sommer, Lea M.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Boisen, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage. The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm−1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate output could be possible with a point-of-care SERS device. PMID:28349938

  8. Susceptibility to Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil of yeasts isolated from the mouths of patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagg, Jeremy; Jackson, Margaret S; Petrina Sweeney, M; Ramage, Gordon; Davies, Andrew N

    2006-05-01

    Yeasts that are resistant to azole antifungal drugs are increasingly isolated from the mouths of cancer patients suffering from oral fungal infections. Tea tree oil is an agent possessing antimicrobial properties that may prove useful in the prevention and management of infections caused by these organisms. In this study, 301 yeasts isolated from the mouths of 199 patients suffering from advanced cancer were examined by an in vitro agar dilution assay for susceptibility to tea tree oil. All of the isolates tested were susceptible, including 41 that were known to be resistant to both fluconazole and itraconazole. Clinical studies of tea tree oil as an agent for the prevention and treatment of oral fungal infections in immunocompromised patients merit consideration.

  9. Failure detection and isolation methods for redundant gimballed inertial measurement units.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solov, E. G.; Thibodeau, J. R., III

    1973-01-01

    Skewed alignment of two redundant conventional inertial measuring units permits nonambiguous detection and isolation of hard and soft failures in real time by an airborne computer. Accelerometer outputs and gimbal readouts are monitored periodically, and attitude rate and velocity error vectors are computed from these data. Magnitudes of these vectors provide failure detection, and projection of these error vectors onto the coordinate axes of the two clusters permits isolation. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of one version of the mechanization as applied to Space Shuttle boost trajectories demonstrates effectiveness down to very low levels of inertial instrument performance failures. The results indicate that worst case overall navigation performance occurs when accelerometer failures are of the order of 20 sigma and gyro failures are about 100 sigma for conventional state-of-the-art IMU instruments.

  10. A hybrid approach for detecting and isolating faults in nuclear power plant interacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.W.; Miller, D.W.; Hajek, B.K.

    1996-09-01

    A fault detection and isolation (FDI) system is presented that can detect and isolate nuclear power plant (NPP) faults occurring in interacting systems. The proposed methodology combines two tools, observer-based residual generation and neural network pattern matching, into a powerful, hybrid diagnostic system. A computer-based model of a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) is used as the reference plant. Two FDI methods are implemented on each of two BWR systems, and their performance characteristics are compared. One method uses conventional neural network techniques that use parameter values for input, and a second, hybrid methodology uses system models to create residuals for input to a neural network. Both FDI systems show good generalization abilities, but only the hybrid system decouples system interactions. Although implementation is impractical for all NPP systems, this hybrid technique is most useful in specific applications where operators have difficulty diagnosing faults in strongly interacting systems.

  11. Efficient isolation of multiphoton processes and detection of collective resonances in dilute samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Lukas; Binz, Marcel; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A phase modulation technique to sensitively and selectively isolate multiple-quantum coherences in a femtosecond pump-probe setup is presented. By detecting incoherent observables and incorporating lock-in amplification, even weak signals of highly dilute samples can be acquired. Applying this method, efficient isolation of one- and two-photon quantum beats in a rubidium-doped helium droplet beam experiment is demonstrated and collective resonances are observed in a potassium vapor for the first time up to fourth order. Our approach provides promising perspectives for coherent time-resolved experiments in the deep UV and multidimensional spectroscopy schemes, in particular when mass-selective detection of particles in dilute gas-phase targets is possible.

  12. Incipient Fault Detection and Isolation of Field Devices in Nuclear Power Systems Using Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaistha, Nitin; Upadhyaya, Belle R.

    2001-11-15

    An integrated method for the detection and isolation of incipient faults in common field devices, such as sensors and actuators, using plant operational data is presented. The approach is based on the premise that data for normal operation lie on a surface and abnormal situations lead to deviations from the surface in a particular way. Statistically significant deviations from the surface result in the detection of faults, and the characteristic directions of deviations are used for isolation of one or more faults from the set of typical faults. Principal component analysis (PCA), a multivariate data-driven technique, is used to capture the relationships in the data and fit a hyperplane to the data. The fault direction for each of the scenarios is obtained using the singular value decomposition on the state and control function prediction errors, and fault isolation is then accomplished from projections on the fault directions. This approach is demonstrated for a simulated pressurized water reactor steam generator system and for a laboratory process control system under single device fault conditions. Enhanced fault isolation capability is also illustrated by incorporating realistic nonlinear terms in the PCA data matrix.

  13. Sensor/actuator failure detection and isolation for airbreathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.; Behbehani, K.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLR) test is used to detect and isolate sensor and/or actuator failures when a digital computer simulation model of the physical system is available. The input to the GLR detector is an innovation sequence formed by subtracting the model outputs from the sensed outputs. Application of the GLR detector to the General Electric QCSEE turbofan engine demonstrates the utility of the proposed procedure.

  14. Rapid isolation and detection of cancer cells by utilizing integrated microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Lien, Kang-Yi; Chuang, Ying-Hsin; Hung, Lein-Yu; Hsu, Keng-Fu; Lai, Wu-Wei; Ho, Chung-Liang; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2010-11-07

    The present study reports a new three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic platform capable of rapid isolation and detection of cancer cells from a large sample volume (e.g. ~1 mL) by utilizing magnetic microbead-based technologies. Several modules, including a 3D microfluidic incubator for the magnetic beads to capture cancer cells, a microfluidic control module for sample transportation and a nucleic acid amplification module for genetic identification, are integrated into this microsystem. With the incorporation of surface-modified magnetic beads, target cancer cells can be specifically recognized and conjugated onto the surface of the antibody-coated magnetic microbeads by utilizing a swirling effect generated by the new 3D microfluidic incubator, followed by isolating and purifying the magnetic complexes via the incorporation of an external magnet and a microfluidic control module, which washes away any unbound waste solution. Experimental results show that over 90% of the target cancer cells can be isolated from a large volume of bio-samples within 10 min in the 3D microfluidic incubator. In addition, the expressed genes associated with ovarian and lung cancer cells can also be successfully amplified by using the on-chip nucleic acid amplification module. More importantly, the detection limit of the developed system is found to be 5 × 10(1) cells mL(-1) for the target cancer cells, indicating that this proposed microfluidic system may be adapted for clinical use for the early detection of cancer cells. Consequently, the proposed 3D microfluidic system incorporated with immunomagnetic beads may provide a promising automated platform for the rapid isolation and detection of cancer cells with a high sensitivity.

  15. Detection, isolation and partial characterization of an immunostimulating glycoprotein from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Butschak, Günter; Karsten, Uwe; Schelhaas, Ute; Ott, Holger; Emmendörffer, Andreas; Niemeyer, Bernd; Helmholz, Heike; Goletz, Steffen

    2006-09-01

    In a search for novel immunostimulating substances we detected that culture supernatants of the gram-positive phytopathogenic bacterium, Rhodococcus fascians, were able to induce cytokine release (TNF(alpha)) from mouse peritoneal macrophages. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the active principle, and were employed for its isolation and partial characterization as a high molecular (MW>100 kDa) glycoprotein. In addition, methods practicable for its biotechnological preparation and several ELISA variants for its determination were developed.

  16. Genetic variability of Brazilian isolates of Alternaria alternata detected by AFLP and RAPD techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Pietrobon, Vivian Cristina; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Romão, Aline Silva; Spósito, Marcel Bellato; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The Alternaria brown spot (ABS) is a disease caused in tangerine plants and its hybrids by the fungus Alternaria alternata f. sp. citri which has been found in Brazil since 2001. Due to the recent occurrence in Brazilian orchards, the epidemiology and genetic variability of this pathogen is still an issue to be addressed. Here it is presented a survey about the genetic variability of this fungus by the characterization of twenty four pathogenic isolates of A. alternata f. sp. citri from citrus plants and four endophytic isolates from mango (one Alternaria tenuissima and three Alternaria arborescens). The application of two molecular markers Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) had revealed the isolates clustering in distinct groups when fingerprintings were analyzed by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Despite the better assessment of the genetic variability through the AFLP, significant modifications in clusters components were not observed, and only slight shifts in the positioning of isolates LRS 39/3 and 25M were observed in PCA plots. Furthermore, in both analyses, only the isolates from lemon plants revealed to be clustered, differently from the absence of clustering for other hosts or plant tissues. Summarizing, both RAPD and AFLP analyses were both efficient to detect the genetic variability within the population of the pathogenic fungus Alternaria spp., supplying information on the genetic variability of this species as a basis for further studies aiming the disease control. PMID:24031413

  17. Fault detection and isolation for a full-scale railway vehicle suspension with multiple Kalman filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesussek, Mathias; Ellermann, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Reliability and dependability in complex mechanical systems can be improved by fault detection and isolation (FDI) methods. These techniques are key elements for maintenance on demand, which could decrease service cost and time significantly. This paper addresses FDI for a railway vehicle: the mechanical model is described as a multibody system, which is excited randomly due to track irregularities. Various parameters, like masses, spring- and damper-characteristics, influence the dynamics of the vehicle. Often, the exact values of the parameters are unknown and might even change over time. Some of these changes are considered critical with respect to the operation of the system and they require immediate maintenance. The aim of this work is to detect faults in the suspension system of the vehicle. A Kalman filter is used in order to estimate the states. To detect and isolate faults the detection error is minimised with multiple Kalman filters. A full-scale train model with nonlinear wheel/rail contact serves as an example for the described techniques. Numerical results for different test cases are presented. The analysis shows that for the given system it is possible not only to detect a failure of the suspension system from the system's dynamic response, but also to distinguish clearly between different possible causes for the changes in the dynamical behaviour.

  18. Detection of the neurotoxin BMAA within cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Tian, Zhijia; Li, Jing; Yu, Rencheng; Banack, Sandra Anne; Wang, Zhenyu

    2010-05-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), has been suggested as an important environmental factor for neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis- Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam. BMAA was detected within the majority of cyanobacterial isolates surveyed in both free and symbiotic cyanobacteria, living in freshwater as well as marine environments. In this study, we report two methods using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) each coupled with a different type of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) column to detect BMAA. A third method using AQC-derivatized BMAA was also used for comparison. Axenic cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Nostoc sp. isolated from Chinese freshwater were analyzed for both free and protein-bound BMAA at the exponential growth stage. Cultures of two strains of M. aeruginosa collected at four growth stages were also analyzed for the presence of BMAA. BMAA was detected in the Nostoc sp. at very low concentrations (<0.07pmoles on column) only when precolumn AQC derivatization was used. No BMAA was detected in the Chinese derived axenic cultures of Microcystis; detection limits for the LC-ESI-MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS without precolumn derivatization were 10ng and 2pg BMAA on column, respectively. We suggest that cyanobacteria grown under some culture conditions may be relatively free of BMAA.

  19. Design and evaluation of a failure detection and isolation algorithm for restructurable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jerold L.; Hsu, John Y.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a decentralized approach to failure detection and isolation for use in restructurable control systems is examined. This work has produced: (1) A method for evaluating fundamental limits to FDI performance; (2) Application using flight recorded data; (3) A working control element FDI system with maximal sensitivity to critical control element failures; (4) Extensive testing on realistic simulations; and (5) A detailed design methodology involving parameter optimization (with respect to model uncertainties) and sensitivity analyses. This project has concentrated on detection and isolation of generic control element failures since these failures frequently lead to emergency conditions and since knowledge of remaining control authority is essential for control system redesign. The failures are generic in the sense that no temporal failure signature information was assumed. Thus, various forms of functional failures are treated in a unified fashion. Such a treatment results in a robust FDI system (i.e., one that covers all failure modes) but sacrifices some performance when detailed failure signature information is known, useful, and employed properly. It was assumed throughout that all sensors are validated (i.e., contain only in-spec errors) and that only the first failure of a single control element needs to be detected and isolated. The FDI system which has been developed will handle a class of multiple failures.

  20. Aptamer-nanobody based ELASA for specific detection of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Rasoulinejad, Samaneh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi

    2016-08-10

    Acinetobacter baumannii has turned into an important threat in nosocomial outbreak infections and multidrug resistance leading to high mortality rates in the 21st century. In recent years its mortality has increased by 15% which in part could be due to lack of a rapid and sensitive diagnostic test. In this work we introduced a new detection test for A. baumannii with two highly specific aptamer and nanobody molecules. High binding affinity DNA oligonucleotide aptamers toward A. baumannii were selected through 12 rounds of whole cell System Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment process (SELEX). The SELEX procedures was monitored by flow cytometry. The dissociation constant and binding efficiency of the selected aptamer Aci49 was 7.547±1:353pM and 47.50%, respectively. A sandwich enzyme linked aptamer sorbent assay (ELASA) was designed with the biotinylated Aci49 aptamer and our previously developed nanobody against biofilm associated protein (Bap). The assay system was optimized with A. baumannii (ATCC 19606) and 47 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested. The threshold of detection in sandwich ELASA process was10(3) CFU/ml. The sensitivity of test toward the clinical isolates was 95.47%. Our results reveal that the sandwich ELASA is sensitive and specific enough for the rapid detection of A. baumannii from clinical isolates.

  1. Detection and isolation of single tumor cells containing mutated DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; He, Feng; Reece, Lisa M.

    1999-04-01

    One of the problems in treating breast cancer patients is discovering the gene rearrangements that are occurring while the patient is in apparent remission. Spontaneous mutations in DNA sequences, particularly in tumor suppressor genes, can lead to the evolution of new clones of tumor cells that may be able to evade both clinical treatments and the patient's immune surveillance system. Isolation of these tumor clones is extremely difficult. Rare-event analysis and single-cell sorting techniques must be used to successfully detect and isolate these tumor clones. PCR amplification of selected gene sequences followed by TA cloning techniques can then be used to perform single-cell DNA sequencing in those gene regions. In this paper we present preliminary data showing successful detection and single-cell sorting of rare tumor clones from defined cell mixtures. Using TA cloning techniques and PCR we have been able to detect a single base-pair mutation in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene in single cells from a breast cancer cell line. Thus, while extremely difficult, it should in the future be possible to isolate tumor clones form a patient for subsequent molecular analyses of DNA mutations in critical gene regions.

  2. Failure detection and isolation investigation for strapdown skew redundant tetrad laser gyro inertial sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, A. J.; Lahm, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    The degree to which flight-critical failures in a strapdown laser gyro tetrad sensor assembly can be isolated in short-haul aircraft after a failure occurrence has been detected by the skewed sensor failure-detection voting logic is investigated along with the degree to which a failure in the tetrad computer can be detected and isolated at the computer level, assuming a dual-redundant computer configuration. The tetrad system was mechanized with two two-axis inertial navigation channels (INCs), each containing two gyro/accelerometer axes, computer, control circuitry, and input/output circuitry. Gyro/accelerometer data is crossfed between the two INCs to enable each computer to independently perform the navigation task. Computer calculations are synchronized between the computers so that calculated quantities are identical and may be compared. Fail-safe performance (identification of the first failure) is accomplished with a probability approaching 100 percent of the time, while fail-operational performance (identification and isolation of the first failure) is achieved 93 to 96 percent of the time.

  3. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus stability in environmental and clinical substrates: implications for virus detection and isolation.

    PubMed

    Dornas, Fábio P; Silva, Lorena C F; de Almeida, Gabriel M; Campos, Rafael K; Boratto, Paulo V M; Franco-Luiz, Ana P M; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies.

  4. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Stability in Environmental and Clinical Substrates: Implications for Virus Detection and Isolation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Gabriel M.; Campos, Rafael K.; Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Franco-Luiz, Ana P. M.; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C. P.; Kroon, Erna G.; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies. PMID:24498379

  5. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices. PMID:25466541

  6. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices.

  7. Genetic Diversity of Benzoyl Coenzyme A Reductase Genes Detected in Denitrifying Isolates and Estuarine Sediment Communities

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bongkeun; Ward, Bess B.

    2005-01-01

    Benzoyl coenzyme A (benzoyl-CoA) reductase is a central enzyme in the anaerobic degradation of organic carbon, which utilizes a common intermediate (benzoyl-CoA) in the metabolism of many aromatic compounds. The diversity of benzoyl-CoA reductase genes in denitrifying bacterial isolates capable of degrading aromatic compounds and in river and estuarine sediment samples from the Arthur Kill in New Jersey and the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland was investigated. Degenerate primers were developed from the known benzoyl-CoA reductase genes from Thauera aromatica, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, and Azoarcus evansii. PCR amplification detected benzoyl-CoA reductase genes in the denitrifying isolates belonging to α-, β-, or γ-Proteobacteria as well as in the sediment samples. Phylogenetic analysis, sequence similarity comparison, and conserved indel determination grouped the new sequences into either the bcr type (found in T. aromatica and R. palustris) or the bzd type (found in A. evansii). All the Thauera strains and the isolates from the genera Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Paracoccus, Ensifer, and Pseudomonas had bcr-type benzoyl-CoA reductases with amino acid sequence similarities of more than 97%. The genes detected from Azarocus strains were assigned to the bzd type. A total of 50 environmental clones were detected from denitrifying consortium and sediment samples, and 28 clones were assigned to either the bcr or the bzd type of benzoyl-CoA reductase genes. Thus, we could determine the genetic capabilities for anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds in sediment communities of the Chesapeake Bay and the Arthur Kill on the basis of the detection of two types of benzoyl-CoA reductase genes. The detected genes have future applications as genetic markers to monitor aromatic compound degradation in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:15812036

  8. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Functional Fault Models For Fault Isolation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    This project implements functional fault models (FFM) to automate the isolation of failures during ground systems operations. FFMs will also be used to recommend sensor placement to improve fault isolation capabilities. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators.

  9. Advanced power system protection and incipient fault detection and protection of spaceborne power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don

    1989-01-01

    This research concentrated on the application of advanced signal processing, expert system, and digital technologies for the detection and control of low grade, incipient faults on spaceborne power systems. The researchers have considerable experience in the application of advanced digital technologies and the protection of terrestrial power systems. This experience was used in the current contracts to develop new approaches for protecting the electrical distribution system in spaceborne applications. The project was divided into three distinct areas: (1) investigate the applicability of fault detection algorithms developed for terrestrial power systems to the detection of faults in spaceborne systems; (2) investigate the digital hardware and architectures required to monitor and control spaceborne power systems with full capability to implement new detection and diagnostic algorithms; and (3) develop a real-time expert operating system for implementing diagnostic and protection algorithms. Significant progress has been made in each of the above areas. Several terrestrial fault detection algorithms were modified to better adapt to spaceborne power system environments. Several digital architectures were developed and evaluated in light of the fault detection algorithms.

  10. Phenotypic Tests for the Detection of β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Different Environments.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Daniele V; Van Der Sand, Sueli T

    2016-07-01

    Some bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family are showing a significant capability to disseminate β-lactams resistance mechanisms among them, and these same mechanisms can be carried out from the hospital environment to superficial water. The aim of this study was to evaluate different phenotypic methods for the detection β-lactamases production by enterobacteria isolated from the anthropogenic environment: hospital wastewater and from a stream that cross the city of Porto Alegre. The applied tests were the modified Hodge test (MHT) and phenotypic tests with the following inhibitors: carbapenemase-phenylboronic acid (APB), metallo-β-lactamase-EDTA, AmpC β-lactamase-cloxacillin, and the confirmatory test for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-clavulanic acid. For this evaluation, 131 isolates were initially subjected to antibiogram using the following antimicrobials: cefotaxime (30 µg), cefpodoxime (10 μg), ceftazidime (30 µg), ertapenem (10 μg), meropenem (10 μg), and aztreonam (30 μg). After this first screening, 62 isolates showed a profile resistance for at least one antimicrobial. These isolates were subjected to all phenotypic tests. Of those, 40 isolates were positive for at least one phenotypic test. In MHT test, one isolate was positive and five were with inconclusive results. The results achieved with the inhibitors are as follows: APB 25/40 positive strains; EDTA 8/40 positive strains; and with CLOXA 2/40 positive strains. ESBL production was observed for 34/40 strains. This assessment shows a high level of bacteria which can produce enzymes that inactivate β-lactams present in the different environment like the stream waters and from the hospital settings.

  11. Molecular characterization of divergent grapevine Pinot gris virus isolates and their detection in Slovak and Czech grapevines.

    PubMed

    Glasa, Miroslav; Predajňa, Lukáš; Komínek, Petr; Nagyová, Alžbeta; Candresse, Thierry; Olmos, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of complete genome sequences of three Slovak isolates of grapevine Pinot gris virus (GPGV) showed their low heterogeneity (reaching 1.7 %) and a close relationship to the Italian NC_015782 isolate (4.2-4.5 % divergence). Comparison of Slovak and Italian isolates revealed an unusual accumulation of 21 indel mutations in ORF1, resulting in a localized high divergence in the encoded amino acid sequences. An elevated divergence in the 5' extremity of the GPGV genomes is suggestive of a recombination between Slovak isolates and grapevine berry inner necrosis virus. RT-PCR allowed the frequent detection of closely related GPGV isolates in grapevines from Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

  12. Failure detection and isolation analysis of a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motyka, P.; Landey, M.; Mckern, R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define and develop techniques for failure detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms for a dual fail/operational redundant strapdown inertial navigation system are defined and developed. The FDI techniques chosen include provisions for hard and soft failure detection in the context of flight control and navigation. Analyses were done to determine error detection and switching levels for the inertial navigation system, which is intended for a conventional takeoff or landing (CTOL) operating environment. In addition, investigations of false alarms and missed alarms were included for the FDI techniques developed, along with the analyses of filters to be used in conjunction with FDI processing. Two specific FDI algorithms were compared: the generalized likelihood test and the edge vector test. A deterministic digital computer simulation was used to compare and evaluate the algorithms and FDI systems.

  13. Implementation issue on failure detection and isolation in electronically controlled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T.L.; Ribbens, W.B.

    1990-12-01

    The study investigates the FDI (failure detection and isolation) implementation issue on electronically controlled diesel engines. The purpose of the study is to provide a systematic FDI design methodology, while the ultimate goal is to improve the overall safety and reliability of electronically controlled subsystems in commercial vehicles. The study covers all important aspects of system design problems, namely, the development of the theoretical foundation for the design of failure detection strategies, the issues of failure detection system structure, the number representation, the assessment of computation requirement, the system architecture, and the implementation procedure. A simplified FDI controller is designed using the procedure proposed to demonstrate its feasibility. The control unit of the FDI subsystem is a microprogrammed control unit, and is so highly flexible that it can be expanded easily in the future to accomodate other important features of the FDI controller.

  14. Fault detection, isolation and reconfiguration in FTMP Methods and experimental results. [fault tolerant multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    The Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) is a highly reliable computer designed to meet a goal of 10 to the -10th failures per hour and built with the objective of flying an active-control transport aircraft. Fault detection, identification, and recovery software is described, and experimental results obtained by injecting faults in the pin level in the FTMP are presented. Over 21,000 faults were injected in the CPU, memory, bus interface circuits, and error detection, masking, and error reporting circuits of one LRU of the multiprocessor. Detection, isolation, and reconfiguration times were recorded for each fault, and the results were found to agree well with earlier assumptions made in reliability modeling.

  15. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    PubMed

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg(2+), Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Pb(2+).

  16. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2011-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  17. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  18. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2013-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  19. Duplex PCR Methods for the Molecular Detection of Escherichia fergusonii Isolates from Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Karen; Rempel, Heidi; Block, Glenn; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Vaillancourt, Rolland; Malouin, François; Topp, Edward; Delaquis, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia fergusonii is an emerging pathogen that has been isolated from a wide range of infections in animals and humans. Primers targeting specific genes, including yliE (encoding a conserved hypothetical protein of the cellulose synthase and regulator of cellulose synthase island), EFER_1569 (encoding a hypothetical protein, putative transcriptional activator for multiple antibiotic resistance), and EFER_3126 (encoding a putative triphosphoribosyl-dephospho-coenzyme A [CoA]), were designed for the detection of E. fergusonii by conventional and real-time PCR methods. Primers were screened by in silico PCR against 489 bacterial genomic sequences and by both PCR methods on 55 reference and field strains. Both methods were specific and sensitive for E. fergusonii, showing amplification only for this bacterium. Conventional PCR required a minimum bacterial concentration of approximately 102 CFU/ml, while real-time PCR required a minimum of 0.3 pg of DNA for consistent detection. Standard curves showed an efficiency of 98.5%, with an R2 value of 0.99 for the real-time PCR assay. Cecal and cloacal contents from 580 chickens were sampled from broiler farms located in the Fraser Valley (British Columbia, Canada). Presumptive E. fergusonii isolates were recovered by enrichment and plating on differential and selective media. Of 301 total presumptive isolates, 140 (46.5%) were identified as E. fergusonii by biochemical profiling with the API 20E system and 268 (89.0%) using PCR methods. E. fergusonii detection directly from cecal and cloacal samples without preenrichment was achieved with both PCR methods. Hence, the PCR methods developed in this work significantly improve the detection of E. fergusonii. PMID:24441160

  20. Advanced techniques for detection and identification of microbial agents of gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Sherry A; Zhang, Hongwei; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Gastroenteritis persists as a worldwide problem, responsible for approximately 2 million deaths annually. Traditional diagnostic methods used in the clinical microbiology laboratory include a myriad of tests, such as culture, microscopy, and immunodiagnostics, which can be labor intensive and suffer from long turnaround times and, in some cases, poor sensitivity. [corrected]. This article reviews recent advances in genomic and proteomic technologies that have been applied to the detection and identification of gastrointestinal pathogens. These methods simplify and speed up the detection of pathogenic microorganisms, and their implementation in the clinical microbiology laboratory has potential to revolutionize the diagnosis of gastroenteritis.

  1. Evaluation of the LightCycler methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) advanced test for detection of MRSA nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Yam, W C; Siu, Gilman K H; Ho, P L; Ng, T K; Que, T L; Yip, K T; Fok, Cathie P K; Chen, Jonathan H K; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, K Y

    2013-09-01

    Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization is crucial for the prevention and control of MRSA infections in health care settings. The LightCycler MRSA Advanced Test (Roche Diagnostics) is a commercially available real-time PCR assay for direct detection of MRSA nasal colonization by targeting of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-orfX junction. The diagnostic performance of the assay was compared with that of ChromID MRSA agar (bioMérieux) culture and an in-house duplex real-time PCR assay. Among 1,246 nasal swab specimens collected from 2 general hospitals in Hong Kong, 174 (14%) were considered true positive for MRSA. Chromogenic culture and the in-house real-time PCR assay identified 147 (84.5%) and 133 (76.4%) true-positive cases with specificities of 100% and 98.6%, respectively. Based on the target melting temperature (Tm) values (57.0 to 62.0 °C) defined by the manufacturer, the LightCycler MRSA Advanced Test identified only 85 (48.9%) true-positive specimens. Interestingly, an additional 60 (34.5%) true-positive specimens were detected despite atypical Tm values of 55 °C, providing overall sensitivity and specificity values of 83.3% and 99%, respectively. Among isolates with Tm values of 55 °C, most were typed as clonal complex 45 (CC45). By sequence analysis of the SCCmec-orfX junction, characteristic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified only in isolates with Tm values of 55°C and not in those with typical Tm values. It is conceivable that those SNPs were located inside the target region of the proprietary hybridization probes, which resulted in a Tm shift in the melting curve analysis. Our study highlights the importance of a global evaluation of commercial kits so that the interpretation algorithm covers different lineages of MRSA clones prevalent in various geographical regions.

  2. In-flight Fault Detection and Isolation in Aircraft Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Pattipati, Krishna; Allanach, Jeffrey; Poll, Scott; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of test design for real-time fault detection and isolation (FDI) in the flight control system of fixed-wing aircraft. We focus on the faults that are manifested in the control surface elements (e.g., aileron, elevator, rudder and stabilizer) of an aircraft. For demonstration purposes, we restrict our focus on the faults belonging to nine basic fault classes. The diagnostic tests are performed on the features extracted from fifty monitored system parameters. The proposed tests are able to uniquely isolate each of the faults at almost all severity levels. A neural network-based flight control simulator, FLTZ(Registered TradeMark), is used for the simulation of various faults in fixed-wing aircraft flight control systems for the purpose of FDI.

  3. Detection and characterization of a Trichomonas isolate from a rehabilitated bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Kelly-Clark, Whitney K; McBurney, Scott; Forzán, María J; Desmarchelier, Marion; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2013-12-01

    A hatching-year bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was presented for clinical examination after being found unable to fly. Upon admission, routine wet-mount microscopy detected no trichomonads. Five months later, oral cavity inspection found no abnormalities, but the eagle was swabbed for research on trichomonosis in maritime birds. The swab was used to inoculate an InPouch TF culture and trichomonads were visible within 24 hr. Genotyping (ITS) revealed a Trichomonas isolate that was 100% identical to an isolate from a bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) from the Czech Republic. The eagle was treated with metronidazole (50 mg/kg q 12h PO for 5 consecutive days). Following treatment, the eagle was swabbed and the inoculated InPouch TF culture was monitored daily for 1 wk. No trichomonads were observed. Rehabilitation centers interested in surveillance should consider combining the InPouch TF technique with clinical inspection of live birds to confirm trichomonosis and for future research.

  4. Analysis of Space Shuttle Ground Support System Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery Processes and Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Trent, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the FDIR (Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery) Project for the Constellation Program, a task was designed within the context of the Constellation Program FDIR project called the Legacy Benchmarking Task to document as accurately as possible the FDIR processes and resources that were used by the Space Shuttle ground support equipment (GSE) during the Shuttle flight program. These results served as a comparison with results obtained from the new FDIR capability. The task team assessed Shuttle and EELV (Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle) historical data for GSE-related launch delays to identify expected benefits and impact. This analysis included a study of complex fault isolation situations that required a lengthy troubleshooting process. Specifically, four elements of that system were considered: LH2 (liquid hydrogen), LO2 (liquid oxygen), hydraulic test, and ground special power.

  5. Functional Fault Modeling of a Cryogenic System for Real-Time Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the model development process used to create a Functional Fault Model (FFM) of a liquid hydrogen (L H2) system that will be used for realtime fault isolation in a Fault Detection, Isolation and Recover (FDIR) system. The paper explains th e steps in the model development process and the data products required at each step, including examples of how the steps were performed fo r the LH2 system. It also shows the relationship between the FDIR req uirements and steps in the model development process. The paper concl udes with a description of a demonstration of the LH2 model developed using the process and future steps for integrating the model in a live operational environment.

  6. A complex network based model for detecting isolated communities in water distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Nan; Jia, Youwei; Xu, Zhao; Ho, Siu-Lau; Wai Kan, Chi

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution network (WDN) is a typical real-world complex network of major infrastructure that plays an important role in human's daily life. In this paper, we explore the formation of isolated communities in WDN based on complex network theory. A graph-algebraic model is proposed to effectively detect the potential communities due to pipeline failures. This model can properly illustrate the connectivity and evolution of WDN during different stages of contingency events, and identify the emerging isolated communities through spectral analysis on Laplacian matrix. A case study on a practical urban WDN in China is conducted, and the consistency between the simulation results and the historical data are reported to showcase the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model.

  7. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose gel electrophoresis for the detection and isolation of amyloid curli fibers.

    PubMed

    Sitaras, Chris; Naghavi, Mahsa; Herrington, Muriel B

    2011-01-15

    Curli are amyloid-like fibers on the surface of some strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. We tested the use of horizontal sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-agarose gel electrophoresis to detect, isolate, and quantitate curli. Cell extracts fractionated in SDS-agarose gels and stained with Coomassie blue exhibited a soluble fraction that entered the gel and an insoluble fraction that remained in the well. Much more insoluble material was observed with curli-proficient strains than with strains that do not make curli. Both highly purified curli and the insoluble material isolated from an SDS-agarose gel could be dissociated into monomers when treated with formic acid. For quantitation, we immobilized samples in SDS-agarose prior to electrophoresis. This avoids losses during the staining of the gel. Our methods provide a rapid and simple fractionation of curli using equipment that is readily available.

  8. [Detection of phospholipidolytic Candida albicans isolated from saliva of children with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Evandro L; Campos, C De Castro; Crespo, A M Costa; Castro, Jovirês S; Rocha, Frederico P; Alves, Marcella; Goulart, Mariella S; Cardoso, Cléver; Ferreira, Wesley; Naves, Plínio Lázaro; Soares, A José; Miranda, Simone R; Pimenta, Fabiana C

    2002-01-01

    The childhood is one of the most propitious period of the life to the occurrence of infection by yeasts of the genus Candida. In children with Down's syndrome, besides the predispose factors to bucal candidiasis; macroglossia, bucal muscular incompetence, frequent respiratory diseases, motor difficulty and immunologic deficit are mentioned as additional elements for this fungus disease. It was verified that the children attacked by this syndrome have much more strains of Candida than other children. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of phospholipase producer, Candida on the saliva of children with Down's syndrome. Candida albicans was the only identified specie of Candida. The phospholipase production was found in isolated strains from both of study and control. However, the isolated strains of the group of children with Down's syndrome have strongly present phospholipidolitic.

  9. Detection of azole susceptibility patterns in clinical yeast strains isolated from 1998 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Czaika, Viktor; Nenoff, Pietro; Glöckner, Andreas; Becker, Karsten; Fegeler, Wolfgang; Schmalreck, Arno F

    2014-10-01

    4,860 clinical yeast isolates (25 genera, 47 species) were tested in parallel to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and voriconazole. After re-evaluation of all species according to their current valid taxonomic denominations, the range of the top four of the dermatology, gynaecology and paediatrics associated species from superficial infections was similar to those isolated from other wards with mainly systemic/invasive infections. Candida albicans (44.7%) was the most frequent pathogen followed by C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis. The MIC-assessment revealed for the ten-year test period an overall azole-susceptibility of about 75%, and ~80% for their associated ICUs. The overall susceptibility of the isolates from systemic and superficial infections to the four azoles was 79% and 80% respectively, and demonstrates a high in vitro activity. When two test periods (1998-2001 and 2002-2008) were compared by characteristic MIC values and multi-azole resistance, no significant increase could be detected in azole susceptibility/resistance over the two periods, respectively, over the total investigation period of ten years. This holds true when the characteristic MIC values were compared with those from different azole susceptibility studies from similar time periods and from different investigators around the world (1991 to 2010). With a new method, susceptibility pattern analysis for fungi, detailed information of multi-resistant microorganism populations could be obtained, and different characteristic resistance patterns in clinical yeast species detected. Although at a relatively low level, multi-resistance was seen in individual species populations demonstrating resistance to two (6.7%), three (4.4%), or all four (4%) azoles tested. A level of 4% and 2% fourfold parallel resistance was also determined in Candia spp. and non-Candida spp. derived of blood culture isolates.

  10. Efficiency of different enrichment and isolation procedures for the detection of Salmonella serotypes in edible offal.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, G; Arroyo, J A

    1995-10-01

    Rapid detection systems for Salmonella in foodstuffs are currently being developed. However, existing standards still call for application of traditional methods employing pre-enrichment followed by selective enrichment and isolation. The efficacy of various methods was tested using 264 chicken and lamb organ meats. Pre-enrichment was carried out in Tryptone Soy Broth (TSB) and enrichment in Tetrathionate Brilliant Green Broth (TTB) at 37 degrees C, Selenite Broth with Brilliant Green and Sulphapyridine at 37 degrees C and 43 degrees C, and Rappaport-Vassiliadis Broth (RV 10) at 42 degrees C. The isolation media were Brilliant Green Agar (BGA), Deoxycholate Citrate Agar, Hektoen Enteric Agar (HEA) and Salmonella-Shigella Agar. Enrichment in RV/42 degrees C followed by isolation on BGA as recommended by ISO standard no. 6579 and enrichment in TTB/37 degrees C followed by isolation in HEA, no longer recommended by that standard, produced the best results. Low percentages of positive samples and difficulties in detecting Salmonella are the result of interference by competing organisms (Enterobacteriaceae) and the number of salmonellas present after enrichment. A total of 528 samples (TSB, eggs, lamb liver and chicken liver) were inoculated with Salm. enteritidis, Salm. kapemba and Salm. virchow, and the preceding experiment was repeated. All the TSB and egg samples tested positive, but the percentage of positive samples from the lamb and chicken liver was only 81-92%. Recovery of the salmonellas did not depend upon the method employed or the serotype inoculated but instead on interference by competing flora and the numbers of Salmonella present in the samples.

  11. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of self-validating multifunctional sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing-li; Chen, Yin-sheng; Zhang, Li-li; Sun, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy for self-validating multifunctional sensors is presented in this paper. The sparse non-negative matrix factorization-based method can effectively detect faults by using the squared prediction error (SPE) statistic, and the variables contribution plots based on SPE statistic can help to locate and isolate the faulty sensitive units. The complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition is employed to decompose the fault signals to a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The sample entropy (SampEn)-weighted energy values of each IMFs and the residual are estimated to represent the characteristics of the fault signals. Multi-class support vector machine is introduced to identify the fault mode with the purpose of diagnosing status of the faulty sensitive units. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other fault detection strategies such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and fault diagnosis strategies such as empirical mode decomposition coupled with support vector machine. The proposed strategy is fully evaluated in a real self-validating multifunctional sensors experimental system, and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID research topic of self-validating multifunctional sensors.

  12. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of self-validating multifunctional sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Li; Chen, Yin-Sheng; Zhang, Li-Li; Sun, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy for self-validating multifunctional sensors is presented in this paper. The sparse non-negative matrix factorization-based method can effectively detect faults by using the squared prediction error (SPE) statistic, and the variables contribution plots based on SPE statistic can help to locate and isolate the faulty sensitive units. The complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition is employed to decompose the fault signals to a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The sample entropy (SampEn)-weighted energy values of each IMFs and the residual are estimated to represent the characteristics of the fault signals. Multi-class support vector machine is introduced to identify the fault mode with the purpose of diagnosing status of the faulty sensitive units. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other fault detection strategies such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and fault diagnosis strategies such as empirical mode decomposition coupled with support vector machine. The proposed strategy is fully evaluated in a real self-validating multifunctional sensors experimental system, and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID research topic of self-validating multifunctional sensors.

  13. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    PubMed

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings.

  14. Detection of mcr-1 colistin resistance gene in polyclonal Escherichia coli isolates in Barcelona, Spain, 2012 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Rivera, Alba; Rodríguez-Navarro, Judith; Español, Montserrat; Turbau, Miquel; Coll, Pere; Mirelis, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Colistin resistance was detected in 53 of 10,011 Escherichia coli (0.5%) by prospective phenotypic testing of consecutive clinical isolates in a single hospital in Barcelona, Spain (2012-15). The mcr-1 gene was retrospectively identified by PCR and sequencing in 15 of 50 available isolates. Each isolate had a unique PFGE pattern except for two. This clonal diversity supports the hypothesis of horizontal dissemination of the mcr-1 gene in the local study population.

  15. Magnetic resonance elastography is accurate in detecting advanced fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Malik, Neera; Yin, Meng; Smyrk, Thomas C; Czaja, Albert J; Ehman, Richard L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the value of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in detecting advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). METHODS In this retrospective study, 36 patients (19 treated and 17 untreated) with histologically confirmed AIH and liver biopsy performed within 3 mo of MRE were identified at a tertiary care referral center. Liver stiffness (LS) with MRE was calculated by a radiologist, and inflammation grade and fibrosis stage in liver biopsy was assessed by a pathologist in a blinded fashion. Two radiologists evaluated morphological features of cirrhosis on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accuracy of MRE was compared to laboratory markers and MRI for detection of advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis. RESULTS Liver fibrosis stages of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 were present in 4, 6, 7, 6 and 13 patients respectively. There were no significant differences in distribution of fibrosis stage and inflammation grade between treated and untreated patient groups. LS with MRE demonstrated stronger correlation with liver fibrosis stage in comparison to laboratory markers for chronic liver disease (r = 0.88 vs -0.48-0.70). A trend of decreased mean LS in treated patients compared to untreated patients was observed (3.7 kPa vs 3.84 kPa) but was not statistically significant. MRE had an accuracy/sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive value/negative predictive value of 0.97/90%/100%/100%/90% and 0.98/92.3%/96%/92.3%/96% for detection of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, respectively. The performance of MRE was significantly better than laboratory tests for detection of advanced fibrosis (0.97 vs 0.53-0.80, P < 0.01), and cirrhosis (0.98 vs 0.58-0.80, P < 0.01) and better than conventional MRI for diagnosis of cirrhosis (0.98 vs 0.78, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION MRE is a promising modality for detection of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with AIH with superior diagnostic accuracy compared to laboratory assessment and MRI. PMID:28223730

  16. Utilization of advanced clutter suppression algorithms for improved standoff detection and identification of radionuclide threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosofret, Bogdan R.; Shokhirev, Kirill; Mulhall, Phil; Payne, David; Harris, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Technology development efforts seek to increase the capability of detection systems in low Signal-to-Noise regimes encountered in both portal and urban detection applications. We have recently demonstrated significant performance enhancement in existing Advanced Spectroscopic Portals (ASP), Standoff Radiation Detection Systems (SORDS) and handheld isotope identifiers through the use of new advanced detection and identification algorithms. The Poisson Clutter Split (PCS) algorithm is a novel approach for radiological background estimation that improves the detection and discrimination capability of medium resolution detectors. The algorithm processes energy spectra and performs clutter suppression, yielding de-noised gamma-ray spectra that enable significant enhancements in detection and identification of low activity threats with spectral target recognition algorithms. The performance is achievable at the short integration times (0.5 - 1 second) necessary for operation in a high throughput and dynamic environment. PCS has been integrated with ASP, SORDS and RIID units and evaluated in field trials. We present a quantitative analysis of algorithm performance against data collected by a range of systems in several cluttered environments (urban and containerized) with embedded check sources. We show that the algorithm achieves a high probability of detection/identification with low false alarm rates under low SNR regimes. For example, utilizing only 4 out of 12 NaI detectors currently available within an ASP unit, PCS processing demonstrated Pd,ID > 90% at a CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate) of 1 in 1000 occupancies against weak activity (7 - 8μCi) and shielded sources traveling through the portal at 30 mph. This vehicle speed is a factor of 6 higher than was previously possible and results in significant increase in system throughput and overall performance.

  17. Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Techniques for Detection of Food-borne Pathogens; Current Applications and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Umesha, S; Manukumar, H M

    2016-01-08

    The elimination of disease-causing microbes from the food supply is a primary goal and this review deals with the overall techniques availavle for detection of food-borne pathogens. Now-a-days conventional methods are replaced by advanced methods like Biosensors, Nucleic Acid-based Tests (NAT) and different PCR based techniques used in molecular biology to identify specific pathogens. Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp, Aspergillus spp. Fusarium spp. Penicillium spp., and pathogens are detected in contaminated food items which cause always diseases in human in any one or the other way. Identification of food-borne pathogens in a short period of time is still a challenge to the scientific field in general and food technology in particular. The low level of food contamination by major pathogens requires specific sensitive detection platforms and the present area of hot research looking forward to new nanomolecular techniques for nanomaterials, make them suitable for the development of assays with high sensitivity, response time and portability. With the sound of these we attemet to highlight a comprehensive overview about food-borne pathogen detection by rapid, sensitive, accurate and cost affordable in situ analytical methods from conventional methods to recent molecular approaches for advanced food and microbiology research.

  18. First detection of oqxAB in Salmonella spp. isolated from food.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marcus Ho Yin; Chen, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Food-borne salmonellosis is an important public health problem worldwide and the second leading cause of food-borne illnesses in Hong Kong. In this study, the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella in meat products in Hong Kong were determined. Interestingly, a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene combination, oqxAB, which mediates resistance to nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, and olaquindox, was for the first time detectable on the chromosomes of two Salmonella enterica serovar Derby isolates. Further surveillance of oqxAB in Salmonella will be needed.

  19. Detection and isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O104 from sprouts.

    PubMed

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Fratamico, Pina M; Rubio, Fernando; Glaze, Thomas; Bagi, Lori K; Albonetti, Sabrina

    2014-03-03

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains belonging to serogroup O104 have been associated with sporadic cases of illness and have caused outbreaks associated with milk and sprouts. An outbreak that occurred in Europe in 2011 linked to fenugreek sprouts was caused by E. coli O104:H4 that had characteristics of an enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) but carried the gene that encoded for Shiga toxin 2. In this study, methods were developed for detection of this enteroaggregative STEC O104, as well as STEC O104 in sprouts. Multiplex PCR assays for enteroaggregative STEC O104:H4 targeted the stx2, aggR, and wzx104 genes, and for STEC O104 targeted the stx1-2, ehxA, and wzx104 genes. After incubating artificially contaminated sprouts at 4 °C for 48 h and overnight enrichment in modified buffered peptone water with pyruvate supplemented with three antibiotics (mBPWp), the pathogens were detected in all samples inoculated at a level of ca. 100CFU/25 g. Several samples inoculated at lower concentrations of ca. 10CFU/25 g were negative by the PCR assays, and this could have been due to cells not surviving or not being able to recover after the stress treatment at 4 °C for 48 h. For isolation of the pathogens, immunomagnetic separation (IMS) using magnetic beads coated with antibodies against O104 were employed, and this was followed by plating the beads onto mRBA and CHROMagar STEC O104 for isolation of E. coli O104:H4 and mRBA and CHROMagar STEC for isolation of E. coli O104:H7. Presumptive colonies were confirmed by agglutination using latex particles attached to antibodies against serogroup O104 and by the multiplex PCR assays. The methodologies described in this study for detection of enteroaggregative STEC O104:H4 and STEC O104 include the use of IMS and latex reagents for serogroup O104, and they enhance the ability to detect and isolate these pathogens from sprouts and potentially other foods, as well.

  20. ISOLATION AND DETECTION OF GIARDIA CYSTS FROM WATER USING DIRECT IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Riggs, John L.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Suk, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    A water-sampling apparatus used for the isolation and detection of Giardia cysts in water has been designed and tested. The sampling apparatus uses one of a variety of pumps or waterline pressure to move water through a filter. Two of the optional pumps are lightweight enough to make the apparatus portable and thus suitable for sampling in remote areas. This technique of sample processing produces good cyst recovery in much less time than is required with previously established methods. Giardia cysts are identified using direct immunofluorescence.

  1. [The detection of a choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin in clinical strains of Proteus isolated in different infections].

    PubMed

    Gabidullin, Z G; Zhukova, S L; Ezepchuk, Iu V; Bondarenko, V M

    1989-12-01

    The capacity of Proteus strains, isolated from patients with purulent inflammatory, urological and enteric infections, for the production of choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin was studied by means of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with the use of antitoxic serum to Escherichia coli enterotoxin. Out of 125 strains, 27 (21.6%) showed the capacity for producing choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin in EIA experiments. The results thus obtained indicate that EIA techniques can be used, in principle, for detecting the capacity of Proteus for the production of choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin.

  2. Multifunctional magnetic nanowires: A novel breakthrough for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cancer cells from non-metastatic early breast cancer patients using small volumes of blood.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wooyoung; Lee, Sooyeon; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as promising biomarkers for diagnosis and indication of the prognosis of several epithelial cancers. However, at present, CTC monitoring is available only for advanced-stage patients rather than for those at an early stage of cancer. This is because of the extraordinary rarity of CTCs and the limited sensitivity of current methods. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional magnetic nanowires for the efficient isolation and detection of CTCs from the blood of patients, especially those with non-metastatic early-stage cancer. The nanowires, which are equipped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and five different types of antibodies (Ab mixture_mPpyNWs), offer a significant improvement in cell-isolation efficiency, even from very small amounts of blood (250 μL-1 mL). Notably, CTCs were isolated and identified in 29 out of 29 patients (100%) with non-metastatic early breast cancer, indicating that this procedure allowed detection of CTCs with greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. In addition, we demonstrated in situ "naked eye" identification of the captured cancer cells via a simple colorimetric immunoassay. Our results show that antibody-functionalized magnetic nanowires offer great potential for a broad range of practical clinical applications, including early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

  3. A rapid method for detecting extracellular proteinase activity in Cryptococcus neoformans and a survey of 63 isolates.

    PubMed

    Ruma-Haynes, P; Brownlee, A G; Sorrell, T C

    2000-08-01

    A rapid method to detect extracellular proteolytic activity around colonies of Cryptococcus neoformans was developed with tannic acid used to complex with residual protein in a solid medium. A survey was conducted with 32 isolates of C. neoformans var. gattii and 31 isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans which were cultured on medium containing gelatin as the sole nitrogen source. The annulus of clearing around fungal colonies was > 1.2 mm in 24 (77%) isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans compared with only 7 (22%) isolates of C. neoformans var. gattii. There was no difference in proteolytic activity between environmental and human clinical isolates of C. neoformans. However, there was a difference between the size of the annulus around animal isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans and isolates of the same variety from other sources. The annuli around the 14 animal isolates were all >1.2 mm, while 7 (70%) of 10 human clinical isolates and only 3 (43%) of 7 environmental isolates were scored in the high proteinase range. A difference between the genetic types (as characterised by RAPD typing) of C. neoformans var. gattii was also evident with 17 (77%) of 22 VG-I isolates having a small annulus compared with only 1 (17%) of 6 VG-II and VG-III isolates with annuli of similar size. Relatively low proteinase production by C. neoformans var. gattii may reduce local and systemic spread of infection in mammalian hosts.

  4. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nirav; Lalla, Yastira; Vu, An N.; Farah, Camile S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions. PMID:24078812

  5. Advances in ground vehicle-based LADAR for standoff detection of road-side hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, Jim; Vessey, Alyssa; Close, Ryan; Middleton, Seth; Williams, Kathryn; Rupp, Ronald; Nguyen, Son

    2016-05-01

    Commercial sensor technology has the potential to bring cost-effective sensors to a number of U.S. Army applications. By using sensors built for a widespread of commercial application, such as the automotive market, the Army can decrease costs of future systems while increasing overall capabilities. Additional sensors operating in alternate and orthogonal modalities can also be leveraged to gain a broader spectrum measurement of the environment. Leveraging multiple phenomenologies can reduce false alarms and make detection algorithms more robust to varied concealment materials. In this paper, this approach is applied to the detection of roadside hazards partially concealed by light-to-medium vegetation. This paper will present advances in detection algorithms using a ground vehicle-based commercial LADAR system. The benefits of augmenting a LADAR with millimeter-wave automotive radar and results from relevant data sets are also discussed.

  6. Detection and isolation of Salmonella from naturally contaminated alfalfa seeds following an outbreak investigation.

    PubMed

    Inami, G B; Moler, S E

    1999-06-01

    Naturally contaminated alfalfa seeds, epidemiologically linked to foodborne disease outbreaks in Oregon and British Columbia, were tested for the presence of Salmonella. Ten sample units from the suspected lot were sprouted and grown for 4 days. After enrichment of the grown sprouts, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and culture method (modified procedure of the Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual) were used for the detection and isolation of Salmonella. Four of the 10 sample units were positive with the EIA; however, 5 of the 10 sample units were culture positive (four were positive for Salmonella serotype Newport and a fifth was positive for Salmonella serotype Albany and serotype Schwarzengrund). The positive alfalfa seed sample units were further tested after shredding, soaking, and washing before culturing. Results suggest that sprouting and shredding methods may yield greater detection and recovery rates of Salmonella, but more research with a larger sample size is warranted.

  7. Failure detection and isolation experiments with the Langley Mini-Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Velde, Wallace E.; Van Schalkwyk, Christiaan M.

    1990-01-01

    A report is presented on experiments to demonstrate failure detection and isolation (FDI) using the flexible truss facility Mini-Mast at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two techniques are selected for study because they are applicable both to sensor and actuator failures and because they do not depend on hypotheses about the forms of possible failures. These two are the method of generalized parity relations and the failure detection filter. These methods utilize the concept of analytical redundancy and therefore their performance depends on the fidelity of the model of the dynamics of the system being monitored. Results are given for sensor FDI using generalized parity relations and input-output data collected during operation of the Mini-Mast. component failures are simulated in the data. The dependence of the performance of the methods on choices of the parameters in their implementation is explored.

  8. a New Online Distributed Process Fault Detection and Isolation Approach Using Potential Clustering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrampour, Soheil; Moshiri, Behzad; Salahshoor, Karim

    2009-08-01

    Most of process fault monitoring systems suffer from offline computations and confronting with novel faults that limit their applicabilities. This paper presents a new online fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm based on distributed online clustering approach. In the proposed approach, clustering algorithm is used for online detection of a new trend of time series data which indicates faulty condition. On the other hand, distributed technique is used to decompose the overall monitoring task into a series of local monitoring sub-tasks so as to locally track and capture the process faults. This algorithm not only solves the problem of online FDI, but also can handle novel faults. The diagnostic performances of the proposed FDI approach is evaluated on the Tennessee Eastman process plant as a large-scale benchmark problem.

  9. Advanced infrared sounder subpixel cloud detection with imagers and its impact on radiance assimilation in NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Li, Zhenglong; Schmit, Timothy J.; Bai, Wenguang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate cloud detection is very important for infrared (IR) radiance assimilation; improved cloud detection could reduce cloud contamination and hence improve the assimilation. Although operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers are using IR sounder radiance data for cloud detection, collocated high spatial resolution imager data could help sounder subpixel cloud detection and characterization. IR sounder radiances with improved cloud detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were assimilated for Hurricane Sandy (2012). Forecast experiments were run with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) as the forecast model and the Three-Dimensional Variational Assimilation (3DVAR)-based Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) as the analysis system. Results indicate that forecasts of both hurricane track and intensity are substantially improved when the collocated high spatial resolution MODIS cloud mask is used for AIRS subpixel cloud detection for assimilating radiances. This methodology can be applied to process Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CRIS)/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP)/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the Metop series for improved radiance assimilation in NWP.

  10. Detection of landmines and UXO using advanced synthetic aperture radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Eric; Peichl, Markus; Dill, Stephan; Heinzel, Andreas; Bischeltsrieder, Florian

    2016-05-01

    A main problem of effective landmine and UXO decontamination is efficient and reliable detection and localization of suspicious objects in reasonable time. This requirement demands for fast sensors investigating large areas with sufficient spatial resolution and sensitivity. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a suitable tool and is considered as a complementing sensor since nearly two decades. However, most GPRs operate in very close distance to ground in a rather punctual method of operation. In contrast, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a technique allowing fast and laminar stand-off investigation of an area. TIRAMI-SAR is imaging radar at lower microwaves for fast close-in detection of buried and unburied objects on a larger area. This allows efficient confirmation of a threat by investigating such regions of detection by other sensors. For proper object detection sufficient spatial resolution is required. Hence the SAR principle is applied. SAR for landmine/UXO detection can be applied by side-looking radar moved on safe ground along the area of interest, being typically the un-safe ground. Additionally, reliable detection of buried and unburied objects requires sufficient suppression of background clutter. For that purpose TIRAMI-SAR is using several antennas in multi-static configuration and wave polarization together with advanced SAR processing. The advantages and necessity of a multi-static antenna configuration for this kind of GPR approach is illustrated in the paper.

  11. Advancements of data anomaly detection research in wireless sensor networks: a survey and open issues.

    PubMed

    Rassam, Murad A; Zainal, Anazida; Maarof, Mohd Aizaini

    2013-08-07

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are important and necessary platforms for the future as the concept "Internet of Things" has emerged lately. They are used for monitoring, tracking, or controlling of many applications in industry, health care, habitat, and military. However, the quality of data collected by sensor nodes is affected by anomalies that occur due to various reasons, such as node failures, reading errors, unusual events, and malicious attacks. Therefore, anomaly detection is a necessary process to ensure the quality of sensor data before it is utilized for making decisions. In this review, we present the challenges of anomaly detection in WSNs and state the requirements to design efficient and effective anomaly detection models. We then review the latest advancements of data anomaly detection research in WSNs and classify current detection approaches in five main classes based on the detection methods used to design these approaches. Varieties of the state-of-the-art models for each class are covered and their limitations are highlighted to provide ideas for potential future works. Furthermore, the reviewed approaches are compared and evaluated based on how well they meet the stated requirements. Finally, the general limitations of current approaches are mentioned and further research opportunities are suggested and discussed.

  12. Advancements of Data Anomaly Detection Research in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey and Open Issues

    PubMed Central

    Rassam, Murad A.; Zainal, Anazida; Maarof, Mohd Aizaini

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are important and necessary platforms for the future as the concept “Internet of Things” has emerged lately. They are used for monitoring, tracking, or controlling of many applications in industry, health care, habitat, and military. However, the quality of data collected by sensor nodes is affected by anomalies that occur due to various reasons, such as node failures, reading errors, unusual events, and malicious attacks. Therefore, anomaly detection is a necessary process to ensure the quality of sensor data before it is utilized for making decisions. In this review, we present the challenges of anomaly detection in WSNs and state the requirements to design efficient and effective anomaly detection models. We then review the latest advancements of data anomaly detection research in WSNs and classify current detection approaches in five main classes based on the detection methods used to design these approaches. Varieties of the state-of-the-art models for each class are covered and their limitations are highlighted to provide ideas for potential future works. Furthermore, the reviewed approaches are compared and evaluated based on how well they meet the stated requirements. Finally, the general limitations of current approaches are mentioned and further research opportunities are suggested and discussed. PMID:23966182

  13. Far-infrared pedestrian detection for advanced driver assistance systems using scene context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guohua; Liu, Qiong; Wu, Qingyao

    2016-04-01

    Pedestrian detection is one of the most critical but challenging components in advanced driver assistance systems. Far-infrared (FIR) images are well-suited for pedestrian detection even in a dark environment. However, most current detection approaches just focus on pedestrian patterns themselves, where robust and real-time detection cannot be well achieved. We propose a fast FIR pedestrian detection approach, called MAP-HOGLBP-T, to explicitly exploit the scene context for the driver assistance system. In MAP-HOGLBP-T, three algorithms are developed to exploit the scene contextual information from roads, vehicles, and background objects of high homogeneity, and we employ the Bayesian approach to build a classifier learner which respects the scene contextual information. We also develop a multiframe approval scheme to enhance the detection performance based on spatiotemporal continuity of pedestrians. Our empirical study on real-world datasets has demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method. The performance is shown to be better than that of state-of-the-art low-level feature-based approaches.

  14. Assessment of the Utility of the Advanced Himawari Imager to Detect Active Fire Over Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hally, B.; Wallace, L.; Reinke, K.; Jones, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wildfire detection and attribution is an issue of importance due to the socio-economic impact of fires in Australia. Early detection of fires allows emergency response agencies to make informed decisions in order to minimise loss of life and protect strategic resources in threatened areas. Until recently, the ability of land management authorities to accurately assess fire through satellite observations of Australia was limited to those made by polar orbiting satellites. The launch of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Himawari-8 satellite, with the 16-band Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI-8) onboard, in October 2014 presents a significant opportunity to improve the timeliness of satellite fire detection across Australia. The near real-time availability of images, at a ten minute frequency, may also provide contextual information (background temperature) leading to improvements in the assessment of fire characteristics. This paper investigates the application of the high frequency observation data supplied by this sensor for fire detection and attribution. As AHI-8 is a new sensor we have performed an analysis of the noise characteristics of the two spectral bands used for fire attribution across various land use types which occur in Australia. Using this information we have adapted existing algorithms, based upon least squares error minimisation and Kalman filtering, which utilise high frequency observations of surface temperature to detect and attribute fire. The fire detection and attribution information provided by these algorithms is then compared to existing satellite based fire products as well as in-situ information provided by land management agencies. These comparisons were made Australia-wide for an entire fire season - including many significant fire events (wildfires and prescribed burns). Preliminary detection results suggest that these methods for fire detection perform comparably to existing fire products and fire incident reporting from relevant

  15. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  16. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food.

    PubMed

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  17. Detection, selective isolation and characterisation of Dactylosporangium strains from diverse environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Yong; Kshetrimayum, Jenileima Devi; Goodfellow, Michael

    2011-12-01

    A culture-independent, nested PCR procedure based on genus-specific oligonucleotide primers detected the presence of members of the genus Dactylosporangium in 14 out of 21 diverse environmental samples. Clones generated from the 14 positive environmental samples formed distinct phyletic lines in the dactylosporangial 16S rRNA gene tree. Presumptive dactylosporangiae were isolated from 7 of these samples using a medium designed to be selective for members of the genus Dactylosporangium, namely Streptomyces Isolation Medium supplemented with gentamicin and antifungal antibiotics. One hundred and two out of 219 representative presumptive dactylosporangiae were considered as authentic members of the genus Dactylosporangium as they gave PCR amplification products using the genus-specific primers and had chemical features typical of dactylosporangiae. Representative of the Dactylosporangium isolates formed distinctive phyletic lines in the dactylosporangial 16S rRNA gene tree, contained the non-ribosomal peptide and type-I polyketide synthase genes and inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Kocuria rhizophila and Staphylococcus aureus strains. It is evident from these results that the genus Dactylosporangium is underspeciated, widely distributed in natural habitats and is a potentially rich source of novel secondary metabolites.

  18. Pseudo-fault signal assisted EMD for fault detection and isolation in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dheeraj Sharan; Zhao, Qing

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a novel data driven technique for the detection and isolation of faults, which generate impacts in a rotating equipment. The technique is built upon the principles of empirical mode decomposition (EMD), envelope analysis and pseudo-fault signal for fault separation. Firstly, the most dominant intrinsic mode function (IMF) is identified using EMD of a raw signal, which contains all the necessary information about the faults. The envelope of this IMF is often modulated with multiple vibration sources and noise. A second level decomposition is performed by applying pseudo-fault signal (PFS) assisted EMD on the envelope. A pseudo-fault signal is constructed based on the known fault characteristic frequency of the particular machine. The objective of using external (pseudo-fault) signal is to isolate different fault frequencies, present in the envelope . The pseudo-fault signal serves dual purposes: (i) it solves the mode mixing problem inherent in EMD, (ii) it isolates and quantifies a particular fault frequency component. The proposed technique is suitable for real-time implementation, which has also been validated on simulated fault and experimental data corresponding to a bearing and a gear-box set-up, respectively.

  19. Flight test results of a vector-based failure detection and isolation algorithm for a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, F. R.; Bailey, M. L.; Motyka, P. R.

    1988-01-01

    Flight test results of a vector-based fault-tolerant algorithm for a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit are presented. Because the inertial sensors provide flight-critical information for flight control and navigation, failure detection and isolation is developed in terms of a multi-level structure. Threshold compensation techniques for gyros and accelerometers, developed to enhance the sensitivity of the failure detection process to low-level failures, are presented. Four flight tests, conducted in a commercial transport type environment, were used to determine the ability of the failure detection and isolation algorithm to detect failure signals, such a hard-over, null, or bias shifts. The algorithm provided timely detection and correct isolation of flight control- and low-level failures. The flight tests of the vector-based algorithm demonstrated its capability to provide false alarm free dual fail-operational performance for the skewed array of inertial sensors.

  20. Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) Portable Liquid Oxygen Hardware Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oostdyk, Rebecca L.; Perotti, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) hardware demonstration will highlight the effort being conducted by Constellation's Ground Operations (GO) to provide the Launch Control System (LCS) with system-level health management during vehicle processing and countdown activities. A proof-of-concept demonstration of the FDIR prototype established the capability of the software to provide real-time fault detection and isolation using generated Liquid Hydrogen data. The FDIR portable testbed unit (presented here) aims to enhance FDIR by providing a dynamic simulation of Constellation subsystems that feed the FDIR software live data based on Liquid Oxygen system properties. The LO2 cryogenic ground system has key properties that are analogous to the properties of an electronic circuit. The LO2 system is modeled using electrical components and an equivalent circuit is designed on a printed circuit board to simulate the live data. The portable testbed is also be equipped with data acquisition and communication hardware to relay the measurements to the FDIR application running on a PC. This portable testbed is an ideal capability to perform FDIR software testing, troubleshooting, training among others.

  1. GES-5 among the β-lactamases detected in ubiquitous bacteria isolated from aquatic environment samples.

    PubMed

    Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Caniça, Manuela; Manaia, Célia M

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the β-lactamase-encoding genes responsible for β-lactam resistance phenotypes detected among 56 Gram-negative isolates (Gamma- and Alpha-proteobacteria) recovered from wastewater, urban streams, and drinking water. The β-lactam resistance mechanisms detected in 36 isolates comprised the presence of class A (blaTEM-1 , blaSHV-1 , blaSHV-11 , blaGES-5 ), class B (ImiS, L1), class C (blaCMY-2 , blaCMY-34 , blaCMY-65 , blaCMY-89 , blaCMY-90 , blaACC-5 , blaACT-13 ), and class D (blaOXA-309)β-lactamase-encoding genes, some variants described for the first time here. Notably, the results showed antimicrobial resistance genes related not only to commonly used antibiotics, but also to carbapenems, providing the first description of a GES-5-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The importance of ubiquitous bacteria thriving in aquatic environments as reservoirs or carriers of clinically relevant resistance determinants was confirmed, and the need to monitor water habitats as potential sources for the emergence and/or spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment was highlighted.

  2. Advanced Trending Analysis/EDS Data Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation (TEFDI) Program, SCT was to use the Advanced Trend...detailed discussion of the algorithm and its underlying theory, the reader is directed to SCT’s Turbine Engine Fault Detection and Isolation (TEF!I) Program...SCT’s Turbine Engine Fault Detection and Isolation (TEFDI) Program Final Report scheduled for release in early 1982. 2. DISCUSSION OF RESULTS -

  3. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Karah, Nabil; Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Johansson, Anders; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-11

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  5. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Sensors for DNA Detection at the Point of Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Kuangwen

    In the post-genomic era, ever-advancing capabilities in DNA detection and analysis have become vital to the detection of infectious diseases and the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities and inheritable diseases. The benefit of such capabilities, however, has yet to reach patients outside of centralized facilities. There thus exists an increasing need to decentralize DNA detection methods and to administer such diagnostics at the "point of care." Electrochemical-based DNA sensors present a compelling approach, but have yet to deliver satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, miniaturization, and real-time monitoring capability to meet the demand of point-of-care diagnostics. Motivated by their potential and their current limitations, in this dissertation, we present a series of strategies that we have undertaken in order to address the key shortcomings of electrochemical DNA sensors and advance them toward point-of-care applications. First, we report a single-step, single reagent, label-free, isothermal electrochemical DNA sensor based on the phenomenon of enzyme catalyzed target recycling amplification. Using this technique, we achieve improved detection limit in comparison to hybridization-based sensors without amplification. We also demonstrate greater than 16-fold amplification of signal at low target concentrations. Next, we present a novel electrochemical DNA sensor that detects single-nucleotide mismatched targets with unprecedented "polarity-switching" responses. This "bipolar" sensor employs a surface-bound and redox-modified (methylene blue) DNA probe architecture, and outputs a decreased Faradaic current when hybridized to a perfectly matched (PM) target, but conversely reports an increased Faradaic current when hybridized to a single-base mismatched (SM) target. Third, we describe the microfluidic electrochemical dynamic allele specific hybridization (microE-DASH) platform for versatile and rapid detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Implementing

  6. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Mycobacterium microti Isolates in Wild Boar from Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Gaffuri, Alessandra; Gelmetti, Daniela; Tagliabue, Silvia; Chiari, Mario; Mangeli, Anna; Spisani, Matteo; Nassuato, Claudia; Gibelli, Lucia; Sacchi, Cristina; Zanoni, Mariagrazia; Pacciarini, M. Lodovica

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 23,000 hunter-harvested wild boars from the pre-Alpine area of northern Italy were examined for tuberculosis over a 9-year period (2003 to 2011). Retropharyngeal and mandibular lymph nodes from the wild boars were examined grossly, and 1,151 of the lymph nodes were analyzed in our laboratory by histology (728 samples) and culture isolation (819 samples). Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC)-specific PCR (1,142 samples) was used for molecular-level detection in tissue samples, as was a gyrB restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay (322 samples). Lesions compatible with tuberculosis and indistinguishable from those described in cases of Mycobacterium bovis infection had been observed since 2003. Mycobacterium microti was identified directly in 256 tissue samples by the adopted molecular approaches. However, only 26 M. microti strains were obtained by culture isolation due to the well-known difficulties in isolating this slow-growing mycobacterium. During 2006, a prevalence study was performed in two provinces of the area, and the diffusion of M. microti was calculated to be 5.8% (95% confidence intervals surrounding the estimated prevalences [CIP95%], 3.94 to 7.68%). Over the following years (2007 to 2011), the presence of M. microti appeared to be stable. All isolates were genotyped by spoligotyping and exact tandem repeat analysis (ETR types A to F). In addition to the typical vole type (SB0118), a new spoligotype lacking the 43 spacers was found. Spoligotyping was also applied directly to tissue samples, and a geographical cluster distribution of the two spoligotypes was observed. This is the first report studying the diffusion and genetic variability of M. microti in wild boar. PMID:24871212

  7. Assessment of environmental DNA for detecting presence of imperiled aquatic amphibian species in isolated wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Barichivich, William J.; Spear, Stephen F.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Glenn, Travis C

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging tool that allows low-impact sampling for aquatic species by isolating DNA from water samples and screening for DNA sequences specific to species of interest. However, researchers have not tested this method in naturally acidic wetlands that provide breeding habitat for a number of imperiled species, including the frosted salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum), reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), striped newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus), and gopher frog (Lithobates capito). Our objectives for this study were to develop and optimize eDNA survey protocols and assays to complement and enhance capture-based survey methods for these amphibian species. We collected three or more water samples, dipnetted or trapped larval and adult amphibians, and conducted visual encounter surveys for egg masses for target species at 40 sites on 12 different longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) tracts. We used quantitative PCRs to screen eDNA from each site for target species presence. We detected flatwoods salamanders at three sites with eDNA but did not detect them during physical surveys. Based on the sample location we assumed these eDNA detections to indicate the presence of frosted flatwoods salamanders. We did not detect reticulated flatwoods salamanders. We detected striped newts with physical and eDNA surveys at two wetlands. We detected gopher frogs at 12 sites total, three with eDNA alone, two with physical surveys alone, and seven with physical and eDNA surveys. We detected our target species with eDNA at 9 of 11 sites where they were present as indicated from traditional surveys and at six sites where they were not detected with traditional surveys. It was, however, critical to use at least three water samples per site for eDNA. Our results demonstrate eDNA surveys can be a useful complement to traditional survey methods for detecting imperiled pond-breeding amphibians. Environmental DNA may be particularly useful in situations

  8. Study on the Integrated Geophysic Methods and Application of Advanced Geological Detection for Complicated Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Xiao, G.

    2014-12-01

    The engineering geological and hydrological conditions of current tunnels are more and more complicated, as the tunnels are elongated with deeper depth. In constructing these complicated tunnels, geological hazards prone to occur as induced by unfavorable geological bodies, such as fault zones, karst or hydrous structures, etc. The working emphasis and difficulty of the advanced geological exploration for complicated tunnels are mainly focused on the structure and water content of these unfavorable geological bodies. The technical aspects of my paper systematically studied the advanced geological exploration theory and application aspects for complicated tunnels, with discussion on the key technical points and useful conclusions. For the all-aroundness and accuracy of advanced geological exploration results, the objective of my paper is targeted on the comprehensive examination on the structure and hydrous characteristic of the unfavorable geological bodies in complicated tunnels. By the multi-component seismic modeling on a more real model containing the air medium, the wave field response characteristics of unfavorable geological bodies can be analyzed, thus providing theoretical foundation for the observation system layout, signal processing and interpretation of seismic methods. Based on the tomographic imaging theory of seismic and electromagnetic method, 2D integrated seismic and electromagnetic tomographic imaging and visualization software was designed and applied in the advanced drilling hole in the tunnel face, after validation of the forward and inverse modeling results on theoretical models. The transmission wave imaging technology introduced in my paper can be served as a new criterion for detection of unfavorable geological bodies. After careful study on the basic theory, data processing and interpretation, practical applications of TSP and ground penetrating radar (GPR) method, as well as serious examination on their application examples, my paper

  9. Advances in antitumor polysaccharides from phellinus sensu lato: Production, isolation, structure, antitumor activity, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Kun; Pei, Juan-Juan; Ma, Hai-Le; Wang, Zhen-Bin; Liu, Yuan-Shuai

    2017-04-13

    Edible and medicinal fungi (mushrooms) are widely applied to functional foods and nutraceutical products because of their proven nutritive and medicinal properties. Phellinus sensu lato is a well-known medicinal mushroom that has long been used in preventing ailments, including gastroenteric dysfunction, diarrhea, hemorrhage, and cancers, in oriental countries, particularly in China, Japan, and Korea. Polysaccharides represent a major class of bioactive molecules in Phellinus s. l., which have notable antitumor, immunomodulatory, and medicinal properties. Polysaccharides that were isolated from fruiting bodies, cultured mycelia, and filtrates of Phellinus s. l. have not only activated different immune responses of the host organism but have also directly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. Studies suggest that polysaccharides from Phellinus s. l. are promising alternative anticancer agents or synergizers for existing antitumor drugs. This review summarizes the recent development of polysaccharides from Phellinus s. l., including polysaccharide production, extraction and isolation methods, chemical structure, antitumor activities, and mechanisms of action.

  10. Advanced glycation end products in human cancer tissues: detection of Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine and argpyrimidine.

    PubMed

    van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Niessen, Hans W M; Hoekman, Klaas; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2005-06-01

    Tumors are generally characterized by an increased glucose uptake and a high rate of glycolysis. Since one consequence of an elevated glycolysis is the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins, we studied the presence of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in human cancer tissues. We detected the presence of the AGEs N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and argpyrimidine in several human tumors using specific antibodies. Because AGEs have been associated with the etiology of a variety of different diseases, these results suggest that CML and argpyrimidine could be implicated in the biology of human cancer.

  11. Technological advancements for the detection of and protection against biological and chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Lisa M; Dickerson, Tobin J; Janda, Kim D

    2007-03-01

    There is a growing need for technological advancements to combat agents of chemical and biological warfare, particularly in the context of the deliberate use of a chemical and/or biological warfare agent by a terrorist organization. In this tutorial review, we describe methods that have been developed both for the specific detection of biological and chemical warfare agents in a field setting, as well as potential therapeutic approaches for treating exposure to these toxic species. In particular, nerve agents are described as a typical chemical warfare agent, and the two potent biothreat agents, anthrax and botulinum neurotoxin, are used as illustrative examples of potent weapons for which countermeasures are urgently needed.

  12. Distress detection, location, and communications using advanced space technology. [satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces a concept for low-cost, global, day-night, all-weather disaster warning and assistance. Evolving, advanced space technology with passive radio frequency reflectors in conjunction with an imaging synthetic aperture radar is employed to detect, identify, locate, and provide passive communication with earth users in distress. This concept evolved from a broad NASA research on new global search and rescue techniques. Appropriate airborne radar test results from this research are reviewed and related to potential disaster applications. The analysis indicates the approach has promise for disaster communications relative to floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe storms.

  13. DETECTION OF MOLECULAR GAS IN VOID GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN ISOLATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Das, M.; Honey, M.; Saito, T.; Iono, D.; Ramya, S.

    2015-12-10

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO(1–0) line emission as a tracer. The observations were performed using the 45 m single dish radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Void galaxies lie in the most underdense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late-type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study, we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Hα line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO(1–0) emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and their molecular gas masses lie between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. We conducted follow-up Hα imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs) from their Hα fluxes. The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in underdense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have SFRs similar to galaxies in denser environments. We discuss the implications of our results.

  14. Comparison of tests to detect oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus schleiferi, and Staphylococcus aureus isolates from canine hosts.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Jones, Rebekah D; Hiatt, Lauren E; Ofori, Edward D; Rohrbach, Barton W; Frank, Linda A; Kania, Stephen A

    2006-09-01

    Multiple tests were compared to the reference standard PBP2a latex agglutination test for detection of mecA-mediated oxacillin resistance in canine staphylococci. Cefoxitin disk diffusion, using breakpoints for human isolates of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., had low sensitivity for detection of oxacillin resistance in members of the Staphylococcus intermedius group.

  15. [Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates and evaluation of clinical symptoms detected in Aydin province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ertuğ, Sema; Malatyalı, Erdoğan; Ertabaklar, Hatice; Özlem Çalışkan, Serçin; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic potential and genetic diversity of Blastocystis are poorly understood despite being one of the most frequent intestinal parasites in routine fecal examination all around the world as well as Turkey. There are numerous defined subtypes (ST) of Blastocystis which infect animals and nine of them were isolated from human fecal samples. Blastocystis is an anaerobic parasite and generally recognized as nonpathogenic microorganism that colonizes the colon. However recent studies have indicated that the genotypes may be related with the pathogenicity and clinical symptoms of the infection. The aims of this study were to investigate the subtypes of Blastocystis isolates obtained from stool samples submitted to the parasitology laboratory of Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, and to evaluate the clinical symptoms of infected cases. A total of 61 cases (40 male, 21 female; age range: 5-69 years, mean age: 35 ± 19.1 years) were included in the study. Stool samples that were positive for Blastocystis cysts in direct microscopic examination, were inoculated in Jones medium and incubated at 37°C for 72 hours for the growth of parasite. Genomic DNAs were isolated from Jones medium directly or frozen samples with a commercial kit (DNAzol, Invitrogen, USA). The subtypes of Blastocystis were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using ST-specific primers and the symptoms of patients were evaluated retrospectively. Forty-four (72.1%) out of 61 isolates were subtyped by PCR, while 17 (27.9%) could not be typed. The distribution of Blastocystis subtypes were found as follows; ST3 in 17 (38.6%), ST2 in 13 (29.5%), ST1 in 9 (20.5%), ST1 + ST3 in 4 (9.1%), and ST1 + ST2 in one (2.3%) of the samples. The most common symptoms among Blastocystis infected cases were abdominal pain (n= 24, 39.4%), pruritus (n= 22, 36.1%), diarrhea (n= 4, 6.6%) and constipation (n= 2, 3.3%), respectively. This is the first study investigating the genotypes of Blastocystis in

  16. Design of Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The lidar atmospheric sensing experiment (LASE) is an instrument designed and operated by the Langley Research Center for high precision water vapor measurements. The design details of a new water vapor lidar detection system that improves the measurement sensitivity of the LASE instrument by a factor of 10 are discussed. The new system consists of an advanced, very low noise, avalanche photodiode (APD) and a state-of-the-art signal processing circuit. The new low-power system is also compact and lightweight so that it would be suitable for space flight and unpiloted atmospheric vehicles (UAV) applications. The whole system is contained on one small printed circuit board (9 x 15 sq cm). The detection system is mounted at the focal plane of a lidar receiver telescope, and the digital output is read by a personal computer with a digital data acquisition card.

  17. Advanced conceptual design report: T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades. Project W-259

    SciTech Connect

    Hookfin, J.D.

    1995-05-12

    The T Plant facilities in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were constructed in the early 1940s to produce nuclear materials in support of national defense activities. T Plant includes the 271-T facility, the 221-T facility, and several support facilities (eg, 2706-T), utilities, and tanks/piping systems. T Plant has been recommended as the primary interim decontamination facility for the Hanford site. Project W-259 will provide capital upgrades to the T Plant facilities to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. This document provides an advanced conceptual design concept that complies with functional requirements for the T Plant Secondary Containment and Leak Detection upgrades.

  18. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    PubMed

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  19. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  20. Advanced modularity-specialized label propagation algorithm for detecting communities in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Murata, T.

    2010-04-01

    A modularity-specialized label propagation algorithm (LPAm) for detecting network communities was recently proposed. This promising algorithm offers some desirable qualities. However, LPAm favors community divisions where all communities are similar in total degree and thus it is prone to get stuck in poor local maxima in the modularity space. To escape local maxima, we employ a multistep greedy agglomerative algorithm (MSG) that can merge multiple pairs of communities at a time. Combining LPAm and MSG, we propose an advanced modularity-specialized label propagation algorithm (LPAm+). Experiments show that LPAm+ successfully detects communities with higher modularity values than ever reported in two commonly used real-world networks. Moreover, LPAm+ offers a fair compromise between accuracy and speed.

  1. [Advancement in the research of early detection of bacterial nucleic acid in molecular diagnosis of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Ren, Hui; Peng, Dai-zhi

    2013-04-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis helps make effective clinical decisions and improve the survival rate of patients with severe infection. However, the timely and accurate diagnosis of sepsis is still a great challenge in clinic. In order to settle the very problem, the scientists in the world have made a lot of exploration and research in the field of rapid molecular identification of pathogens. Nowadays, the nucleic acid detection of sepsis is mainly composed of 3 types of methodological strategies, either based on positive blood culture, single colonies, or directly on blood specimens. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of advances in the research of early detection of bacterial nucleic acid as molecular diagnosis of sepsis.

  2. Detection of pap-, sfa- and afa-specific DNA sequences in Escherichia coli strains isolated from extraintestinal material.

    PubMed

    Bogyiová, E; Kmetová, M; Biros, E; Siegfried, L

    2002-01-01

    P-fimbriae, S-fimbriae and AFA-adhesins are virulence factors responsible for adherence of Escherichia coli strains to extraintestinal host-cell surface. Detection of pap-, sfa- and afa-specific sequences performed by PCR revealed 74% pap+, 65% sfa+, and 8.3% afa+ strains in a group of 84 extraintestinal E. coli isolates. Detection in a group of fecal strains showed 29% pap+, 21% sfa+ and 4% afa+ strains. pap together with sfa were found as the most frequent combination (56%) among extraintestinal isolates probably due to localization of pap- and sfa-operons on a common pathogenicity island. The occurrence of afa-specific sequence among 56 urine strains was 11%, although no afa+ strain was detected among 28 gynecological isolates. No strains with detected adhesin operons were found among twenty (24%) extraintestinal E. coli strains.

  3. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2010-08-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid-based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids.

  4. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid—based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  5. Detection of class 1 integron in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates collected from nine hospitals in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    ÇİÇek, Ayşegül Çopur; Düzgün, Azer Özad; Saral, Ayşegül; Kayman, Tuba; Çİzmecİ, Zeynep; Balcı, Pervin Özlem; Dal, Tuba; Fırat, Mehmet; Tosun, İsmail; Alıtntop, Yasemin Ay; Çalışkan, Ahmet; Yazıcı, Yelda; Sandallı, Cemal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibiotic resistance genes inserted into class 1 and class 2 integrons in Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) isolates obtained from nine different cities in Turkey. Methods A collection of 281 A. baumannii clinical isolates were collected from nine diferent state hospitals in Turkey and were confirmed as A. baumannii by conventional biochemical, API testing and bla-OXA-51 specific PCR. The isolates were examined by PCR for existence of class 1 and 2 integron gene cassettes. Results They were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and the highest resistance rates were determined for piperacillin (90.03%), ciprofloxacin (87.54%), cefepime and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (81.13%). The lowest resistance rates was for cefotaxime (3.55%). class I integrons were detected in 6.4% (18/281) of A. baumannii strains and no class 2 integron was detected. The gene cassettes of class 1 integrons AacC1-AAC(3)I-aadA1, AacC1-aadA1, AAC(3)-I, AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I -aadA1, TEM-1, AAC(3)-I-aadA1 - AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I, AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I -aadA1, AAC(3)-I - aadA1, AAC(3)-I-AAC(3)-I, AAC(3)-I-aadA1- AAC(3)-I-aadA1, AAC(3)-I- AAC(3)-I- aadA1-AAC(3)-I-aadA1 were detected in eighteen strains. The aac genes family were most frequently found integrated into the class 1 integrons and it was followed by aadA genes and TEM-1 genes. Conclusions This is an extensive study on the distribution of class 1 integron among A. baumannii in Turkey. In addition to these, two new alleles were observed. Their percentage rates of similarity to other cassettes are 95% aadA1 ( TKA18) and 89% aadA1 (ANKA3). PMID:23998017

  6. New technology for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.

    1995-04-01

    A high-speed, 11-parameter, 6-color fluorescence, laser flow cytometer/cell sorter with a number of special and unique features has been built for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. The software for real-time data acquisition and sort control, written as C++ programming language modules with a WindowsTM graphical user interface, runs on a 66-MHz 80486 computer joined by an extended bus to 23 sophisticated multi-layered boards of special data acquisition and sorting electronics. Special features include: high-speed (> 100,000 cells/sec) real-time data classification module (U.S. Patent 5,204,884 (1993)); real-time principal component cell sorting; multi-queue signal-processing system with multiple hardware and software event buffers to reduce instrument dead time, LUT charge-pulse definition, high-resolution `flexible' sorting for optimal yield/purity sort strategies (U.S. Patent 5,199,576); pre-focusing optical wavelength correction for a second laser beam; and two trains of three fluorescence detectors-- each adjustable for spatial separation to interrogate only one of two laser beams, syringe- driven or pressure-driven fluidics, and time-windowed parameters. The system has been built to be both expandable and versatile through the use of LUT's and a modular hardware and software design. The instrument is especially useful at detection and isolation of rare cell subpopulations for which our laboratory is well-known. Cell subpopulations at frequencies as small as 10-7 have been successfully studied with this system. Current applications in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics include detection and isolation of (1) fetal cells from material blood for prenatal diagnosis of birth defects, (2) hematopoietic stem and precursor cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation, (3) metastatic breast cancer cells for molecular characterization, and (4) HIV-infected maternal cells in newborn blood to study mother

  7. Highly ordered graphene-isolated silver nanodot arrays as SERS substrate for detection of urinary nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicai; Jiang, Shouzhen; Hu, Guodong; Wei, Jie; Wang, Li; Zhang, Junye; Li, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    An efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been developed based on highly ordered arrays of graphene-isolated Ag nanodot (G/AgND) arrays. By combining the plasmonic activity of AgND arrays and unique physical/chemical properties of graphene, the G/AgND arrays show high performance in terms of sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio and reproducibility. The SERS signals of R6G are clearly detected even at very low concentration of 10-11M. The maximum deviations of SERS intensities from 20 positions of the SERS substrate are less than 5%. The G/AgND arrays were employed for detection of human urinary nucleosides. The diagnostic algorithms based on principal component analysis achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 91.1% and specificity of 93.3% for separating cancer from normal samples. This work demonstrates that G/AgND arrays used in Raman spectroscopy could be developed as a smart and promising system for detection and screening of cancers.

  8. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  9. Detection and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from soil in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Saki, J; Khademvatan, S; Yousefi, E; Tavalla, M; Abdizadeh, R

    2017-03-01

    To detection and genotype of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from soil in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran. Between August 2011 and May 2012 at different sites located in the area of the Ahvaz city south west Iran. A total of 200 soil samples were taken from different points of the region. Oocysts were recovered using the flotation method. Then, PCR reactions targeting the GRA6 gene were performed for specific T. gondii detection. The positive samples were studied by RFLP (random amplified fragment length polymorphism) using MseI enzymes to confirm the parasite linage. Toxoplasma DNA was found in 18 samples. Among them, 12 samples were successfully genotyped as GRA6 type III and 6 as GRA6 Type II. This is the first investigation detecting and genotyping T. gondii oocyst in environmental soil samples of Ahvaz, South west of Iran. The results of this study indicated that soil contaminated with T. gondii oocysts especially in public park may play a role in the epidemiology of human toxoplasmosis in southwest of Iran.

  10. Acquisition and processing of advanced sensor data for ERW and UXO detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory M.; Keranen, Joe; Miller, Jonathan S.; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2014-06-01

    The remediation of explosive remnants of war (ERW) and associated unexploded ordnance (UXO) has seen improvements through the injection of modern technological advances and streamlined standard operating procedures. However, reliable and cost-effective detection and geophysical mapping of sites contaminated with UXO such as cluster munitions, abandoned ordnance, and improvised explosive devices rely on the ability to discriminate hazardous items from metallic clutter. In addition to anthropogenic clutter, handheld and vehicle-based metal detector systems are plagued by natural geologic and environmental noise in many post conflict areas. We present new and advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) technologies including man-portable and towed EMI arrays and associated data processing software. While these systems feature vastly different form factors and transmit-receive configurations, they all exhibit several fundamental traits that enable successful classification of EMI anomalies. Specifically, multidirectional sampling of scattered magnetic fields from targets and corresponding high volume of unique data provide rich information for extracting useful classification features for clutter rejection analysis. The quality of classification features depends largely on the extent to which the data resolve unique physics-based parameters. To date, most of the advanced sensors enable high quality inversion by producing data that are extremely rich in spatial content through multi-angle illumination and multi-point reception.

  11. Summary of the ACS symposium on Advances in Food Allergen Detection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark M; Jackson, Lauren

    2013-06-19

    A symposium titled "Advances in Food Allergen Detection" was held at the 243rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in March 2012 in San Diego, CA, and was sponsored by the ACS Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The purpose of the symposium was to convene the leaders in the food allergen analysis field for presentations on, and discussions of, the state of the art, new developments, and critical challenges in the detection and quantitation of allergenic proteins in foods. Twenty-five presentations were delivered by speakers representing academic, government, and industrial institutions in 10 countries. The presentations covered all aspects of food allergens, including a historical progress review, regulatory policies, clinical practices, food-processing effects, food production equipment cross-contamination and cleaning, and the performance of several food allergen analytical strategies and technologies. This paper is intended to provide a brief summary of the presentations as well as a record of the proceedings of the symposium, which was deemed a great success in advancing food allergen analysis.

  12. [Advance in application of syndromic surveillance for detection of emerging infectious diseases and outbreak alerts].

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Xin; Liang, Dabin

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decade, syndromic surveillance, as supplementation of disease surveillance, has provided possibility of early alert in a real-time way for detection of emerging infectious diseases and outbreaks of widespread infectious diseases, resulting in improvement in sensitivity of outbreak detection and public health alert capacity. This tool has been highly valued and widely used in the world, and effective implementation has been observed in China. Upon abundant literature search, the authors reviewed the progress and advance of syndromic surveillance in early alert of emerging infectious diseases and outbreaks, and analyzed the problem met in the current situation in China when implementing syndromic surveillance in local facilities, which are high cost, lack of medical information platform, lack of real-time digital alert system and lack of a comprehensive information exchange platform. The authors suggested that syndromic surveillance should be implemented considering the local situation and performed in a more effective way in the current situation. Syndromic surveillance has to be integrated into the conventional public health surveillance systems and advanced laboratory networks. Digital information system is urgently needed to achieve real-time alert.

  13. Current Advances in Lanthanide‐Doped Upconversion Nanostructures for Detection and Bioapplication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cailing

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of science and technology, lanthanide‐doped upconversion nanostructures as a new type of materials have taken their place in the field of nanomaterials. Upconversion luminescence is a nonlinear optical phenomenon, which absorbs two or more photons and emits one photon. Compared with traditional luminescence materials, upconversion nanostructures have many advantages, such as weak background interference, long lifetime, low excitation energy, and strong tissue penetration. These interesting nanostructures can be applied in anticounterfeit, solar cell, detection, bioimaging, therapy, and so on. This review is focused on the current advances in lanthanide‐doped upconversion nanostructures, covering not only basic luminescence mechanism, synthesis, and modification methods but also the design and fabrication of upconversion nanostructures, like core–shell nanoparticles or nanocomposites. At last, this review emphasizes the application of upconversion nanostructure in detection and bioimaging and therapy. Learning more about the advances of upconversion nanostructures can help us better exploit their excellent performance and use them in practice. PMID:27840794

  14. Impacts of Inverter-Based Advanced Grid Support Functions on Islanding Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Austin; Hoke, Anderson; Miller, Brian; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Bell, Frances; McCarty, Michael

    2016-12-12

    A long-standing requirement for inverters paired with distributed energy resources is that they are required to disconnect from the electrical power system (EPS) when an electrical island is formed. In recent years, advanced grid support controls have been developed for inverters to provide voltage and frequency support by integrating functions such as voltage and frequency ride-through, volt-VAr control, and frequency-Watt control. With these new capabilities integrated into the inverter, additional examination is needed to determine how voltage and frequency support will impact pre-existing inverter functions like island detection. This paper inspects how advanced inverter functions will impact its ability to detect the formation of an electrical island. Results are presented for the unintentional islanding laboratory tests of three common residential-scale photovoltaic inverters performing various combinations of grid support functions. For the inverters tested, grid support functions prolonged island disconnection times slightly; however, it was found that in all scenarios the inverters disconnected well within two seconds, the limit imposed by IEEE Std 1547-2003.

  15. A vector-based failure detection and isolation algorithm for a dual fail-operational redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Frederick R.; Bailey, Melvin L.

    1987-01-01

    A vector-based failure detection and isolation technique for a skewed array of two degree-of-freedom inertial sensors is developed. Failure detection is based on comparison of parity equations with a threshold, and isolation is based on comparison of logic variables which are keyed to pass/fail results of the parity test. A multi-level approach to failure detection is used to ensure adequate coverage for the flight control, display, and navigation avionics functions. Sensor error models are introduced to expose the susceptibility of the parity equations to sensor errors and physical separation effects. The algorithm is evaluated in a simulation of a commercial transport operating in a range of light to severe turbulence environments. A bias-jump failure level of 0.2 deg/hr was detected and isolated properly in the light and moderate turbulence environments, but not detected in the extreme turbulence environment. An accelerometer bias-jump failure level of 1.5 milli-g was detected over all turbulence environments. For both types of inertial sensor, hard-over, and null type failures were detected in all environments without incident. The algorithm functioned without false alarm or isolation over all turbulence environments for the runs tested.

  16. Automated detection of high-frequency oscillations in electrophysiological signals: Methodological advances.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Miguel; Pyrzowski, Jan; Corlier, Juliana; Valderrama, Mario; Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2017-02-21

    In recent years, new recording technologies have advanced such that oscillations of neuronal networks can be identified from simultaneous, multisite recordings at high temporal and spatial resolutions. However, because of the deluge of multichannel data generated by these experiments, achieving the full potential of parallel neuronal recordings also depends on the development of new mathematical methods capable of extracting meaningful information related to time, frequency and space. In this review, we aim to bridge this gap by focusing on the new analysis tools developed for the automated detection of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, > 40 Hz) in local field potentials. For this, we provide a revision of different aspects associated with physiological and pathological HFOs as well as the several stages involved in their automatic detection including preprocessing, selection, rejection and analysis through time-frequency processes. Beyond basic research, the automatic detection of HFOs would greatly assist diagnosis of epilepsy disorders based on the recognition of these typical pathological patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Also, we emphasize how these HFO detection methods can be applied and the properties that might be inferred from neuronal signals, indicating potential future directions.

  17. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  18. Advances in automated deception detection in text-based computer-mediated communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Mark; Twitchell, Douglas P.; Burgoon, Judee K.; Nunamaker, Jay F., Jr.

    2004-08-01

    The Internet has provided criminals, terrorists, spies, and other threats to national security a means of communication. At the same time it also provides for the possibility of detecting and tracking their deceptive communication. Recent advances in natural language processing, machine learning and deception research have created an environment where automated and semi-automated deception detection of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC, e.g. email, chat, instant messaging) is a reachable goal. This paper reviews two methods for discriminating between deceptive and non-deceptive messages in CMC. First, Document Feature Mining uses document features or cues in CMC messages combined with machine learning techniques to classify messages according to their deceptive potential. The method, which is most useful in asynchronous applications, also allows for the visualization of potential deception cues in CMC messages. Second, Speech Act Profiling, a method for quantifying and visualizing synchronous CMC, has shown promise in aiding deception detection. The methods may be combined and are intended to be a part of a suite of tools for automating deception detection.

  19. Anaerobic gut fungi: Advances in isolation, culture, and cellulolytic enzyme discovery for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Charles H; Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi are an early branching family of fungi that are commonly found in the digestive tract of ruminants and monogastric herbivores. It is becoming increasingly clear that they are the primary colonizers of ingested plant biomass, and that they significantly contribute to the decomposition of plant biomass into fermentable sugars. As such, anaerobic fungi harbor a rich reservoir of undiscovered cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes that can potentially transform the conversion of lignocellulose into bioenergy products. Despite their unique evolutionary history and cellulolytic activity, few species have been isolated and studied in great detail. As a result, their life cycle, cellular physiology, genetics, and cellulolytic metabolism remain poorly understood compared to aerobic fungi. To help address this limitation, this review briefly summarizes the current body of knowledge pertaining to anaerobic fungal biology, and describes progress made in the isolation, cultivation, molecular characterization, and long-term preservation of these microbes. We also discuss recent cellulase- and cellulosome-discovery efforts from gut fungi, and how these interesting, non-model microbes could be further adapted for biotechnology applications.

  20. Recent advances in isolation, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactivities of bispyrroloquinone alkaloids of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Dutta, Shilpa; Velu, Sadanandan E

    2015-08-01

    The ocean continues to provide a plethora of unique scaffolds capable of remarkable biological applications. A large number of pyrroloiminoquinone alkaloids, including discorhabdins, epinardins, batzellines, makaluvamines, and veiutamine, have been isolated from various marine organisms. A class of pyrroloiminoquinone-related alkaloids, known as bispyrroloquinones, is the focus of this review article. This family of marine alkaloids, which contain an aryl substituted bispyrroloquinone ring system, includes three subclasses of alkaloids namely, wakayin, tsitsikammamines A-B, and zyzzyanones A-D. Both wakayin and the tsitsikammamines contain a tetracyclic fused bispyrroloiminoquinone ring system, while zyzzyanones contain a fused tricyclic bispyrroloquinone ring system. The unique chemical structures of these marine natural products and their diverse biological properties, including antifungal and antimicrobial activity, as well as the potent, albeit generally nonspecific and universal cytotoxicities, have attracted great interest of synthetic chemists over the past three decades. Tsitsikammamines, wakayin, and several of their analogs show inhibition of topoisomerases. One additional possible mechanism of anticancer activity of tsitsikammamines analogs that has been discovered recently is through the inhibition of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, an enzyme involved in tumoral immune resistance. This review discusses the isolation, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactivities of bispyrroloquinone alkaloids and their analogs.

  1. Detection of new paternal dystrophin gene mutations in isolated cases of dystrophinopathy in females

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Wessel, H.B.; Schwartz, L.; Hoffman, E.P. ); Schimke, R.N. ); Arahata, Kiichi; Hayashi, Yukiko ); Stern, H. ); Marks, H. ); Glasberg, M.R. )

    1994-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders and is caused by dystrophin deficiency. The disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait; however, recent biochemical and clinical studies have shown that many girls and women with a primary myopathy have an underlying dystrophinopathy, despite a negative family history for Duchenne dystrophy. These isolated female dystrophinopathy patients carried ambiguous diagnoses with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy) prior to biochemical detection of dystrophin abnormalities in their muscle biopsy. It has been assumed that these female dystrophinopathy patients are heterozygous carries who show preferential inactivation of the X chromosome harboring the normal dystrophin gene, although this has been shown for only a few X:autosome translocations and for two cases of discordant monozygotic twin female carriers. Here the authors study X-inactivation patterns of 13 female dystrophinopathy patients - 10 isolated cases and 3 cases with a positive family history for Duchenne dystrophy in males. They show that all cases have skewed X-inactivation patterns in peripheral blood DNA. Of the nine isolated cases informative in the assay, eight showed inheritance of the dystrophin gene mutation from the paternal germ line. Only a single case showed maternal inheritance. The 10-fold higher incidence of paternal transmission of dystrophin gene mutations in these cases is at 30-fold variance with Bayesian predictions and gene mutation rates. Thus, the results suggest some mechanistic interaction between new dystrophin gene mutations, paternal inheritance, and skewed X inactivation. The results provide both empirical risk data and a molecular diagnostic test method, which permit genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of this new category of patients. 58 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Evaluation of an expert system for fault detection, isolation, and recovery in the manned maneuvering unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John; Crow, Judith

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore issues in the specification, verification, and validation of artificial intelligence (AI) based software, using a prototype fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) system for the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). They use this system as a vehicle for exploring issues in the semantics of C-Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS)-style rule-based languages, the verification of properties relating to safety and reliability, and the static and dynamic analysis of knowledge based systems. This analysis reveals errors and shortcomings in the MMU FDIR system and raises a number of issues concerning software engineering in CLIPs. The authors came to realize that the MMU FDIR system does not conform to conventional definitions of AI software, despite the fact that it was intended and indeed presented as an AI system. The authors discuss this apparent disparity and related questions such as the role of AI techniques in space and aircraft operations and the suitability of CLIPS for critical applications.

  3. Fault detection and isolation of aircraft air data/inertial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdjag, D.; Cieslak, J.; Zolghadri, A.

    2013-12-01

    A method for failure detection and isolation (FDI) for redundant aircraft sensors is presented. The outputs of the concerned sensors are involved in the computation of flight control laws, and the objective is to eliminate any fault before propagation in the control loop when selecting a unique flight parameter among a set (generally, three) of redundant measurements. The particular case of an oscillatory failure is investigated. The proposed method allows an accurate FDI of erroneous sensor and computes a consolidated parameter based on the fusion of data from remaining valid sensors. The benefits of the presented method are to enhance the data fusion process with FDI techniques which improve the performance of the fusion when only few sources (less than three) are initially valid.

  4. Application of FDI metrics to detection and isolation of sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. L.; Willsky, A. S.; Pattipati, K. R.; Eterno, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper develops a framework for the design of failure detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms. Rather than trying to apply 'optimal' techniques in a top-down manner, the system redundancies are evaluated with respect to their ability to provide reliable FDI information. Previous work of Pattipati et al. (1984) and Weiss et al. (1984) defined a useful context and several useful analytical results, which provide a basis for the FDI design methodology developed here. A general decision structure which can take advantage of redundancy evaluation is presented, and examples of typical design considerations are discussed. The operation of the decision structure is then demonstrated for a sensor FDI application involving the F-100 jet engine.

  5. Methodology for validation of safety parameters and fault detection and isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper a methodology for instrument data validation as well as fault detection and isolation, based on analytic redundancy, is presented. This work differs from previously reported work on analytic redundancy in that validation of all the main parameters of the plant heat transport loops is sought by using plant-wide instrument information. An LMFBR plant is used as a reference, and validation of the following plant parameters is considered: reactor power (Q), reactor inlet (T/sub IC/) and reactor outlet (T/sub OC/) coolant temperatures, intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) inlet (T/sub IS/) and outlet (T/sub OS/) secondary coolant temperatures, steam generator feedwater temperature (T/sub w/), steam temperature (T/sub s/) and pressure (P/sub s/), as well as primary (G/sub p/), intermediate (G/sub I/), and feedwater (G/sub w/) flow. In this paper, only validation at steady state conditions will be discussed.

  6. Detection and Isolation of Digital Dermatitis Treponemes from Bovine Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Clegg, S R; Crosby-Durrani, H E; Bell, J; Blundell, R; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Evans, N J

    2016-05-01

    Pressure sores cause severe pain and discomfort in hospitalized people and in farmed cattle and are often infected with unknown bacteria. Pressure sores occur on the upper legs of 6-10% of recumbent cattle and are generally considered to be caused by constant pressure, commonly on bony areas of the limbs. This study analyzed pressure sores taken from the upper limbs of 14 cattle using isolation in culture and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect treponemes associated with digital dermatitis (DD). A 100% association of DD treponemes with the pressure sores was demonstrated, but treponemes were shown not to be part of the normal skin microbiota. Immunohistochemistry showed an association of DD treponemes with lesions and particularly with the hair follicles in lesions, identifying the bacteria deep within wounds, thereby suggesting that they could contribute to lesion pathogenesis. The bacteria isolated from the pressure sore lesions were similar or identical on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to those found in DD foot lesions in cattle, suggesting the same bacteria can infect multiple lesions. Indeed, the results of this study suggest that these spirochaetal bacteria may be expanding in host range and in their ability to colonize different tissues and contribute to a range of disease manifestations in farm animals.

  7. Using Decision Trees to Detect and Isolate Simulated Leaks in the J-2X Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Aguilar, Robert; Figueroa, Fernando F.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work was to use data-driven methods to automatically detect and isolate faults in the J-2X rocket engine. It was decided to use decision trees, since they tend to be easier to interpret than other data-driven methods. The decision tree algorithm automatically "learns" a decision tree by performing a search through the space of possible decision trees to find one that fits the training data. The particular decision tree algorithm used is known as C4.5. Simulated J-2X data from a high-fidelity simulator developed at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and known as the Detailed Real-Time Model (DRTM) was used to "train" and test the decision tree. Fifty-six DRTM simulations were performed for this purpose, with different leak sizes, different leak locations, and different times of leak onset. To make the simulations as realistic as possible, they included simulated sensor noise, and included a gradual degradation in both fuel and oxidizer turbine efficiency. A decision tree was trained using 11 of these simulations, and tested using the remaining 45 simulations. In the training phase, the C4.5 algorithm was provided with labeled examples of data from nominal operation and data including leaks in each leak location. From the data, it "learned" a decision tree that can classify unseen data as having no leak or having a leak in one of the five leak locations. In the test phase, the decision tree produced very low false alarm rates and low missed detection rates on the unseen data. It had very good fault isolation rates for three of the five simulated leak locations, but it tended to confuse the remaining two locations, perhaps because a large leak at one of these two locations can look very similar to a small leak at the other location.

  8. An ensemble of dynamic neural network identifiers for fault detection and isolation of gas turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Amozegar, M; Khorasani, K

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a new approach for Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) of gas turbine engines is proposed by developing an ensemble of dynamic neural network identifiers. For health monitoring of the gas turbine engine, its dynamics is first identified by constructing three separate or individual dynamic neural network architectures. Specifically, a dynamic multi-layer perceptron (MLP), a dynamic radial-basis function (RBF) neural network, and a dynamic support vector machine (SVM) are trained to individually identify and represent the gas turbine engine dynamics. Next, three ensemble-based techniques are developed to represent the gas turbine engine dynamics, namely, two heterogeneous ensemble models and one homogeneous ensemble model. It is first shown that all ensemble approaches do significantly improve the overall performance and accuracy of the developed system identification scheme when compared to each of the stand-alone solutions. The best selected stand-alone model (i.e., the dynamic RBF network) and the best selected ensemble architecture (i.e., the heterogeneous ensemble) in terms of their performances in achieving an accurate system identification are then selected for solving the FDI task. The required residual signals are generated by using both a single model-based solution and an ensemble-based solution under various gas turbine engine health conditions. Our extensive simulation studies demonstrate that the fault detection and isolation task achieved by using the residuals that are obtained from the dynamic ensemble scheme results in a significantly more accurate and reliable performance as illustrated through detailed quantitative confusion matrix analysis and comparative studies.

  9. Evaluation of cefoxitin disk diffusion breakpoint for detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Jones, Rebekah D; Videla, Ricardo; Kania, Stephen A

    2012-09-01

    Cefoxitin disk diffusion susceptibility testing is a recommended screening method for the detection of methicillin resistance in human isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. A retrospective analysis of 1,146 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs was conducted to determine if screening by the cefoxitin disk method can be similarly useful with S. pseudintermedius. The distribution of cefoxitin growth inhibition zone diameters within this collection was bimodal and correlated well with the results of methicillin resistance gene (mecA) detection by polymerase chain reaction. Of the isolates, 5% had discordant results and, when retested, 84% of these were in agreement. While a greater diversity of isolates and interlaboratory comparisons must be tested, the current study suggests that an epidemiological breakpoint (of approximately ≤ 30 mm = resistant; ≥ 31 = susceptible) can be established to predict methicillin resistance in S. pseudintermedius.

  10. Advanced Oil Spill Detection Algorithms For Satellite Based Maritime Environment Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radius, Andrea; Azevedo, Rui; Sapage, Tania; Carmo, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    During the last years, the increasing pollution occurrence and the alarming deterioration of the environmental health conditions of the sea, lead to the need of global monitoring capabilities, namely for marine environment management in terms of oil spill detection and indication of the suspected polluter. The sensitivity of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to the different phenomena on the sea, especially for oil spill and vessel detection, makes it a key instrument for global pollution monitoring. The SAR performances in maritime pollution monitoring are being operationally explored by a set of service providers on behalf of the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA), which has launched in 2007 the CleanSeaNet (CSN) project - a pan-European satellite based oil monitoring service. EDISOFT, which is from the beginning a service provider for CSN, is continuously investing in R&D activities that will ultimately lead to better algorithms and better performance on oil spill detection from SAR imagery. This strategy is being pursued through EDISOFT participation in the FP7 EC Sea-U project and in the Automatic Oil Spill Detection (AOSD) ESA project. The Sea-U project has the aim to improve the current state of oil spill detection algorithms, through the informative content maximization obtained with data fusion, the exploitation of different type of data/ sensors and the development of advanced image processing, segmentation and classification techniques. The AOSD project is closely related to the operational segment, because it is focused on the automation of the oil spill detection processing chain, integrating auxiliary data, like wind information, together with image and geometry analysis techniques. The synergy between these different objectives (R&D versus operational) allowed EDISOFT to develop oil spill detection software, that combines the operational automatic aspect, obtained through dedicated integration of the processing chain in the existing open source NEST

  11. Expectations for Joint Gravitational Wave-Electromagnetic Detections with Advanced LIGO/Virgo and the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Hamburg, R.; Littenberg, T.

    2016-10-01

    We estimate the fraction of GBM detected short GRBs that should be detectable by Advanced LIGO/Virgo. We also look at the fraction of GW localizations that should be visible to GBM, as well as area reduction by using joint localizations.

  12. Comparative analysis of EV isolation procedures for miRNAs detection in serum samples

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Zoraida; Rivas, Eva; Sanguino-Pascual, Aitana; Lamana, Amalia; Marazuela, Mónica; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are emerging as potent non-invasive biomarkers. However, current methodologies are time consuming and difficult to translate to clinical practice. To analyse EV-encapsulated circulating miRNA, we searched for a quick, easy and economic method to enrich frozen human serum samples for EV. We compared the efficiency of several protocols and commercial kits to isolate EVs. Different methods based on precipitation, columns or filter systems were tested and compared with ultracentrifugation, which is the most classical protocol to isolate EVs. EV samples were assessed for purity and quantity by nanoparticle tracking analysis and western blot or cytometry against major EV protein markers. For biomarker validation, levels of a set of miRNAs were determined in EV fractions and compared with their levels in total serum. EVs isolated with precipitation-based methods were enriched for a subgroup of miRNAs that corresponded to miRNAs described to be encapsulated into EVs (miR-126, miR-30c and miR-143), while the detection of miR-21, miR-16-5p and miR-19a was very low compared with total serum. Our results point to precipitation using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a suitable method for an easy and cheap enrichment of serum EVs for miRNA analyses. The overall performance of PEG was very similar, or better than other commercial precipitating reagents, in both protein and miRNA yield, but in comparison to them PEG is much cheaper. Other methods presented poorer results, mostly when assessing miRNA by qPCR analyses. Using PEG precipitation in a longitudinal study with human samples, we demonstrated that miRNA could be assessed in frozen samples up to 8 years of storage. We report a method based on a cut-off value of mean of fold EV detection versus serum that provides an estimate of the degree of encapsulation of a given miRNA. PMID:27330048

  13. A novel isolation curtain to reduce turbine ingress heating and an advanced model for honeycomb labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dong Chun

    A combination of 3-D and 2-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling as well as experimental testing of the labyrinth seal with hexagonal honeycomb cells on the stator wall was performed. For the 3-D and 2-D CFD models, the hexagonal honeycomb structure was modeled using the concept of the baffle (zero-thickness wall) and the simplified 2-D fin, respectively. The 3-D model showed that even a small axial change of the tooth (or honeycomb wall) location, or a small circumferential change of the honeycomb wall location significantly affected the flow patterns and leakage characteristics especially for small tooth tip clearance. Also, the local details of the flow field were investigated. The seven basic procedural steps to develop a 2-D axisymmetric honeycomb labyrinth seal leakage model were shown. Clearly demonstrated for varying test conditions was the 2-D model capability to predict the 3-D honeycomb labyrinth flow that had been measured at different operating conditions from that used in developing the 2-D model. Specifically, the 2-D model showed very close agreement with measurements. In addition, the 2-D model greatly reduced the computer resource requirement needed to obtain a solution of the 3-D honeycomb labyrinth seal leakage. The novel and advanced strategy to reduce the turbine ingress heating, and thus the coolant requirement, by injecting a "coolant isolation curtain" was developed numerically using a 3-D CFD model. The coolant isolation curtain was applied under the nozzle guide vane platform for the forward cavity of a turbine stage. Specifically, the isolation curtain serves to isolate the hot mainstream gas from the turbine outer region. The effect of the geometry change, the outer cavity axial gap clearance, the circumferential location of the injection curtain slot and the injection fluid angle on the ingress heating was investigated. Adding the chamfer to the baseline design gave a similar or higher maximum temperature T*max than did the

  14. Fault detection and fault tolerant control of a smart base isolation system with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Song, Gangbing

    2011-08-01

    Fault detection and isolation (FDI) in real-time systems can provide early warnings for faulty sensors and actuator signals to prevent events that lead to catastrophic failures. The main objective of this paper is to develop FDI and fault tolerant control techniques for base isolation systems with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers. Thus, this paper presents a fixed-order FDI filter design procedure based on linear matrix inequalities (LMI). The necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a solution for detecting and isolating faults using the H_{\\infty } formulation is provided in the proposed filter design. Furthermore, an FDI-filter-based fuzzy fault tolerant controller (FFTC) for a base isolation structure model was designed to preserve the pre-specified performance of the system in the presence of various unknown faults. Simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the designed filter can successfully detect and isolate faults from displacement sensors and accelerometers while maintaining excellent performance of the base isolation technology under faulty conditions.

  15. Detection of Integrase Gene in E. coli Isolated from Pigs at Different Stages of Production System.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Eulalia; Colello, Rocío; Padola, Nora Lía; Etcheverría, Analía; Rodríguez, Edgardo; Amanto, Fabián; Tapia, María Ofelia; Soraci, Alejandro Luis

    2014-01-01

    Integrons are one of the genetic elements involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance. The aim of the present research is to investigate the presence of integrons in commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, isolated from pigs at different stages of production system and from the environment in an Argentinian farm. Five sows postpartum and five randomly chosen piglets from each litter were sampled by rectal swabs. They were sampled again at day 21 and at day 70. Environmental samples from the farm were also obtained. E. coli containing any integron class or combination of both integrons was detected by polymerase chain reaction in 100% of sows and in piglets at different stages of production: farrowing pen stage 68.1%;, weaning 60%, and growing/finishing 85.8%, showing an increase along the production system. From environmental samples 78.4% of E. coli containing any integron class was detected. We conclude that animals and farm environment can act as reservoirs for potential spread of resistant bacteria by means of mobile genetic elements as integrons, which has a major impact on production of food animals and that can reach man through the food chain, constituting a problem for public health.

  16. Avian host range of Chlamydophila spp. based on isolation, antigen detection and serology.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Taday, Eva M A

    2003-10-01

    Published reports and our own diagnostic data on the avian host range of avian Chlamydophila spp. are presented in an attempt to provide evidence for the large number of bird species that have been naturally infected with chlamydia. The term 'chlamydia-positive' is based on either isolation of the organism and antigen detection or on serological detection of circulating antibodies. The list of chlamydia-positive birds contains the six major domestic species (chicken, turkey, Pekin duck, Muscovy duck, goose, and pigeon), the three minor domestic species (Japanese quail, bobwhite quail, and peafowl) and a total of 460 free-living or pet bird species in 30 orders. The order Psittaciformes contains by far the most (153 of 342; 45%) chlamydia-positive bird species. More than 20% of all species per order are positive for chlamydia in the orders Lariformes (gulls, 26 of 92 species; 28%), Alciformes (alks, six of 23 species; 26%), Sphenisciformes (penguins, four of 16 species; 25%), and Anseriformes (ducks and geese, 33 of 157 species; 21%). Only 5% of all bird species (14 of 259 species) in the order Phasianiformes (gallinaceus birds) are chlamydia-positive. The different percentages of chlamydia-positive bird species reflect: (i) a high rate of investigations (e.g. of domestic birds) compared with infrequent testing (e.g. of Charadriiformes or Cuculiformes), (ii) frequent zoonotic implications (e.g. psittacine and columbiform birds), and (iii) an assumed high susceptibility to infection and subsequent seroconversion (e.g. waterfowl).

  17. Comparative analyses of different genetic markers for the detection of Acanthamoeba spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Hadaś, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Acanthamoeba are widespread free-living amoebae which may cause granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), keratitis, skin ulcerations and disseminated tissue infection. An important diagnostic and prognostic factor for the treatment of infection is a quick and correct diagnosis of amoebae strains. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid method for detection and identification of pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. strains from diagnostic material collected from water. In this study we analysed five amplification-based genetic markers (Aca 16S, Ac6/210, GP, JDP, Nelson) used for identification of pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. strains isolated in water sources in Poland, Iceland and Sweden. Our results demonstrated the presence of pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains in tap water. PCR assay appeared to be a more rapid and sensitive method to detect the presence of amoebae than the limited conventional techniques. Based on our observations, we can confirm that the use of four out of five genetic markers (Aca 16S, Ac 6/210, JDP, GP, Nelson) may be helpful in identification of Acanthamoeba spp. strains, but only one Aca 16S primer pair is a highly specific marker that distinguishes between pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba and other free-living amoeba families.

  18. Detection of Integrase Gene in E. coli Isolated from Pigs at Different Stages of Production System

    PubMed Central

    Colello, Rocío; Padola, Nora Lía; Etcheverría, Analía; Rodríguez, Edgardo; Amanto, Fabián; Tapia, María Ofelia; Soraci, Alejandro Luis

    2014-01-01

    Integrons are one of the genetic elements involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance. The aim of the present research is to investigate the presence of integrons in commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, isolated from pigs at different stages of production system and from the environment in an Argentinian farm. Five sows postpartum and five randomly chosen piglets from each litter were sampled by rectal swabs. They were sampled again at day 21 and at day 70. Environmental samples from the farm were also obtained. E. coli containing any integron class or combination of both integrons was detected by polymerase chain reaction in 100% of sows and in piglets at different stages of production: farrowing pen stage 68.1%;, weaning 60%, and growing/finishing 85.8%, showing an increase along the production system. From environmental samples 78.4% of E. coli containing any integron class was detected. We conclude that animals and farm environment can act as reservoirs for potential spread of resistant bacteria by means of mobile genetic elements as integrons, which has a major impact on production of food animals and that can reach man through the food chain, constituting a problem for public health. PMID:24734046

  19. Isolation and molecular detection of methylotrophic bacteria occurring in the human mouth.

    PubMed

    Anesti, Vasiliki; McDonald, Ian R; Ramaswamy, Meghna; Wade, William G; Kelly, Donovan P; Wood, Ann P

    2005-08-01

    Diverse methylotrophic bacteria were isolated from the tongue, and supra- and subgingival plaque in the mouths of volunteers and patients with periodontitis. One-carbon compounds such as dimethylsulfide in the mouth are likely to be used as growth substrates for these organisms. Methylotrophic strains of Bacillus, Brevibacterium casei, Hyphomicrobium sulfonivorans, Methylobacterium, Micrococcus luteus and Variovorax paradoxus were characterized physiologically and by their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The type strain of B. casei was shown to be methylotrophic. Enzymes of methylotrophic metabolism were characterized in some strains, and activities consistent with growth using known pathways of C1-compound metabolism demonstrated. Genomic DNA from 18 tongue and dental plaque samples from nine volunteers was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction using primers for the 16S rRNA gene of Methylobacterium and the mxaF gene of methanol dehydrogenase. MxaF was detected in all nine volunteers, and Methylobacterium was detected in seven. Methylotrophic activity is thus a feature of the oral bacterial community.

  20. Advanced x-ray systems for nondestructive inspection and contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armistead, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    High-energy X rays provide the capability for examining the interior of large, complex objects, measuring densities and dimensions, finding flaws, and detecting contraband. Although various types of X-ray imaging systems have been in use for some time, recent developments have greatly extended the envelope of capabilities. Two ARACOR X-ray vision systems will be discussed that offer new and advanced capabilities for contraband detection and nondestructive evaluation. The Eagle is a new mobile, transportable, high- efficiency X-ray imaging system designed for inspection cargo and detecting drugs, explosives and weapons at seaports, airports and border crossings. ARACOR's line of industrial computed tomography systems provide quantitative 3D X-ray images for such applications as the inspection of Minuteman and Peacekeeper solid rocket motors, the safety and security of nuclear weapons, and metrology and failure studies of automobile components and castings. Newly developed software enables the accurate reverse engineering of complex parts to form CAD descriptions and the direct input of image data into rapid prototyping systems for the production of replacement parts.

  1. Detecting method of subjects' 3D positions and experimental advanced camera control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Daiichiro; Abe, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Akio; Yamada, Mitsuho; Suzuki, Takahito; Kuwashima, Shigesumi

    1997-04-01

    Steady progress is being made in the development of an intelligent robot camera capable of automatically shooting pictures with a powerful sense of reality or tracking objects whose shooting requires advanced techniques. Currently, only experienced broadcasting cameramen can provide these pictures.TO develop an intelligent robot camera with these abilities, we need to clearly understand how a broadcasting cameraman assesses his shooting situation and how his camera is moved during shooting. We use a real- time analyzer to study a cameraman's work and his gaze movements at studios and during sports broadcasts. This time, we have developed a detecting method of subjects' 3D positions and an experimental camera control system to help us further understand the movements required for an intelligent robot camera. The features are as follows: (1) Two sensor cameras shoot a moving subject and detect colors, producing its 3D coordinates. (2) Capable of driving a camera based on camera movement data obtained by a real-time analyzer. 'Moving shoot' is the name we have given to the object position detection technology on which this system is based. We used it in a soccer game, producing computer graphics showing how players moved. These results will also be reported.

  2. Advances in mid-infrared detection and imaging: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Razeghi, Manijeh; Nguyen, Binh-Minh

    2014-08-01

    It has been over 200 years since people recognized the presence of infrared radiation, and developed methods to capture this signal. However, current material systems and technologies for infrared detections have not met the increasing demand for high performance infrared detectors/cameras, with each system having intrinsic drawbacks. Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice has been recently considered as a promising candidate for the next generation of infrared detection and imaging. Type-II superlattice is a man-made crystal structure, consisting of multiple quantum wells placed next to each other in a controlled way such that adjacent quantum wells can interact. The interaction between multiple quantum wells offers an additional degree of freedom in tailoring the material's properties. Another advantage of type-II superlattice is the experimental benefit of inheriting previous research on material synthesis and device fabrication of bulk semiconductors. It is the combination of these two unique strengths of type-II superlattice--novel physics and easy manipulation--that has enabled unprecedented progress in recent years. In this review, we will describe historical development, and current status of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice for advanced detection and imaging in the mid-infrared regime (λ = 3-5 µm).

  3. Possibilities and Challenges of Detecting Exomoons for Colonization and for Advanced Terraforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Rohan M.

    Since the dawn of time, mankind has been in search of a way to control nature and a way to reach the stars. Nowadays, with various advancements in space technology, the possibility of colonizing our solar system and beyond looks more and more plausible everyday. Naturally, the final destination would be outside the solar system for the ultimate expansion of mankind. The search for life outside of the Solar System should not be restricted to exclusively planetary bodies; large moons of Extrasolar planets may also be common habitable environments throughout the Galaxy. Extrasolar moons, or Exomoons, may be detected through transit timing effects induced onto the host planet as a result of mutual gravitational interaction. In particular, transit timing variations (TTV) and transit duration variations (TDV) are predicted to produce a unique exomoon signature, which is not only easily distinguished from other gravitational perturbations, but also provides both the period and mass of an exomoon. Using these timing effects, photometry greater or equal to that of the Kepler Mission is readily able to detect habitable-zone exomoons down to 0.2 M and could survey up to 25,000 stars for Earth-mass satellites. We discuss future possibilities for spectral retrieval of such bodies and show that transmission spectroscopy with James Webb Space Telescope should be able to detect molecular species with 30 transit events, in the best cases. Furthermore, the paper will briefly touch the possibilities and the challenges involved in reaching these destinations as well.

  4. Detection of reactive oxygen species in isolated, perfused lungs by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Norbert; Kuzkaya, Nermin; Fuchs, Beate; Tiyerili, Vedat; Schäfer, Rolf U; Schütte, Hartwig; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Schudt, Christian; Sydykov, Akylbek; Egemnazarow, Bakytbek; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    Background The sources and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intact organs are largely unresolved. This may be related to methodological problems associated with the techniques currently employed for ROS detection. Electron spin resonance (ESR) with spin trapping is a specific method for ROS detection, and may address some these technical problems. Methods We have established a protocol for the measurement of intravascular ROS release from isolated buffer-perfused and ventilated rabbit and mouse lungs, combining lung perfusion with the spin probe l-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CPH) and ESR spectroscopy. We then employed this technique to characterize hypoxia-dependent ROS release, with specific attention paid to NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide formation as a possible vasoconstrictor pathway. Results While perfusing lungs with CPH over a range of inspired oxygen concentrations (1–21 %), the rate of CP• formation exhibited an oxygen-dependence, with a minimum at 2.5 % O2. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the buffer fluid illustrated that a minor proportion of this intravascular ROS leak was attributable to superoxide. Stimulation of the lungs by injection of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) into the pulmonary artery caused a rapid increase in CP• formation, concomitant with pulmonary vasoconstriction. Both the PMA-induced CPH oxidation and the vasoconstrictor response were largely suppressed by SOD. When the PMA challenge was performed at different oxygen concentrations, maximum superoxide liberation and pulmonary vasoconstriction occurred at 5 % O2. Using a NADPH oxidase inhibitor and NADPH-oxidase deficient mice, we illustrated that the PMA-induced superoxide release was attributable to the stimulation of NADPH oxidases. Conclusion The perfusion of isolated lungs with CPH is suitable for detection of intravascular ROS release by ESR spectroscopy. We employed this technique to demonstrate that 1) PMA

  5. Characterization of macrolide efflux pump mef subclasses detected in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated between 1999 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Blackman Northwood, J; Del Grosso, M; Cossins, L R; Coley, M D; Creti, R; Pantosti, A; Farrell, D J

    2009-05-01

    The macrolide efflux mechanism of resistance, mef, was characterized in community-acquired respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pyogenes. Fifty-four (4.6%) M phenotype isolates were screen tested as negative for mef(A). Of these 54 isolates, 5 (0.4%), 27 (2.3%), and 1 (0.1%) were considered to be mef(I) positive, a novel mosaic variant of mef, or a novel subclass of mef, respectively. This study shows (i) the definitive presence of mef(E) in S. pyogenes and its global distribution, (ii) the presence of a mosaic variant of mef composed of mef(A) and mef(E), (iii) the previously undescribed presence of mef(I) in S. pyogenes, and (iv) the presence of a novel subclass of mef in S. pyogenes.

  6. Recent advances in epigenomics in NSCLC: real-time detection and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Antonello; Del Re, Marzia; Petrini, Iacopo; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Danesi, Romano

    2016-08-01

    NSCLC is an aggressive disease with one of the poorer prognosis among cancers. The disappointing response to chemotherapy drives the search for genetic biomarkers aimed at both attaining an earlier diagnosis and choosing the most appropriate chemotherapy. In this scenario, epigenomic markers, such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation and the expression of noncoding RNAs, have been demonstrated to be reliable for the stratification of NSCLC patients. Newest techniques with increased sensitivity and the isolation of nucleic acids from plasma may allow an early diagnosis and then monitoring the efficacy over time. However, prospective confirmatory studies are still lacking. This article presents an overview of the epigenetic markers evaluated in NSCLC and discusses the role of their real-time detection in the clinical management of the disease.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a new advanced glycation endproduct of dehydroascorbic acid and lysine.

    PubMed

    Argirov, Ognyan K; Lin, Bin; Olesen, Paul; Ortwerth, Beryl J

    2003-03-17

    Proteins are subject of posttranslational modification by sugars and their degradation products in vivo. The process is often referred as glycation. L-Dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), an oxidation product of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), is known as a potent glycation agent. A new product of modification of lysine epsilon -amino group by DHA was discovered as a result of the interaction between Boc-Lys and dehydroascorbic acid. The chromatographic and spectral analyses revealed that the structure of the product was 1-(5-ammonio-5-carboxypentyl)-3-oxido-4-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium. The same compound was isolated from DHA modified calf lens protein after hydrolysis and chromatographic separation. The study confirmed that L-erythrulose is an important intermediate of modification of proteins by DHA. The structure of the reported product and in vitro experiments suggested that L-erythrulose could further transform to L-threose, L-erythrose and glycolaldehyde under conditions similar to physiological. The present study revealed that the modification of epsilon -amino groups of lysine residues by DHA is a complex process and could involve a number of reactive carbonyl species.

  8. Isolated growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood and adolescence: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Webb, Emma Alice; Le Tissier, Paul; Dattani, Mehul T

    2014-06-01

    The diagnosis of GH deficiency (GHD) in childhood is a multistep process involving clinical history, examination with detailed auxology, biochemical testing, and pituitary imaging, with an increasing contribution from genetics in patients with congenital GHD. Our increasing understanding of the factors involved in the development of somatotropes and the dynamic function of the somatotrope network may explain, at least in part, the development and progression of childhood GHD in different age groups. With respect to the genetic etiology of isolated GHD (IGHD), mutations in known genes such as those encoding GH (GH1), GHRH receptor (GHRHR), or transcription factors involved in pituitary development, are identified in a relatively small percentage of patients suggesting the involvement of other, yet unidentified, factors. Genome-wide association studies point toward an increasing number of genes involved in the control of growth, but their role in the etiology of IGHD remains unknown. Despite the many years of research in the area of GHD, there are still controversies on the etiology, diagnosis, and management of IGHD in children. Recent data suggest that childhood IGHD may have a wider impact on the health and neurodevelopment of children, but it is yet unknown to what extent treatment with recombinant human GH can reverse this effect. Finally, the safety of recombinant human GH is currently the subject of much debate and research, and it is clear that long-term controlled studies are needed to clarify the consequences of childhood IGHD and the long-term safety of its treatment.

  9. Advances in Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Isolation, Characterization, and Application in Regenerative Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wankhade, Umesh D.; Shen, Michael; Kolhe, Ravindra; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a complex, multifactorial disease that has been extensively researched in recent times. Obesity is characterized by excess deposition of adipose tissue in response to surplus energy. Despite the negative connotations of adipose tissue (AT), it serves as a critical endocrine organ. Adipose tissue is a source of several adipokines and cytokines which have been deemed important for both normal metabolic function and disease formation. The discoveries of metabolically active brown AT in adult humans and adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSC) have been key findings in the past decade with potential therapeutic implications. ADSCs represent an enticing pool of multipotent adult stem cells because of their noncontroversial nature, relative abundance, ease of isolation, and expandability. A decade and a half since the discovery of ADSCs, the scientific community is still working to uncover their therapeutic potential in a wide range of diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent developments in the field of ADSCs and examine their potential use in transplantation and cell-based therapies for the regeneration of diseased organs and systems. We also hope to provide perspective on how to best utilize this readily available, powerful pool of stem cells in the future. PMID:26981130

  10. Fault detection and isolation of PEM fuel cell system based on nonlinear analytical redundancy. An application via parity space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitouche, A.; Yang, Q.; Ould Bouamama, B.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a procedure dealing with the issue of fault detection and isolation (FDI) using nonlinear analytical redundancy (NLAR) technique applied in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on its mathematic model. The model is proposed and simplified into a five orders state space representation. The transient phenomena captured in the model include the compressor dynamics, the flow characteristics, mass and energy conservation and manifold fluidic mechanics. Nonlinear analytical residuals are generated based on the elimination of the unknown variables of the system by an extended parity space approach to detect and isolate actuator and sensor faults. Finally, numerical simulation results are given corresponding to a faults signature matrix.

  11. A decentralized fault detection and isolation scheme for spacecraft: bridging the gap between model-based fault detection and isolation research and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indra, S.; Travé-Massuyès, L.; Chanthery, E.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a decentralized fault diagnosis and isolation (FDI) architecture for spacecraft and applies it to the attitude determination and control system (ADCS) of a satellite. A system is decomposed into functional subsystems. The architecture is composed of local diagnosers for subsystems which work with local models. Fault ambiguities due to interactions between subsystems are resolved at a higher level by a supervisor, which combines the partial view of the local diagnosers and performs isolation on request. The architecture is hierarchically scalable. The structure of the ADCS is modeled as constraints and variables and used to demonstrate the decentralized architecture.

  12. Detection and Genetic Environment of Pleuromutilin-Lincosamide-Streptogramin A Resistance Genes in Staphylococci Isolated from Pets

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Wang, Huiwen; Liao, Yifei; Li, Jun; Feßler, Andrea T.; Michael, Geovana B.; Schwarz, Stefan; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Increasing emergence of staphylococci resistant to pleuromutilins, lincosamides, and streptogramin A (PLSA) and isolated from humans and pets is a growing public health concern worldwide. Currently, there was only one published study regarding one of the PLSA genes, vga(A) detected in staphylococci isolated from cat. In this study, eleven pleuromutilin-resistant staphylococci from pets and two from their owners were isolated and further characterized for their antimicrobial susceptibilities, plasmid profiles, genotypes, and genetic context of the PLSA resistance genes. The gene sal(A) identified in 11 staphylococcal isolates was found for the first time in Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus xylosus. Moreover, these 11 isolates shared the identical regions flanking the sal(A) gene located in the chromosomal DNA. Two S. haemolyticus isolates from a cat and its owner carried similar vga(A)LC plasmids and displayed indistinguishable PFGE patterns. A novel chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic island (MDRGI) containing 13 resistance genes, including lsa(E), was firstly identified in S. epidermidis. In addition, vga(A)LC, sal(A), and lsa(E) were for the first time identified in staphylococcal isolates originating from pet animals. The plasmids, chromosomal DNA region, and MDRGI associated with the PLSA resistance genes vga(A), vga(A)LC, sal(A), and lsa(E) are present in staphylococci isolated from pets and humans and present significant challenges for the clinical management of infections by limiting therapeutic options. PMID:28261187

  13. Satellite Detection in Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borncamp, D.; Lim, Pey Lian

    2016-01-01

    This document explains the process by which satellite trails can be found within individual chips of an Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) image. Since satellites are transient and sporadic events, we used the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) dataset which is manually checked for satellite trails has been used as a truth set to verify that the method in this document does a complete job without a high false positive rate. This document also details the process of producing a mask that will update data quality information to inform users where the trail traverses the image and properly account for the affected pixels. Along with this document, the Python source code used to detect and mask satellite trails will be released to users with as a stand-alone product within the STSDAS acstools package.

  14. Recent advances in chemical imaging technology for the detection of contaminants for food safety and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Olkhovyk, Oksana; Drauch, Amy; Treado, Patrick; Kim, Moon; Chao, Kaunglin

    2009-05-01

    The need for routine, non-destructive chemical screening of agricultural products is increasing due to the health hazards to animals and humans associated with intentional and unintentional contamination of foods. Melamine, an industrial additive used to increase flame retardation in the resin industry, has recently been used to increase the apparent protein content of animal feed, of infant formula, as well as powdered and liquid milk in the dairy industry. Such contaminants, even at regulated levels, pose serious health risks. Chemical imaging technology provides the ability to evaluate large volumes of agricultural products before reaching the consumer. In this presentation, recent advances in chemical imaging technology that exploit Raman, fluorescence and near-infrared (NIR) are presented for the detection of contaminants in agricultural products.

  15. Advances in Resistive Pulse Sensors: Devices bridging the void between molecular and microscopic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Darby; Anderson, Will; Vogel, Robert; Trau, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Since the first reported use of a biological ion channel to detect differences in single stranded genomic base pairs in 1996, a renaissance in nanoscale resistive pulse sensors has ensued. This resurgence of a technique originally outlined and commercialized over fifty years ago has largely been driven by advances in nanoscaled fabrication, and ultimately, the prospect of a rapid and inexpensive means for genomic sequencing as well as other macromolecular characterization. In this pursuit, the potential application of these devices to characterize additional properties such as the size, shape, charge, and concentration of nanoscaled materials (10 – 900 nm) has been largely overlooked. Advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology are driving the need for simple yet sensitive individual object readout devices such as resistive pulse sensors. This review will examine the recent progress in pore-based sensing in the nanoscale range. A detailed analysis of three new types of pore sensors – in-series, parallel, and size-tunable pores – has been included. These pores offer improved measurement sensitivity over a wider particle size range. The fundamental physical chemistry of these techniques, which is still evolving, will be reviewed. PMID:22034585

  16. Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Poggio, M; Degen, C L

    2010-08-27

    We review recent efforts to detect small numbers of nuclear spins using magnetic resonance force microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that relies on the mechanical measurement of the weak magnetic force between a microscopic magnet and the magnetic moments in a sample. Spurred by the recent progress in fabricating ultrasensitive force detectors, MRFM has rapidly improved its capability over the last decade. Today it boasts a spin sensitivity that surpasses conventional, inductive nuclear magnetic resonance detectors by about eight orders of magnitude. In this review we touch on the origins of this technique and focus on its recent application to nanoscale nuclear spin ensembles, in particular on the imaging of nanoscale objects with a three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We consider the experimental advances driving this work and highlight the underlying physical principles and limitations of the method. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be met in order to advance the technique towards single nuclear spin sensitivity-and perhaps-to 3D microscopy of molecules with atomic resolution.

  17. Critical insights for advanced bridge scour detection using the natural frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ting; Andrew Swartz, R.; Vitton, Stanley; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Scour around bridge foundations is regarded as one of the predominant causes of bridge failures. The concept of vibration-based real-time bridge scour detection has been explored in recent years by investigating the change in the natural frequency spectrum of a bridge or a bridge component with respect to the scour depth. Despite the progress, significant issues still remain unsolved in the application of this concept. This paper investigates three unsolved issues in the current framework of scour detection using the natural frequency spectrum: the physical meaning of the measured predominant natural frequency, the location of sensor installation, and the influence of the shape of scour holes, which are easily neglected but critical to the further implementations of the natural frequency spectrum-based bridge scour detection. Firstly, in-depth discussions of these three major issues were made separately by numerically modeling the scour progression of a typical and documented laboratory test. Laboratory tests were then performed to validate the conclusions made in the discussions. It was found that for an eigenproblem of the system with soil-structure interaction, the physical meaning of the natural frequency obtained from modal analysis can be understood by comparing the modal natural frequency with the natural frequency calculated from the dynamic response of the test component in that system. The results also verified that the obtained predominant natural frequency of the pier body greatly varies with the location of the pier body where a sensor is mounted for signal pickup. The shape of the scour hole affects the predominant natural frequency of the pier, causing difficulties in practical measurements. To address such a problem, a new criterion was proposed to identify the depth of unsymmetrical scour holes for the first time, which is of practical significance to advance the natural frequency spectrum-based scour detection framework.

  18. Detection of virulence-associated genes in pathogenic and commensal avian Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Paixão, A C; Ferreira, A C; Fontes, M; Themudo, P; Albuquerque, T; Soares, M C; Fevereiro, M; Martins, L; Corrêa de Sá, M I

    2016-07-01

    Poultry colibacillosis due to Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is responsible for several extra-intestinal pathological conditions, leading to serious economic damage in poultry production. The most commonly associated pathologies are airsacculitis, colisepticemia, and cellulitis in broiler chickens, and salpingitis and peritonitis in broiler breeders. In this work a total of 66 strains isolated from dead broiler breeders affected with colibacillosis and 61 strains from healthy broilers were studied. Strains from broiler breeders were typified with serogroups O2, O18, and O78, which are mainly associated with disease. The serogroup O78 was the most prevalent (58%). All the strains were checked for the presence of 11 virulence genes: 1) arginine succinyltransferase A (astA); ii) E.coli hemeutilization protein A (chuA); iii) colicin V A/B (cvaA/B); iv) fimbriae mannose-binding type 1 (fimC); v) ferric yersiniabactin uptake A (fyuA); vi) iron-repressible high-molecular-weight proteins 2 (irp2); vii) increased serum survival (iss); viii) iron-uptake systems of E.coli D (iucD); ix) pielonefritis associated to pili C (papC); x) temperature sensitive haemaglutinin (tsh), and xi) vacuolating autotransporter toxin (vat), by Multiplex-PCR. The results showed that all genes are present in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. The iron uptake-related genes and the serum survival gene were more prevalent among APEC. The adhesin genes, except tsh, and the toxin genes, except astA, were also more prevalent among APEC isolates. Except for astA and tsh, APEC strains harbored the majority of the virulence-associated genes studied and fimC was the most prevalent gene, detected in 96.97 and 88.52% of APEC and AFEC strains, respectively. Possession of more than one iron transport system seems to play an important role on APEC survival.

  19. Detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tzelepi, E; Giakkoupi, P; Sofianou, D; Loukova, V; Kemeroglou, A; Tsakris, A

    2000-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in a consecutive collection of clinical isolates of Enterobacter spp. The abilities of various screening methods to detect ESBLs in enterobacters were simultaneously tested. Among the 68 consecutive isolates (56 Enterobacter cloacae and 12 Enterobacter aerogenes isolates) that were analyzed for beta-lactamase content, 21 (25 and 58%, respectively) possessed transferable ESBLs with pIs of 8.2 and phenotypic characteristics of SHV-type enzymes, 8 (14.3%) of the E. cloacae isolates produced a previously nondescribed, clavulanate-susceptible ESBL that exhibited a pI of 6.9 and that conferred a ceftazidime resistance phenotype on Escherichia coli transconjugants, and 2 E. cloacae isolates produced both of these enzymes. Among the total of 31 isolates that were considered ESBL producers, the Vitek ESBL detection test was positive for 2 (6.5%) strains, and the conventional double-disk synergy test (DDST) with amoxicillin-clavulanate and with expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and aztreonam was positive for 5 (16%) strains. Modifications of the DDST consisting of closer application of the disks (at 20 instead of 30 mm), the use of cefepime, and the use of both modifications increased the sensitivity of this test to 71, 61, and 90%, respectively. Of the 37 isolates for which isoelectric focusing failed to determine ESBLs, the Vitek test was false positive for 1 isolate and the various forms of DDSTs were false-positive for 3 isolates.

  20. Low Utility of Pediatric Isolator Blood Culture System for Detection of Fungemia in Children: a 10-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Campigotto, Aaron; Sebert, Michael; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Chakravarty, Aparna; Doern, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of the Wampole Isolator 1.5-ml pediatric blood culture tube for the detection of fungemia in children was assessed by a 10-year retrospective review at two pediatric hospitals, The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada, and the Children's Medical Center of Dallas, Texas. Over this period, a total of 9,442 pediatric Isolator specimens were processed, with yeast or yeast-like organisms recovered in 297 (3.1%) of the specimens (151 [1.6%] unique clinical episodes) and filamentous or dimorphic fungi recovered in 31 (0.3%) of the specimens (25 unique clinical episodes). Only 18 of the 151 clinical episodes of fungemia attributable to yeast were not detected by automated blood culture systems. The majority of isolated yeast were Candida spp., which were usually detected by automated systems, whereas the most common non-Candida yeast was Malassezia furfur, which the automated system failed to detect. Filamentous or dimorphic fungi were detected in 25 episodes, of which only 9 (36%) episodes were deemed clinically significant after chart review, indicating that in the majority of cases (16/25, 64%) fungal isolation represented contamination. In five of the nine clinically significant episodes, the isolated fungus (Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis/posadasii, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus spp., and Bipolaris spp.) was also identified in other clinical specimens. Over the 10-year study period, the use of the pediatric Isolator system, at the discretion of the treating physician, only rarely provided useful clinical information for the diagnosis of fungemia in children, with the exception of M. furfur and possibly endemic mycoses. PMID:27307462

  1. Detection of toxins A/B and isolation of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from dogs in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Santos, Renata Lara Resende; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Pereira, Luiz Carlos; Pereira, Silvia Trindade; Duarte, Marina Carvalho; de Assis, Ronnie Antunes; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect C. difficile A/B toxins and to isolate strains of C. perfringens and C. difficile from diarrheic and non-diarrheic dogs in Brazil. Stool samples were collected from 57 dogs, 35 of which were apparently healthy, and 22 of which were diarrheic. C. difficile A/B toxins were detected by ELISA, and C. perfringens and C. difficile were identified by multiplex PCR. C. difficile A/B toxins were detected in 21 samples (36.8%). Of these, 16 (76.2%) were from diarrheic dogs, and five (23.8%) were from non-diarrheic dogs. Twelve C. difficile strains (21.1%) were isolated, of which ten were A+B+ and two were A−B−. All non-toxigenic strains were isolated from non-diarrheic animals. The binary toxin gene cdtB was found in one strain, which was A+B+ and was derived from a non-diarrheic dog. C. perfringens strains were isolated from 40 samples (70.2%). Of these, 18 (45%) were from the diarrheic group, and 22 (55%) belonged to the non-diarrheic group. All isolates were classified as C. perfringens type A and there was an association between the detection of the cpe gene and the presence of diarrhea. Interestingly, ten strains (25%) were positive for the presence of the cpb2 gene. The high rate of detection of the A/B toxins in non-diarrheic dogs suggests the occurrence of subclinical disease in dogs or carriage of its toxins without disease. More studies are needed to elucidate the epidemiology of C. difficile and C. perfringens in dogs and to better our understanding of C. difficile as a zoonotic agent. This is the first study to report the binary toxin gene in C. difficile strains isolated from dogs in Brazil. PMID:24159295

  2. Lessons Learned on Implementing Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) in a Ground Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob A.; Lewis, Mark E.; Perotti, Jose M.; Brown, Barbara L.; Oostdyk, Rebecca L.; Goetz, Jesse W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper's main purpose is to detail issues and lessons learned regarding designing, integrating, and implementing Fault Detection Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) for Constellation Exploration Program (CxP) Ground Operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Part of the0 overall implementation of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) CxP, FDIR is being implemented in three main components of the program (Ares, Orion, and Ground Operations/Processing). While not initially part of the design baseline for the CxP Ground Operations, NASA felt that FDIR is important enough to develop, that NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate's (ESMD's) Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) initiated a task for it under their Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) research area. This task, referred to as the FDIIR project, is a multi-year multi-center effort. The primary purpose of the FDIR project is to develop a prototype and pathway upon which Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) may be transitioned into the Ground Operations baseline. Currently, Qualtech Systems Inc (QSI) Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) software products Testability Engineering and Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer and TEAMS RDS/RT are being utilized in the implementation of FDI within the FDIR project. The TEAMS Designer COTS software product is being utilized to model the system with Functional Fault Models (FFMs). A limited set of systems in Ground Operations are being modeled by the FDIR project, and the entire Ares Launch Vehicle is being modeled under the Functional Fault Analysis (FFA) project at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Integration of the Ares FFMs and the Ground Processing FFMs is being done under the FDIR project also utilizing the TEAMS Designer COTS software product. One of the most significant challenges related to integration is to ensure that FFMs developed by different organizations can be integrated easily and without errors. Software Interface

  3. Detection of the glmM Gene in Helicobacter pylori Isolates with a Novel Primer by PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Córdova Espinoza, Maria Guadalupe; González Vazquez, Rosa; Morales Mendez, Iyari; Ruelas Vargas, Consuelo; Giono Cerezo, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    A novel reverse primer (GLM MR1) was designed for detection of the glmM gene in Helicobacter pylori by PCR. The percentage of amplification in clinical isolates using GLM MR1 was 100% for detection of the glmM gene and 86.36% for the ureA gene. The primer designed is useful for the identification of H. pylori. PMID:21289140

  4. Phenotypic Detection of Metallo-Beta-Lactamases in Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Pediatric Patients in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muneeza; Ejaz, Hassan; Zafar, Aizza; Hamid, Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant A. baumannii has emerged as an important and problematic human pathogen as it is the causative agent of several types of infections especially in neonates and immunocompromised patients because they have least capacity to fight against infections. Carbapenems are used as last resort antibiotics for treating these infections but currently resistance against carbapenems due to MBL production is on the rise. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii and also to compare the efficacy of combined disk test and double disk synergy test for detection of metallo-beta-lactamases. A total of 112 A. baumannii were identified from various clinical samples and antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by Kirby-Bauer Disk Diffusion method. Out of 112, 66 (58.9%) isolates were resistant to both imipenem and meropenem (OXOID). These resistant isolates were tested for carbapenemase production, and 55 (83.3%) were carbapenemase producers by Modified Hodge Test. These isolates were further tested for MBL production by combined disk test and double disk synergy test. Out of 66, 49 isolates were positive by both methods, CDT and DDST, and only one isolate was detected as negative (with kappa value = 0.038). All MBL producing strains showed remarkable resistance to cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and piperacillin/tazobactam (OXOID). The antibiotic resistance was very high in A. baumannii which were isolated from children in Pakistan specially attending a nephrology unit.

  5. Evaluation of crystal violet decolorization assay for minimal inhibitory concentration detection of primary antituberculosis drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates*

    PubMed Central

    Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Akbal, Ahmet Ugur; Uzun, Meltem; Cayci, Yeliz Tanriverdi; Birinci, Asuman; Durupinar, Belma

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the crystal violet decolorization assay (CVDA) for detection of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antituberculosis drugs. 53 isolates were tested in this study and 13 of them were multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates. The antibiotics concentrations were 2-0.06 mg/L for isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) and were 16-0.25 mg/L for streptomycin (STM) and ethambutol (EMB). Crystal violet (CV-25 mg/L) was added into the microwells on the seventh day of incubation and incubation was continued until decolorization. Decolorization of CV was the predictor of bacterial growth. Overall agreements for four drugs were detected as 98.1%, and the average time was detected as 9.5 ± 0.89 day after inoculation. One isolate for INH and two isolates for STM were determined resistant in the reference method, but susceptible by the CVDA. One isolate was susceptible to EMB by the reference method, but resistant by the CVDA. All results were concordant for RIF. This study shows that CVDA is a rapid, reliable and suitable for determination of MIC values of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. And it can be used easily especially in countries with limited-sources. PMID:27304025

  6. Flow-through immunomagnetic separation system for waterborne pathogen isolation and detection: application to Giardia and Cryptosporidium cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Qasem; Christophe, Lay; Teo, William; Li, ShuJun; Feng, Han Hua

    2010-07-12

    Simultaneous sample washing and concentration of two waterborne pathogen samples were demonstrated using a rotational magnetic system under continuous flow conditions. The rotation of periodically arranged small permanent magnets close to a fluidic channel carrying magnetic particle suspension allows the trapping and release of particles along the fluidic channel in a periodic manner. Each trapping and release event resembles one washing cycle. The performance of the magnetic separation system (MSS) was evaluated in order to test its functionality to isolate magnetic-labelled protozoan cells from filtered, concentrated tap water, secondary effluent water, and purified water. Experimental protocols described in US Environmental Protection Agency method 1623 which rely on the use of a magnetic particle concentrator, were applied to test and compare our continuous flow cell separation system to the standard magnetic bead-based isolation instruments. The recovery efficiencies for Giardia cysts using the magnetic tube holder and our magnetic separation system were 90.5% and 90.1%, respectively, from a tap water matrix and about 31% and 18.5%, respectively, from a spiked secondary effluent matrix. The recovery efficiencies for Cryptosporidium cells using the magnetic tube holder and our magnetic separation system were 90% and 83.3%, respectively, from a tap water matrix and about 38% and 36%, respectively, from a spiked secondary effluent matrix. Recoveries from all matrices with the continuous flow system were typically higher in glass tubing conduits than in molded plastic conduits.

  7. Detection of blaPER-1 & blaOxa10 among imipenem resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Shiraz Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Amir; Bazargani, Abdollah; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important Gram negative opportunistic bacteria which causes infection among burn patients. Resistance to the antibiotics in this group of bacteria is increased due to the activity of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) genes. In the current study, we investigated the prevalence of two genes (blaPER-1 & blaOxa10) related β-lactamase genes among imipenem resistance clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: From May 2010 to March 2011, 270 P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized burned patients’ wounds in Shiraz Burn Hospital, were tested for Imipenem resistance by disk diffusion method. Presence of ESBLs exo-enzyme, blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes were also evaluated in the resistant isolate. Results: 210 (77.7%) of 270 P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to imipenem. blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 were detected among 168 (80.0%) of imipenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 160 (76.2%) of them had blaOxa10 gene and 84 (40.0%) of them had blaPER-1 while 63 (30.0%) resistant isolates contained both genes simultaneously. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes in hospitalized burn patients in south west of Iran. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to perform such tests routinely to evaluate the resistance pattern in order to better antibiotic selection in the burned patients. PMID:26644867

  8. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012. PMID:26347393

  9. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Peter R; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-07-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  10. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  11. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter; Frazin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012

  12. The Evolution of Advanced Molecular Diagnostics for the Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advancements in the methods used for detecting and characterizing Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common cause of respiratory illness and community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The repertoire of available molecular diagnostics has greatly expanded from nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAATs) that encompass a variety of chemistries used for detection, to more sophisticated characterizing methods such as multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), single nucleotide polymorphism typing, and numerous macrolide susceptibility profiling methods, among others. These many molecular-based approaches have been developed and employed to continually increase the level of discrimination and characterization in order to better understand the epidemiology and biology of M. pneumoniae. This review will summarize recent molecular techniques and procedures and lend perspective to how each has enhanced the current understanding of this organism and will emphasize how Next Generation Sequencing may serve as a resource for researchers to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the genomic complexities of this insidious pathogen.

  13. On advanced estimation techniques for exoplanet detection and characterization using ground-based coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-07-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  14. Development of an advanced digital detection system for multidrug resistant tuberculosis screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkulet, Michelle D.; Beckstead, Jeffrey A.; Gilman, Brian C.; Bardarov, Savco; Castracane, James; Jacobs, William R., Jr.

    2000-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease and the threat is becoming more critical with the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Existing methods for detection of various strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis are complex, time consuming and expensive, and therefore, not suitable for use in developing countries where the spread of the disease is most rampant. Currently, a digital detection system based on advanced digital imaging technology, including CMOS and image intensification technology, is being developed by InterScience, Inc. for use with the luciferase reporter mycobacteriophages technique as developed at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. This compact, low cost and high sensitivity system for rapid diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing for TB will have an immediate impact for both research and clinical applications. It is envisioned that the instrument will be suitable for use as a portable tool for rapid screening of MDR-TB in both developed and developing countries. The development of the system, recent results and a comparison to competing technologies will be presented.

  15. Pilot Investigation into the Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Detection Device (R.A.P.I.D.) for Dengue Detection in East Timor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    were modified for real - time PCR using a LightCycler. Two reporter fluorochromes, the double stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I, and 6-hydroxy...fluorescein conjugated to TaqMan DNA probes, were employed to detect positive reactions. Following optimisation of the assays for real - time PCR , portable... real - time PCR equipment, the Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Detection Device (R.A.P.I.D.(trademark)), was deployed to East Timor and a field trial was

  16. A prototype hail detection algorithm and hail climatology developed with the advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Ralph; Beauchamp, James; Cecil, Daniel; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2015-09-01

    In previous studies published in the open literature, a strong relationship between the occurrence of hail and the microwave brightness temperatures (primarily at 37 and 85 GHz) was documented. These studies were performed with the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and most recently, the Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) sensor. This led to climatologies of hail frequency from TMI and AMSR-E, however, limitations included geographical domain of the TMI sensor (35 S to 35 N) and the overpass time of the Aqua satellite (130 am/pm local time), both of which reduce an accurate mapping of hail events over the global domain and the full diurnal cycle. Nonetheless, these studies presented exciting, new applications for passive microwave sensors. NOAA and EUMETSAT have been operating the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A and -B) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on several operational satellites since 1998: NOAA-15 through NOAA-19; MetOp-A and -B. With multiple satellites in operation since 2000, the AMSU/MHS sensors provide near global coverage every 4 h, thus, offering a much larger time and temporal sampling than TRMM or AMSR-E. With similar observation frequencies near 30 and 85 GHz, one at 157 GHz, and additionally three at the 183 GHz water vapor band, the potential to detect strong convection associated with severe storms on a more comprehensive time and space scale exists. In this study, we develop a prototype AMSU-based hail detection algorithm through the use of collocated satellite and surface hail reports over the continental US for a 10-year period (2000-2009). Compared with the surface observations, the algorithm detects approximately 40% of hail occurrences. The simple threshold algorithm is then used to generate a hail climatology based on all available AMSU observations during 2000-2011 that is stratified in several ways

  17. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Sheng; Xu, Yong-Hui; Yang, Jing-Li; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Shou-da; Wang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The traditional gas sensor array has been viewed as a simple apparatus for information acquisition in chemosensory systems. Gas sensor arrays frequently undergo impairments in the form of sensor failures that cause significant deterioration of the performance of previously trained pattern recognition models. Reliability monitoring of gas sensor arrays is a challenging and critical issue in the chemosensory system. Because of its importance, we design and implement a status self-validating gas sensor array prototype to enhance the reliability of its measurements. A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy is presented in this paper. The principal component analysis-based multivariate statistical process monitoring model can effectively perform fault detection by using the squared prediction error statistic and can locate the faulty sensor in the gas sensor array by using the variables contribution plot. The signal features of gas sensor arrays for different fault modes are extracted by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) coupled with sample entropy (SampEn). The EEMD is applied to adaptively decompose the original gas sensor signals into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The SampEn values of each IMF and the residual are calculated to reveal the multi-scale intrinsic characteristics of the faulty sensor signals. Sparse representation-based classification is introduced to identify the sensor fault type for the purpose of diagnosing deterioration in the gas sensor array. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other different diagnostic approaches, and it is fully evaluated in a real status self-validating gas sensor array experimental system. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

  18. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of status self-validating gas sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-sheng; Xu, Yong-hui; Yang, Jing-li; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Shou-da; Wang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The traditional gas sensor array has been viewed as a simple apparatus for information acquisition in chemosensory systems. Gas sensor arrays frequently undergo impairments in the form of sensor failures that cause significant deterioration of the performance of previously trained pattern recognition models. Reliability monitoring of gas sensor arrays is a challenging and critical issue in the chemosensory system. Because of its importance, we design and implement a status self-validating gas sensor array prototype to enhance the reliability of its measurements. A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy is presented in this paper. The principal component analysis-based multivariate statistical process monitoring model can effectively perform fault detection by using the squared prediction error statistic and can locate the faulty sensor in the gas sensor array by using the variables contribution plot. The signal features of gas sensor arrays for different fault modes are extracted by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) coupled with sample entropy (SampEn). The EEMD is applied to adaptively decompose the original gas sensor signals into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The SampEn values of each IMF and the residual are calculated to reveal the multi-scale intrinsic characteristics of the faulty sensor signals. Sparse representation-based classification is introduced to identify the sensor fault type for the purpose of diagnosing deterioration in the gas sensor array. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other different diagnostic approaches, and it is fully evaluated in a real status self-validating gas sensor array experimental system. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

  19. Advanced biosensors for detection of pathogens related to livestock and poultry.

    PubMed

    Vidic, Jasmina; Manzano, Marisa; Chang, Chung-Ming; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2017-02-21

    Infectious animal diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses threaten the health and well-being of wildlife, livestock, and human populations, limit productivity and increase significantly economic losses to each sector. The pathogen detection is an important step for the diagnostics, successful treatment of animal infection diseases and control management in farms and field conditions. Current techniques employed to diagnose pathogens in livestock and poultry include classical plate-based methods and conventional biochemical methods as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). These methods are time-consuming and frequently incapable to distinguish between low and highly pathogenic strains. Molecular techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real time PCR (RT-PCR) have also been proposed to be used to diagnose and identify relevant infectious disease in animals. However these DNA-based methodologies need isolated genetic materials and sophisticated instruments, being not suitable for in field analysis. Consequently, there is strong interest for developing new swift point-of-care biosensing systems for early detection of animal diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. In this review, we provide an overview of the innovative biosensing systems that can be applied for livestock pathogen detection. Different sensing strategies based on DNA receptors, glycan, aptamers and antibodies are presented. Besides devices still at development level some are validated according to standards of the World Organization for Animal Health and are commercially available. Especially, paper-based platforms proposed as an affordable, rapid and easy to perform sensing systems for implementation in field condition are included in this review.

  20. Isolation of Clostridium difficile and molecular detection of binary and A/B toxins in faeces of dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ghavidel, M.; Salari Sedigh, H.; Razmyar, J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate Clostridium difficile from dogs’ faeces, and to study the frequency of its virulence genes. A total of 151 samples of dogs’ faeces were collected. The isolation of C. difficile was performed by using the bacterial culture methods followed by DNA extraction using boiling method. Multiplex PCR method was performed for identification of tcdA, tcdB, cdtA and cdtB genes and single method was carried out for detection of tcdC. Twelve samples (7.9%) were positive in bacteriological assay and based on molecular assay, 66.7% of the isolates (8 of 12 C. difficile isolated) had shown tcdA+, tcdB+ profile. This is the first investigation on molecular assay of C. difficile in Iran’s dog population. PMID:28224013

  1. Assessment of the Citrus tristeza virus isolates detected in spring 2007 at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center, Exeter, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus was detected in at least 50 trees at the 71 ha Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) near Exeter, Calif. in spring 2007. The purpose of this research was to assess genetic diversity and aphid transmissibility of these isolates. Nine representative trees were sampled o...

  2. Nanostructure embedded microchips for detection, isolation, and characterization of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Millicent; Chen, Jie-Fu; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Zhang, Yang; Song, Jinzhao; Hou, Shuang; Ke, Zunfu; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2014-10-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that break away from either a primary tumor or a metastatic site and circulate in the peripheral blood as the cellular origin of metastasis. With their role as a "tumor liquid biopsy", CTCs provide convenient access to all disease sites, including that of the primary tumor and the site of fatal metastases. It is conceivable that detecting and analyzing CTCs will provide insightful information in assessing the disease status without the flaws and limitations encountered in performing conventional tumor biopsies. However, identifying CTCs in patient blood samples is technically challenging due to the extremely low abundance of CTCs among a large number of hematologic cells. To address this unmet need, there have been significant research endeavors, especially in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and bioengineering, devoted to developing CTC detection, isolation, and characterization technologies. Inspired by the nanoscale interactions observed in the tissue microenvironment, our research team at UCLA pioneered a unique concept of "NanoVelcro" cell-affinity substrates, in which CTC capture agent-coated nanostructured substrates were utilized to immobilize CTCs with high efficiency. The working mechanism of NanoVelcro cell-affinity substrates mimics that of Velcro: when the two fabric strips of a Velcro fastener are pressed together, tangling between the hairy surfaces on two strips leads to strong binding. Through continuous evolution, three generations (gens) of NanoVelcro CTC chips have been established to achieve different clinical utilities. The first-gen NanoVelcro chip, composed of a silicon nanowire substrate (SiNS) and an overlaid microfluidic chaotic mixer, was created for CTC enumeration. Side-by-side analytical validation studies using clinical blood samples suggested that the sensitivity of first-gen NanoVelcro chip outperforms that of FDA-approved CellSearch. In conjunction with the use of the

  3. Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns and Detection of Virulence Genes in Campylobacter Isolates in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Di Serafino, Gabriella; Zilli, Katiuscia; Alessiani, Alessandra; Sacchini, Lorena; Garofolo, Giuliano; Aprea, Giuseppe; Marotta, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter has developed resistance to several antimicrobial agents over the years, including macrolides, quinolones and fluoroquinolones, becoming a significant public health hazard. A total of 145 strains derived from raw milk, chicken faeces, chicken carcasses, cattle faeces and human faeces collected from various Italian regions, were screened for antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characterization (SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) and detection of virulence genes (sequencing and DNA microarray analysis). The prevalence of C. jejuni and C. coli was 62.75% and 37.24% respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility revealed a high level of resistance for ciprofloxacin (62.76%), tetracycline (55.86%) and nalidixic acid (55.17%). Genotyping of Campylobacter isolates using PFGE revealed a total of 86 unique SmaI patterns. Virulence gene profiles were determined using a new microbial diagnostic microarray composed of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes targeting genes implicated in Campylobacter pathogenicity. Correspondence between PFGE and microarray clusters was observed. Comparisons of PFGE and virulence profiles reflected the high genetic diversity of the strains examined, leading us to speculate different degrees of pathogenicity inside Campylobacter populations. PMID:24556669

  4. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance patterns and detection of virulence genes in Campylobacter isolates in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Di Serafino, Gabriella; Zilli, Katiuscia; Alessiani, Alessandra; Sacchini, Lorena; Garofolo, Giuliano; Aprea, Giuseppe; Marotta, Francesca

    2014-02-19

    Campylobacter has developed resistance to several antimicrobial agents over the years, including macrolides, quinolones and fluoroquinolones, becoming a significant public health hazard. A total of 145 strains derived from raw milk, chicken faeces, chicken carcasses, cattle faeces and human faeces collected from various Italian regions, were screened for antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characterization (SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) and detection of virulence genes (sequencing and DNA microarray analysis). The prevalence of C. jejuni and C. coli was 62.75% and 37.24% respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility revealed a high level of resistance for ciprofloxacin (62.76%), tetracycline (55.86%) and nalidixic acid (55.17%). Genotyping of Campylobacter isolates using PFGE revealed a total of 86 unique SmaI patterns. Virulence gene profiles were determined using a new microbial diagnostic microarray composed of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes targeting genes implicated in Campylobacter pathogenicity. Correspondence between PFGE and microarray clusters was observed. Comparisons of PFGE and virulence profiles reflected the high genetic diversity of the strains examined, leading us to speculate different degrees of pathogenicity inside Campylobacter populations.

  5. Motion-Based System Identification and Fault Detection and Isolation Technologies for Thruster Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Sutter, David W.; Berkovitz, Dustin; Betts, Bradley J.; Kong, Edmund; delMundo, Rommel; Lages, Christopher R.; Mah, Robert W.; Papasin, Richard

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the motions of a thruster-controlled spacecraft, it is possible to provide on-line (1) thruster fault detection and isolation (FDI), and (2) vehicle mass- and thruster-property identification (ID). Technologies developed recently at NASA Ames have significantly improved the speed and accuracy of these ID and FDI capabilities, making them feasible for application to a broad class of spacecraft. Since these technologies use existing sensors, the improved system robustness and performance that comes with the thruster fault tolerance and system ID can be achieved through a software-only implementation. This contrasts with the added cost, mass, and hardware complexity commonly required by FDI. Originally developed in partnership with NASA - Johnson Space Center to provide thruster FDI capability for the X-38 during re-entry, these technologies are most recently being applied to the MIT SPHERES experimental spacecraft to fly on the International Space Station in 2004. The model-based FDI uses a maximum-likelihood calculation at its core, while the ID is based upon recursive least squares estimation. Flight test results from the SPHERES implementation, as flown aboard the NASA KC-1 35A 0-g simulator aircraft in November 2003 are presented.

  6. Functional Fault Modeling of a Cryogenic System for Real-Time Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Perotti, Jose

    2009-01-01

    When setting out to model and/or simulate a complex mechanical or electrical system, a modeler is faced with a vast array of tools, software, equations, algorithms and techniques that may individually or in concert aid in the development of the model. Mature requirements and a well understood purpose for the model may considerably shrink the field of possible tools and algorithms that will suit the modeling solution. Is the model intended to be used in an offline fashion or in real-time? On what platform does it need to execute? How long will the model be allowed to run before it outputs the desired parameters? What resolution is desired? Do the parameters need to be qualitative or quantitative? Is it more important to capture the physics or the function of the system in the model? Does the model need to produce simulated data? All these questions and more will drive the selection of the appropriate tools and algorithms, but the modeler must be diligent to bear in mind the final application throughout the modeling process to ensure the model meets its requirements without needless iterations of the design. The purpose of this paper is to describe the considerations and techniques used in the process of creating a functional fault model of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) system that will be used in a real-time environment to automatically detect and isolate failures.

  7. Residual generation for fault detection and isolation in a class of uncertain nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-02-01

    This article studies the problem of fault detection and isolation (FDI) for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems via a residual signal generated by a novel nonlinear adaptive observer. The considered faults are modelled by a set of time-varying vectors, in which a prescribed subset of faults are specially monitored and thus separable from the other faults. In the presence of Lipschitz-like nonlinearities and modelling uncertainties, the sensitivity of the residual signal to the monitored faults and its insensitivity to the other faults are rigorously analysed. Under a persistent excitation condition, the performances of the proposed fault diagnosis scheme, including the robustness to uncertainties, the quickness of estimation, the accuracy of estimation, the sensitivity to the monitored faults and the insensitivity to the complement faults, are quantified by a series of explicit design functions relevant to the observer parameters. It turns out that the number of faults which can be completely diagnosed is independent of the number of output sensors. A simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed FDI method.

  8. [Isolation of a methane-utilizing Klebsiella sp. strain and its application for detecting methane].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yujun; Yang, Yujing; Pang, Jinmei; Yang, Suping; Zhao, Gengui; Dong, Chuan

    2009-05-01

    We have isolated a strain C611 that used methane as the sole carbon sources for growth from paddy soil in Taiyuan of Shanxi province. Based on the physiological characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, we identified the strain as Klebsiella sp.. We used statistic-based experimental design (RSM) to optimize the culture conditions for C611 strain. The optimum conditions were as follows: temperature of 24.4 degrees C, inoculum volume of 6.7% and methane content of 25%. We studied the response time and the relationship between consumption of dissolved oxygen and methane gas contents with PVA-H3BO3 immobilized cell of C611 using electrochemical method. The response time was no more than 100 s of this reaction system, and the linear range of detection of methane content was from 0 to 10%. The standard gas sample 3% methane was measured by this method with the mean content value of 3.09%, RSD of 3.48%, and the relative error of 3%. Hence, it has the potential in developing biosensor for methane.

  9. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  10. A role for maternal serum screening in detecting chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with isolated choroid plexus cysts: a prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Brown, T; Kliewer, M A; Hertzberg, B S; Ruiz, C; Stamper, T H; Rosnes, J; Lucas, A; Wright, L N; Chescheir, N C; Farmer, L; Jordan, S; Kay, H H

    1999-05-01

    A prospective multicentre study was performed to identify patients with fetal choroid plexus cysts and examine the association between choroid plexus cysts and chromosome abnormalities in the context of variables such as maternal age, serum triple-screen results, race, other prenatally-identified fetal anomalies and cyst characteristics. A total of 18 437 scans were performed in 5 centres and 257 fetuses were identified with choroid plexus cysts. Outcome was available on 250 patients, and of these, chromosomal abnormalities were detected in a total of 13 (5.2 per cent) fetuses. 26 patients in the group had additional ultrasound abnormalities, and 8 of these had fetal chromosome abnormalities. Among the 224 patients with isolated choroid plexus cysts, 5 (2.2 per cent) were found to have chromosomal abnormalities. All cases with identified chromosomal abnormalities were associated with an additional risk factor, such as other ultrasound findings, advanced maternal age or abnormal maternal serum triple-screen results.

  11. Characterization of advanced shallow trench isolation (STI) CMP processes and consumables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Craig D.

    The main objectives of this thesis work were to elucidate the correlation between key characteristics of Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) slurry and their polishing performance in shallow trench isolation (STI) applications. More specifically, a range of physical and chemical properties of STI slurries such as particle type, particle size, slurry pH, polymer additives, zeta potential were characterized. Their influences on CMP performance were examined based on their removal rate, selectivity, and response to processing parameters. Furthermore, the dependence of these performance metrics on polishing platform were also investigated. The slurry properties play a vital role in the polishing performance. The particle type influences the surface interaction and removal rate, particle size is significant in the removal rate of the film being planarized, the interaction between the abrasive particle and film surface is influenced by both the slurry pH and zeta potential and the polymer additives affect the oxide:nitride selectivity. These properties are typically studied in order to obtain a further understanding of their roles in the polishing performance. It is believed that the slurry pH, zeta potential and polymer additives are the most critical in the polishing performance for a more mechanical process. For the three slurries the abrasive particle is ceria and the particle size is similar. However, the slurry pH, zeta potential and polymer additives are not similar for each slurry. Each slurry behaves differently in terms of the polishing performance with these varying slurry properties. The removal rate is influenced by the polishing pressure, platen/carrier speeds and polishing time. The oxide:nitride selectivity is important to the polishing of patterned wafers because if the selectivity is poor than the possibility of feature dishing and erosion is greater. It is important to study the removal rate as a function of varying process parameters in order to

  12. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography reduces the complexity of the phosphoproteome and improves global phosphopeptide isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Dean E; Annan, Roland S

    2008-05-01

    The diversity and complexity of proteins and peptides in biological systems requires powerful liquid chromatography-based separations to optimize resolution and detection of components. Proteomics strategies often combine two orthogonal separation modes to meet this challenge. In nearly all cases, the second dimension is a reverse phase separation interfaced directly to a mass spectrometer. Here we report on the use of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) as part of a multidimensional chromatography strategy for proteomics. Tryptic peptides are separated on TSKgel Amide-80 columns using a shallow inverse organic gradient. Under these conditions, peptide retention is based on overall hydrophilicity, and a separation truly orthogonal to reverse phase is produced. Analysis of tryptic digests from HeLa cells yielded numbers of protein identifications comparable to that obtained using strong cation exchange. We also demonstrate that HILIC represents a significant advance in phosphoproteomics analysis. We exploited the strong hydrophilicity of the phosphate group to selectively enrich and fractionate phosphopeptides based on their increased retention under HILIC conditions. Subsequent IMAC enrichment of phosphopeptides from HILIC fractions showed better than 99% selectivity. This was achieved without the use of derivatization or chemical modifiers. In a 300-microg equivalent of HeLa cell lysate we identified over 1000 unique phosphorylation sites. More than 700 novel sites were added to the HeLa phosphoproteome.

  13. Assessment of Crack Detection in Cast Austenitic Piping Components Using Advanced Ultrasonic Methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effec¬tiveness and limitations of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the in-service inspec¬tion of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Cast stainless steel pipe specimens were examined that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots and have inside/outside surface geometrical conditions that simulate several PWR primary piping configurations. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were also examined to understand inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of UT responses from different locations. The advanced UT methods were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The low-frequency ultrasonic method employed a zone-focused, multi-incident angle inspection protocol (operating at 250-450 kHz) coupled with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for improved signal-to-noise and advanced imaging capabilities. The phased array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at 500 kHz and composite volumetric images of the specimens were generated. Re¬sults from laboratory studies for assessing detection, localization and sizing effectiveness are discussed in this paper.

  14. Specific Magnetic Isolation of E6 HPV16 Modified Magnetizable Particles Coupled with PCR and Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Jimenez, Ana Maria; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Dostalova, Simona; Krejcova, Ludmila; Michalek, Petr; Richtera, Lukas; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    The majority of carcinomas that were developed due to the infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) are caused by high-risk HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18. These HPV types contain the E6 and E7 oncogenes, so the fast detection of these oncogenes is an important point to avoid the development of cancer. Many different HPV tests are available to detect the presence of HPV in biological samples. The aim of this study was to design a fast and low cost method for HPV identification employing magnetic isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electrochemical detection. These assays were developed to detect the interactions between E6-HPV16 oncogene and magnetizable particles (MPs) using commercial Dynabeads M-280 Streptavidin particles and laboratory-synthesized “homemade” particles called MANs (MAN-37, MAN-127 and MAN-164). The yields of PCR amplification of E6-HPV16 oncogene bound on the particles and after the elution from the particles were compared. A highest yield of E6-HPV16 DNA isolation was obtained with both MPs particles commercial M-280 Streptavidin and MAN-37 due to reducing of the interferents compared with the standard PCR method. A biosensor employing the isolation of E6-HPV16 oncogene with MPs particles followed by its electrochemical detection can be a very effective technique for HPV identification, providing simple, sensitive and cost-effective analysis. PMID:27164078

  15. [Detection of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase production in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates].

    PubMed

    Balıkçı, Hilal; Açıkgöz, Z Cibali; Güvenman, Selda; Celikbilek, Nevreste; Ozdem, Birsen

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain data about prevalence of plasmid-mediated AmpC (pAmpC), efficacy of various phenotypic tests applied for the detection of pAmpC-mediated resistance and the enzyme types responsible for this resistance. A total of 1316 isolates (1030 Escherichia coli and 286 Klebsiella spp.) obtained from the clinical samples sent to our laboratory between 2008-2011 period, from various inpatient and outpatient clinics and intensive care units, were included in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the isolates were determined by using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Production of pAmpC was phenotypically investigated by Boronic Acid Inhibition Test (BAIT), Cefoxitin Hodge Test (CHT) and AmpC Disk Test (ACDT) in a total of 36 (2.7%) cefoxitin-resistant isolates (77% were E.coli, 23% were K.pneumoniae); and by synergy tests with or without AmpC inhibitors in a total of 165 (88% were E.coli, 12% were K.pneumoniae) cefoxitin-susceptible, third generation cephalosporin-resistant (S3R) isolates. For the detection of pAmpC genes a multiplex-PCR protocol was applied to the isolates found positive at least by one of the phenotypic tests. CHT, ACDT and BAIT were found positive in 21 (58%), 18 (50%) and 7 (19%) of the 36 cefoxitin-resistant isolates, respectively. In only 10 (27.7%) of these isolates (all were E.coli strains), pAmpC presence was detected by PCR; and the enzyme produced was assessed as CMY-2. Based on the positive PCR results; specificity rates of the phenotypic tests, BAIT, ACDT and CHT were 97%, 69% and 58%; while the sensitivity rates were 50%, 100% and 100%, respectively. Our data indicated that, pAmpC prevalence (10/1316, 0.8%) detected in this study, did not seem to be an important problem yet, in the population screened. However, since the first detection of this resistance was in 2010, it should be considered as a sign to get necessary precautions preventing its spread. In conclusion, none of the phenotypic methods

  16. Microfluidic cell sorting: a review of the advances in the separation of cells from debulking to rare cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Shields, C Wyatt; Reyes, Catherine D; López, Gabriel P

    2015-03-07

    Accurate and high throughput cell sorting is a critical enabling technology in molecular and cellular biology, biotechnology, and medicine. While conventional methods can provide high efficiency sorting in short timescales, advances in microfluidics have enabled the realization of miniaturized devices offering similar capabilities that exploit a variety of physical principles. We classify these technologies as either active or passive. Active systems generally use external fields (e.g., acoustic, electric, magnetic, and optical) to impose forces to displace cells for sorting, whereas passive systems use inertial forces, filters, and adhesion mechanisms to purify cell populations. Cell sorting on microchips provides numerous advantages over conventional methods by reducing the size of necessary equipment, eliminating potentially biohazardous aerosols, and simplifying the complex protocols commonly associated with cell sorting. Additionally, microchip devices are well suited for parallelization, enabling complete lab-on-a-chip devices for cellular isolation, analysis, and experimental processing. In this review, we examine the breadth of microfluidic cell sorting technologies, while focusing on those that offer the greatest potential for translation into clinical and industrial practice and that offer multiple, useful functions. We organize these sorting technologies by the type of cell preparation required (i.e., fluorescent label-based sorting, bead-based sorting, and label-free sorting) as well as by the physical principles underlying each sorting mechanism.

  17. Recent advances in the development of extraction chromatographic materials for the isolation of radionuclides from biological and environmental samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M. L.

    1998-11-30

    The determination of low levels of radionuclides in environmental and biological samples is often hampered by the complex and variable nature of the samples. One approach to circumventing this problem is to incorporate into the analytical scheme a separation and preconcentration step by which the species of interest can be isolated from the major constituents of the sample. Extraction chromatography (EXC), a form of liquid chromatography in which the stationary phase comprises an extractant or a solution of an extractant in an appropriate diluent coated onto an inert support, provides a simple and efficient means of performing a wide variety of metal ion separations. Recent advances in extractant design, in particular the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation even in acidic media, have substantially improved the utility of the method. For the preconcentration of actinides, for example, an EXC resin consisting of a liquid diphosphonic acid supported on a polymeric substrate has been shown to exhibit extraordinarily strong retention of these elements from acidic chloride media. This resin, together with other related materials, can provide the basis of a number of efficient and flexible schemes for the separation and preconcentration of radionuclides form a variety of samples for subsequent determination.

  18. Microfluidic Cell Sorting: A Review of the Advances in the Separation of Cells from Debulking to Rare Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Shields, C. Wyatt; Reyes, Catherine D.; López, Gabriel P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and high throughput cell sorting is a critical enabling technology in molecular and cellular biology, biotechnology, and medicine. While conventional methods can provide high efficiency sorting in short timescales, advances in microfluidics have enabled the realization of miniaturized devices offering similar capabilities that exploit a variety of physical principles. We classify these technologies as either active or passive. Active systems generally use external fields (e.g., acoustic, electric, magnetic, and optical) to impose forces to displace cells for sorting, whereas passive systems use inertial forces, filters, and adhesion mechanisms to purify cell populations. Cell sorting on microchips provides numerous advantages over conventional methods by reducing the size of necessary equipment, eliminating potentially biohazardous aerosols, and simplifying the complex protocols commonly associated with cell sorting. Additionally, microchip devices are well suited for parallelization, enabling complete lab-on-a-chip devices for cellular isolation, analysis, and experimental processing. In this review, we examine the breadth of microfluidic cell sorting technologies, while focusing on those that offer the greatest potential for translation into clinical and industrial practice and that offer multiple, useful functions. We organize these sorting technologies by the type of cell preparation required (i.e., fluorescent label-based sorting, bead-based sorting, and label-free sorting) as well as by the physical principles underlying each sorting mechanism. PMID:25598308

  19. Rapid detection and typing of pathogenic nonpneumophila Legionella spp. isolates using a multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-04-01

    We developed a single tube multiplex real-time PCR assay that allows for the rapid detection and typing of 9 nonpneumophila Legionella spp. isolates that are clinically relevant. The multiplex assay is capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating L. micdadei, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. longbeachae, L. feeleii, L. anisa, L. parisiensis, L. tucsonensis serogroup (sg) 1 and 3, and L. sainthelensis sg 1 and 2 isolates. Evaluation of the assay with nucleic acid from each of these species derived from both clinical and environmental isolates and typing strains demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against 43 other Legionella spp. Typing of L. anisa, L. parisiensis, and L. tucsonensis sg 1 and 3 isolates was accomplished by developing a real-time PCR assay followed by high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis targeting the ssrA gene. Further typing of L. bozemanii, L. longbeachae, and L. feeleii isolates to the serogroup level was accomplished by developing a real-time PCR assay followed by HRM analysis targeting the mip gene. When used in conjunction with other currently available diagnostic tests, these assays may aid in rapidly identifying specific etiologies associated with Legionella outbreaks, clusters, sporadic cases, and potential environmental sources.

  20. Detection and identification of Trichophyton tonsurans from clinical isolates and hairbrush samples by loop-mediated isothermal amplification system.

    PubMed

    Yo, Ayaka; Yamamoto, Mikachi; Nakayama, Takako; Ishikawa, Jun; Makimura, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Since the 1990s, there have been reports of the spread of dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton tonsurans among contact sports athletes in several countries, including Japan. This study was performed to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) system for rapid and accurate detection and identification of T. tonsurans from clinical isolates or hairbrush samples for diagnosis and to prevent the spread of infection. A specific primer set was prepared by comparing the whole genome sequence of T. tonsurans with those of six other closely related dermatophytes. After confirming the sensitivity and specificity of this system, LAMP assay was performed using 37 clinical samples obtained from three healthy volunteers and 24 judo athletes. A total of 155 fungal isolates (56 strains of various standard fungi, 96 identified T. tonsurans isolates, three hairbrush-cultured isolates from judo athletes) and 37 hairbrush samples (34 samples from 24 judo athletes, and three samples from three healthy volunteers) were used for culture and LAMP assay, respectively. The assay showed no cross-reactivity to standard strains other than T. tonsurans. The detection limit was 100 copies of DNA template per tube. All of the 96 T. tonsurans isolates were amplified, and all samples from healthy volunteers showed negative results. Four of the 34 hairbrush samples obtained from judo athletes showed positive results in LAMP assay, and two of the four were positive in both culture and LAMP assay. We developed a rapid LAMP system with high specificity and sensitivity for diagnosis of T. tonsurans infection.

  1. Two clinical isolates of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae showed differing pattern of lameness and pathogen detection in experimentally challenged pigs

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Matthew; Bower, Leslie; Ramirez, Alejandro; Madson, Darin M.; Strait, Erin L.; Rosey, Everett L.; Rapp-Gabrielson, Vicki J.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyosynoviae is known to colonize and cause disease in growing-finishing pigs. In this study, two clinical isolates of M. hyosynoviae were compared by inoculating cesarean-derived colostrum-deprived and specific-pathogen-free growing pigs. After intranasal or intravenous inoculation, the proportion and distribution pattern of clinical cases was compared in addition to the severity of lameness. Tonsils were found to be the primary site of colonization, while bacteremia was rarely detected prior to the observation of clinical signs. Regardless of the clinical isolate, route of inoculation, or volume of inocula, histopathological alterations and tissue invasion were detected in multiple joints, indicating an apparent lack of specific joint tropism. Acute disease was primarily observed 7 to 10 days post-inoculation. The variability in the severity of synovial microscopic lesions and pathogen detection in joint cavities suggests that the duration of joint infection may influence the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, these findings demonstrate that diagnosis of M. hyosynoviae-associated arthritis can be influenced by the clinical isolate, and provides a study platform to investigate the colonization and virulence potential of field isolates. This approach can be particularly relevant to auxiliate in surveillance and testing of therapeutic and/or vaccine candidates. PMID:27297416

  2. Active fault detection and isolation of discrete-time linear time-varying systems: a set-membership approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtaba Tabatabaeipour, Seyed

    2015-08-01

    Active fault detection and isolation (AFDI) is used for detection and isolation of faults that are hidden in the normal operation because of a low excitation signal or due to the regulatory actions of the controller. In this paper, a new AFDI method based on set-membership approaches is proposed. In set-membership approaches, instead of a point-wise estimation of the states, a set-valued estimation of them is computed. If this set becomes empty the given model of the system is not consistent with the measurements. Therefore, the model is falsified. When more than one model of the system remains un-falsified, the AFDI method is used to generate an auxiliary signal that is injected into the system for detection and isolation of faults that remain otherwise hidden or non-isolated using passive FDI (PFDI) methods. Having the set-valued estimation of the states for each model, the proposed AFDI method finds an optimal input signal that guarantees FDI in a finite time horizon. The input signal is updated at each iteration in a decreasing receding horizon manner based on the set-valued estimation of the current states and un-falsified models at the current sample time. The problem is solved by a number of linear and quadratic programming problems, which result in a computationally efficient algorithm. The method is tested on a numerical example as well as on the pitch actuator of a benchmark wind turbine.

  3. MOLECULAR DETECTION OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANCE DETERMINANTS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM THE ENDANGERED AUSTRALIAN SEA LION (NEOPHOCA CINEREA).

    PubMed

    Delport, Tiffany C; Harcourt, Robert G; Beaumont, Linda J; Webster, Koa N; Power, Michelle L

    2015-07-01

    Greater interaction between humans and wildlife populations poses significant risks of anthropogenic impact to natural ecosystems, especially in the marine environment. Understanding the spread of microorganisms at the marine interface is therefore important if we are to mitigate adverse effects on marine wildlife. We investigated the establishment of Escherichia coli in the endangered Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) by comparing fecal isolation from wild and captive sea lion populations. Fecal samples were collected from wild colonies March 2009-September 2010 and from captive individuals March 2011-May 2013. Using molecular screening, we assigned a phylotype to E. coli isolates and determined the presence of integrons, mobile genetic elements that capture gene cassettes conferring resistance to antimicrobial agents common in fecal coliforms. Group B2 was the most abundant phylotype in all E. coli isolates (n = 37), with groups A, B1, and D also identified. Integrons were not observed in E. coli (n = 21) isolated from wild sea lions, but were identified in E. coli from captive animals (n = 16), from which class I integrases were detected in eight isolates. Sequencing of gene cassette arrays identified genes conferring resistance to streptomycin-spectinomycin (aadA1) and trimethoprim (dfrA17, dfrB4). Class II integrases were not detected in the E. coli isolates. The frequent detection in captive sea lions of E. coli with resistance genes commonly identified in human clinical cases suggests that conditions experienced in captivity may contribute to establishment. Identification of antibiotic resistance in the microbiota of Australian sea lions provides crucial information for disease management. Our data will inform conservation management strategies and provide a mechanism to monitor microorganism dissemination to sensitive pinniped populations.

  4. Joint Target Detection and Tracking Filter for Chilbolton Advanced Meteorological Radar Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Correa, J.; Adams, M.; Clark, D.; Delande, E.; Houssineau, J.; Franco, J.; Frueh, C.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the growing number of inactive Resident Space Objects (RSOs), or space debris, has provoked increased interest in the field of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and various investigations of new methods for orbital object tracking. In comparison with conventional tracking scenarios, state estimation of an orbiting object entails additional challenges, such as orbit determination and orbital state and covariance propagation in the presence of highly nonlinear system dynamics. The sensors which are available for detecting and tracking space debris are prone to multiple clutter measurements. Added to this problem, is the fact that it is unknown whether or not a space debris type target is present within such sensor measurements. Under these circumstances, traditional single-target filtering solutions such as Kalman Filters fail to produce useful trajectory estimates. The recent Random Finite Set (RFS) based Finite Set Statistical (FISST) framework has yielded filters which are more appropriate for such situations. The RFS based Joint Target Detection and Tracking (JoTT) filter, also known as the Bernoulli filter, is a single target, multiple measurements filter capable of dealing with cluttered and time-varying backgrounds as well as modeling target appearance and disappearance in the scene. Therefore, this paper presents the application of the Gaussian mixture-based JoTT filter for processing measurements from Chilbolton Advanced Meteorological Radar (CAMRa) which contain both defunct and operational satellites. The CAMRa is a fully-steerable radar located in southern England, which was recently modified to be used as a tracking asset in the European Space Agency SSA program. The experiments conducted show promising results regarding the capability of such filters in processing cluttered radar data. The work carried out in this paper was funded by the USAF Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0069, Chilean Conicyt - Fondecyt grant number 1150930, EU Erasmus Mundus MSc

  5. Carbapenem inactivation: a very affordable and highly specific method for phenotypic detection of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates compared with other methods.

    PubMed

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalili, Younes; Ghotaslou, Reza; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Yousefi, Saber; Nagili, Behroz; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-22

    This investigation was undertaken to compare phenotypic and molecular methods for detection of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 245 non-duplicated isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitalized patients. Disc diffusion method was used to identify carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Three phenotypic methods, including Modified Hodge Test (MHT), Modified Carba NP (MCNP) test and Carbapenem Inactivation Method (CIM) were used for investigation of carbapenemase production. In addition, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect carbapenemase encoding genes. Of 245 P. aeruginosa isolates investigated, 121 isolates were carbapenem-resistant. Among carbapenem-resistant isolates, 40, 39 and 35 isolates exhibited positive results using MHT, MCNP test and CIM, respectively. PCR indicated the presence of carbapenemase genes in 35 of carbapenem-resistant isolates. MHT showed low sensitivity and specificity for carbapenemase detection among P. aeruginosa isolates in comparison to PCR. CIM was most affordable and highly specific than MCNP test compared with the molecular method.

  6. DETECTION, RIBOTYPING AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PROPERTIES OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE STRAINS ISOLATED FROM THE CASES OF DIARRHEA

    PubMed Central

    Kouzegaran, Samaneh; Ganjifard, Mahmood; Tanha, Amir Saber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is the most prevalent cause of antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea al-around the world. Prevalence of virulent and resistant strains of Clostridium difficile is increasing now a day. The present investigation was carried out to study the prevalence, ribotyping and antibiotic resistance pattern of C. difficile isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics. Materials and methods: Four-hundred stool specimens were collected from the diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics hospitalized due to the diseases other than diarrhea. Samples were cultured and their positive results were subjected to disk diffusion and PCR-based ribotyping. Results: Thirty-five out of 400 (8.75%) samples were positive for C. difficile. Prevalence of C. difficile in diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics were 11.25% and 4.16%, respectively. Male had the higher prevalence of bacteria than female (P < 0.05). eight to twelve months old pediatrics were the most commonly infected group. R27 (14.28%), R1 (10.71%), R12 (7.14%), R13 (7.14%) and R18 (7.14%) were most commonly detected ribotypes. There were no positive results for studied ribotypes in non-diarrheic pediatrics. C. difficile strains had the highest levels of resistance against tetracycline (71.42%), erythromycin (57.14%), moxifloxacin (48.57%), metronidazole (28.57%) and clindamycin (22.85%) antibiotics. Conclusion: Prescription of antibiotics in diarrheic pediatrics, males and also 8-12 months old pediatrics should be done in a regular and cautious manner. PMID:27999477

  7. Early Validation of Failure Detection, Isolation, and Recovery Design Using Heterogeneous Modelling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, Peter; Guerriero, Suzanne; Cristiano, Leorato; Rugina, Ana

    2012-08-01

    Modelling and simulation can support a number of use cases across the spacecraft development life-cycle. Given the increasing complexity of space missions, the observed general trend is for a more extensive usage of simulation already in the early phases. A major perceived advantage is that modelling and simulation can enable the validation of critical aspects of the spacecraft design before the actual development is started, as such reducing the risk in later phases.Failure Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) is one of the areas with a high potential to benefit from early modelling and simulation. With the increasing level of required spacecraft autonomy, FDIR specifications can grow in such a way that the traditional document-based review process soon becomes inadequate.This paper shows that FDIR modelling and simulation in a system context can provide a powerful tool to support the FDIR verification process. It is highlighted that FDIR modelling at this early stage requires heterogeneous modelling tools and languages, in order to provide an adequate functional description of the different components (i.e. FDIR functions, environment, equipment, etc.) to be modelled.For this reason, an FDIR simulation framework is proposed in this paper. This framework is based on a number of tools already available in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at ESTEC, which are the Avionics Test Bench Functional Engineering Simulator (ATB FES), Matlab/Simulink, TASTE, and Real Time Developer Studio (RTDS).The paper then discusses the application of the proposed simulation framework to a real case-study, i.e. the FDIR modelling of a satellite in support of actual ESA mission. Challenges and benefits of the approach are described. Finally, lessons learned and the generality of the proposed approach are discussed.

  8. Back Translation: An Emerging Sophisticated Cyber Strategy to Subvert Advances in "Digital Age" Plagiarism Detection and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael; Sheridan, Lynnaire

    2015-01-01

    Advances have been made in detecting and deterring the student plagiarism that has accompanied the uptake and development of the internet. Many authors from the late 1990s onwards grappled with plagiarism in the digital age, presenting articles that were provoking and established the foundation for strategies to address cyber plagiarism, including…

  9. Detection of piluslike structures on clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Gander, R M; LaRocco, M T

    1989-01-01

    Twenty clinical isolates of Vibrio vulnificus were compared with 10 environmental strains by using electron microscopy and agglutination assays with human erythrocytes, guinea pig erythrocytes, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the isolates were tested for ability to adhere to the human epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and A549. When examined by electron microscopy, 16 (80%) of the 20 clinical isolates demonstrated the presence of piluslike structures; the composition of the bacterial populations ranged from 0 to 68% piliated cells. In contrast, only 3 (30%) of the 10 environmental isolates were piliated, with a range from 0 to 16% piliated cells. A significant association between the presence of piliated cells and the isolate source was found (P less than 0.05). None of the 30 strains agglutinated erythrocytes or yeast cells. V. vulnificus adherence results obtained with HEp-2 cells showed 10 (50%) of 20 clinical isolates and 0 (0%) of 10 environmental isolates with averages of greater than 10 adherent bacteria per cell, demonstrating a correlation between attachment and the isolate source (P less than 0.05). Selected strains were tested to determine whether methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside, fructose, or alpha-L-(-)-fucose would inhibit bacterial adherence to HEp-2 cells. Multiple patterns of adherence inhibition were observed. Adherence to A549 cells showed 8 (40%) of 20 clinical isolates and 0 (0%) of 10 environmental strains with averages of greater than 10 adherent bacteria per cell. A statistical association between attachment and the isolate source was demonstrated (P less than 0.05). These data suggest that the presence of piluslike structures and the ability to adhere to human epithelial cell lines may be more closely associated with V. vulnificus isolates from clinical specimens than with environmental strains. Images PMID:2568368

  10. Deployment of an Advanced Electrocardiographic Analysis (A-ECG) to Detect Cardiovascular Risk in Career Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolezal, B. A.; Storer, T. W.; Abrazado, M.; Watne, R.; Schlegel, T. T.; Batalin, M.; Kaiser, W.; Smith, D. L.; Cooper, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of line of duty death among firefighters, accounting for approximately 45% of fatalities annually. Firefighters perform strenuous muscular work while wearing heavy, encapsulating personal protective equipment in high ambient temperatures, under chaotic and emotionally stressful conditions. These factors can precipitate sudden cardiac events like myocardial infarction, serious dysrhythmias, or cerebrovascular accidents in firefighters with underlying cardiovascular disease. Screening for cardiovascular risk factors is recommended but not always followed in this population. PHASER is a project charged with identifying and prioritizing risk factors in emergency responders. We have deployed an advanced ECG (A-ECG) system developed at NASA for improved sensitivity and specificity in the detection of cardiac risk. METHODS Forty-four professional firefighters were recruited to perform comprehensive baseline assessments including tests of aerobic performance and laboratory tests for fasting lipid profiles and glucose. Heart rate and conventional 12-lead ECG were obtained at rest and during incremental treadmill exercise testing (XT). In addition, a 5-min resting 12-lead A-ECG was obtained in a subset of firefighters (n=18) and transmitted over a secure networked system to a physician collaborator at NASA for advanced-ECG analysis. This A-ECG system has been proven, using myocardial perfusion and other imaging, to accurately identify a number of cardiac pathologies including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. RESULTS Subjects mean (SD) age was 43 (8) years, weight 91 (13) kg, and BMI of 28 (3) kg/square meter. Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) was 39 (9) ml/kg/min. This compares with the 45th %ile in healthy reference values and a recommended standard of 42 ml/kg/min for firefighters. The metabolic threshold (VO

  11. Detection of genetic alterations in advanced prostate cancer by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kotaro; Taguchi, Takahiro; Yamasaki, Ichiro; Kamada, Masayuki; Yuri, Kazunari; Shuin, Taro

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we examined nine cases of advanced Japanese prostate cancer by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to detect chromosomal imbalances across the entire genome and to identify several new regions likely to contain genes important to the development and progression of this disease. These cases had been previously examined for numerical chromosomal aberrations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). By CGH, the following regions were found to be over-represented (gains), with fluorescence ratio values higher than the threshold: 4p, 6p, 8q, 11q, 12q, 15q, 16p, 17q, 20, and 21 (>4 cases); underrepresentation (losses) involved: 1q, 4q, 5q, 6q, 13q, 14q, and 22 (>4 cases). The shortest regions of overlap (SRO) of gains were noted at 8q24.1 through q24.3, 12q23, and 17q23 through q24 (>5 cases). The SRO of losses were seen at 5q14 through q21, 6q16.1 through q21, 13q21.3 through q22, and 14q21 (>5 cases). Notably, the gain of chromosomes 8 and 12 by CGH was in agreement with the FISH data, suggesting that the gain of chromosomes 8 and 12 may play an important role in prostate carcinogenesis. The genes on the SRO regions were also discussed in relation to oncogenes and bone metastases.

  12. Fusion of optimized indicators from Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for driver drowsiness detection.

    PubMed

    Daza, Iván García; Bergasa, Luis Miguel; Bronte, Sebastián; Yebes, Jose Javier; Almazán, Javier; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-09

    This paper presents a non-intrusive approach for monitoring driver drowsiness using the fusion of several optimized indicators based on driver physical and driving performance measures, obtained from ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistant Systems) in simulated conditions. The paper is focused on real-time drowsiness detection technology rather than on long-term sleep/awake regulation prediction technology. We have developed our own vision system in order to obtain robust and optimized driver indicators able to be used in simulators and future real environments. These indicators are principally based on driver physical and driving performance skills. The fusion of several indicators, proposed in the literature, is evaluated using a neural network and a stochastic optimization method to obtain the best combination. We propose a new method for ground-truth generation based on a supervised Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). An extensive evaluation of indicators, derived from trials over a third generation simulator with several test subjects during different driving sessions, was performed. The main conclusions about the performance of single indicators and the best combinations of them are included, as well as the future works derived from this study.

  13. Multicenter evaluation of the LightCycler methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) advanced test as a rapid method for detection of MRSA in nasal surveillance swabs.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lance R; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Woods, Christopher W; Allen, Stephen D; Pombo, David; Patel, Parul A; Mehta, Maitry S; Nicholson, Bradly; Fuller, DeAnna; Onderdonk, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection continues to rise in many health care settings. Rapid detection of MRSA colonization followed by appropriate isolation can reduce transmission and infection. We compared the performance of the new Roche LightCycler MRSA advanced test to that of the BD GeneOhm MRSA test and culture. Double-headed swabs were used to collect anterior nasal specimens from each subject. For both tests, DNA was extracted and real-time PCR was performed according to manufacturer's instructions. For culture, one swab of the pair was plated directly to CHROMagar MRSA. The swab paired with the BD GeneOhm MRSA test was also placed into an enrichment broth and then plated to CHROMagar MRSA. Colonies resembling staphylococci were confirmed as S. aureus by standard methods. Discrepant specimens had further testing with additional attempts to grow MRSA as well as sample amplicon sequencing. Agreement between results for the two swabs was 99.3% for those with valid results. A total of 1,402 specimens were tested using direct culture detection of MRSA as the gold standard; 187 were culture positive for MRSA. The LightCycler MRSA advanced test had relative sensitivity and specificity of 95.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 91.1% to 97.8%) and 96.4% (95% CI: 95.2% to 97.4%), respectively. The BD GeneOhm assay had relative sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% (95% CI: 91.7% to 98.1%) and 91.7% (95% CI: 90.0% to 93.2%), respectively. Following discrepancy analysis, the relative sensitivities of the LightCycler MRSA advanced test and the BD GeneOhm MRSA assay were 92.2 and 93.2%, respectively; relative specificities were 98.9 and 94.2%, respectively. Specificity was significantly better (P<0.001) with the LightCycler MRSA advanced test. The sensitivity of direct culture was 80.4%. The LightCycler MRSA advanced test is a useful tool for sensitive and rapid detection of MRSA nasal colonization.

  14. Detection of CMY-2, CTX-M-14, and SHV-12 beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli fecal-sample isolates from healthy chickens.

    PubMed

    Briñas, Laura; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Zarazaga, Myriam; Porrero, Concepción; Sáenz, Yolanda; García, María; Dominguez, Lucas; Torres, Carmen

    2003-06-01

    Genes encoding the CMY-2, CTX-M-14, and SHV-12 beta-lactamases were detected in three of five Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples from healthy chickens which showed resistance or diminished susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. A -42 mutation at the promoter region of the ampC gene was detected in the other two isolates.

  15. Detection of CMY-2, CTX-M-14, and SHV-12 β-Lactamases in Escherichia coli Fecal-Sample Isolates from Healthy Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Briñas, Laura; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Zarazaga, Myriam; Porrero, Concepción; Sáenz, Yolanda; García, María; Dominguez, Lucas; Torres, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Genes encoding the CMY-2, CTX-M-14, and SHV-12 β-lactamases were detected in three of five Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples from healthy chickens which showed resistance or diminished susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. A −42 mutation at the promoter region of the ampC gene was detected in the other two isolates. PMID:12760899

  16. Detection and serotyping of Mediterranean plum pox virus isolates by means of strain-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Myrta, A; Di Terlizzi, B; Boscia, D; Caglayan, K; Gavriel, I; Ghanem, G; Varveri, C; Savino, V

    1998-09-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is a major threat to the expanding Mediterranean stone fruit industry. In order to control the plum pox disease it is of utmost importance to detect early PPV foci and to identify the PPV isolates involved. A survey was therefore carried out in Albania, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Italy and Turkey by a double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) with the following monoclonal antibodies (MAbs): 5B (universal), 4DG5 (PPV-D-specific), AL (PPV-M-specific), TUV and AC (PPV-C-specific), and EA24 (PPV-El Amar-specific). A hundred and seventy Mediterranean PPV isolates were tested for strain type. PPV-M was detected in Albania, Cyprus, Greece, Italy, and Turkey; PPV-D was detected in Albania and Italy, whereas samples with natural mixtures of both strains were found in a couple of orchards in Albania. Seven PPV isolates from apricots in two Egyptian localities were recognized only by MAb EA24. In conclusion, DAS-ELISA with a combination of the universal MAb5B and the MAbs specific to the four PPV serotypes currently known (M, D, C and El Amar) is an efficient tool for a simple, sensitive and routine detection of PPV and discrimination of its serotypes.

  17. Genetic detection and isolation of crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Kosovo, Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Bozovi, Bojana; Pavlidou, Vassiliki; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Pelemis, Mijomir; Antoniadis, Aantonis

    2002-08-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (C-CHFV) strains were isolated from a fatal case and the attending physician in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. Early, rapid diagnosis of the disease was achieved by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The physician was successfully treated with oral ribavirin. These cases yielded the first genetically studied C-CHFV human isolates in the Balkans.

  18. [New cardioactive drugs II, detection and isolation of cardiotonic amines with ionpair-HPLC].

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Grevel, J

    1982-01-01

    An ionpair-HPLC-technic using a reversed-phase column was developed to screen plant extracts for cardiotonic amines and to isolate them in a preparative scale for direct MS and pharmacological investigations. By this method the positive inotropic tyramine could be isolated from Selenicereus grandiflorus (L.) Britt et Rose (Cactus grandiflorus).

  19. A high-fidelity airbus benchmark for system fault detection and isolation and flight control law clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goupil, Ph.; Puyou, G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a high-fidelity generic twin engine civil aircraft model developed by Airbus for advanced flight control system research. The main features of this benchmark are described to make the reader aware of the model complexity and representativeness. It is a complete representation including the nonlinear rigid-body aircraft model with a full set of control surfaces, actuator models, sensor models, flight control laws (FCL), and pilot inputs. Two applications of this benchmark in the framework of European projects are presented: FCL clearance using optimization and advanced fault detection and diagnosis (FDD).

  20. Resistance to apramycin in two enterobacterial clinical isolates: detection of a 3-N-acetyltransferase IV.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lus, R; Rivera, M J; Gómez-Lus, M L; Gil, J; Gómez-Lus, S; Castillo, J; Goñi, P; Madero, P; Rubio, M C

    1990-08-01

    Considering the possible role of farm animals in the contamination of human consumers by plasmid-mediated apramycin-resistant enterobacteria strains, this type of resistance should be tested more systematically in human isolates. Very recently we isolated in Zaragoza one apramycin-resistant Escheria coli strain obtained from the blood of a hospitalized patient; this clinical isolate produced a plasmid-mediated 3-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase IV. We describe also the isolation in Madrid of one multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strain. This isolate harbored a single plasmid and carried determinants for apramycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, hygromycin B, streptomycin, and ampicillin, which could be transferred en bloc to E. coli K-12 J62. Extracts from donor and transconjugant strains carrying pUZ6776 plasmid produce acetyltransferase activity AAC(3)-IV and double phosphotransferase activity (HPH and APH(3'')).

  1. First detection of OXA-24 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Bozhana; Velinov, Tzvetan; Ivanov, Ivan; Dobreva, Elina; Kantardjiev, Todor

    2014-04-01

    This report describes the first identification of OXA-24 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Bulgaria. According to national surveillance data A. baumannii along with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most troublesome microorganisms in hospital environment with high rates of acquired carbapenem resistance. In the present study real-time multiplex PCR was performed to identify the most common carbapenemase genes in 15 non-duplicate carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates collected in 2012. The results showed lack of KPC, GES, VIM, IMP-type enzymes. Four A. baumannii isolates tested positive by PCR for the acquired OXA-24 together with the intrinsic OXA-51 carbapenemase. OXA-24 and OXA-23 were determined as co-existent in one isolate. Two isolates were identified with OXA-23 in addition to the OXA-51 carbapenemase.

  2. Detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from dogs and cats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Puño-Sarmiento, Juan; Medeiros, Leonardo; Chiconi, Carolina; Martins, Fernando; Pelayo, Jacinta; Rocha, Sérgio; Blanco, Jorge; Blanco, Miguel; Zanutto, Marcelo; Kobayashi, Renata; Nakazato, Gerson

    2013-10-25

    Escherichia coli are gut microbiota bacteria that can cause disease in some humans and other animals, including dogs and cats that humans often keep as pets. Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) strains are classified into six categories: enteropathogenic (EPEC), enterotoxigenic (ETEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), enteroinvasive (EIEC), enteroaggregative (EAEC), and diffuse-adhering E. coli (DAEC). In this study 144 and 163 E. coli colonies were isolated from the fecal samples of 50 dogs and 50 cats, respectively, with and without diarrhea from a Veterinary Hospital (clinical isolates). The virulence factors were determined using multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction. Adherence assays, antibacterial susceptibility and serotyping (somatic or flagellar antigens) were performed on DEC isolates. We found 25 (17.4%) and 4 (2.5%) DEC strains isolated from dogs and cats, respectively. Only the EPEC and EAEC pathotypes were found in both animals. Meanwhile, genes from other pathotypes (STEC, EIEC, and ETEC) were not found in these clinical isolates. All of the DEC strains showed mannose-resistant adherence to HEp-2 and HeLa cells, and aggregative adherence was predominant in these isolates. Multiresistant strains to antimicrobials were found in most DEC strains including usual and unusual antimicrobials in veterinary practices. The serotypes of these DEC isolates were variable. The ONT serotype was predominant in these isolates. Some serotypes found in our study were described to human DEC. Here, we demonstrate that pets carry virulent DEC genes, which are mainly strains of EPECs and EAECs. The presence of these virulence factors in isolates from animals without diarrhea suggests that pets can act as a reservoir for human infection.

  3. Dynamic Neural Network-Based Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Fault Detection and Isolation for Formation Flying of Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, A.; Khorasani, K.

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a dynamic neural network-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme for the Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) that are used in the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) of satellites that are tasked to perform a formation flying mission. By using data collected from the relative attitudes of the formation flying satellites our proposed "High Level" FDI scheme can detect the pair of thrusters which is faulty, however fault isolation cannot be accomplished. Based on the "High Level" FDI scheme and the DNN-based "Low Level" FDI scheme developed earlier by the authors, an "Integrated" DNN-based FDI scheme is then proposed. To demonstrate the FDI capabilities of the proposed schemes various fault scenarios are simulated.

  4. Visual detection technique for efficient screening and isolation of Salmonella based on a novel enrichment assay using chromatography membrane.

    PubMed

    Tang, F; Xiong, Y; Zhang, H; Wu, K; Xiang, Y; Shao, J-B; Ai, H-W; Xiang, Y-P; Zheng, X-L; Lv, J-R; Sun, H; Bao, L-S; Zhang, Z; Hu, H-B; Zhang, J-Y; Chen, L; Lu, J; Liu, W-Y; Mei, H; Ma, Y; Xu, C-F; Fang, A-Y; Gu, M; Xu, C-Y; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Sun, Z-Y

    2016-03-01

    To detect Salmonella more efficiently and isolate strains more easily, a novel and simple detection method that uses an enrichment assay and two chromogenic reactions on a chromatography membrane was developed. Grade 3 chromatography paper is used as functionalized solid phase support (SPS), which contains specially optimized medium. One reaction for screening is based on the sulfate-reducing capacity of Salmonella. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generated by Salmonella reacts with ammonium ferric citrate to produce black colored ferrous sulfide. Another reaction is based on Salmonella C8 esterase that is unique for Enterobacteriaceae except Serratia and interacts with 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) to produce fluorescent umbelliferone, which is visible under ultraviolet light. A very low detection limit (10(1) CFU ml(-1)) for Salmonella was achieved on the background of 10(5) CFU ml(-1) Escherichia coli. More importantly, testing with more than 1,000 anal samples indicated that our method has a high positive detection rate and is relatively low cost, compared with the traditional culture-based method. It took only 1 day for the preliminary screening and 2 days to efficiently isolate the Salmonella cells, indicating that the new assay is specific, rapid, and simple for Salmonella detection. In contrast to the traditional culture-based method, this method can be easily used to screen and isolate targeted strains with the naked eye. The results of quantitative and comparative experiments showed that the visual detection technique is an efficient alternative method for the screening of Salmonella spp. in many applications of large-sized samples related to public health surveillance.

  5. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  6. Increased sensitivity of RT-PCR for Potato virus Y detection using RNA isolated by a procedure with differential centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Nie, Xianzhou; Boquel, Sébastien; Al-Daoud, Fadi; Pelletier, Yvan

    2015-12-01

    The sensitivity of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for virus detection is influenced by many factors such as specificity of primers and quality of templates. These factors become extremely important for successful detection when virus concentration is low. Total RNA isolated from Potato virus Y (PVY)-infected potato plants using the sodium sulfite RNA isolation method or RNeasy plant mini kit contains a high proportion of host RNA and may also contain trace amount of phenolic and polysaccharide residues, which may inhibit RT-PCR. The goal of this study was to enhance the sensitivity of PVY detection by reducing host RNA in the extract by differential centrifugation followed by extraction using an RNeasy mini kit (DCR method). One-step RT-PCR had relatively low amplification efficiency for PVY RNA when a high proportion of plant RNA was present. SYBR Green-based real time RT-PCR showed that the RNA isolated by the DCR method had a higher cycle threshold value (Ct) for the elongation factor 1-α mRNA (Ef1α) of potato than the Ct value of the RNA extracted using the RNeasy plant mini kit, indicating that the DCR method significantly reduced the proportion of potato RNA in the extract. The detectable amount of RNA extracted using the DCR method was <0.001ng when plant sap from 10 PVY-infected and PVY-free potato leaflets in a 1.5:100 fresh weight ratio was extracted, compared with 0.01 and 0.02ng of RNA using the RNeasy plant mini kit and sodium sulfite RNA isolation methods, respectively.

  7. Isolation of a peptide from Ph.D.-C7C phage display library for detection of Cry1Ab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ai-Hua; Hao, Zhen-Ping; Liu, Xian-Jin

    2017-03-06

    Traditional ELISA methods of using animal immunity yield antibodies for detection Cry toxin. Not only is this incredibly harmful to the animals, but is also time-intensive. Here we developed a simple method to yield the recognition element. Using a critical selection strategy and immunoassay we confirmed a clone from the Ph.D-C7C phage library, which has displayed the most interesting Cry1Ab-binding characteristics examined in this study (Fig. 1). The current study indicates that isolating peptide is an alternative method for the preparation of a recognition element, and that the developed assay is a potentially useful tool for detecting Cry1Ab.

  8. Genetic detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-containing Escherichia coli isolates and vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal samples of healthy children.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Bruno; Barreto, Angela; Radhouani, Hajer; Figueiredo, Nicholas; Gaspar, Eurico; Rodrigues, Jorge; Torres, Carmen; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2009-09-01

    One hundred twelve fecal samples of healthy children were recovered in Portugal during October 2007 and February 2008 and were tested for extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) containing Escherichia coli isolates and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Three of the 112 fecal samples (2.7%) harbored ESBL-positive E. coli isolates and the bla(CTX-M-1), bla(TEM-52), and bla(SHV-12) genes were identified in these isolates. The bla(TEM-52)-containing isolate showed a phenotype of multiresistance that included fluoroquinolones, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol; sul1, sul3, and cmlA genes were detected in this isolate, in addition to two amino acid changes in GyrA (Ser83Leu + Asp87Asn) and one in ParC protein (Ser80Ile). The ESBL isolates corresponded to phylogroup A (one isolate), B1 (one isolate), and D (one isolate). vanA-containing Escherichia faecium isolates were detected in 13 of the 112 fecal samples (11.6%), and vanC-1 isolates were found in 2 samples. A diversity of resistance genes [(tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(6)-Ia, catA, and vat(E)] were found in VRE isolates. These results show that the intestinal tract of healthy children constitutes a reservoir of ESBL-containing E. coli and VRE isolates.

  9. Cross-reactions in specific Brachyspira spp. PCR assays caused by "Brachyspira hampsonii" isolates: implications for detection.

    PubMed

    Aller-Morán, Luis M; Martínez-Lobo, F Javier; Rubio, Pedro; Carvajal, Ana

    2016-11-01

    An emerging novel spirochete in swine, provisionally designated "Brachyspira hampsonii," has been detected worldwide. It has been associated with swine dysentery and cannot be differentiated from B. hyodysenteriae, the classical etiologic agent of this disease, using standard phenotypic methods. We evaluated cross-reactions of "B. hampsonii" isolates recovered from avian species in some of the currently available species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the identification of swine Brachyspira species. Ten avian "B. hampsonii" isolates recovered from wild waterfowl were used. No false-positive results were recorded with a B. pilosicoli-specific PCR based on the amplification of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. However, the percentage of false-positive results varied, with a range of 10-80%, in the evaluated B. hyodysenteriae-specific assays based on the amplification of the 23S rRNA, nox, and tlyA genes. Similarly, results of the B. intermedia-specific PCR assays yielded poor specificity, with up to 80% of the "B. hampsonii" isolates tested giving false-positive results. Finally, 2 "B. hampsonii" avian isolates yielded a positive result in a B. innocens- and B. murdochii-specific PCR. This result should be interpreted very cautiously as these 2 isolates could represent a recombinant genotype.

  10. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  11. Landslide detection and long-term monitoring in urban area by means of advanced interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Liguori, Vincenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    This work aims at illustrating the potential of advanced interferometric techniques for detection and long-term monitoring of landslide ground deformations at local scale. Space-born InSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been successfully exploited in recent years to measure ground deformations associated to processes with slow kinematics, such as landslides, tectonic motions, subsidence or volcanic activity, thanks to both the standard single-interferogram approach (centimeter accuracy) and advanced time-series analyses of long temporal radar satellite data stacks (millimeter accuracy), such as Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) techniques. In order to get a complete overview and an in-depth knowledge of an investigated landslide, InSAR satellite measures can support conventional in situ data. This methodology allows studying the spatial pattern and the temporal evolution of ground deformations, improving the spatial coverage and overcoming issues related to installation of ground-based instrumentation and data acquisition in unstable areas. Here we describe the application of the above-mentioned methodology on the test area of Agrigento, Sicily (Italy), affected by hydrogeological risk. The town is located in Southern Sicily, at edge of the Apennine-Maghrebian thrust belt, on the Plio-Pleistocene and Miocene sediments of the Gela Nappe. Ground instabilities affect the urban area and involve the infrastructures of its NW side, such as the Cathedral, the Seminary and many private buildings. An integration between InSAR analyses and conventional field investigations (e.g. structural damages and fractures surveys) was therefore carried out, to support Regional Civil Protection authorities for emergency management and risk mitigation. The results of InSAR analysis highlighted a general stability of the whole urban area between 1992 and 2007. However, very high deformation rates (up to 10-12 mm/y) were identified in 1992-2000 in the W slope of the

  12. Probabilistic approach to cloud and snow detection on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, J. P.; Hüsler, F.; Sütterlin, M.; Neuhaus, C.; Wunderle, S.

    2014-03-01

    Derivation of probability estimates complementary to geophysical data sets has gained special attention over the last years. Information about a confidence level of provided physical quantities is required to construct an error budget of higher-level products and to correctly interpret final results of a particular analysis. Regarding the generation of products based on satellite data a common input consists of a cloud mask which allows discrimination between surface and cloud signals. Further the surface information is divided between snow and snow-free components. At any step of this discrimination process a misclassification in a cloud/snow mask propagates to higher-level products and may alter their usability. Within this scope a novel probabilistic cloud mask (PCM) algorithm suited for the 1 km × 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data is proposed which provides three types of probability estimates between: cloudy/clear-sky, cloudy/snow and clear-sky/snow conditions. As opposed to the majority of available techniques which are usually based on the decision-tree approach in the PCM algorithm all spectral, angular and ancillary information is used in a single step to retrieve probability estimates from the precomputed look-up tables (LUTs). Moreover, the issue of derivation of a single threshold value for a spectral test was overcome by the concept of multidimensional information space which is divided into small bins by an extensive set of intervals. The discrimination between snow and ice clouds and detection of broken, thin clouds was enhanced by means of the invariant coordinate system (ICS) transformation. The study area covers a wide range of environmental conditions spanning from Iceland through central Europe to northern parts of Africa which exhibit diverse difficulties for cloud/snow masking algorithms. The retrieved PCM cloud classification was compared to the Polar Platform System (PPS) version 2012 and Moderate Resolution Imaging

  13. Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) for Advanced Life Detection Instrumentation Development and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel; Brinkerhoff, Will; Dworkin, Jason; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul; Stern, Jen; Blake, Daid; Sandford, Scott; Fries, marc; Steele, Andrew; Amashukeli, Xenia; Fisher, Anita; Grunthaner, Frank; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeff; Chiesl, Tom; Stockton, Amanda; Mathies, Rich

    2008-01-01

    Scientific ground-truth measurements for near-term Mars missions, such as the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, are essential for validating current in situ flight instrumentation and for the development of advanced instrumentation technologies for life-detection missions over the next decade. The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) has recently funded a consortium of researchers called the Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) to analyze an identical set of homogenized martian analog materials in a "round-robin" style using both state-of-the-art laboratory techniques as well as in-situ flight instrumentation including the SAM gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and CHEMIN X-ray diffraction/fluorescence instruments on MSL and the Urey and MOMA organic analyzer instruments under development for the 2013 ExoMars missions. The analog samples studied included an Atacama Desert soil from Chile, the Murchison meteorite, a gypsum sample from the 2007 AMASE Mars analog site, jarosite from Panoche Valley, CA, a hydrothermal sample from Rio Tinto, Spain, and a "blind" sample collected during the 2007 MSL slow-motion field test in New Mexico. Each sample was distributed to the team for analysis to: (1) determine the nature and inventory of organic compounds, (2) measure the bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition, (3) investigate elemental abundances, mineralogy and matrix, and (4) search for biological activity. The experimental results obtained from the ASAP Mars analog research consortium will be used to build a framework for understanding the biogeochemistry of martian analogs, help calibrate current spaceflight instrumentation, and enhance the scientific return from upcoming missions.

  14. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  15. Detection, Isolation, and Characterization of Acidophilic Methanotrophs from Sphagnum Mosses ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Nardy; Ouyang, Wenjing; van Winden, Julia; Raghoebarsing, Ashna; van Niftrik, Laura; Pol, Arjan; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente; van Donselaar, Elly G.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Sphagnum peatlands are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane-oxidizing bacteria in these ecosystems serve as a methane filter and limit methane emissions. Yet little is known about the diversity and identity of the methanotrophs present in and on Sphagnum mosses of peatlands, and only a few isolates are known. The methanotrophic community in Sphagnum mosses, originating from a Dutch peat bog, was investigated using a pmoA microarray. A high biodiversity of both gamma- and alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs was found. With Sphagnum mosses as the inoculum, alpha- and gammaproteobacterial acidophilic methanotrophs were isolated using established and newly designed media. The 16S rRNA, pmoA, pxmA, and mmoX gene sequences showed that the alphaproteobacterial isolates belonged to the Methylocystis and Methylosinus genera. The Methylosinus species isolated are the first acid-tolerant members of this genus. Of the acidophilic gammaproteobacterial strains isolated, strain M5 was affiliated with the Methylomonas genus, and the other strain, M200, may represent a novel genus, most closely related to the genera Methylosoma and Methylovulum. So far, no acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs in the Gammaproteobacteria class are known. All strains showed the typical features of either type I or II methanotrophs and are, to the best of our knowledge, the first isolated (acidophilic or acid-tolerant) methanotrophs from Sphagnum mosses. PMID:21724892

  16. Multi-damage detection with embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm using piezoelectric wafer active sensors through advanced signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2005-05-01

    The embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm was developed by using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. EUSR has been verified to be effective for detecting a single crack either at a broadside or at an offside position. In this research, advanced signal processing techniques were included to enhance inspection image quality and detect multiple damage. The signal processing methods include discrete wavelet transform for signal denoising, short-time Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform for time-frequency analysis, continuous wavelet transform for frequency filtering, and Hilbert transform for envelope extraction. All these signal processing modules were implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabVIEW. The paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm, followed with the theoretical aspect of the phased array signal processing method. Then, the mathematical algorithms for advanced signal processing are introduced. In the end, laboratory experimental results are presented to show how efficiently the improved EUSR works. The results are analyzed and EUSR is concluded to have been improved by using the advanced signal processing techniques. The improvements include: 1) EUSR is able to provide better image of the specimen under monitoring; 2) it is able to detect multi-damage such as several cracks; 3) it is able to identify different damage types.

  17. Molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance in local isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from urinary tract infections in Faisalabad region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farid, Anam; Naz, Iram; Ashraf, Asma; Ali, Aamir; Rehman, Asad-Ur; Sarwar, Yasra; Haque, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci are one of the foremost causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. The emergence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) among Staphylococci poses serious challenges in antimicrobial therapy for UTIs. Most work has been done on S. aureus while coagulase negative Staphylococci (mainly S. epidermidis) are often neglected. This study was conducted to establish a baseline profile of drug resistance in local S. epidermidis isolates from UTIs. Eighty urine samples were collected from suspected UTIs cases and screened for S. epidermidis. Twenty isolates were suspected as S. epidermidis based on colony morphology and Gram staining. Molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed 13 isolates as S. epidermidis. Using disc diffusion method, phenotypic drug resistance of the isolates was observed towards erythromycin (100 %), gentamycin, azithromycin and tetracycline (92.3 %), ampicillin and oxytetracyclin (84.6 %), amikacin and srteptomycin (76.9 %), methicillin (69.2 %), cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin (53.8 %) and vancomycin (15.3 %). Eighteen most commonly reported genes responsible for conferring resistance towards these drugs were targeted by PCR: among these tetM gene was found most prevalent (46.1 %) followed by tetK (30.7 %), aac(6')/aph(2") (30.7 %), aacA-aphD (23 %), ermA (23 %), blaZ (23 %), mecA (23 %) blaTEM-1 (23 %), MeccA (23 %) and mecA (15.3 %). No gene fragment for vancomycin resistance was detected. The salient finding was that all S. epidermidis isolates were multiple drugs resistant as they showed resistance against at least three structurally different antimicrobial agents. It is concluded that in addition to the mostly used antimicrobial agent vancomycin, the cephalosporins including cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin are also the drugs of choice against UTIs caused by S. epidermidis.

  18. Comparison of methods for the detection of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Melo, Poliana; Ferreira, Luciano Menezes; Filho, Antônio Nader; Zafalon, Luiz Francisco; Vicente, Hinig Isa Godoy; de Souza, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is considered to be a selective advantage for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolates by facilitating bacterial persistence in the udder. It requires attachment to mammary epithelium, proliferation and accumulation of cells in multilayers. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of three techniques for the detection of S. aureus biofilm-positive strains. Two phenotypic tests, including growth on microtitre plates and Congo red agar, were compared with a PCR technique using 94 S. aureus strains obtained from cows with subclinical mastitis from two farms in the state of São Paulo. These strains were characterised by in vitro slime production on Congo red agar, biofilm formation on microtitre plates and the presence of the icaA and icaD genes. The results revealed that 85% of the isolates tested produced slime on the Congo red agar, 98.9% of the isolates produced biofilms in vitro by adhering to sterile 96-well “U” bottom polystyrene tissue culture plates, and 95.7% of the isolates carried the icaA and icaD genes. The results of the phenotypic tests for biofilm formation were compared with those of the molecular analysis, and the sensitivity and specificity of the Congo red agar test were 88.9% and 100%, respectively, while those of the microtitre plate test were 100% and 25%, respectively. When the phenotypic methods for the detection of biofilm producers, namely growth on microtitre plates and Congo red agar, were compared, the sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 100%, respectively. Therefore, growth on Congo red agar and the microtitre plate test are methods that could be used to determine whether an isolate has the potential for biofilm production. PMID:24159293

  19. Evaluation of Particle Counter Technology for Detection of Fuel Contamination Detection Utilizing Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-24

    replacement of water bottom removal.  Recirculation – Air was purged from the filter separator vessel and fuel was again pumped from the tank , through...8, Automatic Particle Counter, cleanliness, free water , Diesel 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT none 18. NUMBER OF...Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System Joel Schmitigal U S Army Tank Automotive Research DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release

  20. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    PubMed

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  1. Comparative study of fluorogenic and chromogenic media for specific detection of environmental isolates of thermotolerant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Pramod W; Tewari, Suman

    2002-10-01

    In a field study 78 water samples were analysed employing Fluorocult Brilla Broth (BB) and its performance was compared with standard MPN procedure. Out of 78 water samples analysed 56 (71.7%) samples yielded positive reactions in BB whereas, 50 (64.1%) samples were positive by standard fecal coliform test. A comparative study of fluorogenic and chromogenic media containing substrate beta-D glucuronide for specific detection of environmental isolates of 313 thermotolerant E. coli has been undertaken. Five fluorogenic media were used: Fluorocult MacConkey agar (MCA), Fluorocult ECD agar (ECD), Fluorocult VRB agar (VRB), Fluorocult E. coli 0157:H7 agar (ECH7) and Fluorocult Brilla Broth (BB) and Chromogenic Chromocult agar (CCA). BB and CCA were found to be highly specific and sensitive media to detect E. coli as all E. coli yielded positive reaction on them. On ECH7 and ECD agar 67.5 and 64.9 of E. coli isolates gave positive reaction, respectively. Low sensitivity was observed in case of MCA and VRB agar in detecting E. coli. The performance of BB appears to be better when compared with standard MPN procedure employing MacConkey broth/Brilliant green bile broth in detecting E. coli in drinking water.

  2. Efficient single muscle fiber isolation from alcohol-fixed adult muscle following β-galactosidase staining for satellite cell detection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mayank; Asakura, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Staining for β-galactosidase activity for whole tissues, sections, and cells is a common method to detect expression of β-galactosidase reporter transgene as well as senescence-dependent β-galactosidase activity. Choice of fixatives is a critical step for detection of β-galactosidase activity, subsequent immunostaining, and enzymatic digestion of tissue to dissociate cells. In this report, the authors examined several aldehyde and alcohol fixatives in mouse skeletal muscle tissues for their efficiency at improving detection of β-galactosidase activity as well as detection by immunostaining. In addition, fixatives were also analyzed for their efficiency for collagenase digestion to isolate single muscle fibers on postfixed β-galactosidase-stained whole skeletal muscle tissues. The results show that fixing cells with isopropanol yields the greatest reliability and intensity in both β-galactosidase staining as well as double staining for β-galactosidase activity and antibodies. In addition, isopropanol and ethanol, but not glutaraldehyde or paraformaldehyde, allow for the isolation of single muscle fibers from the diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles following postfixed β-galactosidase staining. Using this method, it is possible to identify the amount of cells that occupy the satellite cell compartment in single muscle fibers prepared from any muscle tissues, including tibialis anterior muscle and diaphragm.

  3. Isolated tumor cells are frequently detectable in the peritoneal cavity of gastric and colorectal cancer patients and serve as a new prognostic marker.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, A; Vogel, I; Krueger, U; Kalthoff, H; Schreiber, H W; Schmiegel, W; Henne-Bruns, D; Kremer, B; Juhl, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic significance of isolated tumor cells detected by a panel of various monoclonal antibodies. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Previously, we showed by using immunocytology that cancer cells are frequently found in bone marrow and peritoneal cavity samples of gastrointestinal cancer patients. METHODS: Findings in bone marrow and peritoneal cavity samples were compared and correlated with the 4-year survival rate of 84 gastric and 109 colorectal patients with cancer. RESULTS: Although positive results in the bone marrow showed little prognostic significance, the peritoneal cavity results correlated with the 4-year survival rate (gastric cancer: p = 0.0038; colorectal cancer: p = 0.0079). Additionally, in subgroups of patients with early (gastric cancer: p = 0.02, colorectal cancer: p = 0.48) and advanced (gastric cancer: p = 0.02, colorectal cancer: p < 0.0001) tumor stages, a correlation of immunocytologic findings and the survival rate was seen. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of minimal residual disease in the peritoneal cavity serves as a new prognostic marker. Images Figure 5. PMID:9527060

  4. The potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the predictions of general relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess what magnitude of deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters for different binary masses from the observation of a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order. We also find that neglect of orbital eccentricity or tidal deformation effects do not cause a significant bias on the detectable region of generic deviations from general relativity.

  5. Method comparison for enhanced recovery, isolation and qualitative detection of C. jejuni and C. coli from wastewater effluent samples.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Florez-Cuadrado, Diego; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Porrero, María Concepción; Domínguez, Lucas

    2015-03-02

    Seeking a sensitive protocol, culture-dependent methods were compared to detect thermophilic Campylobacter species in untreated urban effluents. We evaluated various combinations of selective media, with and without an enrichment steps, as well as an extra filtration step. Culture-independent real-time quantitative PCR was also included and all detected isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All tested water samples contained Campylobacter DNA, but only 64% were positive after culture. Although enrichment using Preston broth resulted in better recovery of potentially stressed Campylobacter than Bolton or Campyfood broth (CFB), there was no significant increase in efficiency compared to direct plating. The type of selective agar media used, on the other hand, had a significant effect, with CASA plates performing better than mCCDA or CFA ones. Inclusion of an enrichment step increased the ratio of C. coli vs. C. jejuni being isolated. Resistances against all antimicrobials tested were observed in C. coli, but fewer instances of resistance were found in C. jejuni isolates. Whether this difference was the result of selection during the enrichment step could not be determined. The presence of Campylobacter in urban effluents can be considered as a valuable proxy for Campylobacter populations present in urban environments.

  6. Value of plasmid profiling, ribotyping, and detection of IS200 for tracing avian isolates of Salmonella typhimurium and S. enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Millemann, Y; Lesage, M C; Chaslus-Dancla, E; Lafont, J P

    1995-01-01

    Seventy selected strains of Salmonella typhimurium and S. enteritidis isolated from related poultry flocks in three independent geographical areas were characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods to compare the usefulness of the methods in epidemiological studies. The 56 S. typhimurium isolates were poorly discriminated by their biotypes, resistance patterns, and plasmid profiles. Nine different ribotypes were obtained after DNA digestion by BglII, PvuII, and SmaI. Seven IS200 types, characterized by six to nine copies of IS200 on the chromosome, were detected after digestion of genomic DNA by PstI. These studies resulted in the definition of 15 clonal lineages distributed in three clusters. The 14 S. enteritidis strains were not discriminated either by ribotyping or by detection of IS200 (IS200 typing), but were separated on the basis of antibiotic resistance and plasmid profiling. The stability of the insertion sequence type was confirmed by inoculation of an S. typhimurium strain to axenic chickens reared for 15 weeks in sterile isolators. PMID:7699037

  7. Method Comparison for Enhanced Recovery, Isolation and Qualitative Detection of C. jejuni and C. coli from Wastewater Effluent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Florez-Cuadrado, Diego; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Porrero, María Concepción; Domínguez, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Seeking a sensitive protocol, culture-dependent methods were compared to detect thermophilic Campylobacter species in untreated urban effluents. We evaluated various combinations of selective media, with and without an enrichment steps, as well as an extra filtration step. Culture-independent real-time quantitative PCR was also included and all detected isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All tested water samples contained Campylobacter DNA, but only 64% were positive after culture. Although enrichment using Preston broth resulted in better recovery of potentially stressed Campylobacter than Bolton or Campyfood broth (CFB), there was no significant increase in efficiency compared to direct plating. The type of selective agar media used, on the other hand, had a significant effect, with CASA plates performing better than mCCDA or CFA ones. Inclusion of an enrichment step increased the ratio of C. coli vs. C. jejuni being isolated. Resistances against all antimicrobials tested were observed in C. coli, but fewer instances of resistance were found in C. jejuni isolates. Whether this difference was the result of selection during the enrichment step could not be determined. The presence of Campylobacter in urban effluents can be considered as a valuable proxy for Campylobacter populations present in urban environments. PMID:25739008

  8. Complete genome sequence of two rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus variant b isolates detected on the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Dalton, K P; Abrantes, J; Lopes, A M; Nicieza, I; Álvarez, Á L; Esteves, P J; Parra, F

    2015-03-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of two isolates (RHDV-N11 and CBVal16) of variant rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDVb). Isolate N11 was detected in young domestic animals during a rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) outbreak that occurred in 2011 on a rabbit farm in Navarra, Spain, while CBVal16 was isolated from a wild rabbit found dead in Valpaços, Northern Portugal, a year later. The viral sequences reported show 84.8-85.1 % and 78.3-78.5 % identity to RHDVAst/89 and RCV-A1 MIC-07, representative members of the pathogenic genogroup 1 RHDV and apathogenic rabbit calicivirus, respectively. In comparison with other RHDV isolates belonging to the previously known genogroups 1-6, RHDVb shows marked phenotypic differences, as it causes disease preferentially in young rabbits under 40 days of age and shows modified red blood cell agglutination profiles as well as antigenic differences that allow this variant to escape protection by the currently available vaccines.

  9. Influence of enrichment and isolation media on the detection of Campylobacter spp. in naturally contaminated chicken samples.

    PubMed

    Repérant, E; Laisney, M J; Nagard, B; Quesne, S; Rouxel, S; Le Gall, F; Chemaly, M; Denis, M

    2016-09-01

    Investigating Campylobacter epidemiology requires adequate technique and media to ensure optimal culturing and accurate detection and isolation of Campylobacter strains. In the present study, we investigated the performances of three enrichment durations in Bolton broth (0, 24 and 48h) and compared four isolation media (mCCDA, Karmali, Butzler no. 2 and CampyFood agar (CFA)) for the detection of Campylobacter positive samples and the identification of Campylobacter species, from naturally contaminated broiler chicken samples (caeca, neck skin from carcasses, and skin from thighs). We compared our local results to those we obtained with samples from a European survey (caeca and neck skin) and a national survey (neck skin, thigh skin, and breast). Direct plating favored the detection of positive samples highly contaminated by Campylobacter (caeca and neck skin from carcasses) whatever the media. A longer enrichment reduced the rates of Campylobacter recovery except when using Butzler no. 2, more particularly for neck skin which background microflora was less important than in caeca. As a matter of fact, enrichment allowed a higher detection rate of positive samples with low Campylobacter contamination levels (breast, thigh skin), this detection being enhanced when using Butzler no. 2. When comparing the 3 other selective media, CFA was the 2nd most efficient media prior to mCCDA and Karmali. Interestingly, enrichment promoted the growth of Campylobacter coli but this promotion was least with Butzler no. 2 agar. Our study has confirmed the need to adapt the method to the types of samples for improving the detection of Campylobacter and that the method may affect the prevalence of the species.

  10. Virological and phylogenetic characterization of attenuated small ruminant lentivirus isolates eluding efficient serological detection.

    PubMed

    Cardinaux, Laure; Zahno, Marie-Luise; Deubelbeiss, Martina; Zanoni, Reto; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Bertoni, Giuseppe

    2013-03-23

    Three field isolates of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) were derived from a mixed flock of goats and sheep certified for many years as free of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV). The phylogenetic analysis of pol sequences permitted to classify these isolates as A4 subtype. None of the animals showed clinical signs of SRLV infection, confirming previous observations which had suggested that this particular subtype is highly attenuated, at least for goats. A quantitative real time PCR strategy based on primers and probes derived from a highly variable env region permitted us to classify the animals as uninfected, singly or doubly infected. The performance of different serological tools based on this classification revealed their profound inadequacy in monitoring animals infected with this particular SRLV subtype. In vitro, the isolates showed differences in their cytopathicity and a tendency to replicate more efficiently in goat than sheep cells, especially in goat macrophages. By contrast, in vivo, these viruses reached significantly higher viral loads in sheep than in goats. Both env subtypes infected goats and sheep with equal efficiency. One of these, however, reached significantly higher viral loads in both species. In conclusion, we characterized three isolates of the SRLV subtype A4 that efficiently circulate in a mixed herd of goats and sheep in spite of their apparent attenuation and a strict physical separation between goats and sheep. The poor performance of the serological tools applied indicates that, to support an SRLV eradication campaign, it is imperative to develop novel, subtype specific tools.

  11. Identification and detection of the isolated sinus venosus from the Asian toad.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Guan, Chao; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Bing; Li, Sen; Sun, Guiyuan; Hao, Liying; Li, Gensong

    2013-12-01

    The pacemaker activity of mammalian sinoatrial node (SAN) of the heart plays a fundamental role in the integration of vital functions. Studying factors such as drugs that influence pacemaker activity of SAN has its significance. In this study, we isolated sinus venosus, SAN from toads (Bufo gargarizans), and analysed its electronic signal, histological characteristics and the influence of acetylcholine (ACh) and ivabradine on its pacemaker activity using PowerLab® and Chart® 5.0 software. We found that when isolated sinus venosus was treated with ACh, its histological distribution was disorganized and inter-beat (RR) interval was also broadened. The high frequency normalized unit (HFnu) and Poincaré plot of heart rate variability (HRV) of the isolated sinus venosus was also altered upon ACh treatment in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. When treated with ivabradine, these parameters of HRV such as square root of the mean of the squared differences between adjacent NN intervals (RMSSD) and HFnu were in the upward tendency, but low frequency normalized unit and low frequency/high frequency were in the opposite tendency. Taken together, we have developed a new model for studying the influences of drugs on autorhythmicity using isolated sinus venosus of the toad. With this model, we showed that ACh and ivabradine may affect the pacemaker activity by stimulating muscarinic receptor or inhibiting If current, respectively.

  12. Use of a Passive Reaction Wheel Jitter Isolation System to Meet the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Imaging Performance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Christopher J.

    1998-01-01

    Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in November of 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this observatory will image light at X-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF project is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Because of exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it was necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction was accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system to interface the reaction wheels with the spacecraft central structure. In addition to presenting a description of the spacecraft, the isolation system, and the key image quality requirement flowdown, this paper details the analyses performed in support of system-level imaging performance requirement verification. These analyses include the identification of system-level requirement suballocations, quantification of imaging and pointing performance, and formulation of unit-level isolation system transmissibility requirements. Given in comparison to the non-isolated system imaging performance, the results of these analyses clearly illustrate the effectiveness of an innovative reaction wheel passive isolation system.

  13. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Measles Patients in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Kristi L.; Alassaf, Wajdan; Burns, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious airborne disease that was declared eliminated in the U.S. in the year 2000. Only sporadic U.S. cases and minor outbreaks occurred until the larger outbreak beginning in 2014 that has become a public health emergency. The “Identify-Isolate-Inform” tool will assist emergency physicians to be better prepared to detect and manage measles patients presenting to the emergency department. Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots. Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body. Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease. Emergency physicians must rapidly inform the local public health department and hospital infection control personnel of suspected measles cases. PMID:25834659

  14. Analytic Confusion Matrix Bounds for Fault Detection and Isolation Using a Sum-of-Squared- Residuals Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Given a system which can fail in 1 or n different ways, a fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm uses sensor data in order to determine which fault is the most likely to have occurred. The effectiveness of an FDI algorithm can be quantified by a confusion matrix, which i ndicates the probability that each fault is isolated given that each fault has occurred. Confusion matrices are often generated with simulation data, particularly for complex systems. In this paper we perform FDI using sums of squares of sensor residuals (SSRs). We assume that the sensor residuals are Gaussian, which gives the SSRs a chi-squared distribution. We then generate analytic lower and upper bounds on the confusion matrix elements. This allows for the generation of optimal sensor sets without numerical simulations. The confusion matrix bound s are verified with simulated aircraft engine data.

  15. Detection and isolation of circulating exosomes and microvesicles for cancer monitoring and diagnostics using micro-/nano-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jina

    2016-01-01

    In the last several years, nanoscale vesicles that originate from tumor cells and which can be found circulating in the blood (i.e. exosomes and microvesicles) have been discovered to contain a wealth of proteomic and genetic information to monitor cancer progression, metastasis, and drug efficacy. However, the use of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers to improve patient care has been limited by their small size (30 nm–1 μm) and the extensive sample preparation required for their isolation and measurement. In this Critical Review, we explore the emerging use of micro and nano-technology to isolate and detect exosomes and microvesicles in clinical samples and the application of this technology to the monitoring and diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26378496

  16. Identify-isolate-inform: a tool for initial detection and management of measles patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Alassaf, Wajdan; Burns, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious airborne disease that was declared eliminated in the U.S. in the year 2000. Only sporadic U.S. cases and minor outbreaks occurred until the larger outbreak beginning in 2014 that has become a public health emergency. The "Identify-Isolate-Inform" tool will assist emergency physicians to be better prepared to detect and manage measles patients presenting to the emergency department. Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots. Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body. Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease. Emergency physicians must rapidly inform the local public health department and hospital infection control personnel of suspected measles cases.

  17. Real-time RT-PCR assay for detection and differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For universal detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains by real time RT-PCR, a protocol was developed based on a set of primers and a Cy5-labeled TaqMan probe. This test included primers and a TET-labeled TaqMan probe selected on the mitochondrial nad5 gene for the simultaneous detection of ...

  18. Comparison of commercially available media for detection and isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed Central

    Broitman, N L; Floyd, C M; Johnson, C A; de la Maza, L M; Peterson, E M

    1992-01-01

    The Mycotrim Triphasic flask system (Irvine Scientific, Irvine, Calif.) was compared with a system composed of Mycotrim GU broth (Irvine Scientific) and A7 or A8 agar (Remel, Lenexa, Kans.) for the ability to detect Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis from 129 genital specimens. Of the 64 specimens positive for U. urealyticum, 25, 98, and 100% were detected on Mycotrim Triphasic agar and A7 and A8 agars, respectively. All 18 specimens that grew M. hominis were detected by A7 and A8 agars, and 94% grew on Mycotrim Triphasic agar. Mycotrim GU broth detected all of the positive specimens, and Mycotrim Triphasic broth detected all but one. Mycotrim GU broth inoculated simultaneously with either A7 or A8 agar was found to be more sensitive and cost-effective than the Mycotrim Triphasic flask system. PMID:1583143

  19. Comparison of commercially available media for detection and isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed

    Broitman, N L; Floyd, C M; Johnson, C A; de la Maza, L M; Peterson, E M

    1992-05-01

    The Mycotrim Triphasic flask system (Irvine Scientific, Irvine, Calif.) was compared with a system composed of Mycotrim GU broth (Irvine Scientific) and A7 or A8 agar (Remel, Lenexa, Kans.) for the ability to detect Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis from 129 genital specimens. Of the 64 specimens positive for U. urealyticum, 25, 98, and 100% were detected on Mycotrim Triphasic agar and A7 and A8 agars, respectively. All 18 specimens that grew M. hominis were detected by A7 and A8 agars, and 94% grew on Mycotrim Triphasic agar. Mycotrim GU broth detected all of the positive specimens, and Mycotrim Triphasic broth detected all but one. Mycotrim GU broth inoculated simultaneously with either A7 or A8 agar was found to be more sensitive and cost-effective than the Mycotrim Triphasic flask system.

  20. Advances in land mine detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Janni, James A.; Klein, James D.

    1999-08-01

    We report surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for vapors of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 4-amino-2, 6-dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene (TNT) adsorbed onto gold metal foils. Detection of 2,4-DNT down to approximately 1 ppb has been demonstrated. A compact field portable Raman unit with fiber optic SERS attachment has been fabricated and field tested for landmine detection. Preliminary results showed little environmental interference to the SERS measurement and detection of a buried landmine. The results demonstrate that SERS can detect buried landmines and, with further improvements, has the potential to be a man-portable field unit for landmine detection.

  1. A real-time engineering software system for failure detection and isolation of self-repairing flight control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Juan; Ai, Jianliang; Gao, Min; Luo, Changhang

    2006-11-01

    This paper introduces a real-time Failure Detection and Isolation (FDI) software system of Self-Repairing Flight Control System (SRFCS) that is developed by Institute of Vehicle Design of Fudan University. An algorithm of adopting the method of parity space to get residual sequences and the theory of residual vector data fusion is applied to detecting and isolating the abrupt change failures of SRFCS, especially the actuators' failures, single control surface's failures and multiple failures. The system follows the theory of object-oriented software design by adopting the design idea of modularization and uses Dynamic Link Library (DLL) widely so that it is easy to replant new modules and extend its ability freely. The interface of this system is friendly and the operation on it is convenient. In this paper, the system is applied to the flight control system of some type of fighter of Chinese Air Force and the results show that this software system can detect single control surface's failures within 0.125 seconds (10 sampling periods) and actuators' failures within 0.0625 seconds (5 sampling periods) under strong noise circumstances. The test results based on the simulated data prove the validity of the theory, the robust and real time property of the developed software.

  2. An improved method of DNA isolation suitable for PCR-based detection of begomoviruses from jute and other mucilaginous plants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Paul, Sujay; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Roy, Anirban

    2009-07-01

    A relatively quick and inexpensive modified cetyl trimethylammonium bromide method for extraction of DNA from leaf materials containing large quantities of mucilage is described. The modification including use of more volume of extraction buffer and dissolving crude nucleic acid pellet in 1 M NaCl, reduced markedly the viscosity of the mucilage and thus in the final purification step yielded a larger quantity of mucilage-free DNA suitable for subsequent PCR-based detection of begomoviruses. The method was standardized with jute samples with yellow mosaic disease and validated with different other mucilaginous-hosts with low titre of begomoviruses. DNA isolated using this method showed consistency in yield and compatibility with PCR for detection of begomoviruses from different mucilaginous plant species. The method was compared for efficacy with other reported methods and it was found to be superior over the existing methods described for isolation of DNA from mucilaginous hosts. Thus the method described could be used on a wider scale for reliable and consistent detection of begomoviruses from mucilaginous hosts for characterization and variability study.

  3. [Comparison of the modified Hodge test and the Carba NP test for detection of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae isolates].

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Uluçam, Gülşen; Gençoğlu Özgür, Çiğdem; Kılıç, Ali Osman; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, practical, and accurate identification of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates is crucial for the implementation of appropriate infection control measures and proper treatment of the infections. For this purpose, a large number of phenotypic test methods have been developed, although none has 100% sensitivity and specificity. Variations in sensitivity and specificity of these tests based on the type of beta-lactamase enzymes carried by that isolates might result in differences between regions and countries. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of widely used modified Hodge test (MHT) and Carbapenemase Nordmann-Poirel (Carba NP) test in the detection of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae family members. A total of 65 Enterobacteriaceae isolates (43 bla(OXA-48), 10 bla(VIM), 9 bla(IMP), 1 bla(NDM-1), 1 bla(KPC-2) and 1 bla(OXA-48)+bla(VIM) carrying strains) that showed decreased sensitivity to at least one carbapenem (ertapenem, imipenem or meropenem), and carriage of carbapenemase gene confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were included in the study. Seventy-eight isolates showing decreased susceptibility to carbapenems but lacking carbapenemase genes were used as controls. All isolates were identified by using conventional methods as well as automated BD Phoenix System (Becton Dickinson, USA). The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the same automated system, and was confirmed by disk diffusion method. Results were evaluated according to the CLSI criteria. MHT was performed in accordance with the CLSI guideline, and Carba NP test was carried out by a modified protocol. Instead of imipenem monohydrate, which was used in the original protocol, 6 mg/ml imipenem/cilastatin was used in the modified protocol. In the study, MHT identified 90.8% (59/65) of carbapenemase-producing isolates, while 93.9% (61/65) of the isolates were identified by Carba NP test. With MHT, four Klebsiella pneumoniae

  4. Plasmid Profile Analysis and bla VIM Gene Detection of Metalo β-lactamase (MBL) Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    M, Jeya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of hospitalized patients. They are responsible for serious infections such as meningitis, urological infections, septicemia and pneumonia. Carbapenem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is currently increasingly reported which is often mediated by production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates may involve reduced cell wall permeability, production of chromosomal and plasmid mediated β lactamases, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and an active multidrug efflux mechanism. Objective: This study is aimed to detect the presence and the nature of plasmids among metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Also to detect the presence of bla VIM gene from these isolates. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showing the metalo-β-lactamase enzyme (MBL) production were isolated. The MBL production was confirmed by three different methods. From the MBL producing isolates plasmid extraction was done by alkaline lysis method. Plasmid positive isolates were subjected for blaVIM gene detection by PCR method. Results: Two thousand seventy six clinical samples yielded 316 (15.22%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, out of which 141 (44.62%) were multidrug resistant. Among them 25 (17.73%) were metallo-β-lactamase enzyme producers. Plasmids were extracted from 18 out of 25 isolates tested. Five out of 18 isolates were positive for the blaVIM gene detection by the PCR amplification. Conclusion: The MBL producers were susceptible to polymyxin /colistin with MIC ranging from 0.5 – 2μg/ml. Molecular detection of specific genes bla VIM were positive among the carbapenem resistant isolates. PMID:25120980

  5. Advances in the early detection of lung cancer using analysis of volatile organic compounds: from imaging to sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Liu, Hong-Ying; Jia, Zi-Ru; Qiao, Pan-Pan; Pi, Xi-Tian; Chen, Jun; Deng, Lin-Hong

    2014-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 1.37 million people died of lung cancer all around the world in 2008, occupying the first place in all cancer-related deaths. However, this number might be decreased if patients were detected earlier and treated appropriately. Unfortunately, traditional imaging techniques are not sufficiently satisfactory for early detection of lung cancer because of limitations. As one alternative, breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may reflect the biochemical status of the body and provide clues to some diseases including lung cancer at early stage. Early detection of lung cancer based on breath analysis is becoming more and more valued because it is non-invasive, sensitive, inexpensive and simple. In this review article, we analyze the limitations of traditional imaging techniques in the early detection of lung cancer, illustrate possible mechanisms of the production of VOCs in cancerous cells, present evidence that supports the detection of such disease using breath analysis, and summarize the advances in the study of E-noses based on gas sensitive sensors. In conclusion, the analysis of breath VOCs is a better choice for the early detection of lung cancer compared to imaging techniques. We recommend a more comprehensive technique that integrates the analysis of VOCs and non-VOCs in breath. In addition, VOCs in urine may also be a trend in research on the early detection of lung cancer.

  6. Detection of Oxacillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from the Neonatal and Pediatric Units of a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Martins, André; de Souza Rugolo, Lígia Maria Suppo; de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine, by phenotypic and genotypic methods, oxacillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit patients seen at the University Hospital of the Botucatu School of Medicine. Methods: A total of 100 S. aureus strains isolated from the following materials were studied: 25 blood cultures, 21 secretions, 12 catheters, 3 cannulae and one chest drain from 62 patients in the neonatal unit, and 36 blood cultures, one pleural fluid sample and one peritoneal fluid sample from 38 patients in the pediatric unit. Resistance of the S. aureus isolates to oxacillin was evaluated by the disk diffusion method with oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg), agar screening test using Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 6 μg/ml oxacillin and 4% NaCl, and detection of the mecA gene by PCR. In addition, the isolates were tested for β-lactamase production using disks impregnated with Nitrocefin and hyperproduction of β-lactamase using amoxicillin (20 μg) and clavulanic acid (10 μg) disks. Results: Among the 100 S. aureus strains included in the study, 18.0% were resistant to oxacillin, with 16.1% MRSA being detected in the neonatal unit and 21.0% in the pediatric unit. The oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg) disk diffusion methods presented 94.4% and 100% sensitivity, respectively, and 98.8% specificity. The screening test showed 100% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity. All isolates produced β-lactamase and one of these strains was considered to be a hyperproducer. Conclusions: The 30 μg cefoxitin disk diffusion method presented the best result when compared to the 1 μg oxacillin disk. The sensitivity of the agar screening test was similar to that of the cefoxitin disk diffusion method and higher than that of the oxacillin disk diffusion method. We observed variations in the percentage of oxacillin-resistant isolates during the study period, with a decline over the last years which might be

  7. Characterization of clinical Clostridium difficile isolates by PCR ribotyping and detection of toxin genes in Austria, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Indra, A; Schmid, D; Huhulescu, S; Hell, M; Gattringer, R; Hasenberger, P; Fiedler, A; Wewalka, G; Allerberger, F

    2008-06-01

    In order to assess the lethality of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) and the PCR ribotypes prevalent in Austria, the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety requested isolates of C. difficile from patients in a structured but arbitrary sampling scheme. In the allocated period from February 2006 to January 2007, local hospital laboratories within each of the nine provinces were asked to submit C. difficile isolates from at least ten cases of CDAD. Confirmation of species identification, toxin detection, susceptibility testing against four antimicrobial agents and typing using a PCR ribotyping method were performed at the reference laboratory. In total, 149 isolates of putative C. difficile were submitted, from which 142 were included for study. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns revealed resistance to clindamycin in 57% and high-level resistance to moxifloxacin in 38% of isolates tested. CDAD manifested as diarrhoea (including eight cases of bloody diarrhoea) in 126 cases (88.7%), as pseudomembranous colitis in 15 cases (10.6%) and as toxic megacolon in one case. Twelve of the 142 patients died within 30 days of specimen collection (8.45% lethality). A lethal outcome occurred in 2/15 cases (13.3%) when pseudomembranous colitis was present and in 10/126 cases (7.9%) in the absence of pseudomembranous colitis or toxic megacolon. Among the 142 isolates from 25 health-care facilities, 41 PCR ribotype patterns were found. The most frequent ribotypes were AI-5 (including six lethal cases out of 26 patients), 014 (two out of 24) and 053 (one out of 24). The typing patterns demonstrated the occurrence of clusters in hospitals.

  8. Detection of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) and Extremely Drug Resistant (XDR) P. Aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Horieh; Owlia, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was done to detect multidrug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among strains isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, due to importance of these phenotypes in treatment of human infections. Methods: Eighty eight P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, and identified by routine methods and PCR for oprL gene. Their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents from 7 antimicrobial categories (aminoglycosides, carbapenems, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, penicillins/ß-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, polymyxins) were determined by disk diffusion method, according to recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Characterization of P. aeruginosa isolates as MDR and XDR was done according to standardized international terminology presented by European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥3 antimicrobial categories and XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥6 antimicrobial categories. Results: The rates of susceptibility to antimicrobials were as follows: gentamicin 27.3%, tobramycin 54.5%, amikacin 56.8%, netilmicin 36.4%, imipenem 55.7%, meropenem 55.7%, doripenem 60.2%, ceftazidime 63.6%, cefepime 56.8%, ciprofloxacin 59.1%, levofloxacin 60.2%, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid 37.5%, piperacillin-tazobactam 63.6%, aztreonam 43.2%, colistin 90.9%, polymyxin 95.5%. Altogether, 48 (54.5%) and 29 (33%) isolates were characterized as MDR and XDR, respectively. Discussion: The high frequency of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Iran makes epidemiological surveillance of susceptibility of this bacterium more essential for the best selection of empirical antibiotics. PMID:26351496

  9. Detoxification of Atrazine by Endophytic Streptomyces sp. Isolated from Sugarcane and Detection of Nontoxic Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Mesquini, Josiane A; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; López, Begonã G C; Oliveira, Valéria M; Miyasaka, Natalia R S

    2015-12-01

    Atrazine is still one of the most used agricultural pesticides worldwide and it has been recognized as a major contaminant of surface and ground water. The aims of this research were to isolate an endophytic microorganism from leaves of sugarcane, evaluate its ability to degrade atrazine, and investigate the formation of metabolites. By sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the endophytic isolate atz2 was identified as Streptomyces sp. The reduction in atrazine concentration by Streptomyces sp. atz2 was 98 % and UHPLC-MS/MS analyses showed the appearance of an unknown metabolite observed as m/z 311. Ecotoxicity tests with an aquatic organism, Daphnia similis, confirmed that this metabolite was nontoxic. This mechanism of detoxification of atrazine is different from the ones of other free-living microorganisms that inhabit the soil or rhizosphere. The results show new aspects of atrazine detoxification, highlighting a new role of endophytic bacteria in plants.

  10. [Detection and description of avian hepatitis E virus isolated in China--a review].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Zhou, Enmin

    2012-03-04

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), a member of Hepeviridae family, is genetically and antigenically related with human and swine HEV in the family. Since its discovery, avian HEV infection has been investigated in many countries from serology and molecular epidemiology studies. At present, five complete or near complete genomes of avian HEV isolates were reported in GenBank and were divided into three genotypes. The complete genome of avian HEV contains 3 ORFs of which ORF2 gene encodes capsid protein containing the primary epitopes of viral particles and is target gene for serodiagnostic antigen and vaccine candidate. Because avian HEV infection has significant impact on the poultry industry and potential zoonotic transmission, the researches on avian HEV have been given much attention. We here give a broad review of the research update on the aetiology, pathogenesis and the antigenicity of capsid protein of avian HEV based on identification of Chinese avian HEV isolate.

  11. Detection of plasmid-borne extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes in Escherichia coli isolates from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christin; Michael, Geovana Brenner; Kadlec, Kristina; Hassel, Melanie; Schwarz, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates have been increasingly reported during recent years. The aims of this study were to characterize ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from bovine mastitis as well as their ESBL gene-carrying plasmids. A culture collection of E. coli isolated from bovine quarter milk samples (2009-2013), was screened for ESBL production using ESBL selective agar plates. Putative ESBL producers (n=16) were investigated by phenotypic confirmatory tests and were characterized by the detection/sequencing of ESBL genes, XbaI macrorestriction analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), phylotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. ESBL gene-carrying plasmids were investigated by transfer experiments, PCRs for the detection of co-located antimicrobial resistance genes, PCR-based replicon typing and S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Twelve ESBL-producing isolates were found. They showed eleven different XbaI patterns and were distributed among eight MLST types [ST10 (n=3), ST117 (n=2), ST361 (n=1), ST362 (n=1), ST540 (n=1), ST1431 (n=2), ST1508 (n=1), and the novel ST5447 (n=1)] and the phylogenetic groups A (n=6), B1 (n=2), B2 (n=1) and D (n=3). ESBL genes blaCTX-M-1 (n=5), blaCTX-M-2 (n=2), blaCTX-M-14 and blaCTX-M-15 (n=4) were found on conjugative plasmids (35-225kb) of diverse incompatibility groups (e.g. IncF, IncI1 or HI2+P). Co-located resistance to sulfonamides, tetracycline, trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol/florfenicol was detected on five ESBL gene-carrying plasmids, but seven plasmids conferred solely resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. The presence of additional resistance genes on the ESBL gene-carrying plasmids suggests that co-selection of ESBL genes may occur even in the absence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  12. Detection of AmpC β-lactamase producing bacteria isolated in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Salamat, Sonia; Ejaz, Hasan; Zafar, Aizza; Javed, Humera

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence and antimicrobial profile of AmpC β-lactamase producing bacteria. Methods: The study was conducted at The Children’s Hospital and The Institute of Child Health Lahore, Pakistan, during September 2011 to June 2012. A total number of 1,914 blood samples of suspected neonatal septicemia were processed. Isolates were identified using Gram’s staining, API 20E and API 20NE tests. Gram negative isolates were screened for AmpC β-lactamase production against ceftazidime, cefotaxime and cefoxitin resistance and confirmed by inhibitor based method. Results: Total number of 54 (8.49%) Gram positive and 582 (91.5%) Gram negative bacteria were identified. Among Gram negative isolates 141 (22%) were AmpC producers and found to be 100% resistant to co-amoxiclav, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefuroxime, cefixime, ceftriaxone, cefpodoxime, gentamicin, amikacin and aztreonam. Less resistance was observed against cefepime (30.4%), sulbactam-cefoperazone (24.8%), piperacillin-tazobactam (10.6%), ciprofloxacin (20.5%) and meropenem (2.1%). All the isolates were found sensitive to imipenem. The patients harbored AmpC β-lactamases were on various interventions in which intravenous line was noted among (51.1%), naso-gastric tube (37.6%), ambu bag (8.5%), endotracheal tube (3.5%), ventilator (2.1%) and surgery (0.7%). Conclusion: Extensive use of invasive procedures and third generation cephalosporins should be restricted to avoid the emergence of AmpC beta-lactamases in neonates. PMID:28083055

  13. Detection and experimental transmission of a novel Babesia isolate in captive olive baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis).

    PubMed

    Reichard, Mason V; Gray, Kristene M; Van den Bussche, Ronald A; d'Offay, Jean M; White, Gary L; Simecka, Christine M; Wolf, Roman F

    2011-07-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-transmitted apicomplexan hemoparasites that infect mammalian red blood cells. Our purpose was to determine the prevalence of Babesia infection in a colony of captive baboons and to evaluate potential experimental routes of the transmission of the hemoparasite. DNA was extracted from the blood of baboons and tested for infection with Babesia by PCR and primers that amplify the 18s rRNA gene of the parasite. The overall prevalence of infection of Babesia in the baboon population was 8.8% (73 of 830). Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced DNA from 2 baboons revealed that the Babesia isolate found in captive baboons was a novel species most closely related (97% to 99%) to B. leo. Blood from a Babesia-infected donor baboon was inoculated intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously into 3 naive baboons. The intravenously inoculated baboon was PCR-positive at 7 d after inoculation; the 2 baboons inoculated by other routes became PCR-positive at 10 d after inoculation. All 3 baboons remained PCR-positive for Babesia through day 31. Baboons experimentally inoculated with the new Babesia isolate did not exhibit clinical signs of babesiosis during the experiments. We demonstrated that captive baboons are infected with a novel Babesia isolate. In addition we showed that Babesia can be transmitted in the absence of the organism's definitive host (ticks) by transfer of infected blood through intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous routes to naive baboons.

  14. Molecular detection of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Mohsen; Salimi Chirani, Alireza; Khoshnood, Saeed; Eslami, Gita; Atyabi, Seyyed Mohammad; Nazem, Habibollah; Fazilati, Mohammad; Hashemi, Ali; Soleimani, Saleh

    2016-12-16

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major opportunistic pathogen in healthcare settings worldwide. In Iran, there are only few reports on the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes among A. baumannii isolates. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes from A. baumannii strains collected at a university teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred A. baumannii strains were collected between 2014 and 2015 from hospitalized patients at Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. The DNA was extracted using a kit obtained from Bioneer Co. (Korea) and was used as a template for polymerase chain reaction. The most active antimicrobial agent against these strains was colistin. The rate of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance was 97%. The aadA1, aadB, aac(6')-Ib, and aac(3)-IIa genes were found in 85%, 77%, 72%, and 68% of A. baumannii isolates, respectively. This study showed a high prevalence rate of AME genes in A. baumannii. This prevalence rate has explained that further aminoglycoside resistance genes may have role in the resistance of clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Therefore, control and treatment of serious infections caused by this opportunistic pathogen should be given more consideration.

  15. Detection of benzalkonium chloride resistance in community environmental isolates of staphylococci.

    PubMed

    He, Gui-Xin; Landry, Michael; Chen, Huizhong; Thorpe, Conner; Walsh, Dennis; Varela, Manuel F; Pan, Hongmiao

    2014-05-01

    We isolated a total of 653 strains from 64 community environmental samples in Massachusetts, USA. Among these isolates, 9.65 % (63 strains) were benzalkonium chloride (BC)-resistant staphylococci. All BC-resistant strains were collected from surfaces upon which antibacterial wipes or antibacterial sprays containing 0.02-0.12 % BC had frequently been used in the fitness centres. However, isolates from surfaces upon which antibacterial wipes or antibacterial sprays had not been used were all sensitive to BC. All BC-resistant strains were also resistant to erythromycin, penicillin and ampicillin. In addition, 51 strains showed resistance to cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), 15 strains showed resistance to chloramphenicol, 12 strains showed resistance to ciprofloxacin and four strains showed resistance to meticillin. Resistance gene analysis demonstrated that 41 strains contained qacA/B, 30 strains had qacC, 25 strains contained qacG, 16 strains had qacH and eight strains contained qacJ. These data indicate that application of BC is associated with environmental staphylococcal antimicrobial resistance.

  16. Detection of Anthropogenic Particles in Fish Stomachs: An Isolation Method Adapted to Identification by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Collard, France; Gilbert, Bernard; Eppe, Gauthier; Parmentier, Eric; Das, Krishna

    2015-10-01

    Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation often is circumvented by the difficulty to separate MP from bulk samples. Visual examination often is used as one or the only step to sort these particles. However, color, size, and shape are insufficient and often unreliable criteria. We present an extraction method based on hypochlorite digestion and isolation of MP from the membrane by sonication. The protocol is especially well adapted to a subsequent analysis by Raman spectroscopy. The method avoids fluorescence problems, allowing better identification of anthropogenic particles (AP) from stomach contents of fish by Raman spectroscopy. It was developed with commercial samples of microplastics and cotton along with stomach contents from three different Clupeiformes fishes: Clupea harengus, Sardina pilchardus, and Engraulis encrasicolus. The optimized digestion and isolation protocol showed no visible impact on microplastics and cotton particles while the Raman spectroscopic spectrum allowed the precise identification of microplastics and textile fibers. Thirty-five particles were isolated from nine fish stomach contents. Raman analysis has confirmed 11 microplastics and 13 fibers mainly made of cellulose or lignin. Some particles were not completely identified but contained artificial dyes. The novel approach developed in this manuscript should help to assess the presence, quantity, and composition of AP in planktivorous fish stomachs.

  17. Molecular detection of virulence genes as markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Neha; Dhall, Shriya; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections by P. aeruginosa are related to variety of complications. Quorum sensing and related circuitry guard its virulence potential. Though P. aeruginosa accounts for an appreciable amount of virulence factors, this organism is highly unstable phenotypically. Thus, genotyping of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa is of utmost importance for understanding the epidemiology of infection. This may contribute towards development of immunotherapeutic approaches against this multi drug resistant pathogen. Moreover, no epidemiological study has been reported yet on uroisolates of P. aeruginosa. Thus this study was planned to obtain information regarding presence, distribution and rate of occurrence of quorum sensing and some associated virulence genes at genetic level. The profiling of quorum sensing genes lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR and virulence genes like toxA, aprA, rhlAB, plcH, lasB and fliC of twelve strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from patients with UTIs was done by direct PCR. The results showed variable distribution of quorum sensing genes and virulence genes. Their percentage occurrence may be specifically associated with different levels of intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity in urinary tract. Such information can help in identifying these virulence genes as useful diagnostic markers for clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from UTIs.

  18. Securing Special Nuclear Material: Recent Advances in Neutron Detection and Their Role in Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Bernstein, A.; Vanier, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Neutron detection is an integral part of the global effort to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear material (SNM). Applications relying on neutron-detection technology range from traditional nuclear non-proliferation objectives, such as safeguarding nuclear material and verifying stockpile reductions, to the interdiction of SNM—a goal that has recently risen in priority to a level on par with traditional applications. Large multi-national programs targeting detection and safeguards have deployed radiation-detection assets across the globe. Alongside these deployments of commercially available technology, significant research and development efforts have been directed towards the creation of next-generation assets. While much of this development has focused on gamma-ray spectrometers, neutron-detection technology remains an important component of the global strategy because of the capability of neutrons to penetrate materials that readily absorb gamma rays and the unique multiplicity signatures offered by neutrons. One particularly acute technology-development challenge results from dwindling supplies of 3He, partially triggered by widespread deployment of high-efficiency systems for portal monitoring. Other emerging missions, such as the desire to detect SNM at greater standoff distances, have also stimulated neutron-detection technology development. In light of these needs for novel neutron-detection technologies, this manuscript reviews the signatures of neutrons emitted by SNM, the principles of neutron detection, and various strategies under investigation for detection in the context of nonproliferation.

  19. Evaluation of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification-Based Methodology To Detect Carbapenemase Carriage in Acinetobacter Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Andrea; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Mosqueda, Noraida; Morosini, María Isabel; García-Fernández, Sergio; Roca, Ignasi; Cantón, Rafael; Marco, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is a major source of nosocomial infections worldwide and is mainly associated with the acquisition of OXA-type carbapenemases and, to a lesser extent, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). In this study, 82 nonepidemiologically related Acinetobacter strains carrying different types of OXA or MBL enzymes were tested using the Eazyplex system, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based method to rapidly detect carbapenemase carriage. The presence/absence of carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes was correctly determined for all isolates in <30 min. PMID:25224010

  20. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  1. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  2. Fault isolation detection expert (FIDEX). Part 1: Expert system diagnostics for a 30/20 Gigahertz satellite transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, John; Schlegelmilch, Richard; Tallo, Donald

    1992-01-01

    LeRC has recently completed the design of a Ka-band satellite transponder system, as part of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) System. To enhance the reliability of this satellite, NASA funded the University of Akron to explore the application of an expert system to provide the transponder with an autonomous diagnosis capability. The results of this research was the development of a prototype diagnosis expert system called FIDEX (fault-isolation and diagnosis expert). FIDEX is a frame-based expert system that was developed in the NEXPERT Object development environment by Neuron Data, Inc. It is a MicroSoft Windows version 3.0 application, and was designed to operate on an Intel i80386 based personal computer system.

  3. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huey Jia; Ee, Robson; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11. PMID:25019635

  4. Role of Advanced Laryngeal Imaging in Glottic Cancer: Early Detection and Evaluation of Glottic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Kathleen M; Tan, Melin

    2015-08-01

    Laryngeal cancer accounts for approximately 2.4% of new malignancies worldwide each year. Early identification of laryngeal neoplasms results in improved prognosis and functional outcomes. Imaging plays an integral role in the diagnosis, staging, and long-term follow-up of laryngeal cancer. This article highlights advanced laryngeal imaging techniques and their application to early glottic neoplasms.

  5. Isolation or detection of Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii and Bartonella rochalimae in the endangered island foxes (Urocyon littoralis).

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jonathan D; Kasten, Rickie W; Coonan, Timothy J; Clifford, Deana L; Chomel, Bruno B

    2011-12-29

    Bartonella rochalimae (B.r.) and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (B.v.b.) have been isolated from gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) in mainland California and high Bartonella seroprevalence was reported in island foxes (U. litorralis), especially from Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa Islands. As a follow-up study, the objectives were to determine the prevalence of Bartonella bacteremia and seropositivity and to identify the Bartonella species infecting a convenience sample of 51 island foxes living on Santa Rosa Island. Using an immuno-fluorescence antibody test directed against B.v.b and Bartonella clarridgeiae (B.c.), used as a substitute for B.r., the overall antibody prevalence was 62.7% with 16 (31.4%) foxes seropositive for B.c. only, 5 (9.8%) for B.v.b. only, and 11 (21.6%) for both antigens. B.v.b. was isolated from 6 (11.8%) foxes using blood culture medium. An additional seropositive fox tested PCR positive for B.v.b. and 3 other seropositive foxes tested PCR positive for B. rochalimae. All of the isolated B.v.b. colonies and the B.v.b. PCR positive sample belonged to type III, the same type found to infect mainland gray foxes. Therefore, Bartonella infection is widespread within this island fox population with evidence for B.v.b. type III reservoir host-specificity. Presence of B. rochalimae in the Channel Islands has been detected for the first time using PCR.

  6. Detection of Ribosomal DNA Sequence Polymorphisms in the Protist Plasmodiophora brassicae for the Identification of Geographical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Laila, Rawnak; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yang, Kiwoung; Choi, Gyung Ja; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2017-01-04

    Clubroot is a soil-borne disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae (P. brassicae). It is one of the most economically important diseases of Brassica rapa and other cruciferous crops as it can cause remarkable yield reductions. Understanding P. brassicae genetics, and developing efficient molecular markers, is essential for effective detection of harmful races of this pathogen. Samples from 11 Korean field populations of P. brassicae (geographic isolates), collected from nine different locations in South Korea, were used in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from the clubroot-infected samples to sequence the ribosomal DNA. Primers and probes for P. brassicae were designed using a ribosomal DNA gene sequence from a Japanese strain available in GenBank (accession number AB526843; isolate NGY). The nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of P. brassicae, comprising 6932 base pairs (bp), was cloned and sequenced and found to include the small subunits (SSUs) and a large subunit (LSU), internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), and a 5.8s. Sequence variation was observed in both the SSU and LSU. Four markers showed useful differences in high-resolution melting analysis to identify nucleotide polymorphisms including single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), oligonucleotide polymorphisms, and insertions/deletions (InDels). A combination of three markers was able to distinguish the geographical isolates into two groups.

  7. Detection of Ribosomal DNA Sequence Polymorphisms in the Protist Plasmodiophora brassicae for the Identification of Geographical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Laila, Rawnak; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yang, Kiwoung; Choi, Gyung Ja; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2017-01-01

    Clubroot is a soil-borne disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae (P. brassicae). It is one of the most economically important diseases of Brassica rapa and other cruciferous crops as it can cause remarkable yield reductions. Understanding P. brassicae genetics, and developing efficient molecular markers, is essential for effective detection of harmful races of this pathogen. Samples from 11 Korean field populations of P. brassicae (geographic isolates), collected from nine different locations in South Korea, were used in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from the clubroot-infected samples to sequence the ribosomal DNA. Primers and probes for P. brassicae were designed using a ribosomal DNA gene sequence from a Japanese strain available in GenBank (accession number AB526843; isolate NGY). The nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of P. brassicae, comprising 6932 base pairs (bp), was cloned and sequenced and found to include the small subunits (SSUs) and a large subunit (LSU), internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), and a 5.8s. Sequence variation was observed in both the SSU and LSU. Four markers showed useful differences in high-resolution melting analysis to identify nucleotide polymorphisms including single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), oligonucleotide polymorphisms, and insertions/deletions (InDels). A combination of three markers was able to distinguish the geographical isolates into two groups. PMID:28054984

  8. Advancing Early Detection of Autism Spectrum Disorder by Applying an Integrated Two-Stage Screening Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterling, Iris J.; Wensing, Michel; Swinkels, Sophie H.; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Visser, Janne C.; Woudenberg, Tim; Minderaa, Ruud; Steenhuis, Mark-Peter; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Few field trials exist on the impact of implementing guidelines for the early detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aims of the present study were to develop and evaluate a clinically relevant integrated early detection programme based on the two-stage screening approach of Filipek et al. (1999), and to expand the evidence…

  9. 78 FR 16513 - Application of Advances in Nucleic Acid and Protein Based Detection Methods to Multiplex...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Detection Methods to Multiplex Detection of Transfusion-Transmissible Agents and Blood Cell Antigens in...- Transmissible Agents and Blood Cell Antigens in Blood Donations.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... and blood cell antigen typing. The public workshop has been planned in partnership with the...

  10. Impact of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic on detection of Mycobacterium isolates in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Albadalejo, J; Cercenado, E; Ruiz Serrano, M J; Vicente, T; Ortega, A

    1997-04-01

    The number of human samples processed in our mycobacteriology laboratory ranged from 148 per 1,000 admissions in 1988 to 263 per 1,000 admissions in 1995 (5.2% were positive). The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population contributed 33.3% of all samples, 43.3% of all isolates, and 36% of all new patients. Given that the ratios of the total number of samples to the number of Mycobacterium-positive samples were 18.3:1 in HIV-positive patients and 28:1 in HIV-negative patients, efforts to reduce the laboratory workload should begin with the HIV-negative population.

  11. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  12. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  13. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  14. Detection of Salmonella spp. Isolates from specimens due to pork production Chains in Hue City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takeshi, Koichi; Itoh, Shigeru; Hosono, Hiromi; Kono, Hiroichi; Tin, Vo Trung; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Thuy, Nguyen Thi Bich; Kawamoto, Keiko; Makino, Sou-Ichi

    2009-04-01

    From August 2007 until March 2008, we perfomed a detection and epidemiological analysis for Salmonella spp. in specimens collected from pork production chains to improve the quality of meat hygiene conditions in Hue, Vietnam. A total of 306 specimens were examined for Salmonella spp., aerobic bacterial counts and coliform. Seven serovars of Salmonella spp. were detected in retail pork, slaughterhouse carcasses and environmental specimens with the following detection rates: 32.8% of retail pork, 15.5% of slaughterhouse carcasses, 47.4% of floors, 38.1% of weighing bowls, 28.6% of cooking boards and 16.7% of tank water samples. Based on these results, we recommend that exhaustive sterilization, washing, routine bacteriological examinations and treatments at low temperature are performed in slaughterhouses, transportation facilities and retail stores.

  15. Detection of integrons and Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome (SCCmec) types in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from burn and non-burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Khodaei, Farzaneh; Bijari, Aslan; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have been recognized as an important reason of infections in health care units. Integrons role in antibiotic resistance box gene transfer has been well recognized which are found in Gram positive bacteria. Objective The aim of this study was analyzed of SCCmec typing and determine of integron classes in burn and non-burn specimens. Methodology A total of 110 S. aureus strains were isolated from burn and non-burn patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of mecA gene, various SCCmec types and integrons classes were analyzed. Results In antimicrobial susceptibility test in burn patients, resistant to both gentamicin and oxacilin and in non-burn patients resistance to oxacilin and cefepime showed the highest ratio In PCR molecular test (80%) and (52.7%) of strains harbored the mecA gene. Therefore five different SCCmec types were recognized among our studied strains. Subsequently, integron class I was evaluated as (94.5%) in burn and (12.7%) in non-burn isolates by the multiplex PCR method. Conclusion Albeit MRSA strains have the hospital reservoir so may cause serious treats for hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients, hence clinical decision for prevention and treatment may develop due to, mecA gene, SCCmec elements and integrons detection in health care units. PMID:26715924

  16. Magnetic nanowires for rapid and ultrasensitive isolation of DNA from cervical specimens for the detection of multiple human papillomaviruses genotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, HyungJae; Hwang, Na Rae; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-12-15

    Detecting human papillomavirus (HPV) is central in diagnosing and monitoring HPV-related disease. However, limited sensitivity and the wide variability of the HPV genome pose challenges in the identification of HPV genes, particularly high-risk types. This study reports the development of polyethyleneimine-conjugated magnetic nanowires (PEI-MNWs) and their use in the isolation, identification, and analysis of multiple genotypes of HPV DNA from cervical cancer specimens. The nanowires are electrochemically doped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and biotin moieties during potentiostatic deposition, thereby allowing conjugating cationic branched polymers to direct the attachment of negatively charged DNA molecules with strong magnetic response. For proof of concept, the rapid and ultrasensitive isolation of HPV DNA is performed at concentrations as low as 10pg/mL with an efficiency of >95%. For clinical optimization, the analytical and clinical sensitivity of PEI-MNWs is compared with that of the Roche Cobas 4800 HPV Test and demonstrates excellent correlation for multiple HPV DNA genotypes with superior threshold cycle values. The high sensitivity, specificity, and good reproducibility of PEI-MNWs are particularly well suited for the recovery of DNA and provide significant and clinically meaningful evidence for the early detection and treatment of HPV-associated cancers.

  17. Application of a DNA hybridization-hydrophobic-grid membrane filter method for detection and isolation of verotoxigenic escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Todd, E C; Szabo, R A; MacKenzie, J M; Martin, A; Rahn, K; Gyles, C; Gao, A; Alves, D; Yee, A J

    1999-11-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains were isolated from food and animal fecal samples by using PCR to screen for the presence of VTEC after broth enrichment and then filtering VTEC-positive cultures through hydrophobic-grid membrane filters (HGMFs) which were incubated on MacConkey agar. The filters were probed with a digoxigenin-labeled PCR product generated by amplification of a conserved verotoxin gene sequence. Replication of the growth on filters allowed probe-positive colonies to be picked. When ground beef samples were inoculated with VTEC strains, 100% of the strains were recovered, and the detection limit was 0.1 CFU per g. Similar results were obtained with seven types of artificially contaminated vegetables. A survey of 32 packages of vegetables and 23 samples of apple cider obtained at the retail level did not reveal the presence of VTEC. However, the intestinal fecal contents of a moose, 1 of 35 wild mammals and birds examined, contained E. coli O157:H7. The DNA hybridization-HGMF method was also used in a prevalence survey of 327 raw and 744 ready-to-eat products; VTEC strains were recovered from 4.9% of the raw products and 0.7% of the ready-to-eat products. No serotype O157:H7 strains were detected. This method is particularly suited for surveys in which low numbers of VTEC-positive samples are expected and isolates are required.

  18. Application of a DNA Hybridization–Hydrophobic-Grid Membrane Filter Method for Detection and Isolation of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Todd, E. C. D.; Szabo, R. A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Martin, A.; Rahn, K.; Gyles, C.; Gao, A.; Alves, D.; Yee, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains were isolated from food and animal fecal samples by using PCR to screen for the presence of VTEC after broth enrichment and then filtering VTEC-positive cultures through hydrophobic-grid membrane filters (HGMFs) which were incubated on MacConkey agar. The filters were probed with a digoxigenin-labeled PCR product generated by amplification of a conserved verotoxin gene sequence. Replication of the growth on filters allowed probe-positive colonies to be picked. When ground beef samples were inoculated with VTEC strains, 100% of the strains were recovered, and the detection limit was 0.1 CFU per g. Similar results were obtained with seven types of artificially contaminated vegetables. A survey of 32 packages of vegetables and 23 samples of apple cider obtained at the retail level did not reveal the presence of VTEC. However, the intestinal fecal contents of a moose, 1 of 35 wild mammals and birds examined, contained E. coli O157:H7. The DNA hybridization-HGMF method was also used in a prevalence survey of 327 raw and 744 ready-to-eat products; VTEC strains were recovered from 4.9% of the raw products and 0.7% of the ready-to-eat products. No serotype O157:H7 strains were detected. This method is particularly suited for surveys in which low numbers of VTEC-positive samples are expected and isolates are required. PMID:10543785

  19. Advances in the study of the structures and bioactivities of metabolites isolated from mangrove-derived fungi in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Mao, Zhi-Gang; Song, Bing-Bing; Chen, Chun-Hua; Xiao, Wei-Wei; Hu, Bin; Wang, Ji-Wen; Jiang, Xiao-Bing; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2013-09-30

    Many metabolites with novel structures and biological activities have been isolated from the mangrove fungi in the South China Sea, such as anthracenediones, xyloketals, sesquiterpenoids, chromones, lactones, coumarins and isocoumarin derivatives, xanthones, and peroxides. Some compounds have anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties, but the biosynthesis of these compounds is still limited. This review summarizes the advances in the study of secondary metabolites from the mangrove-derived fungi in the South China Sea, and their biological activities reported between 2008 and mid-2013.

  20. Detection of genes for heat-stable enterotoxin I in Escherichia coli strains isolated in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Maas, R; Silva, R M; Gomes, T A; Trabulsi, L R; Maas, W K

    1985-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxin I (STI) can be assayed in intestinal loops of pigs and rabbits and in the gut of infant mice. To produce a simpler and more discriminating assay procedure, we used three gene probes corresponding to three forms of STI called STIa, STIb, and STIc. We tested 159 Brazilian isolates, of which 40 were positive in the infant mouse assay. The STIb and STIc probes are similar (93% DNA homology) and are both different from the STIa probe (70% DNA homology). Of 33 strains that were still active for STI 3 years after their isolation, 25 reacted with both the STIb and STIc probes, 4 reacted with the STIc probe only, and 7 reacted strongly with the STIa probe and weakly or not at all with the other probes. Two strains reacted with all three probes. Further analysis showed that each of these two strains contains a small plasmid that reacts with the STIa probe and a large plasmid that reacts with the STIc probe in one strain and weakly with both the STIa and STIc probes in the other strain. It was also shown that the STIa probe reacts with the cloning vehicle pACYC184 used for the cloning of STIc. We conclude that the gene probes used can identify most STI-producing strains and that in cases of positive responses with several probes careful scrutiny is necessary for analysis. Images PMID:3891629

  1. Gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1: A comparison of search methods and prospects for detection with advanced detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, C.; Bulten, H. J.; Crowder, S. G.; Dergachev, V.; Galloway, D. K.; Goetz, E.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Lasky, P. D.; Meadors, G. D.; Melatos, A.; Premachandra, S.; Riles, K.; Sammut, L.; Thrane, E. H.; Whelan, J. T.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is potentially the most luminous source of continuous gravitational-wave radiation for interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. For low-mass X-ray binaries this radiation would be sustained by active accretion of matter from its binary companion. With the Advanced Detector Era fast approaching, work is underway to develop an array of robust tools for maximizing the science and detection potential of Sco X-1. We describe the plans and progress of a project designed to compare the numerous independent search algorithms currently available. We employ a mock-data challenge in which the search pipelines are tested for their relative proficiencies in parameter estimation, computational efficiency, robustness, and most importantly, search sensitivity. The mock-data challenge data contains an ensemble of 50 Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) type signals, simulated within a frequency band of 50-1500 Hz. Simulated detector noise was generated assuming the expected best strain sensitivity of Advanced LIGO [1] and Advanced VIRGO [2] (4 ×10-24 Hz-1 /2 ). A distribution of signal amplitudes was then chosen so as to allow a useful comparison of search methodologies. A factor of 2 in strain separates the quietest detected signal, at 6.8 ×10-26 strain, from the torque-balance limit at a spin frequency of 300 Hz, although this limit could range from 1.2 ×10-25 (25 Hz) to 2.2 ×10-26 (750 Hz) depending on the unknown frequency of Sco X-1. With future improvements to the search algorithms and using advanced detector data, our expectations for probing below the theoretical torque-balance strain limit are optimistic.

  2. Recent Advances in Bacteriophage Based Biosensors for Food-Borne Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit; Poshtiban, Somayyeh; Evoy, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne diseases are a major health concern that can have severe impact on society and can add tremendous financial burden to our health care systems. Rapid early detection of food contamination is therefore relevant for the containment of food-borne pathogens. Conventional pathogen detection methods, such as microbiological and biochemical identification are time-consuming and laborious, while immunological or nucleic acid-based techniques require extensive sample preparation and are not amenable to miniaturization for on-site detection. Biosensors have shown tremendous promise to overcome these limitations and are being aggressively studied to provide rapid, reliable and sensitive detection platforms for such applications. Novel biological recognition elements are studied to improve the selectivity and facilitate integration on the transduction platform for sensitive detection. Bacteriophages are one such unique biological entity that show excellent host selectivity and have been actively used as recognition probes for pathogen detection. This review summarizes the extensive literature search on the application of bacteriophages (and recently their receptor binding proteins) as probes for sensitive and selective detection of foodborne pathogens, and critically outlines their advantages and disadvantages over other recognition elements. PMID:23364199

  3. On-line two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection using a fully electric isolated mechanical valve.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Felix J; Montealegre, Cristina; Neusüß, Christian

    2016-04-01

    CE is becoming more and more important in many fields of bioanalytical chemistry. Besides optical detection, hyphenation to ESI-MS detection is increasingly applied for sensitive identification purposes. Unfortunately, many CE techniques and methods established in research and industry are not compatible to ESI-MS since essential components of the background electrolyte interfere in ES ionization. In order to identify unknown peaks in established CE methods, here, a heart-cut 2D-CE separation system is introduced using a fully isolated mechanical valve with an internal loop of only 20 nL. In this system, the sample is separated using potentially any non-ESI compatible method in the first separation dimension. Subsequently, the portion of interest is cut by the internal sample loop of the valve and reintroduced to the second dimension where the interfering compounds are removed, followed by ESI-MS detection. When comparing the separation efficiency of the system with the valve to a system using a continuous capillary only a slight increase in peak width is observed. Ultraviolet/visible detection is integrated in the first dimension for switching time determination, enabling reproducible cutting of peaks of interest. The feasibility of the system is successfully demonstrated by a 2D analysis of a BSA tryptic digest sample using a nonvolatile (phosphate based) background electrolyte in the first dimension.

  4. Role of nanoparticle valency in the nondestructive magnetic-relaxation-mediated detection and magnetic isolation of cells in complex media.

    PubMed

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Santra, Santimukul; Perez, J Manuel

    2009-09-09

    Nanoparticle-based diagnostics typically involve the conjugation of targeting ligands to the nanoparticle to create a sensitive and specific nanosensor that can bind and detect the presence of a target, such as a bacterium, cancer cell, protein, or DNA sequence. Studies that address the effect of multivalency on the binding and detection pattern of these nanosensors, particularly on magnetic relaxation nanosensors that sense the presence of a target in a dose-dependent manner by changes in the water relaxation times (DeltaT2), are scarce. Herein, we study the effect of multivalency on the detection profile of cancer cells and bacteria in complex media, such as blood and milk. In these studies, we conjugated folic acid at two different densities (low-folate and high-folate) on polyacrylic-acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles and studied the interaction of these magnetic nanosensors with cancer cells expressing the folate receptor. Results showed that the multivalent high-folate magnetic relaxation nanosensor performed better than its low folate counterpart, achieving single cancer cell detection in blood samples within 15 min. Similar results were also observed when a high molecular weight anti-folate antibody (MW 150 kDa) was used instead of the low molecular weight folic acid ligand (MW 441.4 kDa), although better results in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and speed of detection were obtained when the folate ligand was used. Studies using bacteria in milk suspensions corroborated the results observed with cancer cells. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that nanoparticle multivalency plays a key role in the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular target and modulate the behavior and sensitivity of the assay. Furthermore, as detection with magnetic relaxation nanosensors is a nondestructive technique, magnetic isolation and further characterization of the cancer cells is possible.

  5. Development of cost effective fenceline monitoring methods to support advanced leak detection and repair strategies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved mitigation of fugitive emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is an important emerging topic in many industrial sectors. Efficacious leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs of the future yiel...

  6. Advanced Methods for Passive Acoustic Detection, Classification, and Localization of Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    click classification. Algorithms are being developed and tested for several species of beaked whales and small odontocetes. 2. Tonal signal detection... Tonal signal detection and classification “ Tonal signal” is a generic term for frequency-modulated calls such as baleen whale moans or...methods to be developed here determine the species associated with odontocete whistles that are extracted automatically via the Silbido tonal contour

  7. Detection of manganese peroxidase and other exoenzymes in four isolates of Geastrum (Geastrales) in pure culture.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Francisco; Castiglia, Valeria C; Zamora, Juan C

    Knowledge regarding the enzymatic machinery of fungi is decisive to understand their ecological role. The species of the genus Geastrum are known to grow extremely slowly in pure culture, which makes it difficult to evaluate physiological parameters such as enzyme activity. Qualitative assays were performed on isolates of four species of this genus, showing evidence of laccase, cellulase, pectinase, amylase and lipase activity and suggesting that a wide range of carbon sources can be exploited by these species. For the first time in this genus, quantitative assays verified manganese peroxidase activity (up to 0.6mU/g) in 30-day old cultures, as well as laccase, β-glycosidase and β-xylosidase activities.

  8. Identification and Antimicrobial Activity Detection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Corn Stover Silage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxia; Ni, Kuikui; Pang, Huili; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin; Jin, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    A total of 59 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from corn stover silage. According to phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and recA gene polymerase chain reaction amplification, these LAB isolates were identified as five species: Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum subsp. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Enterococcus mundtii, Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively. Those strains were also screened for antimicrobial activity using a dual-culture agar plate assay. Based on excluding the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, two L. plantarum subsp. plantarum strains ZZU 203 and 204, which strongly inhibited Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971T, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698T and Escherichia coli ATCC 11775T were selected for further research on sensitivity of the antimicrobial substance to heat, pH and protease. Cell-free culture supernatants of the two strains exhibited strong heat stability (60 min at 100°C), but the antimicrobial activity was eliminated after treatment at 121°C for 15 min. The antimicrobial substance remained active under acidic condition (pH 2.0 to 6.0), but became inactive under neutral and alkaline condition (pH 7.0 to 9.0). In addition, the antimicrobial activities of these two strains decreased remarkably after digestion by protease K. These results preliminarily suggest that the desirable antimicrobial activity of strains ZZU 203 and 204 is the result of the production of a bacteriocin-like substance, and these two strains with antimicrobial activity could be used as silage additives to inhibit proliferation of unwanted microorganism during ensiling and preserve nutrients of silage. The nature of the antimicrobial substances is being investigated in our laboratory. PMID:25924957

  9. Detection of catabolic genes in indigenous microbial consortia isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Milcic-Terzic, J; Lopez-Vidal, Y; Vrvic, M M; Saval, S

    2001-05-01

    Bioremediation is often used for in situ remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. The primary focus of this study was on understanding the indigenous microbial community which can survive in contaminated environment and is responsible for the degradation. Diesel. toluene and naphthalene-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from diesel-contaminated soil by growing on selective hydrocarbon substrates. The presence and frequency of the catabolic genes responsible for aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation (xylE, ndoB) within the isolated consortia were screened using polymerase chain reaction PCR and DNA DNA colony hybridization. The diesel DNA-extract possessed both the xy/E catabolic gene for toluene, and the nah catabolic gene for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. The toluene DNA-extract possessed only the xylE catabolic gene, while the naphthalene DNA-extract only the ndoB gene. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII indicated similar restriction patterns for the xylE gene fragment between toluene DNA-extract and a type strain, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 23973. A substantial proportion (74%) of the colonies from the diesel-consortium possessed the xylE gene, and the ndoB gene (78%), while a minority (29%) of the toluene-consortium harbored the xylE gene. 59% of the colonies from the naphthalene-consortium had the ndoB gene, and did not have the xylE gene. These results indicate that the microbial population has been naturally enriched in organisms carrying genes for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and that significant aromatic biodegradative potential exists at the site. Characterization of the population genotype constitutes a molecular diagnosis which permits the determination of the catabolic potential of the site to degrade the contaminant present.

  10. Antigen Detection in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Using Secretory Immunoglobulin A Antibodies Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez-Hernandez, H. A.; Gavilanes-Parra, S.; Chavez-Berrocal, E.; Navarro-Ocaña, A.; Cravioto, A.

    2000-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produces a characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion in the small intestines of infected children. The immune response to EPEC infection remains poorly characterized. The molecular targets that elicit protective immunity against EPEC disease are unknown. In this study protein antigens from EPEC were identified using secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) antibodies isolated from milk from Mexican women by Western blot analysis. Purified sIgA antibodies, which inhibit the adherence of EPEC to cells, reacted to many EPEC proteins, the most prominent of which were intimin (a 94-kDa outer membrane protein) and two unknown proteins with apparent molecular masses of 80 and 70 kDa. A culture supernatant protein of 110 kDa also reacted strongly with the sIgA antibodies. The molecular size of this protein and its reactivity with specific anti-EspC antiserum suggest that it is EPEC-secreted protein C (EspC). These EPEC surface protein antigens were consistently recognized by all the different sIgA samples obtained from 15 women. Screening of clinical isolates of various O serogroups from cases of severe infantile diarrhea revealed that all EPEC strains able to produce the A/E lesion showed expression of intimin and the 80- and 70-kDa proteins. Such proteins reacted strongly with the purified sIgA pool. Moreover, nonvirulent E. coli strains were unable to generate a sIgA response. The immunogenic capacities of the 80- and 70-kDa proteins as virulence antigens have not been previously reported. The strong sIgA response to intimin and the 80- and 70-kDa proteins obtained in this study indicates that such antigens stimulate intestinal immune responses and may elicit protective immunity against EPEC disease. PMID:10948121

  11. Passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection using advanced sensor signal acquisition and fusion.

    PubMed

    Ljungblad, Jonas; Hök, Bertil; Allalou, Amin; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-04-03

    The research objective of the present investigation is to demonstrate the present status of passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection and highlighting the necessary conditions for large scale implementation of such a system. Completely passive detection has remained a challenge mainly because of the requirements on signal resolution combined with the constraints of vehicle integration. The work is part of the DADSS (driver alcohol detection system for safety) program aiming at massive deployment of alcohol sensing systems which could potentially save thousands of American lives annually. The work reported here builds on earlier investigations, in which it has been shown that detection of alcohol vapor in the proximity of a human subject may be traced to that subject by means of simultaneous recording of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the same location. Sensors based on infrared spectroscopy were developed to detect and quantify low concentrations of alcohol and CO2. In the present investigation, alcohol and CO2 were recorded at various locations in a vehicle cabin while human subjects were performing normal in-step procedures and driving preparations. A video camera directed to the driver position was recording images of the driver's upper body parts including the face, and the images were analyzed with respect to features of significance to the breathing behavior and breath detection, such as mouth opening and head direction. Improvement of the sensor system with respect to signal resolution including algorithm and software development, and fusion of the sensor and camera signals was successfully implemented and tested before starting the human study. In addition, experimental tests and simulations were performed with the purpose of connecting human subject data with repeatable experimental conditions. The results include occurrence statistics of detected breaths by signal peaks of CO2 and alcohol. From the statistical data, the accuracy of breath alcohol

  12. Advancing the detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials in brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Peer, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Spatial filtering has proved to be a powerful pre-processing step in detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials and boosted typical detection rates both in offline analysis and online SSVEP-based brain-computer interface applications. State-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby share many common foundations as they all build upon the second order statistics of the acquired Electroencephalographic (EEG) data, that is, its spatial autocovariance and cross-covariance with what is assumed to be a pure SSVEP response. The present study aims at highlighting the similarities and differences between these methods. Approach. We consider the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method as a basis for the theoretical and empirical (with real EEG data) analysis of the state-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby. We build upon the findings of this analysis and prior research and propose a new detection method (CVARS) that combines the power of the canonical variates and that of the autoregressive spectral analysis in estimating the signal and noise power levels. Main results. We found that the multivariate synchronization index method and the maximum contrast combination method are variations of the CCA method. All three methods were found to provide relatively unreliable detections in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regimes. CVARS and the minimum energy combination methods were found to provide better estimates for different SNR levels. Significance. Our theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that the proposed CVARS method outperforms other state-of-the-art detection methods when used in an unsupervised fashion. Furthermore, when used in a supervised fashion, a linear classifier learned from a short training session is able to estimate the hidden user intention, including the idle state (when the user is not attending to any stimulus), rapidly, accurately and reliably.

  13. Molecular detection and species identification of Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolated from immunocompetent Orang Asli in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ashikin, Azah; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Moktar, Norhayati; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul

    2017-04-01

    Most studies of opportunistic infections focus on immunocompromised patients. However, there is a lack of information on microsporidiosis in healthy people (immunocompetent) worldwide. This study aimed to detect and identify microsporidia species in immunocompetent Orang Asli living in Pahang, Malaysia. Orang Asli is a collective term for a group of indigenous people that usually reside in the interior regions of Peninsular Malaysia. They comprise about 0.7% of the total population in Malaysia and 76% of them lived below the poverty line i.e., poor housing conditions with the lack of access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation, contaminated environment, high illiteracy rate and unhygienic practices by these people. Stool samples were collected from 209 Orang Asli and analyzed for detecting the presence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis by polymerase chain reaction assay targeting small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. E. bieneusi was detected in 8 individuals (3.83%). This infection was commonly found in males than females (5.2% vs. 2.7%). All infected Orang Asli were adults, with a mean age of 44years. Diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms were reported in one case (12.5%) among individuals infected with this species. These findings clearly show that exposure to E. bieneusi may actually be common than reported. The accurate detection and identification of microsporidian species by molecular technique will improve therapy, clinical manifestations and prognosis of this infection, as no antiparasitic therapy has been approved for E. bieneusi. It is hoped that these findings will allow the formulation of better health management and disease prevention advisories, and improvement in the standards of health in similar communities.

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R.; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M.; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-01-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated “cases.” A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool. PMID:26962088

  15. Does MRI-detected cranial nerve involvement affect the prognosis of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Zong, Jingfeng; Lin, Shaojun; Chen, Yunbin; Wang, Bingyi; Xiao, Youping; Lin, Jin; Li, Rui; Pan, Jianji

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the common cancers in South China. It can easily invade into cranial nerves, especially in patients with local advanced disease. Despite the fact that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings are not always consistent with the symptoms of CN palsy, MRI is recommended for the detection of CN involvement (CNI). However, the prognostic impact of MRI-detected CNI in NPC patients is still controversial. To investigate the prognostic value of MRI detected CNI, we performed a retrospective analysis on the clinical data of 375 patients with NPC who were initially diagnosed by MRI. All patients had T3-4 disease and received radical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as their primary treatment. The incidence of MRI-detected CNI was 60.8%. A higher incidence of MRI-detected CNI was observed in T4 disease compared with T3 disease (96.8% vs. 42.8%, P<0.001), and a higher incidence was also found in patients with Stage IV disease compared with those with Stage III disease (91.5% vs. 42.3%; P<0.001). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients with T3 disease, with or without MRI-detected CNI, was superior to that of patients with T4 disease (P<0.05). No significant differences in LRFS, DMFS or OS were observed between T3 patients with or without MRI-detected CNI. The survival of Stage III patients with or without MRI-detected CNI was significantly superior to that of Stage IV patients (P<0.01), but there was no significant difference between Stage III patients with or without MRI-detected CNI for all endpoints. Therefore, when treated with IMRT, MRI-detected CNI in patients with NPC does not appear to affect the prognosis. In patients with clinical T3 disease, the presence of MRI-detected CNI is not sufficient evidence for defining T4 disease.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of coagulase-negative bloodstream isolates: detection of Staphylococcus epidermidis ST2, ST7 and linezolid-resistant ST23.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Camacho-Ortíz, Adrián; González-González, Gloria; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Garza-González, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to persistence of coagulase-negative staphylococci are diverse; to better understanding of their dynamics, the characterization of nosocomial isolates is needed. Our aim was to characterize phenotypic and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus human blood isolates from two tertiary care hospitals in Mexico, the Hospital Universitario in Monterrey and the Hospital Civil in Guadalajara. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined. Biofilm formation was assessed by crystal violet staining. Detection of the ica operon and Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec typing were performed by PCR. Clonal relatedness was determined by Pulsed-fiel gel electrophoresis and Multi locus sequence typing. Methicillin-resistance was 85.5% and 93.2% for S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus, respectively. Both species showed resistance >70% to norfloxacin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and erythromycin. Three S. epidermidis and two S. haemolyticus isolates were linezolid-resistant (one isolate of each species was cfr+). Most isolates of both species were strong biofilm producers (92.8% of S. epidermidis and 72.9% of S. haemolyticus). The ica operon was amplified in 36 (43.4%) S. epidermidis isolates. SCCmec type IV was found in 47.2% of the S. epidermidis isolates and SCCmec type V in 14.5% of S. haemolyticus isolates. No clonal relatedness was found in either species. Resistance to clindamycin, levofloxacin, erythromycin, oxacillin, and cefoxitin was associated with biofilm production for both species (p<0.05). A G2576T mutation in 23S rRNA gene was detected in an S. haemolyticus linezolid-resistant isolate. All linezolid-resistant S. epidermidis isolates belonged to ST23; isolate with SCCmec type IV belonged to ST7, and isolate with SCCmec type III belonged to ST2. This is the first report of ST7 in Mexico. There was a high genetic diversity in both species, though both species shared

  17. Detection of Candida dubliniensis in Oropharyngeal Samples from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in North America by Primary CHROMagar Candida Screening and Susceptibility Testing of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William R.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Mcatee, Robert K.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Fothergill, Annette W.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Sanche, Stephen E.; Cantu, Rebecca A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis has been associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). C. dubliniensis isolates may have been improperly characterized as atypical Candida albicans due to the phenotypic similarity between the two species. Prospective screening of oral rinses from 63 HIV-infected patients detected atypical dark green isolates on CHROMagar Candida compared to typical C. albicans isolates, which are light green. Forty-eight atypical isolates and three control strains were characterized by germ tube formation, differential growth at 37, 42, and 45°C, identification by API 20C, fluorescence, chlamydoconidium production, and fingerprinting by Ca3 probe DNA hybridization patterns. All isolates were germ tube positive. Very poor or no growth occurred at 42°C with 22 of 51 isolates. All 22 poorly growing isolates at 42°C and one isolate with growth at 42°C showed weak hybridization of the Ca3 probe with genomic DNA, consistent with C. dubliniensis identification. No C. dubliniensis isolate but only 18 of 28 C. albicans isolates grew at 45°C. Other phenotypic or morphologic tests were less reliable in differentiating C. dubliniensis from C. albicans. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed fluconazole MICs ranging from ≤0.125 to 64 μg/ml. Two isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC, 64 μg/ml) and one strain was dose dependent susceptible (MIC, 16 μg/ml). MICs of other azoles, including voriconazole, itraconazole, and SCH 56592, for these isolates were lower. C. dubliniensis was identified in 11 of 63 (17%) serially evaluated patients. Variability in phenotypic characteristics dictates the use of molecular and biochemical techniques to identify C. dubliniensis. This study identifies C. dubliniensis in HIV-infected patients from San Antonio, Tex., and shows that C. dubliniensis is frequently detected in those patients by using a primary CHROMagar screen. PMID:9738058

  18. Development and Validation of a Cultural Method for the Detection and Isolation of Salmonella in Cloves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Ali, Laila; Gill, Vikas; Tatavarthy, Aparna; Deng, Xiaohong; Hu, Lijun; Brown, Eric W; Hammack, Thomas S

    2017-03-01

    Detection of Salmonella in some spices, such as cloves, remains a challenge due to their inherent antimicrobial properties. The purpose of this study was to develop an effective detection method for Salmonella from spices using cloves as a model. Two clove varieties, Ceylon and Madagascar, were used in the study. Cloves were inoculated with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Montevideo, Typhimurium, or Weltevreden at about 1, 3, or 6 log CFU/25 g. Two test portion sizes, 10 and 25 g, were compared. After adding Trypticase soy broth (TSB) to the weighed cloves for preenrichment, three preenrichment methods were compared: cloves were left in the TSB for 24 h during preenrichment (PreE1), or the cloves-TSB mixture was shaken vigorously for 30 s (PreE2) or 60 s (PreE3), and the decanted material was transferred to a new bag for 24 h of preenrichment. The rest of the procedures were carried out according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM). At the low inoculation level (<1 log CFU/25 g), the detection rate was low across the three preenrichment methods, with the highest for PreE3 and lowest for PreE1. At the medium and high inoculation levels (3 and 6 log CFU/25 g), all samples from PreE2 and PreE3 were positive for Salmonella , whereas PreE1 produced only 12 positive samples from the 48 samples at the medium inoculation level and 38 positive samples from the 48 samples at the high inoculation level. Therefore, PreE3 with 25 g of cloves per sample was more effective than the other two tested methods. This newly designed method was then validated by comparing with the BAM method in six trials, with each trial consisting of 40 test samples. The results showed that PreE3 detected Salmonella from 88 of 120 inoculated test samples compared with only 31 positive from 120 test samples with the BAM method. Thus, our newly designed method PreE3 was more sensitive and easier to operate than the current BAM method for

  19. Advanced DNA- and Protein-based Methods for the Detection and Investigation of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Prado, M; Ortea, I; Vial, S; Rivas, J; Calo-Mata, P; Barros-Velázquez, J

    2016-11-17

    Currently, food allergies are an important health concern worldwide. The presence of undeclared allergenic ingredients or the presence of traces of allergens due to contamination during food processing poses a great health risk to sensitized individuals. Therefore, reliable analytical methods are required to detect and identify allergenic ingredients in food products. The present review addresses the recent developments regarding the application of DNA- and protein-based methods for the detection of allergenic ingredients in foods. The fitness-for-purpose of reviewed methodology will be discussed, and future trends will be highlighted. Special attention will be given to the evaluation of the potential of newly developed and promising technologies that can improve the detection and identification of allergenic ingredients in foods, such as the use of biosensors and/or nanomaterials to improve detection limits, specificity, ease of use, or to reduce the time of analysis. Such rapid food allergen test methods are required to facilitate the reliable detection of allergenic ingredients by control laboratories, to give the food industry the means to easily determine whether its product has been subjected to cross-contamination and, simultaneously, to identify how and when this cross-contamination occurred.

  20. Phylogenetic typing and detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Ramezan Ali; Motamedi, Hossein; Maleki, Elham; Ghanbarpour, Reza; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to reveal the phylogenetic background, to detect the genes encoding TEM, SHV and CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL), and to analyze their distribution in phylo-groups of 150 Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Ahvaz (Southwest of Iran). Seventy- five cloacal swabs from healthy birds (fecal isolates), and 75 heart blood samples from birds with colibacillosis (septicemic isolates) were obtained. All isolates were phylotyped and screened for ESBL genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The fecal isolates belonged to four main phylo-groups, including 41 isolates (54.67%) to A, 9 (12.00%) to B1, 5 (6.67%) to B2, and 20 (26.67%) to D. Of septicemic isolates, 37 isolates (49.33%) were classified as phylotype A, 5 (6.67%) as B1, 10 (13.33%) as B2, and 23 (30.67%) as D. In molecular analysis, a total of 72 isolates (35 fecal and 37 septicemic) were identified to harbor ESBL genes, which were distributed in phylo-groups A, B1, B2, and D. Regardless of the type of isolate, blaCTX-M-15 gene was the most common genotype, followed by blaTEM and blaSHV genes. This study suggests that broiler chickens in Iran are infected to ESBL genes- harboring Escherichia coli strains which may be spread to the food chain through fecal contamination of carcasses during slaughtering. PMID:27872719