Science.gov

Sample records for advanced detector group

  1. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  2. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  3. Advanced Slit Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    removed by chemical etching, shown in step 3. The etch solution used is a diluted aqua regia (2 HCl^i^O:! NHO3) . The etch was terminated by quenching...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (ol Hi* mbtltmcl •nl«rad In Black 30, II dlftartnl from Htpotl) 18. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Contlnum on reverse ...source. When 13 : .- ^Mtti m —"—— ’■-■"-—’^ ’-’- ^ - .-».A-.... ■». .^.^.„^^JJ^....^^.^^^. DETECTOR: AD18-L11-#1 FORWARD BIAS fl REVERSE BIAS 1

  4. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    The University of Michigan

    1998-07-01

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size.

  5. SSC muon detector group report

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsmith, D.; Groom, D.; Hedin, D.; Kirk, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Reeder, D.; Rosner, J.; Wojcicki, S.

    1986-01-01

    We report here on results from the Muon Detector Group which met to discuss aspects of muon detection for the reference 4..pi.. detector models put forward for evaluation at the Snowmass 1986 Summer Study. We report on: suitable overall detector geometry; muon energy loss mechanisms; muon orbit determination; muon momentum and angle measurement resolution; raw muon rates and trigger concepts; plus we identify SSC physics for which muon detection will play a significant role. We conclude that muon detection at SSC energies and luminosities is feasible and will play an important role in the evolution of physics at the SSC.

  6. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  7. Advanced Space-Based Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-17

    Research Laboratory 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave., SE Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 AFRL -RV...Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0010 TR-2014-0010 ADVANCED SPACE-BASED DETECTORS David Cardimona 17 Jul 2014 Final Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC

  8. Advanced UV Detectors and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Torvik, John

    1998-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) with its wide energy bandgap of 3.4 eV holds excellent promise for solar blind UV detectors. We have successfully designed, fabricated and tested GaN p-i-n detectors and detector arrays. The detectors have a peak responsivity of 0.14A/W at 363 nm (3.42 eV) at room temperature. This corresponds to an internal quantum efficiency of 56%. The responsivity decreases by several orders of magnitude to 0.008 A/W at 400 nm (3.10 eV) giving the excellent visible rejection ratio needed for solar-blind applications.

  9. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  10. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  11. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  12. Advanced Space-Based Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-24

    this interim report, we will discuss this detector architecture, as well as our preliminary electrical and optical characterization results from 200K to...complementary optics .1-2 It would be ideal to be able to achieve multi-color sensing with a single FPA via an internally voltage-tunable, narrowband spectral...pinch-off gate on top of the mesa device and photocarriers generated in that layer are expected to vertically tunnel through the AlGaAs barrier to the

  13. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  14. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies-imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution-will enable precision cosmological constraints and also awide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the AdvancedACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the AdvancedACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  15. Report of the working group on detector simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.; Lebrun, P.

    1986-01-01

    An ad hoc group at Snowmass reviewed the need for detector simulation to support detectors at the SSC. This report first reviews currently available programs for detector simulation, both those written for single specific detectors and those aimed at general utility. It then considers the requirements for detector simulation for the SSC, with particular attention to enhancements that are needed relative to present programs. Finally, a list of recommendations is given.

  16. Squeezed light for advanced gravitational wave detectors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Oelker, E; Barsotti, L; Dwyer, S; Sigg, D; Mavalvala, N

    2014-08-25

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that squeezed vacuum states can be injected into gravitational wave detectors to improve their sensitivity at detection frequencies where they are quantum noise limited. Squeezed states could be employed in the next generation of more sensitive advanced detectors currently under construction, such as Advanced LIGO, to further push the limits of the observable gravitational wave Universe. To maximize the benefit from squeezing, environmentally induced disturbances such as back scattering and angular jitter need to be mitigated. We discuss the limitations of current squeezed vacuum sources in relation to the requirements imposed by future gravitational wave detectors, and show a design for squeezed light injection which overcomes these limitations.

  17. Advances in Detector Technology for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCreight, Craig; Cheng, P. L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Progress in semiconductor materials and processing technology has allowed the development of infrared detector arrays with unprecedented sensitivity, for imaging and spectroscopic applications in astronomy. The earlier discrete-detector approach has been replaced by large-element (up to 1024 x 1024 pixel), multiplexed devices. Progress has been made against a number of key limiting factors, such as quantum efficiency, noise, spectral response, linearity, and dark current. Future developments will focus on the need for even larger arrays, which operate at higher temperatures.

  18. Report of the large solenoid detector group

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Mori, S.; Pondrom, L.G.; Williams, H.H.; Barnett, B.; Barnes, V.; Cashmore, R.; Chiba, M.; DeSalvo, R.; Devlin, T.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design of a large solenoid for studying physics at the SSC. The parameters and nature of the detector have been chosen based on present estimates of what is required to allow the study of heavy quarks, supersymmetry, heavy Higgs particles, WW scattering at large invariant masses, new W and Z bosons, and very large momentum transfer parton-parton scattering. Simply stated, the goal is to obtain optimum detection and identification of electrons, muons, neutrinos, jets, W's and Z's over a large rapidity region. The primary region of interest extends over +-3 units of rapidity, although the calorimetry must extend to +-5.5 units if optimal missing energy resolution is to be obtained. A magnetic field was incorporated because of the importance of identifying the signs of the charges for both electrons and muons and because of the added possibility of identifying tau leptons and secondary vertices. In addition, the existence of a magnetic field may prove useful for studying new physics processes about which we currently have no knowledge. Since hermeticity of the calorimetry is extremely important, the entire central and endcap calorimeters were located inside the solenoid. This does not at the moment seem to produce significant problems (although many issues remain to be resolved) and in fact leads to a very effective muon detector in the central region.

  19. Advancement of Polymer Detectors for Space Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Photovoltaic polymer detectors incorporating Indium Phosphide (InP) and Cadmiume Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) were...Indium Phosphide (InP) and Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dot (QD) materials were fabricated, characterized for their open circuit voltage...the InP QDs absorb energy from the photons and generate excited carriers ( electron -hole pairs) which are localized by the quantum dot field; c) the

  20. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  1. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  2. The advanced LIGO detectors in the era of first discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigg, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Following a major upgrade, the two advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Ob- servatory (LIGO) held their first observation run between September 2015 and January 2016. The product of observable volume and measurement time exceeded that of all previous runs within the first 16 days of coincident observation. On September 14th, 2015 the Advanced LIGO detectors observed the transient gravitational-wave signal GW150914, determined to be the coalescence of two black holes, launching the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. We present the main features of the detectors that enabled this observation. At its core Advanced LIGO is a multi-kilometer long Michelson interferometer employing optical resonators to enhance its sensitivity. Four very pure and homogeneous fused silica optics with excellent figure quality serve as the test masses. The displacement produced by the event GW150914 was one 200th of a proton radius. It was observed with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 24 in coincidence by the two detectors. At full sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO detectors are designed to deliver another factor of three improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for binary black hole systems similar in masses to GW150914.

  3. Advanced Group Support Systems and Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Group Support Systems and Facilities held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, July 19-20, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced group support systems and to identify the potential of these systems for use in future collaborative distributed design and synthesis environments. The presentations covered the current status and effectiveness of different group support systems.

  4. Advancement and application of bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.; Casson, W.H.; Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    Every field is searching for it's better mouse trap, and the field of dosimetry is no different. Until recently, a dosimetrist would have been hard-pressed to identify an affordable and yet reliably accurate dosimeter for mixed neutron and gamma fields. A new technology has reared it head and is vying for position in the dosimetry community. This relatively young technology is building upon the foundation of the bubble chamber, conceptualized by Glaser in 1952 (Glaser 1952). Although the attitudes surrounding this technology, as with any new development, are somewhat mixed, with the proper combination of tweaking and innovative thought, applications of this technology hold great promise for the future of neutron dosimetry. The Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is looking into some innovative applications of this technology. We are investigating options for overcoming its limiting features in hopes of achieving an unprecedented level of proficiency in neutron detection. Among these are the developing and testing of a Combination Area Neutron Spectrometer, CANS, assessing the plausibility of extremity applications, the assembly of an alternative reader for research, investigation of temperature-related effects and how to correct them and considerations on the coming of age of neutron dosimetry via real time detection of bubble formation in Bubble Technology Industries Inc. (BTI) detectors. In the space allowed, we will attempt to answer the questions: (1) What areas hold the greatest promise for application of this emerging technology (2) What obstacles must be overcome before full-blown application becomes a reality ; and (3) What might the future hold 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Advanced mercuric iodide detectors for X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, W.K.; Iwanczyk, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    We first present a brief tutorial on Mercuric Iodide (HgI/sub 2/) detectors and the intimately related topic of near-room temperature ultralow noise preamplifiers. This provides both a physical basis and technological perspective for the topics to follow. We next describe recent advances in HgI/sub 2/ applications to x-ray microanalysis, including a space probe Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Synchrotron x-ray detectors, and energy dispersive detector arrays. As a result of this work, individual detectors can now operate stably for long periods in vacuum, detect soft x-rays to the oxygen K edge at 523 eV, or count at rates exceeding 2x10(5)/sec. The detector packages are small, lightweight, and use low power. Preliminary HgI/sub 2/ detector arrays of 10 elements with 500eV resolution have also been constructed and operate stably. Finally, we discuss expected advances in HgI/sub 2/ array technology, including improved resolution, vacuum operation, and the development of soft x-ray transparent encapsulants. Array capabilities include: large active areas, high (parallel) count rate capability and spatial sensitivity. We then consider areas of x-ray microanalysis where the application of such arrays would be advantageous, particularly including elemental microanalysis, via x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, in both SEMs and in scanning x-ray microscopes. The necessity of high count rate capability as spatial resolution increases is given particular attention in this connection. Finally, we consider the possibility of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) studies on square micron sized areas, using detector arrays.

  6. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  7. Thin-film infrared absorber structures for advanced thermal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. D.; Pedder, D. J.

    1988-06-01

    Imaging thermal detector technology is a rapidly advancing field in which the current emphasis is towards the development of very large arrays of very small pyroelectric detector elements. For maximum responsivity, each of the thin pyroelectric elements in an array must be provided with a thermal absorber to convert incoming infrared radiation into heat. This paper describes one such absorber structure, comprising a thin metal film, impedance matched to free space, and a quarter-wave polymer film which offers an acceptably low thermal mass. The structure and properties of this thin-film absorber are compared with those of an electroplated platinum black absorber commonly used in thermal detectors. The theory of the absorber is presented and good agreement is shown between calculated and experimentally derived absorption spectra.

  8. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.; Mroue, A.

    2013-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such “hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass and unequal mass non-spinning binaries. We also explore the possibility of using these hybrid waveforms as a detection template bank for Advanced LIGO. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  9. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  10. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.

    2012-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such "hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass non-spinning binaries. Preliminary research has also been done in the case of unequal-mass non-spinning binaries. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  11. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Breakout Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perka, Alan; Walz, Carl; Cobb, Sharon; Hanford, Anthony; Eppler, Dean

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph document summarizes the workings of the Advanced Extravehicular Activity (AEVA) Breakout group in a Martian environment. The group was tasked with: identifying potential contaminants and pathways for AEVA systems with respect to forward and backward contamination; identifying plausible mitigation alternatives and obstacles for pertinent missions; identifying topics that require further research and technology development and discuss development strategies with uncertain Planetary Protection (PP) requirements; Identifying PP requirements that impose the greatest mission/development costs; Identifying PP requirements/topics that require further definition;

  12. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  13. Advanced Polymers Containing the Phenyltrifluoroethylidene Connecting Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstron, William B.; Sivko, Gloria S.

    2006-01-01

    A new, lower cost fluorinated dianhydride based on the phenyltrifluoroethylidene (3F) connecting linkage was invented by the principal author in the early 1980's. New 3F condensation and addition cured polyimides were synthesized with the newly discovered 3F dianhydride and the previously known 3F diamine. As controls, polyimides based on the somewhat analogous higher cost hexafluoroisopropylidene (6F) linkage were also prepared. The short term thermal oxidative stability (TOS), determined by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and the glass transition temperatures (Tg) of 3F dianhydride polyimides were found to be similar to 6F dianhydride polyimides, but the Tg was slightly higher for 3F diamine polyimides than 6F diamine polyimides. Unfortunately, in real time testing, long term TOS of 3F polymers was clearly inferior to 6F polymers. This was due to a 3 to 5 fold greater rate of loss of trifluoromethyl group from 3F versus 6F linkages. However, at shorter times or lower temperatures, 3F TOS was almost comparable to 6F TOS. The wide scope of the 3F technology was also demonstrated to have distinct unique advantages over 6F technology through the use of the 3F pendant phenyl ring as a synthetic site to introduce other functional groups. These groups have been used for the control or modification of polymer properties; an advantage lacking within 6F technology. The synthetic ease by which 3F can be introduced into various types of monomers has lead to the explosion of advanced 3F polyimides and other high performance advanced 3F polymers in the prior decade of 3F polymer literature as cited herein; covering polyimides, substituted polyimides, at least ten types of nonpolyimide 3F polymer modifications, and also the government's nine 3F U.S. patents and corporations' nine 3F U.S. patents.

  14. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  15. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  16. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  17. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  18. TFTR alpha extraction and measurement: Development and testing of advanced alpha detectors: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.

    1988-02-15

    Advanced alpha-particle detectors made of heavy elements were investigated as alternatives to silicon surface-barrier detectors for the ''foil-neutralization technique'' of alpha-particle diagnostics in fusion reactors with high neutron backgrounds. From an extensive literature review, it was decided that HgI/sub 2/ would make a more suitable detector for alpha-particle diagnostics than other heavy element detectors such as CdTe. Thus, HgI/sub 2/ detectors were designed and fabricated. Experimental tests were performed to determine detector characteristics and detector responses to alpha particles. Radiation noise measurements were also performed using the North Carolina State University PULSTAR nuclear reactor for both the HgI/sub 2/ detectors and commercial Si(Au) surface barrier detectors. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  19. NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) User Services Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandori, John; Hamilton, Chris; Niggley, C. E.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing), its goals, and its mainframe computer assets. Also covered are its functions, including systems monitoring and technical support.

  20. Advanced passive detectors for neutron dosimetry and spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L

    2004-01-01

    Different neutron detectors have been developed in the past which exploit electrical and electrochemical processes in plastic foils and thin-film capacitors (namely metal-oxide-silicon devices) to trigger avalanche processes, which greatly facilitate the detection of neutron-induced charged particles. These detectors are: (i) spark-replica counter of neutron-induced fission-fragment holes in plastic films, thin-film breakdown counter of neutron-induced fission fragments, and electrochemically etched detectors of neutron-induced recoils in plastic foils. The major shortcomings of damage-track detectors for the measurement of low neutron fluencies, such as those of cosmic ray neutrons at civil aviation altitudes, are their large and unpredictable background and their small signal-to-noise ratio. These shortcomings have been overcome respectively by using long exposure times and large detector areas and counting coincidence-track events on matched pairs of detectors even for a few-micron-long tracks such as those of neutron recoils. The responses of all these detectors have been analysed both with neutrons with energy up to approximately 200 MeV and protons up to tens of gigaelectron volts. Applications of these detectors for the cosmic ray neutron dosimetry and/or spectrometry will be mentioned.

  1. Final Report of the Advanced Coal Technology Work Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Advanced Coal Technology workgroup reported to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee. This page includes the final report of the Advanced Coal Technology Work Group to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee.

  2. Development of an advanced antineutrino detector for reactor monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, T.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Ho, A.; Jonkmans, G.; Kogler, L.; Reyna, D.; Sur, B.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the development of a compact antineutrino detector for the purpose of nuclear reactor monitoring, improving upon a previously successful design. This paper will describe the design improvements of the detector which increases the antineutrino detection efficiency threefold over the previous effort. There are two main design improvements over previous generations of detectors for nuclear reactor monitoring: dual-ended optical readout and single volume detection mass. The dual-ended optical readout eliminates the need for fiducialization and increases the uniformity of the detector's optical response. The containment of the detection mass in a single active volume provides more target mass per detector footprint, a key design criteria for operating within a nuclear power plant. This technology could allow for real-time monitoring of the evolution of a nuclear reactor core, independent of reactor operator declarations of fuel inventories, and may be of interest to the safeguards community.

  3. Advanced Si IR detectors using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Jones, E. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detectors have been fabricated by MBE. The SiGe/Si HIP detector offers a tailorable spectral response in the long wavelength infrared regime by varying the SiGe/Si heterojunction barrier. Degenerately doped p(+) SiGe layers were grown using elemental boron, as the dopant source allows a low growth temperature. Good crystalline quality was achieved for boron-doped SiGe due to the reduced growth temperature. The dark current density of the boron-doped HIP detectors was found to be thermionic emission limited. HIP detectors with a 0.066 eV were fabricated and characterized using activation energy analysis, corresponding to a 18 micron cutoff wavelength. Photoresponse of the detectors at wavelengths ranging from 2 to 12 microns has been characterized with corresponding quantum efficiencies of 5 - 0.1 percent.

  4. Advanced Ge detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, Larry S.

    1991-01-01

    Externally segmented coaxial detectors are fabricated for high efficiency in detecting gamma rays from cosmic sources with good sensitivities. The external background is reduced by enclosing the Ge detector array inside a thick active shield. The outer electrode of the coaxial detectors is subdivided into five segments, and internal beta activity is rejected by operating the segmented detector in a multisegment mode. The multisegment mode requires that events be detected in two or more segments before they are recorded. The full-energy-peak (FEP) efficiency of the unit is tested as a function of the incident gamma-ray energy and of the discriminator threshold of the segments. Measurements of beta-rejection and FEP efficiency are compared with Monte Carlo calculations, and good agreement is noted.

  5. Recent advances in processing and characterization of edgeless detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Kalliopuska, J.; Eränen, S.; Virolainen, T.

    2012-02-01

    During past five years VTT has actively developed edgeless detector fabrication process. The straightforward and high yield process relies on ion-implantation to activate the edges of the detector. A recent fabrication process was performed at VTT to provide p-on-n edgeless detectors. The layout contained DC- and AC-coupled strip detector and pixel detectors for Medipix/Timepix readouts. The fabricated detector thicknesses were 50, 100 and 150 μm. Electrical characterization was done for 5 × 5 mm2 edgeless diodes on wafer level. All measured electrical parameters showed a dramatic dependence on the diode thickness. Leakage current was measured below 10 nA/cm2 at full depletion. Calculation using a theoretical approximation indicates the diode surface generation current of less than 300 pA. The breakdown voltages were measured to be above 140 V and increased as a function of diode thickness. Reverse bias of 10 V is enough to fully deplete designed edgeless diodes. Leakage current dependence of temperature was investigated for both p-on-n and previous n-on-n edgeless detectors and results show that the leakage current doubles for every 8.5 degree Celsius rise in temperature. TCAD device simulations reveal that breakdown occurs at the lateral p-n junction where the electric field reaches its highest value. Thick edgeless diodes have wider bulk space that allows electric potential to drop and causes smaller curvature of the equipotential lines. This releases the accumulation of electric field at the corner of anode and increases the breakdown voltage. A good match of the simulated and the measured capacitance-voltage curves enables identification of proper parameters used in the simulation.

  6. Advanced Virgo Interferometer: a Second Generation Detector for Gravitational Waves Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Agathos, M.; Allocca, A.; Astone, P.; Ballardin, G.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Basti, A.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blom, M.; Boer, M.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Boschi, V.; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Branchesi, M.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Canuel, B.; Carbognani, F.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Cuoco, E.; D'Antonio, S.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; Day, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dereli, H.; De Rosa, R.; di Fiore, L.; di Lieto, A.; di Virgilio, A.; Drago, M.; Endrőczi, G.; Fafone, V.; Farinon, S.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Giazotto, A.; Gouaty, R.; Granata, M.; Groot, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Heidmann, A.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Jaranowski, P.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Kasprzack, M.; Kéfélian, F.; Kowalska, I.; Królak, A.; Kutynia, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, T. G. F.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martinelli, L.; Masserot, A.; Meacher, D.; Meidam, J.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Minenkov, Y.; Mohan, M.; Morgado, N.; Mours, B.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Nocera, F.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Prijatelj, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Rapagnani, P.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Ricci, F.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Romano, R.; Rosińska, D.; Ruggi, P.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Shah, S.; Siellez, K.; Sperandio, L.; Straniero, N.; Sturani, R.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Ter Braack, A. P. M.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Travasso, F.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; Vasúth, M.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Wei, L.-W.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2015-03-01

    In the last ten years great improvements have been done in the development and operation of ground based detectors for Gravitational Waves direct observation and study. The second generation detectors are presently under construction in Italy, United States and Japan with a common intent to create a worldwide network of instruments able to start a new era in astronomy and astrophysics, a century after the development of the General Relativity theory predicting the existence of Gravitational Waves. The design sensitivity of the advanced detectors will be approximately ten times better with respect to the previous generation corresponding to an increment of a factor one thousand in the observational volume of the Universe where black holes, neutron stars and other enigmatic sources of these weak signals are spread around. In this paper we present a general overview of the advanced detectors with particular emphasis on Advanced VIRGO, the largest European interferometer located at the European Gravitational Observatory (EGO) site in the Pisa countryside (Italy).

  7. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors II: performance tests on Advanced LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jade; Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Lynch, Ryan; Trifirò, Daniele; Cuoco, Elena; Cavaglià, Marco; Heng, Ik Siong; Font, José A.

    2017-02-01

    The data taken by the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors contains short duration noise transients that limit the significance of astrophysical detections and reduce the duty cycle of the instruments. As the advanced detectors are reaching sensitivity levels that allow for multiple detections of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources it is crucial to achieve a fast and accurate characterization of non-astrophysical transient noise shortly after it occurs in the detectors. Previously we presented three methods for the classification of transient noise sources. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), Principal Component LALInference Burst (PC-LIB) and Wavelet Detection Filter with Machine Learning (WDF-ML). In this study we carry out the first performance tests of these algorithms on gravitational-wave data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. We use the data taken between the 3rd of June 2015 and the 14th of June 2015 during the 7th engineering run (ER7), and outline the improvements made to increase the performance and lower the latency of the algorithms on real data. This work provides an important test for understanding the performance of these methods on real, non stationary data in preparation for the second advanced gravitational-wave detector observation run, planned for later this year. We show that all methods can classify transients in non stationary data with a high level of accuracy and show the benefits of using multiple classifiers.

  8. Recent advances in high-speed photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1982-12-01

    Recent progress of some fast high-gain photon detectors using photoemission and secondary emission processes is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, performance characteristics are presented, of the new Amperex XP 2020, RCA 8854, and Hamamatsu R 647-01 conventionally design photomultipliers. Also, characteristics are presented of the ITT F 4129 and Hamamatsu R 1564U extended lifetime microchannel plate photomultipliers as well as certain special made photomultipliers intended for application in positron emission tomography, high energy physics and plasma diagnostic experimental systems. Finally, microchannel plates as photon detectors for ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths are discussed.

  9. Recent advances in CZT strip detectors and coded mask imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Hink, P. L.; Slavis, K. R.; Binns, W. R.; Tumer, T.; Visser, G.

    1999-09-01

    The UCSD, WU, UCR and Nova collaboration has made significant progress on the necessary techniques for coded mask imaging of gamma-ray bursts: position sensitive CZT detectors with good energy resolution, ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Results on coded mask imaging techniques appropriate for wide field imaging and localization of gamma-ray bursts are presented, including a shadowgram and deconvolved image taken with a prototype detector/ASIC and MURA mask. This research was supported by NASA Grants NAG5-5111, NAG5-5114, and NGT5-50170.

  10. Advanced Silicon Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of silicon detectors for high energy astrophysics missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Background: Motivation for Event-Driven CCD; 2) Report of Grant Activity; 3) Packaged EDCCD; 4) Measured X-ray Energy Resolution of the Gen1 EDCCDs Operated in "Conventional Mode"; and 5) EDCCD Gen 1.5-Lot 1 Planning.

  11. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  12. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  13. Target-based optimization of advanced gravitational-wave detector network operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szölgyén, Á.; Dálya, G.; Gondán, L.; Raffai, P.

    2017-04-01

    We introduce two novel time-dependent figures of merit for both online and offline optimizations of advanced gravitational-wave (GW) detector network operations with respect to (i) detecting continuous signals from known source locations and (ii) detecting GWs of neutron star binary coalescences from known local galaxies, which thereby have the highest potential for electromagnetic counterpart detection. For each of these scientific goals, we characterize an N-detector network, and all its (N  ‑  1)-detector subnetworks, to identify subnetworks and individual detectors (key contributors) that contribute the most to achieving the scientific goal. Our results show that aLIGO-Hanford is expected to be the key contributor in 2017 to the goal of detecting GWs from the Crab pulsar within the network of LIGO and Virgo detectors. For the same time period and for the same network, both LIGO detectors are key contributors to the goal of detecting GWs from the Vela pulsar, as well as to detecting signals from 10 high interest pulsars. Key contributors to detecting continuous GWs from the Galactic Center can only be identified for finite time intervals within each sidereal day with either the 3-detector network of the LIGO and Virgo detectors in 2017, or the 4-detector network of the LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA detectors in 2019–2020. Characterization of the LIGO-Virgo detectors with respect to goal (ii) identified the two LIGO detectors as key contributors. Additionally, for all analyses, we identify time periods within a day when lock losses or scheduled service operations could result with the least amount of signal-to-noise or transient detection probability loss for a detector network.

  14. Tuning advanced gravitational-wave detectors to optimally measure neutron-star merger waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Leo

    2010-02-01

    Next-generation gravitational wave detectors have the potential to bring us astrophysical information in yet unexplored regimes. One of the possibilities is learning about neutron stars' equations of state from the gravitational wave burst of a binary coalescence. Since these events are ``bursty'', one does not have the luxury of time-averaging to improve S/N; one can only hope to do better by ``tuning'' a detector network to have the noise performance which will be most informative about the physics. We present a Bayesian method for optimizing a detector network given a prior distribution of physical parameters which affect the gravitational wave signal. Each detection adds information about the parameter distribution, updating the posterior and the optimal detector configuration. We demonstrate the algorithm with toy signal and detector response models and predict whether tuning Advanced LIGO (via the signal recycling cavity) will be fruitful in accelerating our understanding of neutron stars through their mergers. )

  15. Advanced Microstructured Semiconductor Neutron Detectors: Design, Fabrication, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, Steven Lawrence

    The microstructured semiconductor neutron detector (MSND) was investigated and previous designs were improved and optimized. In the present work, fabrication techniques have been refined and improved to produce three-dimensional microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors with reduced leakage current, reduced capacitance, highly anisotropic deep etched trenches, and increased signal-to-noise ratios. As a result of these improvements, new MSND detection systems function with better gamma-ray discrimination and are easier to fabricate than previous designs. In addition to the microstructured diode fabrication improvement, a superior batch processing backfill-method for 6LiF neutron reactive material, resulting in a nearly-solid backfill, was developed. This method incorporates a LiF nano-sizing process and a centrifugal batch process for backfilling the nanoparticle LiF material. To better transition the MSND detector to commercialization, the fabrication process was studied and enhanced to better facilitate low cost and batch process MSND production. The research and development of the MSND technology described in this work includes fabrication of variant microstructured diode designs, which have been simulated through MSND physics models to predict performance and neutron detection efficiency, and testing the operational performance of these designs in regards to neutron detection efficiency, gamma-ray rejection, and silicon fabrication methodology. The highest thermal-neutron detection efficiency reported to date for a solid-state semiconductor detector is presented in this work. MSNDs show excellent neutron to gamma-ray (n/γ) rejection ratios, which are on the order of 106, without significant loss in thermal-neutron detection efficiency. Individually, the MSND is intrinsically highly sensitive to thermal neutrons, but not extrinsically sensitive because of their small size. To improve upon this, individual MSNDs were tiled together into a 6x6-element array

  16. Advances in capillary-based gaseous UV imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobaeus, C.; Breskin, A.; Danielsson, M.; Francke, T.; Mörmann, D.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-06-01

    We studied gain and position resolution of gaseous UV-photon detectors combining single- and cascaded- glass capillary-plate multipliers and CsI photocathodes. Two modes of operation were investigated: a conventional one, where the main amplification occurs within capillary holes and a parallel-plate amplification mode, where the main amplification occurs between the capillary plate and the readout anode. Results of these studies demonstrate that in the parallel-plate amplification mode one can reach both high gains (>10 5) and good position resolutions (˜100 μm) even with a single-element multiplier. This offers a compact amplification structure, which can be used in many applications.

  17. Advances in Performance of Microchannel Plate Detectors for HEDP Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, a team from NSTec and SNL has built a unique capability to develop microchannel plate (MCP)?based framing x-ray cameras for HEDP diagnostics. At the SNL Z facility, multistrip MCP detectors to record up to eight channels are employed in 2-D, sub-nanosecond time-resolved imaging and time- and space-resolved spectroscopy diagnostics. Progressively more stringent technical temporal resolution and response uniformity requirements have necessitated a systematic design approach based on iterative modeling of the MCP using inputs from electrical circuit characterization. An inherently large exponential dependence in MCP gain, V{sup 11.5}, has mandated a firm understanding of the applied voltage pulse shape propagating across the strip. We pioneered direct measurements of the propagating waveform using a Picoprobe{reg_sign} and developed a Monte Carlo code to simulate MCP response to compare against test measurements. This scheme is shown in Figure 1. The simulation detailed a physical model of the cascade and amplification process of the MCP that includes energy conservation for the secondary electrons, the effects of elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, and gain saturation mechanisms from wall charging and space charge. Our model can simulate MCP response for both static and pulsed voltage waveforms. Using this design approach, we began to characterize the newly developed second-generation detector (H-CA-65) by using a Manson x-ray source to evaluate the following DC characteristics: MCP sensitivity as a function of bias voltage, flat-field uniformity and spatial resolution, and variation of spatial resolution and sensitivity as a function of phosphor bias voltage. Dynamic performance and temporal response were obtained by using an NSTec short-pulse laser to measure optical gate profiles, saturation, and dynamic range. These data were processed and combined to obtain the gain variation and gate profiles for any position along

  18. Mechanical designs and development of TES bolometer detector arrays for the Advanced ACTPol experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Thornton, Robert; Ullom, Joel N.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline profile leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modified to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  19. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  20. LOCALIZATION OF SHORT DURATION GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENTS WITH THE EARLY ADVANCED LIGO AND VIRGO DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-20

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg{sup 2} in 2015 and 60-110 deg{sup 2} in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg{sup 2}. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  1. Localization of Short Duration Gravitational-wave Transients with the Early Advanced LIGO and Virgo Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg2 in 2015 and 60-110 deg2 in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg2. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  2. GW150914: The Advanced LIGO Detectors in the Era of First Discoveries.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; 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Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; 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Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-04-01

    Following a major upgrade, the two advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) held their first observation run between September 2015 and January 2016. With a strain sensitivity of 10^{-23}/sqrt[Hz] at 100 Hz, the product of observable volume and measurement time exceeded that of all previous runs within the first 16 days of coincident observation. On September 14, 2015, the Advanced LIGO detectors observed a transient gravitational-wave signal determined to be the coalescence of two black holes [B. P. Abbott et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016)], launching the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. The event, GW150914, was observed with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 24 in coincidence by the two detectors. Here, we present the main features of the detectors that enabled this observation. At full sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO detectors are designed to deliver another factor of 3 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for binary black hole systems similar in mass to GW150914.

  3. GW150914: The Advanced LIGO Detectors in the Era of First Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Following a major upgrade, the two advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) held their first observation run between September 2015 and January 2016. With a strain sensitivity of 10-23/√{Hz } at 100 Hz, the product of observable volume and measurement time exceeded that of all previous runs within the first 16 days of coincident observation. On September 14, 2015, the Advanced LIGO detectors observed a transient gravitational-wave signal determined to be the coalescence of two black holes [B. P. Abbott et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016)], launching the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. The event, GW150914, was observed with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 24 in coincidence by the two detectors. Here, we present the main features of the detectors that enabled this observation. At full sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO detectors are designed to deliver another factor of 3 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for binary black hole systems similar in mass to GW150914.

  4. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  5. Advanced Detector and Waveform Digitizer for Water Vapor DIAL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor has become a major requirement for understanding moist-air processes. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a technique best suited for the measurement of atmospheric water vapor. NASA Langley Research Center is continually developing improved DIAL systems. One aspect of current development is focused on the enhancement of a DIAL receiver by applying state-of-the-art technology in building a new compact detection system that will be placed directly on the DIAL receiver telescope. The newly developed detection system has the capability of being digitally interfaced with a simple personal computer, using a discrete input/output interface. This has the potential of transmitting digital data over relatively long distances instead of analog signals, which greatly reduces measurement noise. In this paper, we discuss some results from the new compact water vapor DIAL detection system which includes a silicon based avalanche photodiode (APD) detector, a 14-bit, 10-MHz waveform digitizer, a microcontroller and other auxiliary electronics. All of which are contained on a small printed-circuit-board. This will significantly reduce the weight and volume over the current CAMAC system and eventually will be used in a water vapor DIAL system on an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) aircraft, or alternatively on an orbiting spacecraft.

  6. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  7. Progress and challenges in advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adier, M.; Aguilar, F.; Akutsu, T.; Arain, M. A.; Ando, M.; Anghinolfi, L.; Antonini, P.; Aso, Y.; Barr, B. W.; Barsotti, L.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bellon, L.; Bertolini, A.; Blair, C.; Blom, M. R.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Brown, D.; Buchler, B. C.; Bulten, H. J.; Cagnoli, G.; Canepa, M.; Carbone, L.; Cesarini, E.; Champagnon, B.; Chen, D.; Chincarini, A.; Chtanov, A.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Ciani, G.; Coccia, E.; Conte, A.; Cortese, M.; Daloisio, M.; Damjanic, M.; Day, R. A.; De Ligny, D.; Degallaix, J.; Doets, M.; Dolique, V.; Dooley, K.; Dwyer, S.; Evans, M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Farinon, S.; Feldbaum, D.; Flaminio, R.; Forest, D.; Frajuca, C.; Frede, M.; Freise, A.; Fricke, T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Geitner, M.; Gemme, G.; Gleason, J.; Goßler, S.; Gordon, N.; Gräf, C.; Granata, M.; Gras, S.; Gross, M.; Grote, H.; Gustafson, R.; Hanke, M.; Heintze, M.; Hennes, E.; Hild, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Izumi, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kasprzack, M.; Khalaidovski, A.; Kimura, N.; Koike, S.; Kume, T.; Kumeta, A.; Kuroda, K.; Kwee, P.; Lagrange, B.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Leavey, S.; Leonardi, M.; Li, T.; Liu, Z.; Lorenzini, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lumaca, D.; Macarthur, J.; Magalhaes, N. S.; Majorana, E.; Malvezzi, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G.; Marque, J.; Martin, R.; Martynov, D.; Mavalvala, N.; McClelland, D. E.; Meadors, G. D.; Meier, T.; Mermet, A.; Michel, C.; Minenkov, Y.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mudadu, L.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mul, F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Neri, M.; Niwa, Y.; Ohashi, M.; Okada, K.; Oppermann, P.; Pinard, L.; Poeld, J.; Prato, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Puncken, O.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Reitze, D. H.; Risson, P.; Rocchi, A.; Saito, N.; Saito, Y.; Sakakibara, Y.; Sassolas, B.; Schimmel, A.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Sequino, V.; Serra, E.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shoda, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shibata, K.; Sigg, D.; Smith-Lefebvre, N.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stefszky, M. S.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Suzuki, T.; Takahashi, R.; Tanner, D. B.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Tokoku, C.; Tsubono, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Ueda, S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vorvick, C.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Wade, A.; Ward, R.; Wessels, P.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Yamamoto, K.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    The Amaldi 10 Parallel Session C3 on Advanced Gravitational Wave detectors gave an overview of the status and several specific challenges and solutions relevant to the instruments planned for a mid-decade start of observation. Invited overview talks for the Virgo, LIGO, and KAGRA instruments were complemented by more detailed discussions in presentations and posters of some instrument features and designs.

  8. Cosmology using advanced gravitational-wave detectors alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stephen R.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a novel approach to measuring the Hubble constant using gravitational-wave (GW) signals from compact binaries by exploiting the narrowness of the distribution of masses of the underlying neutron-star population. Gravitational-wave observations with a network of detectors will permit a direct, independent measurement of the distance to the source systems. If the redshift of the source is known, these inspiraling double-neutron-star binary systems can be used as standard sirens to extract cosmological information. Unfortunately, the redshift and the system chirp mass are degenerate in GW observations. Thus, most previous work has assumed that the source redshift is obtained from electromagnetic counterparts. However, we investigate a novel method of using these systems as standard sirens with GW observations alone. In this paper, we explore what we can learn about the background cosmology and the mass distribution of neutron stars from the set of neutron-star (NS) mergers detected by such a network. We use a Bayesian formalism to analyze catalogs of NS-NS inspiral detections. We find that it is possible to constrain the Hubble constant, H0, and the parameters of the NS mass function using gravitational-wave data alone, without relying on electromagnetic counterparts. Under reasonable assumptions, we will be able to determine H0 to ±10% using ˜100 observations, provided the Gaussian half-width of the underlying double NS mass distribution is less than 0.04M⊙. The expected precision depends linearly on the intrinsic width of the NS mass function, but has only a weak dependence on H0 near the default parameter values. Finally, we consider what happens if, for some fraction of our data catalog, we have an electromagnetically measured redshift. The detection, and cataloging, of these compact-object mergers will allow precision astronomy, and provide a determination of H0 which is independent of the local distance scale.

  9. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  10. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  11. Modular detector for deep underwater registration of muons and muon groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demianov, A. I.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Sinyov, N. B.; Varadanyan, I. N.; Yershov, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Registration and identification of muons and muon groups penetrating into the ocean depth, can be performed using a modular multilayer detector with high resolution bidimensional readout - deep underwater calorimeter (project NADIR). Laboratory testing of a prototype sensor cell with liquid scintillator in light-tight casing, testifies to the practicability of the full-scale experiment within reasonable expences.

  12. Advanced combined iodine dispenser and detector. [for microorganism annihilation in potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.; Powell, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    A total weight of 1.23 kg (2.7 lb), a total volume of 1213 cu m (74 cu in), and an average power consumption of 5.5W was achieved in the advanced combined iodine dispenser/detector by integrating the detector with the iodine source, arranging all iodinator components within a compact package and lowering the parasitic power to the detector and electronics circuits. These achievements surpassed the design goals of 1.36 kg (3.0 lb), 1671 cu m (102 cu in) and 8W. The reliability and maintainability were improved by reducing the detector lamp power, using an interchangeable lamp concept, making the electronic circuit boards easily accessible, providing redundant water seals and improving the accessibility to the iodine accumulator for refilling. The system was designed to iodinate (to 5 ppm iodine) the fuel cell water generated during 27 seven-day orbiter missions (equivalent to 18,500 kg (40,700 lb) of water) before the unit must be recharged with iodine crystals.

  13. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  14. Technology assessment for the advanced life detector. Final technical report, May 1987-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, W.D.; George, D.T.

    1988-01-29

    This report summarizes an assessment of technology available to develop a noninvasive life detector for use on the battlefield. The detectors determine if casualties wearing chemical protective overgarments are alive or dead without further exposing either the casualties or the aidmen to the contaminated environment. Seven technology approaches sponsored by the Department of Defense (comprising 11 devices), four technologies identified in a market survey, and one device described in a Broad Agency Announcement proposal were examined as candidate Advanced Life Detectors. The technologies and instruments surveyed included three transmitter-receiver technologies, an electrocardiogram (ECG) technology, pacemaker-transmitter/receiver, dry electrode heart rate monitor, five microwave technologies, flash reflectance oximetry, an ultrasound technology, a streaming potential technology, a dry electrode ECG monitor coupled to a microphone, a statometric technique for determining heart rate and blood pressure, and a vital-signs monitor that determines heart rate and blood pressure using blood pressure cuff and microphones incorporated into the cuff. Analysis of the state-of-the-art of each device indicates that none of them are advanced enough to fulfill all the requirements of the draft Joint Services Operational Requirement. Three of the devices identified are recommended for further evaluation.

  15. β-Decay Studies of r-Process Nuclei Using the Advanced Implantation Detector Array (AIDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, C. J.; Davinson, T.; Estrade, A.; Braga, D.; Burrows, I.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Grahn, T.; Grant, A.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Kiss, G.; Kogimtzis, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Liu, Z.; Lorusso, G.; Matsui, K.; Nishimura, S.; Page, R. D.; Prydderch, M.; Phong, V. H.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thomas, S. L.; Woods, P. J.

    Thought to produce around half of all isotopes heavier than iron, the r-process is a key mechanism for nucleosynthesis. However, a complete description of the r-process is still lacking and many unknowns remain. Experimental determination of β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission probabilities along the r-process path would help to facilitate a greater understanding of this process. The Advanced Implantation Detector Array (AIDA) represents the latest generation of silicon implantation detectors for β-decay studies with fast radioactive ion beams. Preliminary results from commissioning experiments demonstrate successful operation of AIDA and analysis of the data obtained during the first official AIDA experiments is now under-way.

  16. Apparatus for dimensional characterization of fused silica fibers for the suspensions of advanced gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Cumming, A; Jones, R; Barton, M; Cagnoli, G; Cantley, C A; Crooks, D R M; Hammond, G D; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Strain, K A

    2011-04-01

    Detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources remains one of the most challenging problems faced by experimental physicists. A significant limit to the sensitivity of future long-baseline interferometric gravitational wave detectors is thermal displacement noise of the test mass mirrors and their suspensions. Suspension thermal noise results from mechanical dissipation in the fused silica suspension fibers suspending the test mass mirrors and is therefore an important noise source at operating frequencies between ∼10 and 30 Hz. This dissipation occurs due to a combination of thermoelastic damping, surface and bulk losses. Its effects can be reduced by optimizing the thermoelastic and surface loss, and these parameters are a function of the cross sectional dimensions of the fiber along its length. This paper presents a new apparatus capable of high resolution measurements of the cross sectional dimensions of suspension fibers of both rectangular and circular cross section, suitable for use in advanced detector mirror suspensions.

  17. Development of an ultrahigh-performance infrared detector platform for advanced spectroscopic sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manish; Wicks, Gary; Marshall, Andrew; Craig, Adam; Golding, Terry; Hossain, Khalid; McEwan, Ken; Howle, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Laser-based stand-off sensing of threat agents (e.g. explosives, toxic industrial chemicals or chemical warfare agents), by detection of distinct infrared spectral absorption signature of these materials, has made significant advances recently. This is due in part to the availability of infrared and terahertz laser sources with significantly improved power and tunability. However, there is a pressing need for a versatile, high performance infrared sensor that can complement and enhance the recent advances achieved in laser technology. This work presents new, high performance infrared detectors based on III-V barrier diodes. Unipolar barrier diodes, such as the nBn, have been very successful in the MWIR using InAs(Sb)-based materials, and in the MWIR and LWIR using type-II InAsSb/InAs superlattice-based materials. This work addresses the extension of the barrier diode architecture into the SWIR region, using GaSb-based and InAs-based materials. The program has resulted in detectors with unmatched performance in the 2-3 μm spectral range. Temperature dependent characterization has shown dark currents to be diffusion limited and equal to, or within a factor of 5, of the Rule 07 expression for Auger-limited HgCdTe detectors. Furthermore, D* values are superior to those of existing detectors in the 2-3 μm band. Of particular significance to spectroscopic sensing systems is the ability to have near-background limited performance at operation temperatures compatible with robust and reliable solid state thermoelectric coolers.

  18. Imaging performance of a clinical selenium flat-panel detector for advanced applications in full-field digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loustauneau, Vincent; Bissonnette, Michel; Cadieux, Sebastien; Hansroul, Marc; Masson, E.; Savard, Serge; Polischuk, Brad T.; Lehtimauki, Mari J.

    2003-06-01

    The advent of digital detectors will enable several advanced imaging applications to be used in the fight against breast cancer. For example, dynamic imaging applications such as tomosynthesis, contrast enhanced and dual energy mammography have demonstrated promising results. In this paper, we will assess the suitability of this detector for these advanced applications. MTF and DQE measurements were performed on a selenium FFDM detector to assess image quality. Ghosting properties of a digital detector are also an important factor, since it can strongly degrade image quality. In this paper, we will also report on the ghosting characteristics of the selenium detector, using typical exposures envisioned to be used in tomosynthesis exams. The physical mechanisms that create ghost images will be discussed and will be quantified.

  19. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-07

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments.

  20. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Dark Current and Noise Characterization and Anomalous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The dark current and noise characteristics of the Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager measured during ground calibration at MIT Lincoln Laboratory are presented. Data were collected for the nominal focal plane operating temperature of 220 K as well as supplemental operating temperatures (215 and 225 K). Dark current baseline values are provided, and noise characterization includes the evaluation of white, coherent, low frequency, and high frequency components. Finally, anomalous detectors, characterized by unusual dark current, noise, gain, or cross-talk properties are investigated.

  1. Effect of Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm on Specificity and Sensitivity of Portable High Purity Germanium Gamma Detector Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    with a 50 mm diameter and 30 mm deep Ge crystal and low power Stirling Cooler . The detector is shown in Figure 9. 28 Figure 9. Ortec...recording some characteristics of their average behavior. The common behavior of particles in the physical system is then concluded from the 14...modeling. With increased computational power, Monte Carlo simulations of detector systems have become a complement to experimental detector work

  2. Sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO detectors at the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, D. V.; Hall, E. D.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Aston, S. M.; Austin, L.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barbet, M.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Batch, J. C.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Bergman, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Black, E.; Blair, C. D.; Bogan, C.; Bork, R.; Bridges, D. O.; Brooks, A. F.; Celerier, C.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Cook, D.; Countryman, S. T.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Damjanic, M.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Driggers, J. C.; Dwyer, S. E.; Effler, A.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fair, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Foley, S.; Frede, M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, R.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Grote, H.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Heefner, J.; Heintze, M. C.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hoak, D.; Hough, J.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jones, R.; Kandhasamy, S.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kells, W.; Kijbunchoo, N.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kokeyama, K.; Korth, W. Z.; Kuehn, G.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Le Roux, A.; Levine, B. M.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lormand, M.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacDonald, T.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Merilh, E. L.; Meyer, M. S.; Meyers, P. M.; Miller, J.; Mittleman, R.; Moreno, G.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dell, J.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Palamos, J. R.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Patrick, Z.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I.; Poeld, J.; Principe, M.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Ramet, C. R.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Robertson, N. A.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Ryan, K.; Sadecki, T.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Savage, R. L.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schultz, B.; Schwinberg, P.; Sellers, D.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sigg, D.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Sorazu, B.; Staley, A.; Stein, A. J.; Stochino, A.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vargas, M.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Weaver, B.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Weßels, P.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Wipf, C. C.; Worden, J.; Wu, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Zhang, L.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two widely separated 4 km laser interferometers designed to detect gravitational waves from distant astrophysical sources in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The first observation run of the Advanced LIGO detectors started in September 2015 and ended in January 2016. A strain sensitivity of better than 10-23/√{Hz } was achieved around 100 Hz. Understanding both the fundamental and the technical noise sources was critical for increasing the astrophysical strain sensitivity. The average distance at which coalescing binary black hole systems with individual masses of 30 M⊙ could be detected above a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 8 was 1.3 Gpc, and the range for binary neutron star inspirals was about 75 Mpc. With respect to the initial detectors, the observable volume of the Universe increased by a factor 69 and 43, respectively. These improvements helped Advanced LIGO to detect the gravitational wave signal from the binary black hole coalescence, known as GW150914.

  3. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  4. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the QCD Group's Research into Properties of the Strong Interaction

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The QCD group studies the properties of the strong interaction. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  5. TU-EF-207-04: Advances in Detector Technology for Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  6. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    We report in this paper decisive advance on the detector development for the astronomical applications that require very fast operation. Since the CCD220 and OCAM2 major success, new detector developments started in Europe either for visible and IR wavelengths. Funded by ESO and the FP7 Opticon European network, the NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with strong ESO involvement. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate and providing digital outputs. A camera development, based on this CMOS device and also funded by the Opticon European network, is ongoing. Another major AO wavefront sensing detector development concerns IR detectors based on Avalanche Photodiode (e- APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter offers a 320x255 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3 microns, with less than 2 e readout noise at 1600 fps. A rectangular window can also be programmed to speed up even more the frame rate when the full frame readout is not required. The high QE response, in the range of 70%, is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using pulse tube cryocoolers was developed in the frame of this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. The characterization results of this device are presented here. Readout noise as low as 1.7 e at 1600 fps has been measured with a 3 microns wavelength cut-off chip and a multiplication gain of 14 obtained with a limited photodiode polarization of 8V. This device also exhibits excellent linearity, lower than 1%. The pulse tube cooling allows smart and easy cooling down to 55 K. Vibrations investigations using centroiding and FFT measurements were performed proving that the miniature pulse tube does not induce measurable vibrations to the optical bench, allowing use of this

  7. Modelling an advanced ManPAD with dual band detectors and a rosette scanning seeker head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, Richard P.; Richardson, Mark A.; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Man Portable Air Defence Systems (ManPADs) have been a favoured anti aircraft weapon since their appearance on the military proliferation scene in the mid 1960s. Since this introduction there has been a 'cat and mouse' game of Missile Countermeasures (CMs) and the aircraft protection counter counter measures (CCMs) as missile designers attempt to defeat the aircraft platform protection equipment. Magnesium Teflon Viton (MTV) flares protected the target aircraft until the missile engineers discovered the art of flare rejection using techniques including track memory and track angle bias. These early CCMs relied upon CCM triggering techniques such as the rise rate method which would just sense a sudden increase in target energy and assume that a flare CM had been released by the target aircraft. This was not as reliable as was first thought as aspect changes (bringing another engine into the field of view) or glint from the sun could inadvertently trigger a CCM when not needed. The introduction of dual band detectors in the 1980s saw a major advance in CCM capability allowing comparisons between two distinct IR bands to be made thus allowing the recognition of an MTV flare to occur with minimal false alarms. The development of the rosette scan seeker in the 1980s complemented this advancement allowing the scene in the missile field of view (FOV) to be scanned by a much smaller (1/25) instantaneous FOV (IFOV) with the spectral comparisons being made at each scan point. This took the ManPAD from a basic IR energy detector to a pseudo imaging system capable of analysing individual elements of its overall FOV allowing more complex and robust CCM to be developed. This paper continues the work published in [1,2] and describes the method used to model an advanced ManPAD with a rosette scanning seeker head and robust CCMs similar to the Raytheon Stinger RMP.

  8. Gravity Spy: integrating advanced LIGO detector characterization, machine learning, and citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevin, M.; Coughlin, S.; Bahaadini, S.; Besler, E.; Rohani, N.; Allen, S.; Cabero, M.; Crowston, K.; Katsaggelos, A. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lee, T. K.; Lintott, C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lundgren, A.; Østerlund, C.; Smith, J. R.; Trouille, L.; Kalogera, V.

    2017-03-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves, the advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) has initiated a new field of astronomy by providing an alternative means of sensing the universe. The extreme sensitivity required to make such detections is achieved through exquisite isolation of all sensitive components of LIGO from non-gravitational-wave disturbances. Nonetheless, LIGO is still susceptible to a variety of instrumental and environmental sources of noise that contaminate the data. Of particular concern are noise features known as glitches, which are transient and non-Gaussian in their nature, and occur at a high enough rate so that accidental coincidence between the two LIGO detectors is non-negligible. Glitches come in a wide range of time-frequency-amplitude morphologies, with new morphologies appearing as the detector evolves. Since they can obscure or mimic true gravitational-wave signals, a robust characterization of glitches is paramount in the effort to achieve the gravitational-wave detection rates that are predicted by the design sensitivity of LIGO. This proves a daunting task for members of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration alone due to the sheer amount of data. In this paper we describe an innovative project that combines crowdsourcing with machine learning to aid in the challenging task of categorizing all of the glitches recorded by the LIGO detectors. Through the Zooniverse platform, we engage and recruit volunteers from the public to categorize images of time-frequency representations of glitches into pre-identified morphological classes and to discover new classes that appear as the detectors evolve. In addition, machine learning algorithms are used to categorize images after being trained on human-classified examples of the morphological classes. Leveraging the strengths of both classification methods, we create a combined method with the aim of improving the efficiency and accuracy of each individual

  9. Inverted pendulum as low-frequency pre-isolation for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamori, A.; Raffai, P.; Márka, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Sannibale, V.; Tariq, H.; Bertolini, A.; Cella, G.; Viboud, N.; Numata, K.; Takahashi, R.; Fukushima, M.

    2007-11-01

    We have developed advanced seismic attenuation systems for Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors. The design consists of an Inverted Pendulum (IP) holding stages of Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF) and pendula, which isolate the test mass suspension from ground noise. The ultra-low-frequency IP suppresses the horizontal seismic noise, while the GASF suppresses the vertical ground vibrations. The three legs of the IP are supported by cylindrical maraging steel flexural joints. The IP can be tuned to very low frequencies by carefully adjusting its load. As a best result, we have achieved an ultra low, ˜12 mHz pendulum frequency for the system prototype made for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory). The measured quality factor, Q, of this IP, ranging from Q˜2500 (at 0.45 Hz) to Q˜2 (at 12 mHz), is compatible with structural damping, and is proportional to the square of the pendulum frequency. Tunable counterweights allow for precise center-of-percussion tuning to achieve the required attenuation up to the first leg internal resonance (˜60 Hz for advanced LIGO prototype). All measurements are in good agreement with our analytical models. We therefore expect good attenuation in the low-frequency region, from ˜0.1to ˜50 Hz, covering the micro-seismic peak. The extremely soft IP requires minimal control force, which simplifies any needed actuation.

  10. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  11. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  12. Development of an advanced combined iodine dispenser/detector. [for spacecraft water supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Jensen, F. C.; Winkler, H. E.; Schubert, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Injection of iodine into water is widely used to control microbial growth. An entirely automated device for I2 injection has been developed for spacecraft application. Transfer of I2 into the water from a concentrated form is controlled electrochemically via feedback from an integrated photometric I2 level detector. All components are contained within a package weighing only 1.23 kg (2.7 lb) dry, which occupies only 1213 cu cm (74 cu in) of space, and which has the capacity to iodinate 10,900 kg (24,000 lb) of water of 5 ppm. These features exceed design specifications. The device performed satisfactorily during extended testing at variable water flow rates and temperatures. Designed to meet specifications of the Shuttle Orbiter, the device will find application in the regenerative water systems of advanced spacecraft.

  13. Advances in the growth of alkaline-Earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Cherepy, N. J.; Beck, P. R.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Rowe, E.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystalgrowth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  14. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  15. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  16. Up-conversion detectors at 1550 nm for quantum communication: review and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, M.; Alibart, O.; Doutre, F.; Tascu, S.; de Micheli, M. P.; Ostrowsky, D. B.; Thyagarajan, K.; Tanzilli, S.

    . The poled waveguides are designed to up-convert single photons at 1550 nm to 600 nm when a 980 nm diode laser is used as pump. We obtain an overall efficiency of about 0.6% for a noise level of about 8× 103 counts/s. This overall efficiency includes both insertion and propagation losses, and internal up-conversion and quantum detection (Si-APD) efficiencies. Despite a low efficiency value compared to what has been obtained so far by other groups, the efficiency/noise ratio is still comparable which still allows us investigating the noise issue. From the spectrum obtained in both poled and non-poled waveguides we conclude that the noise comes from an alternative phase-matching scheme which permits creating paired photons at 1550 and 2700 nm wavelength by down-conversion of the 980 nm pump laser. Knowing that 1550 nm corresponds to the input signal wavelength, up-conversion of actual signal or pump-induced photons at this particular wavelength cannot be discriminated, therefore contributing to the noise at the final wavelength of 600 nm. We believe that this process of down-conversion of the pump laser to the signal wavelength (plus complementary wavelength) is responsible for the unexpected noise level reported in all the up-conversion detector realizations.

  17. 40 CFR 35.4095 - What can my group pay for with an advance payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What can my group pay for with an... the Money § 35.4095 What can my group pay for with an advance payment? (a) Advance payments may be... for contracts for technical advisors or other contractors. (c) Advance payments are not available...

  18. 40 CFR 35.4095 - What can my group pay for with an advance payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What can my group pay for with an... the Money § 35.4095 What can my group pay for with an advance payment? (a) Advance payments may be... for contracts for technical advisors or other contractors. (c) Advance payments are not available...

  19. 40 CFR 35.4095 - What can my group pay for with an advance payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What can my group pay for with an... the Money § 35.4095 What can my group pay for with an advance payment? (a) Advance payments may be... for contracts for technical advisors or other contractors. (c) Advance payments are not available...

  20. New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm (ASIA-NEW) for radiation monitors with plastic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrov, Andrei; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) with plastic detectors represent the main instruments used for primary border (customs) radiation control. RPM are widely used because they are simple, reliable, relatively inexpensive and have a high sensitivity. However, experience using the RPM in various countries has revealed the systems have some grave shortcomings. There is a dramatic decrease of the probability of detection of radioactive sources under high suppression of the natural gamma background (radiation control of heavy cargoes, containers and, especially, trains). NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) existing in objects under control trigger the so-called 'nuisance alarms', requiring a secondary inspection for source verification. At a number of sites, the rate of such alarms is so high it significantly complicates the work of customs and border officers. This paper presents a brief description of new variant of algorithm ASIA-New (New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm), which was developed by the authors and based on some experimental test results. It also demonstrates results of different tests and the capability of a new system to overcome the shortcomings stated above. New electronics and ASIA-New enables RPM to detect radioactive sources under a high background suppression (tested at 15-30%) and to verify the detected NORM (KCl) and the artificial isotopes (Co-57, Ba-133 and other). New variant of ASIA is based on physical principles and does not require a lot of special tests to attain statistical data for its parameters. That is why this system can be easily installed into any RPM with plastic detectors. This algorithm was tested for 1,395 passages of different transports (cars, trucks and trailers) without radioactive sources. It also was tested for 4,015 passages of these transports with radioactive sources of different activity (Co-57, Ba-133, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Th-232) and these sources masked by NORM (K-40) as well. (authors)

  1. The “Puck” energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low‐resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low‐resource but highly capable, mass‐species‐discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the “Puck” EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high‐voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions. PMID:27867799

  2. Aspects of suspension design for the development of advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul

    The Institute for Gravitational Research in the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, Golm and the University of Cardiff has been actively involved in the research for the development of instruments and data analysis techniques to detect gravitational waves. This includes construction of a long ground based interferometer in Germany called GEO 600 (upgraded to GEO-HF) having an arm length 600 m and strong involvement in the larger detectors of the LIGO (Laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory) project in USA having arm lengths of 4 km (Operated by MIT, Boston and CALTECH, Pasadena). An upgrade to LIGO called Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) is currently under construction with significant input from the University of Glasgow. Thermal noise is one of the most significant noise sources affecting the sensitivity of the detector at a range of frequencies. Thermal noise arises due to the random fluctuations of atoms and molecules in the materials of the test mass mirrors and suspension elements, and is related to mechanical loss in these materials. The work presented in chapter 3 of this thesis is devoted to the analysis of aspects of mechanical loss and thermal noise in the final stages of the GEO suspension. The work in chapter 4 focuses on the theory of photoelasticty and birefringence techniques. A study of mechanical and thermal stress induced in fused silica has been discussed in chapter 5 of this thesis. To understand the working of photoelastic techniques learned in chapter 4, a study of mechanical stress was undertaken by applying a load on the sample to induce temporary birefringence. A study of thermal stress in fused silica welds has also been presented in chapter 5.

  3. Phase-locked onset detectors for monaural sound grouping and binaural direction finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie

    2002-05-01

    Locating sound sources is an important task for animals. IIDs and ITDs are normally used to provide information about the instantaneous direction of sound received at the ears. In a reverberating environment, this may differ from the direction of the sound source. However the IID and ITD always provide information about sound source direction at onset, since onsets always arrive from the shortest, direct path. Binaural recordings were filtered using a gammatone filterbank, converted to a phase-locked spike code, and passed to a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron through a rapidly depressing synapse. This provides a phase-locked onset detector in each bandpassed channel. Nearly coincident onsets from different channels in each ear were grouped. IIDs and ITDs were computed when grouped onsets in both ears occur at almost the same time. ITDs were converted to azimuth geometrically: IIDs were converted using the impulse response at each ear. The results show that even in a reverberating environment, sound direction can be found from a single onset. Wideband and long sounds provide better results. Multiple sound sources can be accommodated. The system exhibits the precedence effect since a second onset (without intermediate offset) will be ignored because the depressing synapses will not have recovered.

  4. Advanced Instruction: Facilitation of Individual Learning Processes in Large Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putz, Claus; Intveen, Geesche

    2009-01-01

    By supplying various combinations of advanced instructions and different forms of exercises individual learning processes within the impartation of basic knowledge can be activated and supported at best. The fundamentals of our class "Introduction to spatial-geometric cognition using CAD" are constructional inputs, which systematically induce the…

  5. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  6. Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

    2003-10-28

    The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

  7. Psychosocial Accommodation to Group Confinement in the Advanced Base Habitat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP CONFINED ENVIRONMENTS STRESS( PSYCHOLOGY ) "FERSONNEL TEST AND EVALUATION PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS CONFLICT...during the tests provided an opportunity to assess the psychological effects of the Habitat. Three tests were conducted with four crew members each...IRITY CLASSIFICATION OF TwiS PAGE All other editions are obsolete ’S ,...’LASSIFIED 18. CONFINEMENT( PSYCHOLOGY ), LONG RANCE(TIME), BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

  8. [Recent advance on blood group antigen modification of porcine erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Xi; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2002-06-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. Serologically, pRBCs share a number of characteristics with human red blood cells (RBCs), so pRBCs are considered the most likely donor for xenotransfusion. However, xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes play major roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1, 3Galbeta1, 4GalNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated.

  9. Grouped actinide separation in advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, J.P.; Malmbeck, R.; Ougier, M.; Soucek, P.; Murakamin, T.; Tsukada, T.; Koyama, T.

    2013-07-01

    Aiming at cleaner waste streams (containing only the short-lived fission products) a partitioning and transmutation (P-T) scheme can significantly reduce the quantities of long-lived radionuclides consigned to waste. Many issues and options are being discussed and studied at present in view of selecting the optimal route. The choice is between individual treatment of the relevant elements and a grouped treatment of all actinides together. In the European Collaborative Project ACSEPT (Actinide recycling by Separation and Transmutation), grouped separation options derived from an aqueous extraction or from a dry pyroprocessing route were extensively investigated. Successful demonstration tests for both systems have been carried out in the frame of this project. The aqueous process called GANEX (Grouped Actinide Extraction) is composed of 2 cycles, a first one to recover the major part of U followed by a co-extraction of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm altogether. The pyro-reprocessing primarily applicable to metallic fuels such as the U-Pu-Zr alloy originally developed by the Argonne National Laboratory (US) in the mid 1980s, has also been applied to the METAPHIX fuels containing up to 5% of minor actinides and 5% of lanthanides (e.g. U{sub 60}Pu{sub 20}-Zr{sub 10}Am{sub 2}Nd{sub 3.5}Y{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}). A grouped actinide separation has been successfully carried out by electrorefining on solid Al cathodes. At present the recovery of the actinides from the alloy formed with Al upon electrodeposition is under investigation, because an efficient P-T cycle requires multiple re-fabrication and re-irradiation. (authors)

  10. Advanced technologies for future ground-based, laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Pitkin, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of modern optical techniques being used and developed for the field of gravitational wave detection. We describe the current state-of-the-art of gravitational waves detector technologies with regard to optical layouts, suspensions and test masses. We discuss the dominant sources and noise in each of these subsystems and the developments that will help mitigate them for future generations of detectors. We very briefly summarise some of the novel astrophysics that will be possible with these upgraded detectors. PMID:25705087

  11. Advanced technologies for future ground-based, laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Pitkin, Matthew

    2014-12-12

    We present a review of modern optical techniques being used and developed for the field of gravitational wave detection. We describe the current state-of-the-art of gravitational waves detector technologies with regard to optical layouts, suspensions and test masses. We discuss the dominant sources and noise in each of these subsystems and the developments that will help mitigate them for future generations of detectors. We very briefly summarise some of the novel astrophysics that will be possible with these upgraded detectors.

  12. Advanced technologies for future ground-based, laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Pitkin, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    We present a review of modern optical techniques being used and developed for the field of gravitational wave detection. We describe the current state-of-the-art of gravitational waves detector technologies with regard to optical layouts, suspensions and test masses. We discuss the dominant sources and noise in each of these subsystems and the developments that will help mitigate them for future generations of detectors. We very briefly summarise some of the novel astrophysics that will be possible with these upgraded detectors.

  13. Advancing the Technology of Monolithic CMOS detectors for their use as X-ray Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) proposes a two year program to further advance the scientific capabilities of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers. This proposal will build upon the progress achieved with funding from a previous APRA proposal that ended in 2013. As part of that previous proposal, x- ray optimized, highly versatile, monolithic CMOS imaging detectors and technology were developed and tested. The performance and capabilities of these devices were then demonstrated, with an emphasis on the performance advantages these devices have over CCDs and other technologies. The developed SAO/SRI-Sarnoff CMOS devices incorporate: Low noise, high sensitivity ("gain") pixels; Highly parallel on-chip signal chains; Standard and very high resistivity (30,000Ohm-cm) Si; Back-Side thinning and passivation. SAO demonstrated the performance benefits of each of these features in these devices. This new proposal high-lights the performance of this previous generation of devices, and segues into new technology and capability. The high sensitivity ( 135uV/e) 6 Transistor (6T) Pinned Photo Diode (PPD) pixels provided a large charge to voltage conversion gain to the detect and resolve even small numbers of photo electrons produced by x-rays. The on-chip, parallel signal chain processed an entire row of pixels in the same time that a CCD requires to processes a single pixel. The resulting high speed operation ( 1000 times faster than CCD) provide temporal resolution while mitigating dark current and allowed room temperature operation. The high resistivity Si provided full (over) depletion for thicker devices which increased QE for higher energy x-rays. In this proposal, SAO will investigate existing NMOS and existing PMOS devices as xray imaging spectrometers. Conventional CMOS imagers are NMOS. NMOS devices collect and measure photo-electrons. In contrast, PMOS devices collect and measure photo-holes. PMOS devices have various

  14. Gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1: A comparison of search methods and prospects for detection with advanced detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, C.; Bulten, H. J.; Crowder, S. G.; Dergachev, V.; Galloway, D. K.; Goetz, E.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Lasky, P. D.; Meadors, G. D.; Melatos, A.; Premachandra, S.; Riles, K.; Sammut, L.; Thrane, E. H.; Whelan, J. T.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is potentially the most luminous source of continuous gravitational-wave radiation for interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. For low-mass X-ray binaries this radiation would be sustained by active accretion of matter from its binary companion. With the Advanced Detector Era fast approaching, work is underway to develop an array of robust tools for maximizing the science and detection potential of Sco X-1. We describe the plans and progress of a project designed to compare the numerous independent search algorithms currently available. We employ a mock-data challenge in which the search pipelines are tested for their relative proficiencies in parameter estimation, computational efficiency, robustness, and most importantly, search sensitivity. The mock-data challenge data contains an ensemble of 50 Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) type signals, simulated within a frequency band of 50-1500 Hz. Simulated detector noise was generated assuming the expected best strain sensitivity of Advanced LIGO [1] and Advanced VIRGO [2] (4 ×10-24 Hz-1 /2 ). A distribution of signal amplitudes was then chosen so as to allow a useful comparison of search methodologies. A factor of 2 in strain separates the quietest detected signal, at 6.8 ×10-26 strain, from the torque-balance limit at a spin frequency of 300 Hz, although this limit could range from 1.2 ×10-25 (25 Hz) to 2.2 ×10-26 (750 Hz) depending on the unknown frequency of Sco X-1. With future improvements to the search algorithms and using advanced detector data, our expectations for probing below the theoretical torque-balance strain limit are optimistic.

  15. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 10(sup 13) cm(exp -3) can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm(exp -1) with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  16. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Christopher Sean

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 1013 cm-3 can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm-1 with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  17. Summer Support of the Advanced Structures and Measurements Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuber, Alexander Lee

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is my exit presentation summarizing the work that I did this summer during my 10 week summer internship. It is primarily focused on tensile testing of composite coupons including the use of the ARAMIS optical strain measurement system, but it also includes some discussion of other support that I provided for the Dryden composites working group effort. My main efforts in that area were focused on T-joint design for an upcoming hands-on-workshop as well as design of a fixture to test joint coupons. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the other small projects that I worked on, including support of structurally integrated thermal protection system (STIPS) research and the Global Observer wing loads test.

  18. Advance Care Planning Meets Group Medical Visits: The Feasibility of Promoting Conversations

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Hillary D.; Jones, Jacqueline; Matlock, Daniel D.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Lobo, Ingrid; Levy, Cari R.; Schwartz, Robert S.; Sudore, Rebecca L.; Kutner, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Primary care needs new models to facilitate advance care planning conversations. These conversations focus on preferences regarding serious illness and may involve patients, decision makers, and health care providers. We describe the feasibility of the first primary care–based group visit model focused on advance care planning. METHODS We conducted a pilot demonstration of an advance care planning group visit in a geriatrics clinic. Patients were aged at least 65 years. Groups of patients met in 2 sessions of 2 hours each facilitated by a geriatrician and a social worker. Activities included considering personal values, discussing advance care planning, choosing surrogate decision-makers, and completing advance directives. We used the RE-AIM framework to evaluate the project. RESULTS Ten of 11 clinicians referred patients for participation. Of 80 patients approached, 32 participated in 5 group visit cohorts (a 40% participation rate) and 27 participated in both sessions (an 84% retention rate). Mean age was 79 years; 59% of participants were female and 72% white. Most evaluated the group visit as better than usual clinic visits for discussing advance care planning. Patients reported increases in detailed advance care planning conversations after participating (19% to 41%, P = .02). Qualitative analysis found that older adults were willing to share personal values and challenges related to advance care planning and that they initiated discussions about a broad range of relevant topics. CONCLUSION A group visit to facilitate discussions about advance care planning and increase patient engagement is feasible. This model warrants further evaluation for effectiveness in improving advance care planning outcomes for patients, clinicians, and the system. PMID:26951587

  19. Stable optical spring in the Advanced LIGO detector with unbalanced arms and in the Michelson-Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrosablin, Nikita; Vyatchanin, Sergey P.

    2014-03-01

    Optical rigidity in the Advanced LIGO gravitational-wave detector, operated on the dark port regime, is unstable. We show that the same interferometer with excluded symmetric mechanical mode but with unbalanced arms allows us to get stable optical spring for the antisymmetric mechanical mode. The arm detuning necessary to get stability is shown to be a small one—it corresponds to small power in the signal port. We show that stable optical spring may be also obtained in the Michelson-Sagnac interferometer with both power and signal recycling mirrors and unbalanced arms.

  20. Symmetrical Josephson vortex interferometer as an advanced ballistic single-shot detector

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Pankratov, A. L.; Kuzmin, L. S.

    2014-11-17

    We consider a ballistic detector formed in an interferometer manner which operational principle relies on Josephson vortex scattering at a measurement potential. We propose an approach to symmetrize the detector scheme and explore arising advantages in the signal-to-noise ratio and in the back-action on a measured object by means of recently presented numerical and analytical methods for modeling of a soliton scattering dynamics in the presence of thermal fluctuations. The obtained characteristics for experimentally relevant parameters reveal practical applicability of the considered schemes including possibility of coupling with standard digital rapid single flux quantum circuits.

  1. Chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: an overview of randomised clinical trials. Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists Group.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To consider the role of platinum and the relative merits of single agent and combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. DESIGN--Formal quantitative overview using updated individual patient data from all available randomised trials (published and unpublished). SUBJECTS--8139 patients (6408 deaths) included in 45 different trials. RESULTS--No firm conclusions could be reached. Nevertheless, the results suggest that in terms of survival immediate platinum based treatment was better than non-platinum regimens (overall relative risk 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.05); platinum in combination was better than single agent platinum when used in the same dose (overall relative risk 0.85; 0.72 to 1.00); and cisplatin and carboplatin were equally effective (overall relative risk 1.05; 0.94 to 1.18). CONCLUSIONS--In the past, randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer have been much too small to detect the degree of benefit which this overview suggests is realistic for currently available chemotherapeutic regimens. Hence a new trial comparing cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) with carboplatin has been launched and plans to accrue 2000 patients. PMID:1834291

  2. ProtoEXIST2: Advanced Wide-field Imaging CZT Detector Development For The HET On The Proposed EXIST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.; Gehrels, N.; Cook, W.; Kaye, S.; Harrison, F.

    2010-03-01

    We describe our development of ProtoEXIST2, the advanced CZT imaging detector and wide field telescope prototype for the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the proposed Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission. EXIST is a multi-wavelength Medium class mission which would explore the early Universe using high redshift Gamma-ray Bursts and survey black holes on all scales. ProtoEXIST2 will demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale imaging module (256 cm2) with a close-tiled array of fine pixel (0.6 mm) CZT with a balloon flight test in 2010 or 2011. This second generation close-tiled CZT imager follows ProtoEXIST1, which had a recent successful balloon flight (see Allen et al in this meeting) using the same area CZT detector module (256 cm2) but with larger pixel size (2.5mm). For signal readout and event processing, we use the Direct-Bond (DB) ASIC, developed for the NuSTAR mission to be used in a close-tiled 2 x 2 array of 2x2 cm2 CZT detectors, each with 32x32 pixels. The DB-ASIC is attractive for a large scale implementation of tiled imaging CZT detectors given its low noise and power consumption (70uW/pixel). We are developing readout for the DB-ASIC that incorporates our back-end FPGA readout architecture developed for ProtoEXIST1 in order to accomplish the 256 cm2 detector module area with totally vertical integration (i.e. no auxialliary boards to the sides of the module. This is required to tile large numbers of modules into the very large total area (4.5m^2) proposed for the HET on EXIST. We review the design of the EXIST/HET and its optimum shielding in light of our ProtoEXIST1 balloon flight and our plan for future development of ProtoEXIST3, a final EXIST/HET detector module that would incorporate a still lower power version of the DB ASIC.

  3. Developing Successful Conversation Groups in the Intermediate and Advanced ESL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassano, Sharron Kay; Christison, Mary Ann

    Suggestions for improving conversation groups in the intermediate and advanced English as a second language classroom are considered with attention directed to design of the activities, preparation of the individuals involved, and selection of the subject matter. In addition, factors that cause conversation groups to fail are discussed. A…

  4. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  5. Advanced data readout technique for Multianode Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube applicable in radiation imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the best performing PSPMT tubes from Hamamatsu and Burle are designed with a pad-matrix anode layout. However, for obtaining a high resolution, a small-sized anode photomultiplier tubes are preferable; these tubes may have 64, 256 or 1024 anodes per tube. If the tubes are used in array to get a larger area detector, the number of analog channels may range from hundreds to thousands. Multichannel analog readout requires special electronics ICs, ASICs etc., which are attached to multichannel DAQ system. As a result, the data file and data processing time will be increased. Therefore, this readout could not be performed in a small project. Usually, most of radiation imaging applications allow the use of analog data processing in front-end electronics, significantly reducing the number of the detector's output lines to data acquisition without reducing the image quality. The idea of pad-matrix decoupling circuit with gain correction was invented and intensively tested in JLab. Several versions of PSPMT readout electronics were produced and studied. All developments were done and optimized specifically for radiation imaging projects. They covered high resolution SPECT, high speed PET, fast neutron imaging, and single tube and multi tube array systems. This paper presents and discusses the summary of the observed results in readout electronics evaluation with different PSPMTs and radiation imaging systems, as well as the advantages and limitations of the developed approach to radiation imaging detectors readout.

  6. Advances in CMOS Solid-state Photomultipliers for Scintillation Detector Applications

    PubMed Central

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric; Augustine, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance. PMID:25540471

  7. Growth of detector-grade CZT by Traveling Heater Method (THM): An advancement

    SciTech Connect

    ROY, U.N.; JAMES, R.; WEILER, S.; STEIN, J.; GROZA, M.; BURGER, A.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; HOSSAIN, A.; YANG, G.

    2011-04-25

    In this present work we report the growth of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te doped with In by a modified THM technique. It has been demonstrated that by controlling the microscopically flat growth interface, the size distribution and concentration can be drastically reduced in the as-grown ingots. This results in as-grown detector-grade CZT by the THM technique. The three-dimensional size distribution and concentrations of Te inclusions/precipitations were studied. The size distributions of the Te precipitations/inclusions were observed to be below the 10-{micro}m range with the total concentration less than 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. The relatively low value of Te inclusions/precipitations results in excellent charge transport properties of our as-grown samples. The ({mu}{tau}){sub e} values for different as-grown samples varied between 6-20 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V. The as-grown samples also showed fairly good detector response with resolution of {approx}1.5%, 2.7% and about 3.8% at 662 keV for quasi-hemispherical geometry for detector volumes of 0.18 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3} and 4.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  8. Backscatter tolerant squeezed light source for advanced gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sheon S Y; Stefszky, Michael S; Mow-Lowry, Conor M; Buchler, Ben C; Dwyer, Sheila; Shaddock, Daniel A; Lam, Ping Koy; McClelland, David E

    2011-12-01

    We report on the performance of a dual-wavelength resonant, traveling-wave optical parametric oscillator to generate squeezed light for application in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. Shot noise suppression of 8.6±0.8 dB was measured across the detection band of interest to Advanced LIGO, and controlled squeezing measured over 5900 s. Our results also demonstrate that the traveling-wave design has excellent intracavity backscattered light suppression of 47 dB and incident backscattered light suppression of 41 dB, which is a crucial design issue for application in advanced interferometers.

  9. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of < 25 μm in tests over 65 mm x 65 mm (3k x3k resolution elements) with excellent linearity. Using high speed TDC's, we have been able to encode event positions for random photon rates of ~1 MHz, while time tagging events using the MCP output signal to better than 100 ps. The unique ability to record photon X,Y,T high fidelity information has advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina

  10. Advanced Virus Detection Technologies Interest Group (AVDTIG): Efforts on High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) for Virus Detection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arifa S; Vacante, Dominick A; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Ng, Siemon H S; Lambert, Christophe; Charlebois, Robert L; King, Kathryn E

    Several nucleic-acid based technologies have recently emerged with capabilities for broad virus detection. One of these, high throughput sequencing, has the potential for novel virus detection because this method does not depend upon prior viral sequence knowledge. However, the use of high throughput sequencing for testing biologicals poses greater challenges as compared to other newly introduced tests due to its technical complexities and big data bioinformatics. Thus, the Advanced Virus Detection Technologies Users Group was formed as a joint effort by regulatory and industry scientists to facilitate discussions and provide a forum for sharing data and experiences using advanced new virus detection technologies, with a focus on high throughput sequencing technologies. The group was initiated as a task force that was coordinated by the Parenteral Drug Association and subsequently became the Advanced Virus Detection Technologies Interest Group to continue efforts for using new technologies for detection of adventitious viruses with broader participation, including international government agencies, academia, and technology service providers.

  11. Lunar Seismic Detector to Advance the Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galitzki, Nicholas B.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of small seismic signals on the Moon are needed to study lunar internal structure and to detect possible signals from Strange Quark m&er transit events. The immediate objective is to create a prototype seismic detector using a tunnel diode oscillator with a variable capacitor attached to a proof mass. The device is designed to operate effectively on the Moon, which requires a low power consumption to operate through lunar night, while preserving sensitivity. The goal is capacitance resolution of better than 1 part in 10' and power consumption of less than 1 watt.

  12. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  13. Advances in crystal growth, device fabrication and characterization of thallium bromide detectors for room temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amlan; Moed, Demi; Becla, Piotr; Overholt, Matthew; Motakef, Shariar

    2016-10-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a promising room-temperature radiation detector candidate with excellent charge transport properties. However, several critical issues need to be addressed before deployment of this material for long-term field applications can be realized. In this paper, progress made towards solving some of these challenges is discussed. The most significant factors for achieving long-term performance stability for TlBr devices include residual stress as generated during crystal growth and fabrication processes, surface conditions, and the choice of contact metal. Modifications to the commonly used traveling molten zone growth technique for TlBr crystals can significantly minimize the stresses generated by large temperature gradients near the melt-solid interface of the growing crystal. Plasma processing techniques were introduced for the first time to modify the Br-etched TlBr surfaces, which resulted in improvements to the surface conditions, and consequently the spectroscopic response of the detectors. Palladium electrodes resulted a 20-fold improvement in the room-temperature device lifetime when compared to its Br-etched Pt counterpart.

  14. Displacement noise from back scattering and specular reflection of input optics in advanced gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Canuel, B; Genin, E; Vajente, G; Marque, J

    2013-05-06

    The second generation of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors are currently being built and installed. They are designed to be better in strain sensitivity by about a factor 10 with respect to the first generation. Light originating from the laser and following unintended paths, called stray light, has been a major problem during the commissioning of all of the first generation detectors. Indeed, stray light carries information about the phase of the emitting object. Therefore, in the next generation all the optics will be suspended in the vacuum in order to mitigate their associated stray light displacement noise. Despite this additional precaution, the challenging target sensitivity at low frequency which is partially limited by quantum radiation pressure combined with up-conversion effects, requires more detailed investigation. In this paper, we turn our attention to stray light originating from auxiliary optical benches. We use a dedicated formalism to compute the re-coupling of back-reflected and back-scattered light. We show, in particular, how much care should be taken in designing and setting requirements for the input bench optics.

  15. The potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the predictions of general relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess what magnitude of deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters for different binary masses from the observation of a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order. We also find that neglect of orbital eccentricity or tidal deformation effects do not cause a significant bias on the detectable region of generic deviations from general relativity.

  16. The Urey instrument: an advanced in situ organic and oxidant detector for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, Andrew D; Chalmers, John H; Bada, Jeffrey L; Grunthaner, Frank J; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Quinn, Richard C; Zent, Aaron P; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin, Daniel P; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L; Clark, Benton C; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Robert, François; Sephton, Mark A; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life.

  17. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, R. M.; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 107 n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  18. The Urey Instrument: An Advanced In Situ Organic and Oxidant Detector for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, Andrew D.; Chalmers, John H.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M.; Mathies, Richard A.; Quinn, Richard C.; Zent, Aaron P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin Daniel P.; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A.; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Musée, François Robert; Sephton, Mark A.; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life.

  19. Measurements on semiconductor and scintillator detectors at the Advanced Light Source (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Roy, Utpal N.; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph B.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2016-09-01

    During the transition period between closure of Beamline X27B at BNL's NSLS and the opening of Beamline MID at NSLS-II, we began operation of LBNL's ALS Beamline 3.3.2 to carry out our radiation detection materials RD. Measurements performed at this Beamline include, X-ray Detector Response Mapping and White Beam X-ray Diffraction Topography (WBXDT), among others. We will introduce the capabilities of the Beamline and present the most recent results obtained on CdZnTe and scintillators. The goal of the studies on CdZnTe is to understand the origin and effects of subgrain boundaries and help to visualize the presence of a higher concentration of impurities, which might be responsible for the deterioration of the energy resolution and response uniformity in the vicinity of the sub-grain boundaries. The results obtained in the second year of measurements will be presented.

  20. The Science Advancement through Group Engagement Program: Leveling the Playing Field and Increasing Retention in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Donna M.; Curtin-Soydan, Amanda J.; Canelas, Dorian A.

    2014-01-01

    How can colleges and universities keep an open gateway to the science disciplines for the least experienced first-year science students while also maintaining high standards that challenge the students with the strongest possible high school backgrounds? The Science Advancement through Group Engagement (SAGE) project targets cohorts of less…

  1. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-02

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  2. Coarse-scaling adjustment of fine-group neutron spectra for epithermal neutron beams in BNCT using multiple activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide an improved and reliable neutron source description for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a spectrum adjustment procedure named coarse-scaling adjustment has been developed and applied to the neutron spectrum measurements of both the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam in Taiwan and the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in The Netherlands, using multiple activation detectors. The coarse-scaling adjustment utilizes a similar idea as the well-known two-foil method, which adjusts the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes according to the Maxwellian distribution for thermal neutrons and 1/ E distribution over the epithermal neutron energy region. The coarse-scaling adjustment can effectively suppress the number of oscillations appearing in the adjusted spectrum and provide better smoothness. This paper also presents a sophisticated 9-step process utilizing twice the coarse-scaling adjustment which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with satisfactory continuity and excellently matched reaction rates between measurements and calculation. The spectrum adjustment algorithm applied in this study is the same as the well-known SAND-II.

  3. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  4. Electron multiplication CCD detector technology advancement for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Leon K.; Demers, Richard T.; Hoenk, Michael; Peddada, Pavani; Nemati, Bijan; Cherng, Michael; Michaels, Darren; Loc, Anthony; Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Murray, Neil; Gow, Jason; Burgon, Ross; Holland, Andrew; Reinheimer, Alice; Jorden, Paul R.; Jordan, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA (Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset) is a NASA space observatory. It will host two major astronomical instruments: a wide-field imager (WFI) to search for dark energy and carry out wide field near infrared (NIR) surveys, and a coronagraph instrument (CGI) to image and spectrally characterize extrasolar planets. In this paper, we discuss the work that has been carried out at JPL in advancing Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) technology to higher flight maturity, with the goal of reaching a NASA technology readiness level of 6 (TRL-6) by early-to-mid 2016. The EMCCD has been baselined for both the coronagraph's imager and integral field spectrograph (IFS) based on its sub-electron noise performance at extremely low flux levels - the regime where the AFTA CGI will operate. We present results from a study that fully characterizes the beginning of life performance of the EMCCD. We also discuss, and present initial results from, a recent radiation test campaign that was designed and carried out to mimic the conditions of the WFIRST-AFTA space environment in an L2 orbit, where we sought to assess the sensor's end of life performance, particularly degradation of its charge transfer efficiency, in addition to other parameters such as dark current, electron multiplication gain, clock induced charge and read noise.

  5. Preparation of a one-curie 171Tm target for the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.

    2008-05-15

    Roughly one curie of 171Tm (t1/2=1.92a) has been produced and purified for the purpose of making a nuclear target for the first measurements of its neutron capture cross section. Target preparation consisted of three key steps: (1) material production; (2) separation and purification; and (3) electrodeposition onto a suitable backing material. Approximately 1.5 mg of the target material (at the time of separation) was produced by irradiating roughly 250 mg of its stable enriched 170Er lanthanide neighbor with neutrons at the ILL reactor in France. This production method resulted in a “difficult-to-separate” 1:167 mixture of near-neighboring lanthanides, Tm and Er. Separation and purification was accomplished using high-performance liquid chromatorgraphy (HPLC), with a proprietary cation exchange column (Dionex, CS-3) and alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (a-HIB) eluent. This technique yielded a final product of ~95% purity with respect to Tm. A portion (20 ug) of the Tm was electrodeposited on thin Be foil and delivered to the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE) for preliminary analysis of its neutron capture cross section using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This paper discusses the major hurdles associated with the separation and purification step including, scale-up issues related to the use of HPLC for material separation and purification of the target material from a-HIB and 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) colorant.

  6. 40 CFR 35.4090 - If my group is eligible for an advance payment, how do we get our funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... payment, how do we get our funds? 35.4090 Section 35.4090 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Assistance How You Get the Money § 35.4090 If my group is eligible for an advance payment, how do we get our funds? (a) Your group must submit in writing a request for an advance payment and identify...

  7. 40 CFR 35.4090 - If my group is eligible for an advance payment, how do we get our funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... payment, how do we get our funds? 35.4090 Section 35.4090 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Assistance How You Get the Money § 35.4090 If my group is eligible for an advance payment, how do we get our funds? (a) Your group must submit in writing a request for an advance payment and identify...

  8. 40 CFR 35.4090 - If my group is eligible for an advance payment, how do we get our funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payment, how do we get our funds? 35.4090 Section 35.4090 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Assistance How You Get the Money § 35.4090 If my group is eligible for an advance payment, how do we get our funds? (a) Your group must submit in writing a request for an advance payment and identify...

  9. Investigating the Group-Level Impact of Advanced Dual-Echo fMRI Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Kettinger, Ádám; Hill, Christopher; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán; Windischberger, Christian; Nagy, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Multi-echo fMRI data acquisition has been widely investigated and suggested to optimize sensitivity for detecting the BOLD signal. Several methods have also been proposed for the combination of data with different echo times. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these advanced echo combination methods provide advantages over the simple averaging of echoes when state-of-the-art group-level random-effect analyses are performed. Both resting-state and task-based dual-echo fMRI data were collected from 27 healthy adult individuals (14 male, mean age = 25.75 years) using standard echo-planar acquisition methods at 3T. Both resting-state and task-based data were subjected to a standard image pre-processing pipeline. Subsequently the two echoes were combined as a weighted average, using four different strategies for calculating the weights: (1) simple arithmetic averaging, (2) BOLD sensitivity weighting, (3) temporal-signal-to-noise ratio weighting and (4) temporal BOLD sensitivity weighting. Our results clearly show that the simple averaging of data with the different echoes is sufficient. Advanced echo combination methods may provide advantages on a single-subject level but when considering random-effects group level statistics they provide no benefit regarding sensitivity (i.e., group-level t-values) compared to the simple echo-averaging approach. One possible reason for the lack of clear advantages may be that apart from increasing the average BOLD sensitivity at the single-subject level, the advanced weighted averaging methods also inflate the inter-subject variance. As the echo combination methods provide very similar results, the recommendation is to choose between them depending on the availability of time for collecting additional resting-state data or whether subject-level or group-level analyses are planned. PMID:28018165

  10. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuigan, Michael; Smith, Gordon; Spiletic, John; Fine, Valeri; Nevski, Pavel

    2001-08-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactive control, including the ability to slice, search and mark areas of the detector. We incorporate the ability to make a high quality still image of a view of the detector and the ability to generate animations and a fly through of the detector and output these to MPEG or VRML models. We develop data compression hardware and software so that remote interactive visualization will be possible among dispersed collaborators. We obtain real time visual display for events accumulated during simulations.

  11. Overview of the 3rd isirv-Antiviral Group Conference – advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Aeron C; Hui, David S; Hay, Alan; Hayden, Frederick G

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the main points which emerged from the presentations and discussions at the 3rd isirv-Antiviral Group Conference - advances in clinical management. The conference covered emerging and potentially pandemic influenza viruses and discussed novel/pre-licensure therapeutics and currently approved antivirals and vaccines for the control of influenza. Current data on approved and novel treatments for non-influenza respiratory viruses such as MERS-CoV, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinoviruses and the challenges of treating immunocompromised patients with respiratory infections was highlighted. PMID:25399715

  12. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  13. Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) meeting compendium. October 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Under the direction of the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG), the Power Information Center (PIC) provides support services for each IAPG information exchange session. IAPG members meet a minimum of once each year to share programmatic and technical information on federally funded research and development (R&D) projects in the area of advanced power. This R&D is directed by one of the five IAPG member agencies-the US Army, US Navy, US Air Force, US Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Affiliated Federal groups and federally funded research and development centers can also participate. To enhance the exchange of information between Government researchers, this 1992 IAPG Meeting Compendium has been assembled. This publication is a re-printing of abstracts of each IAPG presentation offered during 1991-1992. The information is arranged chronologically by IAPG meeting. During the 1992 IAPG meeting year, there were presentations restricted to Government audiences only. These ``Restricted`` minutes have not been included in this compilation.

  14. Meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Pessin, Hayley; Poppito, Shannon; Nelson, Christian; Tomarken, Alexis; Timm, Anne Kosinski; Berg, Amy; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives An increasingly important concern for clinicians who care for patients at the end of life is their spiritual well-being and sense of meaning and purpose in life. In response to the need for short-term interventions to address spiritual well-being, we developed Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) to help patients with advanced cancer sustain or enhance a sense of meaning, peace and purpose in their lives, even as they approach the end of life. Methods Patients with advanced (stage III or IV) solid tumor cancers (N = 90) were randomly assigned to either MCGP or a supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the 8-week intervention, and again 2 months after completion. Outcome assessment included measures of spiritual well-being, meaning, hopelessness, desire for death, optimism/pessimism, anxiety, depression and overall quality of life. Results MCGP resulted in significantly greater improvements in spiritual well-being and a sense of meaning. Treatment gains were even more substantial (based on effect size estimates) at the second follow-up assessment. Improvements in anxiety and desire for death were also significant (and increased over time). There was no significant improvement on any of these variables for patients participating in SGP. Conclusions MCGP appears to be a potentially beneficial intervention for patients’ emotional and spiritual suffering at the end of life. Further research, with larger samples, is clearly needed to better understand the potential benefits of this novel intervention. PMID:19274623

  15. SNM Movement Detection/Radiation Sensors and Advanced Materials Portfolio Review, CdMnTe (CMT) Gamma Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2009-06-02

    The project goals are: (1) Develop CMT radiation detectors - Demonstrate feasibility (Phase 1 is complete) and Improve material properties and device performance; (2) This project will lead to novel radiation detectors - high detection efficiency, high energy-resolution, ambient-temperature operation, and low production cost; and (3) Such detectors are needed in areas of nonproliferation and national security for detection of SNM. Research highlights are: (1) We achieved our Phase-I goal - Demonstration of CMT detector performance approaching that of CZT detectors; (2) Demonstrated that In-doped CMT is much closer to its anticipated performance as radiation detectors than other alternative materials, TlBr and HgI{sub 2} - Large crystal volumes, 10{sup 10}{Omega}{center_dot}cm, 3 x 10{sup -3}cm{sup 2}/V, and stable response; and (3) Conducted material and device characterization experiments - Detectors: I-V, {mu}{sub e}, ({mu}{tau}){sub e}, internal E fields, energy spectra, and high-resolution x-ray response mapping data and Materials - DLTS, TCT, PL, EPDs, XRD, PCD and IR transmission.

  16. Advanced composites: Design and application. Proceedings of the meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R.; Willard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of advanced composites is discussed with emphasis on aerospace, aircraft, automotive, marine, and industrial applications. Failure modes in advanced composites are also discussed.

  17. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  18. 40 CFR 35.4085 - Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Can my group get an âadvance paymentâ to help us get started? 35.4085 Section 35.4085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... You Get the Money § 35.4085 Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started? Yes,...

  19. 40 CFR 35.4085 - Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can my group get an âadvance paymentâ to help us get started? 35.4085 Section 35.4085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... You Get the Money § 35.4085 Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started? Yes,...

  20. 40 CFR 35.4085 - Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Can my group get an âadvance paymentâ to help us get started? 35.4085 Section 35.4085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... You Get the Money § 35.4085 Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started? Yes,...

  1. 40 CFR 35.4085 - Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Can my group get an âadvance paymentâ to help us get started? 35.4085 Section 35.4085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... You Get the Money § 35.4085 Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started? Yes,...

  2. 40 CFR 35.4085 - Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Can my group get an âadvance paymentâ to help us get started? 35.4085 Section 35.4085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... You Get the Money § 35.4085 Can my group get an “advance payment” to help us get started? Yes,...

  3. Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies - Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott; Devinney, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a ``stealth'' stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large - e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT

  4. Neutron radiography as a non-destructive method for diagnosing neutron converters for advanced thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraro, A.; Albani, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Croci, G.; Angella, G.; Birch, J.; Cazzaniga, C.; Caniello, R.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Schimdt, S.; Robinson, L.; Rebai, M.; Salvato, G.; Tresoldi, D.; Vasi, C.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the well-known problem of 3He shortage, a series of different thermal neutron detectors alternative to helium tubes are being developed, with the goal to find valid candidates for detection systems for the future spallation neutron sources such as the European Spallation Source (ESS). A possible 3He-free detector candidate is a charged particle detector equipped with a three dimensional neutron converter cathode (3D-C). The 3D-C currently under development is composed by a series of alumina (Al2O3) lamellas coated by 1 μ m of 10B enriched boron carbide (B4C). In order to obtain a good characterization in terms of detector efficiency and uniformity it is crucial to know the thickness, the uniformity and the atomic composition of the B4C neutron converter coating. In this work a non-destructive technique for the characterization of the lamellas that will compose the 3D-C was performed using neutron radiography. The results of these measurements show that the lamellas that will be used have coating uniformity suitable for detector applications. This technique (compared with SEM, EDX, ERDA, XPS) has the advantage of being global (i.e. non point-like) and non-destructive, thus it is suitable as a check method for mass production of the 3D-C elements.

  5. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  6. Advanced analytical facilities report of the planetary materials and geochemistry working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The role of advanced analytical facilities; upgrading/replacement of the existing facilities; the relationship of advanced facilities to the present program; and possible facilities are examined. Major conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  7. Teaching Groups as Foci for Evaluating Performance in Cost-Effectiveness of GCE Advanced Level Provision: Some Practical Methodological Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Antony

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes subject teaching-group effectiveness in English and Welsh General Certification of Education (GCE) Advanced Level prior to a linking to resources; suggests cross-classified multilevel models with weighted random effects for disentangling student, group, and teacher effects; finds that teacher effects are considerable, but cannot find…

  8. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary

  9. Operation of the power information center: Performance of secretariat functions and information exchange activities in the advanced power field of the interagency advanced power group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Highlights of activities conducted during the reporting period to facilitate the exchange of technical information among scientists and engineers both within the federal government and within industry are cited. Interagency Advanced Power Group meetings and special efforts, project briefs, and organization development are considered.

  10. Advanced Ionospheric Sensing using GROUP-C and LITES aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.; Finn, S. C.; Cook, T.; Powell, S. P.; O'Hanlon, B.; Bishop, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) and Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are manifested for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016 as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 payload. The two experiments provide technical development and risk-reduction for future DoD space weather sensors suitable for ionospheric specification, space situational awareness, and data products for global ionosphere assimilative models. In addition, the combined instrument complement of these two experiments offers a unique opportunity to study structures of the nighttime ionosphere. GROUP-C includes an advanced GPS receiver providing ionospheric electron density profiles and scintillation measurements and a high-sensitivity far-ultraviolet photometer measuring horizontal ionospheric gradients. LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans 60-140 nm and will obtain high-cadence limb profiles of the ionosphere and thermosphere from 150-350 km altitude. In the nighttime ionosphere, recombination of O+ and electrons produces optically thin emissions at 91.1 and 135.6 nm that can be used to tomographically reconstruct the two-dimensional plasma distribution in the orbital plane below ISS altitudes. Ionospheric irregularities, such as plasma bubbles and blobs, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the ISS would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry, vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, and recent advancements in UV tomography, high-fidelity tomographic reconstruction of

  11. ProtoEXIST: The Development of Advanced Tiled CZT Detector Planes for Wide Field Hard X-Ray Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Branden; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-05-01

    ProtoEXIST is a technology development program for a coded aperture hard X-ray telescope with a large area (1-5 m^2) CZT detector plane for use in a future hard X-ray wide field sky monitor and survey telescope. The successful flight of the ProtoEXIST1 (P1) coded-aperture telescope concluded the first phase of the program on October 9, 2009. The black hole binary Cyg X-1 was imaged and its spectrum measured at the end of the (6h) flight. The P1 detector plane is comprised of a 8x8 array of detector crystal units (DCUs); each made up of a single 20 mm x 20 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystal with a 8x8 pixilated anode (pixel pitch of 2.5 mm) bonded to an interposer board connecting each of the individual 64 anode pixels to a single input channel on a RadNET ASIC, forming a 256 cm^2 contiguous CZT imaging array with 4096 individual pixels. P1 was successfully recovered and has undergone further characterization in the interim. The program continues with the ongoing development ProtoEXIST2 (P2) utilizing a closely tiled 8x8 array of DCUs now with a reduced anode pixel pitch of 0.6 mm. Each DCU in P2 will consist of a CZT crystal, identical to that utilized in P1 now with a 32x32 pixelated anode, directly bonded to a single NuSTAR ASIC (Nu-ASIC). The fully assembled P2 imaging detector will be comprised of a semi-contiguous 256x256 array of pixels on 256 cm^2 of CZT. With its finer pixelation the P2 detector plane will enable 5' (FWHM) imaging with a 70 cm focal length and will be flown side-by-side with P1 from Ft. Sumner in the Spring of 2012. Results from the characterization of the P1 detector are discussed as well as current progress in the development of the P2 detector plane.

  12. Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

    Detecting, quantifying and visualizing biochemical mechanism in a living system without perturbing function is the goal of the instrument and algorithms designed in this thesis. Biochemical mechanisms of cells have long been known to be dependent on the signals they receive from their environment. Studying biological processes of cells in-vitro can vastly distort their function, since you are removing them from their natural chemical signaling environment. Mice have become the biological system of choice for various areas of biomedical research due to their genetic and physiological similarities with humans, the relatively low cost of their care, and their quick breeding cycle. Drug development and efficacy assessment along with disease detection, management, and mechanism research all have benefited from the use of small animal models of human disease. A high resolution, high sensitivity, three-dimensional (3D) positioning positron emission tomography (PET) detector system was designed through device characterization and Monte Carlo simulation. Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) were characterized in various packaging configurations; coupled to various configurations of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystals. Forty novelly packaged final design devices were constructed and characterized, each providing characteristics superior to commercially available scintillation detectors used in small animal imaging systems: ˜1mm crystal identification, 14-15% of 511 keV energy resolution, and averaging 1.9 to 5.6 ns coincidence time resolution. A closed-cornered box-shaped detector configuration was found to provide optimal photon sensitivity (˜10.5% in the central plane) using dual LSO-PSAPD scintillation detector modules and Monte Carlo simulation. Standard figures of merit were used to determine optimal system acquisition parameters. A realistic model for constituent devices was developed for understanding the signals reported by the

  13. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P. ); Gatti, E. )

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and x-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; classical semiconductor diode detectors; and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Dust detector using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate with current-to-voltage converting amplifier for functional advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Miyachi, Takashi; Hattori, Maki; Sugita, Seiji; Takechi, Seiji; Okada, Nagaya

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the concept of a dust monitor using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics with a large detection area. Its potential as a dust detector is experimentally demonstrated. The dust monitor has a small volume compared to an impact ionization detector with the same detection area, due to the PZT sensor. The PZT sensor, as a traditional device for the in-situ observation of hypervelocity dust particles, has been used for momentum measurement. The hypervelocity impact signals of PZT sensors are typically read by charge-sensitive amplifiers. Instead, we suggest a new method that a current-to-voltage converting amplifier is useful for interpreting the impact signal of a PZT sensor arising from dust particles down to 0.5 μm in radius. We propose that datasets of dust impacts can be obtained with a higher statistical accuracy, if the new method is applied to instruments on forthcoming interplanetary-space-cruising spacecrafts.

  15. TEPEE/GReAT (General Relativity Accuracy Test in an Einstein Elevator): Advances in the detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Lucchesi, D. M.; Morbidini, A.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Persichini, M.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Ashenberg, J.; Bombardelli, C.; Glashow, S.

    This paper reports the development of an experiment (TEPEE/GReAT) to test the Equivalence Principle (EP) at a level of accuracy equal to (5 × 10-15), by means of a differential accelerometer free falling in a cryogenic vacuum capsule released from a stratospheric balloon. Such an accuracy requires resolving a very small signal out of the instrument's intrinsic noise and the noise associated with the instrument's motion. Imperfections in the construction of the detector introduce gravity gradient noise that it is possible to separate from the violation signal spinning the detector around an horizontal axis in order to have the EP violation signal and the gravity gradients one modulated at two different frequencies. Experimental results on prototype instruments showing high sensitivity and common mode rejection factor are shown.

  16. Collision avoidance during group evasive manoeuvres: a comparison of real versus simulated swarms with manipulated vision and surface wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Romey, William L; Miller, Magenta M; Vidal, Jose M

    2014-08-07

    Coordinated group motion has been studied extensively both in real systems (flocks, swarms and schools) and in simulations (self-propelled particle (SPP) models using attraction and repulsion rules). Rarely are attraction and repulsion rules manipulated, and the resulting emergent behaviours of real and simulation systems are compared. We compare swarms of sensory-deprived whirligig beetles with matching simulation models. Whirligigs live at the water's surface and coordinate their grouping using their eyes and antennae. We filmed groups of beetles in which antennae or eyes had been unilaterally obstructed and measured individual and group behaviours. We then developed and compared eight SPP simulation models. Eye-less beetles formed larger diameter resting groups than antenna-less or control groups. Antenna-less groups collided more often with each other during evasive group movements than did eye-less or control groups. Simulations of antenna-less individuals produced no difference from a control (or a slight decrease) in group diameter. Simulations of eye-less individuals produced an increase in group diameter. Our study is important in (i) differentiating between group attraction and repulsion rules, (ii) directly comparing emergent properties of real and simulated groups, and (iii) exploring a new sensory modality (surface wave detection) to coordinate group movement.

  17. Collision avoidance during group evasive manoeuvres: a comparison of real versus simulated swarms with manipulated vision and surface wave detectors

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Miller, Magenta M.; Vidal, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated group motion has been studied extensively both in real systems (flocks, swarms and schools) and in simulations (self-propelled particle (SPP) models using attraction and repulsion rules). Rarely are attraction and repulsion rules manipulated, and the resulting emergent behaviours of real and simulation systems are compared. We compare swarms of sensory-deprived whirligig beetles with matching simulation models. Whirligigs live at the water's surface and coordinate their grouping using their eyes and antennae. We filmed groups of beetles in which antennae or eyes had been unilaterally obstructed and measured individual and group behaviours. We then developed and compared eight SPP simulation models. Eye-less beetles formed larger diameter resting groups than antenna-less or control groups. Antenna-less groups collided more often with each other during evasive group movements than did eye-less or control groups. Simulations of antenna-less individuals produced no difference from a control (or a slight decrease) in group diameter. Simulations of eye-less individuals produced an increase in group diameter. Our study is important in (i) differentiating between group attraction and repulsion rules, (ii) directly comparing emergent properties of real and simulated groups, and (iii) exploring a new sensory modality (surface wave detection) to coordinate group movement. PMID:24943378

  18. Interagency Advanced Power Group, Joint Electrical and Nuclear Working Group, meeting minutes, November 16--17, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Reports on soldier power R&D review, N-MCT power electronic building blocks, silicon carbide power semiconductor work, and ground based radar were made to the Power Conditioning Panel. An introduction to high temperature electronics needs, research and development was made to the High Temperature Electronics Subcommittee. The Pulse Power Panel received reports on the navy ETC gun, and army pulse power. The Superconductivity Panel received reports on high-tc superconducting wires, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and superconducting applications. The Nuclear Working Group received presentations on the Topaz nuclear power program, and space nuclear work in the Department of Energy.

  19. Development of a flight qualified 100 x 100 mm MCP UV detector using advanced cross strip anodes and associated ASIC electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; McPhate, Jason; Tremsin, Anton; Siegmund, Oswald; Raffanti, Rick; Cumming, Harley; Seljak, Andrej; Virta, Vihtori; Varner, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last three decades (e.g. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.) and been mentioned for instruments on future large telescopes in space such as LUVOIR14. Using cross strip anodes, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x 1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. A crossed strip anode MCP readout starts with a set of orthogonal conducting strips (e.g. 80 x 80), typically spaced at a 635 micron pitch onto which charge clouds from MCP amplified events land. Each strip has its own charge sensitive amplifier that is sampled continuously by a dedicated analog to digital converter (ADC). All of the ADC digital output lines are fed into a field programmable gate array (FGPA) which can detect charge events landing on the strips, measure the peak amplitudes of those charge events and calculate their spatial centroid along with their time of arrival (X,Y,T) and pass this information to a downstream computer. Laboratory versions of these electronics have demonstrated < 20 microns FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of 1ns. In 2012 our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) grant to raise the TRL of a cross strip detector from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the 19" rack mounted, high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass, and volume requirements of the detector electronics. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration

  20. Flight performance of an advanced CZT imaging detector in a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope—ProtoEXIST1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelemy, S.; Baker, R.; Garson, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Apple, J.; Cleveland, W. H.

    2011-10-01

    We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes such as the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8×8 array of closely tiled 2 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8×8 pixels, mounted on a set of readout electronics boards and covering a 256 cm2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30-600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9°×9° (and 19°×19° for 50% coding fraction) with an angular resolution of 20‧. In order to reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm×26 cm×2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as ≳100keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 h due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1, a bright black hole binary system, for ˜1h at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4° off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2σ in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very

  1. Incidence of advanced neoplasia during surveillance in high- and intermediate-risk groups of the European colorectal cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cubiella, Joaquín; Carballo, Fernando; Portillo, Isabel; Cruzado Quevedo, José; Salas, Dolores; Binefa, Gemma; Milà, Núria; Hernández, Cristina; Andreu, Montse; Terán, Álvaro; Arana-Arri, Eunate; Ono, Akiko; Valverde, María José; Bujanda, Luis; Hernández, Vicent; Morillas, Juan Diego; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni

    2016-11-01

    Background and study aims: The European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening have established high-risk (≥ 5 adenomas or an adenoma ≥ 20 mm) and intermediate-risk (3 - 4 adenomas or at least one adenoma 10 - 19 mm in size, or villous histology, or high grade dysplasia) groups with different endoscopic surveillance intervals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in the incidence of advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma or CRC) between the two risk groups. Patients and methods: This retrospective group study included patients meeting high- or intermediate-risk criteria for adenomas detected in CRC screening programs and the COLONPREV study before European guidelines were adopted in Spain (June 2011) with a 3-year surveillance recommendation according to Spanish guidelines. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of advanced neoplasia in patients undergoing surveillance. The secondary outcome measure was the CRC incidence. We used an adjusted proportional hazards regression model to control confounding variables. Results: The study included 5401 patients (3379 intermediate risk, 2022 high risk). Endoscopic surveillance was performed in 65.5 % of the patients (2.8 ± 1 years). The incidence of advanced neoplasia in the high- and intermediate-risk groups was 16.0 % (59.0 cases/1000 patient-years) and 12.3 % (41.2 cases/1000 patient-years), respectively. The CRC incidence was 0.5 % (1.4 cases/1000 patient-years) and 0.4 % (1 case/1000 patient-years), respectively. The advanced neoplasia and CRC attributable risk to the high risk group was of 3.7 % and 0.1 %, respectively. In the proportional hazards analysis, the risk of advanced neoplasia was greater in the high-risk group (hazard ratio [HR] 1.5, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.2 - 1.8), with no significant differences in the CRC incidence (HR 1.6, 95 %CI 0.6 - 3.8). Conclusions: Patients meeting high-risk criteria

  2. {A Review of Working Group 2 (Advanced Terrestrial Systems) of the COST 296 Action}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Tulunay, E.

    2009-04-01

    E.M. Warrington, E. Tulunay, N.M. Abbasi, J. Azevedo, L. Bertel, A. Bourdillon, E. Benito, C. Bianchi, A. Casimiro, L. Economou, Y. Erhel, S.M. Feeney, S.D. Gunashekar, H. Haralambous, D. Lemur, F. Marie, J.P. Monilie, M. Muriuki, M. Oger M. Pietrella, V. Rannou, H. Rothkaehl, S. Saillant, S. Salous, O. Sari, A.J. Stocker, H.J. Strangeways, Y. Tulunay and N.Y. Zaalov This paper deals with the research undertaken during the COST 296 Action in Working Group 2 on Advanced Terrestrial Systems. The Working Group comprised three work packages covering various topics: Radar and Radiolocation, HF/MF Communications, and Spectrum Management. Results from this Working Group are presented in this paper, and may be summarised as follows. Aspects of HF propagation The propagation characteristics of radio signals are important parameters to consider when designing and operating radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST-296 Action, interest lies with effects associated with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects were covered: The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation of HF radiolocation systems. Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough) and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals

  3. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy: An Effective Intervention for Improving Psychological Well-Being in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Applebaum, Allison; Kulikowski, Julia; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP) to reduce psychological distress and improve spiritual well-being in patients with advanced or terminal cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced cancer (N = 253) were randomly assigned to manualized eight-session interventions of either MCGP or supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the treatment and 2 months after treatment. The primary outcome measures were spiritual well-being and overall quality of life, with secondary outcome measures assessing depression, hopelessness, desire for hastened death, anxiety, and physical symptom distress. Results Hierarchical linear models that included a priori covariates and only participants who attended ≥ three sessions indicated a significant group × time interaction for most outcome variables. Specifically, patients receiving MCGP showed significantly greater improvement in spiritual well-being and quality of life and significantly greater reductions in depression, hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and physical symptom distress compared with those receiving SGP. No group differences were observed for changes in anxiety. Analyses that included all patients, regardless of whether they attended any treatment sessions (ie, intent-to-treat analyses), and no covariates still showed significant treatment effects (ie, greater benefit for patients receiving MCGP v SGP) for quality of life, depression, and hopelessness but not for other outcome variables. Conclusion This large randomized controlled study provides strong support for the efficacy of MCGP as a treatment for psychological and existential or spiritual distress in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:25646186

  4. Facebook and Classroom Group Work: A Trial Study Involving University of Botswana Advanced Oral Presentation Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magogwe, Joel M.; Ntereke, Beauty; Phetlhe, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    In the 21st century, the use of information technology in the classroom is advancing rapidly, especially in higher education. The Internet, through social networking, has made it possible for students to learn and teachers to teach outside the classroom walls. Facebook in particular has made it possible for students to interact and communicate…

  5. [Rehabilitation in undergraduate education and advanced professional training of the participating professional groups].

    PubMed

    Mau, Wilfried; Bengel, Jürgen; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2017-02-14

    In the German health care system, multiprofessional and coordinated rehabilitation care provides support for successful disease management. Against a background of the conditions and strong dynamics of the provision, this article gives an overview of some of the pertinent developments in rehabilitation-related undergraduate education and advanced professional training of physicians, psychologists, and exercise therapy professions in Germany. Frequently, there are few provisions and great variation between different locations. New conditions, such as the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education, the National Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education, and the ongoing reform of the psychotherapists' law emphasizing training in psychotherapy at university, allow the expectation of a positive effect on the competence of rehabilitation professionals. Education in physiotherapy is developing according to international standards aimed at improved evidence-based care. For the widely evidence-based undergraduate education and advanced professional training in sports and exercise therapy better profiling and professionalization should be sought.

  6. Development of Collaborative Research Initiatives to Advance the Aerospace Sciences-via the Communications, Electronics, Information Systems Focus Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knasel, T. Michael

    1996-01-01

    The primary goal of the Adaptive Vision Laboratory Research project was to develop advanced computer vision systems for automatic target recognition. The approach used in this effort combined several machine learning paradigms including evolutionary learning algorithms, neural networks, and adaptive clustering techniques to develop the E-MOR.PH system. This system is capable of generating pattern recognition systems to solve a wide variety of complex recognition tasks. A series of simulation experiments were conducted using E-MORPH to solve problems in OCR, military target recognition, industrial inspection, and medical image analysis. The bulk of the funds provided through this grant were used to purchase computer hardware and software to support these computationally intensive simulations. The payoff from this effort is the reduced need for human involvement in the design and implementation of recognition systems. We have shown that the techniques used in E-MORPH are generic and readily transition to other problem domains. Specifically, E-MORPH is multi-phase evolutionary leaming system that evolves cooperative sets of features detectors and combines their response using an adaptive classifier to form a complete pattern recognition system. The system can operate on binary or grayscale images. In our most recent experiments, we used multi-resolution images that are formed by applying a Gabor wavelet transform to a set of grayscale input images. To begin the leaming process, candidate chips are extracted from the multi-resolution images to form a training set and a test set. A population of detector sets is randomly initialized to start the evolutionary process. Using a combination of evolutionary programming and genetic algorithms, the feature detectors are enhanced to solve a recognition problem. The design of E-MORPH and recognition results for a complex problem in medical image analysis are described at the end of this report. The specific task involves the

  7. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): Science working group report. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mission concept is examined from a scientific viewpoint. A brief description of the development of X-ray astronomy and a summary description of AXAF, the scientific objectives of the facility, a description of representative scientific instruments, requirements for X-ray ground testing, and a summary of studies related to spacecraft and support subsystems, are included.

  8. Advancing Entrepreneurship Education. A Report of the Youth Entrepreneurship Strategy Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Youth Entrepreneurship Strategy Group convened its inaugural meeting from September 26-28, 2007 at the Aspen Institute in Aspen, Colorado. A group of dynamic national leaders from the fields of education, entrepreneurship and business, public policy, media, and philanthropy met over three days to explore the promise of, and obstacles to,…

  9. Template banks to search for low-mass binary black holes in advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan A.; Kumar, Prayush; Nitz, Alexander H.

    2013-04-01

    Coalescing binary black holes (BBHs) are among the most likely sources for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and its international partners Virgo and KAGRA. Optimal searches for BBHs require accurate waveforms for the signal model and effectual template banks that cover the mass space of interest. We investigate the ability of the second-order post-Newtonian TaylorF2 hexagonal template placement metric to construct an effectual template bank, if the template waveforms used are effective one-body waveforms tuned to numerical relativity (EOBNRv2). We find that by combining the existing TaylorF2 placement metric with EOBNRv2 waveforms, we can construct an effectual search for BBHs with component masses in the range 3M⊙≤m1, m2≤25M⊙. We also show that the (computationally less expensive) TaylorF2 post-Newtonian waveforms can be used in place of EOBNRv2 waveforms when M≲11.4M⊙. Finally, we investigate the effect of modes other than the dominant l=m=2 mode in BBH searches. We find that for systems with (m1/m2)≤1.68 or inclination angle ι≤0.31 or ι≥2.68 radians, there is no significant loss in the total possible signal-to-noise ratio due to neglecting modes other than l=m=2 in the template waveforms. For a source population uniformly distributed in spacial volume, over the entire sampled region of the component-mass space, the loss in detection rate (averaged over a uniform distribution of inclination angle and sky-location/polarization angles) remains below ˜11%. For binaries with high mass ratios and 0.31≤ι≤2.68, including higher-order modes could increase the signal-to-noise ratio by as much as 8% in Advanced LIGO. Our results can be used to construct matched-filter searches in Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo.

  10. Factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J.; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Pessin, Hayley A.; Radomski, Julia N.; Gökbayrak, N. Simay; Katz, Aviva M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective The generalizability of palliative care intervention research is often limited by high rates of study attrition. This study examined factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial comparing meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP), an intervention designed to help advanced cancer patients sustain or enhance their sense of meaning to the supportive group psychotherapy (SGP), a standardized support group. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumor cancers (n = 153) were randomized to eight sessions of either the MCGP or SGP. They completed assessments of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical well-being pretreatment, midtreatment, and 2 months post-treatment. Attrition was assessed in terms of the percent of participants who failed to complete these assessments, and demographic, psychiatric, medical, and study-related correlates of attrition were examined for the participants in each of these categories. Results The rates of attrition at these time points were 28.1%, 17.7%, and 11.1%, respectively; 43.1% of the participants (66 of 153) completed the entire study. The most common reason for dropout was patients feeling too ill. Attrition rates did not vary significantly between study arms. The participants who dropped out pretreatment reported less financial concerns than post-treatment dropouts, and the participants who dropped out of the study midtreatment had poorer physical health than treatment completers. There were no other significant associations between attrition and any demographic, medical, psychiatric, or study-related variables. Conclusions These findings highlight the challenge of maintaining advanced cancer patients in longitudinal research and suggest the need to consider alternative approaches (e.g., telemedicine) for patients who might benefit from group interventions but are too ill to travel. PMID:21751295

  11. Adaptive Radiation in Socially Advanced Stem-Group Ants from the Cretaceous.

    PubMed

    Barden, Phillip; Grimaldi, David A

    2016-02-22

    Across terrestrial ecosystems, modern ants are ubiquitous. As many as 94 out of every 100 individual arthropods in rainforests are ants, and they constitute up to 15% of animal biomass in the Amazon. Moreover, ants are pervasive agents of natural selection as over 10,000 arthropod species are specialized inquilines or myrmecomorphs living among ants or defending themselves through mimicry. Such impact is traditionally explained by sociality: ants are the first major group of ground-dwelling predatory insects to become eusocial, increasing efficiency of tasks and establishing competitive superiority over solitary species. A wealth of specimens from rich deposits of 99 million-year-old Burmese amber resolves ambiguity regarding sociality and diversity in the earliest ants. The stem-group genus Gerontoformica maintained distinct reproductive castes including morphotypes unknown in solitary aculeate (stinging) wasps, providing insight into early behavior. We present rare aggregations of workers, indicating group recruitment as well as an instance of interspecific combat; such aggression is a social feature of modern ants. Two species and an unusual new genus are described, further expanding the remarkable diversity of early ants. Stem-group ants are recovered as a paraphyletic assemblage at the base of modern lineages varying greatly in size, form, and mouthpart structure, interpreted here as an adaptive radiation. Though Cretaceous stem-group ants were eusocial and adaptively diverse, we hypothesize that their extinction resulted from the rise of competitively superior crown-group taxa that today form massive colonies, consistent with Wilson and Hölldobler's concept of "dynastic succession."

  12. Prototype Demonstration of Gamma- Blind Tensioned Metastable Fluid Neutron/Multiplicity/Alpha Detector – Real Time Methods for Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2016-12-20

    The content of this report summarizes a multi-year effort to develop prototype detection equipment using the Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector (TMFD) technology developed by Taleyarkhan [1]. The context of this development effort was to create new methods for evaluating and developing advanced methods for safeguarding nuclear materials along with instrumentation in various stages of the fuel cycle, especially in material balance areas (MBAs) and during reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. One of the challenges related to the implementation of any type of MBA and/or reprocessing technology (e.g., PUREX or UREX) is the real-time quantification and control of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes as they move through the process. Monitoring of higher actinides from their neutron emission (including multiplicity) and alpha signatures during transit in MBAs and in aqueous separations is a critical research area. By providing on-line real-time materials accountability, diversion of the materials becomes much more difficult. The Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector (TMFD) is a transformational technology that is uniquely capable of both alpha and neutron spectroscopy while being “blind” to the intense gamma field that typically accompanies used fuel – simultaneously with the ability to provide multiplicity information as well [1-3]. The TMFD technology was proven (lab-scale) as part of a 2008 NERI-C program [1-7]. The bulk of this report describes the advancements and demonstrations made in TMFD technology. One final point to present before turning to the TMFD demonstrations is the context for discussing real-time monitoring of SNM. It is useful to review the spectrum of isotopes generated within nuclear fuel during reactor operations. Used nuclear fuel (UNF) from a light water reactor (LWR) contains fission products as well as TRU elements formed through neutron absorption/decay chains. The majority of the fission products are gamma and beta emitters and they represent the

  13. Performance of advanced a-Si/CsI-based flat-panel x-ray detectors for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas; Hudspeth, Heather; Possin, George E.; Lee, Ji Ung; Granfors, Paul R.; Giambattista, Brian W.

    2003-06-01

    The GE Senographe 2000D, the first full field digital mammography system based on amorphous Silicon (a-Si) flat panel arrays and a Cesium-Iodide (CsI) scintillator, has been in clinical use for several years. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate and quantify improvements in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for both typical screening and ultra-low exposure levels for this technology platform. A new figure of merit, the electronic noise factor, is introduced to explicitly quantify the influence of the electronic noise, conversion factor, modulation transfer function (MTF), and pixel pitch towards the reduction of DQE at low exposure levels. Methods to improve the DQE through an optimization of both the flat panel design and the scintillator deposition process are discussed. The results show a substantial improvement in the DQE(f) at all frequencies and demonstrate the potential for DQE(0) to exceed 80%. The combination of high DQE at ultra low exposures and the inherent fast read-out capability makes this technology platform ideal for both current clinical procedures and advanced applications that may use multiple projections (tomosynthesis) or contrast media to enhance digital mammography.

  14. Recent Advances Toward Robust N-Protecting Groups for Glucosamine as Required for Glycosylation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Mohamed Ramadan El Sayed; El Ashry, El Sayed H

    2016-01-01

    2-Amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose (d-glucosamine) is among the most abundant monosaccharides found in natural products. This constituent, recognized for its ubiquity, is presented in most instances as its N-acetyl derivative 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranose (N-acetylglucosamine, GlcNAc, NAG). It occurs as the β-linked pyranosyl group in polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, and sometimes as the monosaccharide itself, either in its native state or as a glycoconjugate. The compound's acylation profile and other aspects of its structure are important elements in determining the variety of reactivities and functions of the molecule as a whole. Methods elaborated to investigate these challenges have been intensively reviewed; however, a relatively more comprehensive reviewing of this subject is introduced here to cover some aspects that have not been sufficiently covered. This might enable those who are beginners in this field to be aware of the subject in a more comprehensive context. 2-Amino-2-deoxy-d-glucosylation strategies demand robust amino-protecting groups that survive under a variety of chemical conditions, yet provide groups that can be deprotected under relatively mild conditions. At the end of this review, a table that includes all the N-protecting groups that have been used for glucosamine is provided to introduce them at a glance to aid in constructing building blocks that will act as useful 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucosyl donors.

  15. Group Work during International Disaster Outreach Projects: A Model to Advance Cultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Henesy, Rachel; Varney, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Given the rise in disasters worldwide, counselors will increasingly be called upon to respond. Current accreditation standards require that programs train students to become skillful in disaster/crisis interventions. Group processing to enhance self-awareness and improve conceptualization skills is an essential element of such training. This…

  16. Advances in atomic physics: Four decades of contribution of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M

    2015-09-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s - when the author first engaged in research - an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  17. Caribbean Families: Diversity among Ethnic Groups. Advances in Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roopnarine, Jaipaul L., Ed.; Brown, Janet, Ed.

    Little is known about the development and function of families in major Caribbean communities, an area composed of diverse ethnic and political groups, the majority of whom live on the edge of poverty. This edited book provides an interdisciplinary examination of Caribbean families, each chapter detailing studies dealing with family structures and…

  18. Advances in the development of complexes that contain a group 13 element chalcogen multiple bond.

    PubMed

    Franz, Daniel; Inoue, Shigeyoshi

    2016-06-21

    Inorganic group 13 element (M) chalcogenides (E) based on the general formular M2E3 are ubiquitous in synthesis, catalysis and material science. The parent ME fragment which aggregates to form three dimensional networks in the condensed phase can be expected to exhibit multiple bond character between the elements. Low temperature matrix isolation techniques are required to investigate the nature of this elusive species. An alternate approach for respective studies is the synthesis of electron-precise molecular complexes that contain the ME entity and for which isolation at ambient temperature is possible. This is realized by kinetic stabilization with bulky ligands and thermodynamic stabilization using electron donor, as well as acceptor groups attached to the ME functionality (i.e. donor-acceptor stabilization). In this article we revise the literature on complex compounds that exhibit a bonding interaction between a group 13 element atom and a chalcogen atom that is reasonably to be interpreted in terms of a double- or triple bond.

  19. Working Group summary reports from the Advanced Photon Source reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    A workshop was held at APS to address reliability goals for accelerator systems. Seventy-one individuals participated in the workshop, including 30 from other institutions. The goals of the workshop were to: (1) Give attendees an introduction to the basic concepts of reliability analysis. (2) Exchange information on operating experience at existing accelerator facilities and strategies for achieving reliability at facilities under design or in construction. (3) Discuss reliability goals for APS and the means of their achievement. This report contains the working group summary report an APS`s following systems: RF Systems; Power Supplies; Magnet Systems; Interlock and Diagnostics; and Vacuum Systems.

  20. Working Group summary reports from the Advanced Photon Source reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    A workshop was held at APS to address reliability goals for accelerator systems. Seventy-one individuals participated in the workshop, including 30 from other institutions. The goals of the workshop were to: (1) Give attendees an introduction to the basic concepts of reliability analysis. (2) Exchange information on operating experience at existing accelerator facilities and strategies for achieving reliability at facilities under design or in construction. (3) Discuss reliability goals for APS and the means of their achievement. This report contains the working group summary report an APS's following systems: RF Systems; Power Supplies; Magnet Systems; Interlock and Diagnostics; and Vacuum Systems.

  1. Pazopanib and depot octreotide in advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a multicentre, single-group, phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Alexandria T; Halperin, Daniel M; Chan, Jennifer A; Fogelman, David R; Hess, Kenneth R; Malinowski, Paige; Regan, Eileen; Ng, Chaan S; Yao, James C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment options for advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) remain scarce. Pazopanib is an orally bioavailable, small molecule, multitargeted kinase inhibitor that inhibits VEGF receptors 1, 2, and 3. We did a study of the efficacy of pazopanib with depot octreotide in patients with advanced NETs. Methods We did a parallel cohort study of patients with metastatic or locally advanced grade 1–2 carcinoid tumours or pancreatic NETs, by use of a single-group, two-stage design. Patients received pazopanib 800 mg orally once per day and octreotide at their preprotocol dosage. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving an objective response, as assessed by investigators, by intention-to-treat analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT00454363, and was completed in March, 2014. Findings Between April 12, 2007, and July 2, 2009, we enrolled 52 patients, including 32 individuals with pancreatic NETs and 20 individuals with carcinoid tumours. Seven (21.9%, 95% CI 11.0–38.8) of 32 patients with pancreatic NETs achieved an objective response. We detected no responses in the first stage of the cohort with carcinoid tumours, and we terminated accrual at 20 patients. Toxic effects included one patient with grade 4 hypertriglyceridaemia and one with grade 4 thrombosis, with the most common grade three events being aminotransferase increases and neutropenia, each of which happened in 3 patients. In all 52 patients, the most frequently observed toxic effects were fatigue (39 [75%]), nausea (33 [63%]), diarrhoea (33 [63%]), and hypertension (28 [54%]). Interpretation Treatment with pazopanib is associated with tumour response for patients with pancreatic NETs, but not for carcinoid tumours; a randomised controlled phase 3 study to assess pazopanib in advanced pancreatic NETs is warranted. Funding US National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. PMID:25956795

  2. Semiconductor neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueorguiev, Andrey; Hong, Huicong; Tower, Joshua; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Burger, Arnold; Shah, Kanai

    2016-09-01

    Lithium Indium Selenide (LiInSe2) has been under development in RMD Inc. and Fisk University for room temperature thermal neutron detection due to a number of promising properties. The recent advances of the crystal growth, material processing, and detector fabrication technologies allowed us to fabricate large detectors with 100 mm2 active area. The thermal neutron detection sensitivity and gamma rejection ratio (GRR) were comparable to 3He tube with 10 atm gas pressure at comparable dimensions. The synthesis, crystal growth, detector fabrication, and characterization are reported in this paper.

  3. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rusch, V.W.; Griffin, B.R.; Livingston, R.B. )

    1989-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease in the United States. Only the few tumors detected very early are curable, but there has been some progress in the management of more advanced non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in regionally inoperable disease. Prevention of central nervous system relapse is an important issue in this group of patients because brain metastases ultimately develop in 20% to 25% of them. Seventy-three patients with regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were entered into a Phase II trial of neutron chest radiotherapy sandwiched between four cycles of chemotherapy including cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin C. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered concurrently with chest radiotherapy (3000 cGy in 10 fractions in 15 patients; 3600 cGy in 18 fractions in the remaining 50 patients). Patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the brain before treatment and every 3 months after treatment. The initial overall response rate was 79%, but 65 of the 73 patients have subsequently died of recurrent disease. Median follow-up is 9 months for all 73 patients and 26 months for eight long-term survivors. No patient who completed the prophylactic cranial irradiation program had clinical or radiologic brain metastases. Toxic reactions to prophylactic cranial irradiation included reversible alopecia in all patients, progressive dementia in one patient, and possible optic neuritis in one patient. Both of these patients received 300 cGy per fraction of irradiation. The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation has been controversial, but its safety and efficacy in this trial supports its application in a group of patients at high risk for central nervous system relapse. Further evaluation of prophylactic cranial irradiation in clinical trials for regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is warranted.

  4. Real breakthrough in detection of radioactive sources by portal monitors with plastic detectors and New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm (ASIA-New)

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrov, Andrei; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) with plastic detectors represent the main instruments used for primary border (customs) radiation control. RPM are widely used because they are simple, reliable, relatively inexpensive and have a high sensitivity. However, experience using the RPM in various countries has revealed the systems have some grave shortcomings. There is a dramatic decrease of the probability of detection of radioactive sources under high suppression of the natural gamma background (radiation control of heavy cargoes, containers and, especially, trains). NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) existing in objects under control trigger the so-called 'nuisance alarms', requiring a secondary inspection for source verification. At a number of sites, the rate of such alarms is so high it significantly complicates the work of customs and border officers. This paper presents a brief description of new variant of algorithm ASIA-New (New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm), which was developed by the Rapiscan company. It also demonstrates results of different tests and the capability of a new system to overcome the shortcomings stated above. New electronics and ASIA-New enables RPM to detect radioactive sources under a high background suppression (tested at 15-30%) and to verify the detected NORM (KCl) and the artificial isotopes (Co- 57, Ba-133 and other). New variant of ASIA is based on physical principles, a phenomenological approach and analysis of some important parameter changes during the vehicle passage through the monitor control area. Thanks to this capability main advantage of new system is that this system can be easily installed into any RPM with plastic detectors. Taking into account that more than 4000 RPM has been installed worldwide their upgrading by ASIA-New may significantly increase probability of detection and verification of radioactive sources even masked by NORM. This algorithm was tested for 1,395 passages of different

  5. SNM Detection with a Large Water Cerenkov Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, S; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Ouedraogo, S; Svoboda, R; Sweeny, M

    2009-06-04

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission, or be induced to do so. Either case results in neutron emission. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could, potentially, be detected escaping even a well shielded cargo container. Obviously, if the shielding is sophisticated, detecting it would require a highly efficient detector with close to 4{pi} solid angle coverage. Water Cerenkov detectors may be a cost effective way to achieve that goal if it can be shown that the neutron capture signature is large enough and if sufficient background rejection can be employed as detectors get larger. In 2008 the LLNL Advanced Detector Group reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 1/4 ton gadolinium doped water Cerenkov prototype. We have now built a 4 ton version. This detector is not only bigger, it was designed with photon detection efficiency in mind from the beginning. We are employing increased photocathode coverage and more reflective walls, coated with PTFE. The increased efficiency should allow better energy resolution. We expect that the better diffusive wall reflectivity will reduce the overall dependence of the detector response on particle direction, again producing a more consistent response. We also believe that as detectors get larger, both uncorrelated and correlated backgrounds due to gamma-rays and cosmic ray interactions near the detector will increase. To prove the effectiveness of the technology we must develop new ways to reject these backgrounds while maintaining our sensitivity to SNM neutrons. Better energy resolution will enable us to reject more of the low energy gamma-ray backgrounds on this basis. Overcoming cosmic ray induced neutrons is perhaps an even larger concern as detectors get larger. Our detector is designed so that we can test various segmentation schemes - effectively dividing the detector up into smaller ones. In this presentation, we will describe our detector in detail.

  6. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Austin; Bhavsar, Sheila; Riley, Erinn; Caponetti, Gabriel; Agrawal, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  7. Spirituality and meaning in supportive care: spirituality- and meaning-centered group psychotherapy interventions in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William

    2002-05-01

    Existential and spiritual issues are at the frontier of new clinical and research focus in palliative and supportive care of cancer patients. As concepts of adequate supportive care expand beyond a focus on pain and physical symptom control, existential and spiritual issues such as meaning, hope and spirituality in general have received increased attention from supportive care clinicians and clinical researchers. This paper reviews the topics of spirituality and end-of-life care, defines spirituality, and suggests measures of spirituality that deal with two of its main components: faith/religious beliefs and meaning/spiritual well-being. These two constructs of spirituality are reviewed in terms of their role in supportive care. Finally, a review of existing psychotherapeutic interventions for spiritual suffering are reviewed and a novel meaning-centered group psychotherapy for advanced cancer patients is described.

  8. Special Nuclear Material Detection with a Water Cherenkov based Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R

    2008-11-10

    Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, produce a number of neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. Assuming the neutron multiplicity is approximately Poissonian with an average of 2 to 3, the observation of time correlations between these particles from a cargo container would constitute a robust signature of the presence of SNM inside. However, in order to be sensitive to the multiplicity, one would require a high total efficiency. There are two approaches to maximize the total efficiency; maximizing the detector efficiency or maximizing the detector solid angle coverage. The advanced detector group at LLNL is investigating one way to maximize the detector size. We are designing and building a water Cerenkov based gamma and neutron detector for the purpose of developing an efficient and cost effective way to deploy a large solid angle car wash style detector. We report on our progress in constructing a larger detector and also present preliminary results from our prototype detector that indicates detection of neutrons.

  9. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  10. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, Gabriella; Denes, Peter; Gruener, Sol; Lessner, Elianne

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  11. Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

  12. Degarelix for Treating Advanced Hormone-Dependent Prostate Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Uttley, Lesley; Whyte, Sophie; Gomersall, Timothy; Ren, Shijie; Wong, Ruth; Chambers, Duncan; Tappenden, Paul

    2016-12-10

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal Process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of degarelix (Ferring Pharmaceuticals) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of degarelix for the treatment of advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence contained within the company's submission to NICE. The evidence, which included a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of degarelix versus leuprorelin, found that degarelix was non-inferior to leuprorelin for reduction of testosterone levels and that degarelix achieved a more rapid suppression of prostate-specific antigen levels and subsequently decreased incidences of testosterone flare associated with luteinising hormone releasing-hormone (LHRH) agonists. However, protection against testosterone flare for the comparators in the clinical trials was not employed in line with UK clinical practice. Further claims surrounding overall survival, cardiovascular adverse events and clinical equivalence of the comparator drugs from six RCTs of degarelix should be regarded with caution because of flaws and inconsistencies in the pooling of trial data to draw conclusions. The cost-effectiveness evidence included a de novo economic model. Based on the ERG's preferred base case, the deterministic incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (ICER) for degarelix versus 3-monthly triptorelin was £14,798 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Additional scenario analyses undertaken by the ERG resulted in ICERs for degarelix versus 3-monthly triptorelin ranging from £17,067 to £35,589 per QALY gained. Subgroup analyses undertaken using the Appraisal Committee's preferred assumptions suggested that degarelix was not cost effective for the subgroup with

  13. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1992-12-31

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported.

  14. Overexpression of receptor for advanced glycation end products and high-mobility group box 1 in human dental pulp inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Tokuda, Masayuki; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection.

  15. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  16. Current State of the LIGO Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    The basic physics of the detector will be described: how the the interferometer interacts with a gravitational wave and the noise sources that limit the measurements. The actual performance of the detectors, the result of a great deal of hard work and elegant diagnostics by members of the LIGO collaboration, will be presented. The talk will end with some ideas for incremental improvements in the initial detectors. The major improvements in the detectors, associated with the Advanced LIGO detector project, will be described in a presentation by David Reitze at this meeting. The data analysis and results of science runs made with the initial LIGO and GEO detectors are discussed by Gabriela Gonzalez.

  17. Linguistic Focus of Language Related Episodes in Intermediate and Advanced EFL Learners' Group-Based Interactions: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadnia, Zhila; Khalili, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated linguistic focus of language related episodes (LREs),in Iranian EFL classrooms. Eighteen male participants in the advanced and intermediate levels from Urmia branch of Academic Centre of Education, Culture and Research (ACECR) participated in the study. They were assigned to intermediate and advanced levels with one…

  18. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  19. The MIC photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, J. L. A.; Bone, D. A.; Oldfield, M. K.; Bellis, J. G.; Norton, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    The MIC (Microchannel plate Intensified CCD (Charge Coupled Device)) detector is an advanced performance Micro Channel Plate (MCP) intensified CCD photon counting detector developed for high resolution, high dynamic range, astronomical applications. The heart of the detector is an MCP intensifier developed specifically for photon counting applications. The maximum detector format is 3072 by 2304 pixels. The measured resolution of the detector system is 18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm. The detector is linear to approximately 1,000,000 events/detector area/sec on a flat field and linear to count rates up to 200 events/object/s on star images. Two versions of the system have been developed. The first for ground based astronomical applications based around a 40 mm diameter intensifier, was proven in trials at a number of large optical telescopes. The second, specifically for the ESA X-Ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM), where the MIC has been accepted as the blue detector for the incorporated Optical Monitor (OM). For the XMM-OM, the system is based around a 25 mm diameter intensifier. At present, under development, is a 75 mm diameter version of the detector which will have a maximum format of 6144 by 4608 pixels. Details of the MIC detector and its performance are presented.

  20. Report of the intermediate-)ital p)/sub perpendicular/ detector group: A beauty spectrometer for the SSC (superconducting super collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.J.; Buchanan, C.D.; Morrison, R.J.; McHugh, S.W.; Witherell, M.S.; Atac, M.; Cox, B.; Purohit, M.V.; Stefanski, R.; Wagoner, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    A ''Beauty Spectrometer'' has been designed for studies of B physics at the SSC. The ultimate goal is a definitive measurement of CP violation in the B system. The spectrometer consists of two stages and occupies one side of an intermediate-luminosity interaction region. An upstream, or intermediate, stage extends from the interaction point to 14 m and covers the angular region from 57 mrad (3.3 degree) to 350 mrad (20 degree). The forward stage extends to 77 m and to angles down to 5.7 mrad. The design includes silicon microstrip detectors, conventional tracking, momentum analysis, and hadron and lepton identification. While no fundamental problems have been found, the detector must deal with unprecedented particles fluxes, trigger rates, and data rates. 11 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Approximating large resonance parameter covariance matrices with group-wise covariance matrices for advanced nuclear fuel cycle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Leal, Luiz C; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    The large size of resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCM) in the actinide region often renders them impractical for dissemination via ENDF. Therefore, a method of approximating the RPCM by a much smaller group-wise covariance matrix (GWCM) is described, implemented, and examined. In this work, 233U RPCM is used to generate GWCM's for the 44 group AMPX, 100 group GE, 171 group VITAMIN-C, and 240 group CSWEG. Each of these GWCM's is then used to compute group-wise uncertainties for the groups of the remaining group structures. The group-wise uncertainties thus obtained are compared with those obtained from a full RPCM, i.e. without the approximation. A systematic comparison of group-wise uncertainties based on GWCM's vs. RPCM, for a variety of group structures, will shed light on the validity of this approximation and may suggest which group structure(s) yield a GWCM that could be used in lieu of the RPCM.

  2. UV and Optical Detectors: Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    UV and visible detectors - status and prospects. The status and prospects for UV and visible detectors for space astrophysics missions will be described, based on the findings of the NASA working group roadmap report, hopefully updated.

  3. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  4. Analysis of laser jamming to satellite-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si-wen; Guo, Li-hong; Guo, Ru-hai

    2009-07-01

    The reconnaissance satellite, communication satellite and navigation satellite used in the military applications have played more and more important role in the advanced technique wars and already become the significant support and aid system for military actions. With the development of all kinds of satellites, anti-satellite laser weapons emerge as the times require. The experiments and analyses of laser disturbing CCD (charge coupled detector) in near ground have been studied by many research groups, but their results are not suitable to the case that using laser disturbs the satellite-based detector. Because the distance between the satellite-based detector and the ground is very large, it is difficult to damage it directly. However the optical receive system of satellite detector has large optical gain, so laser disturbing satellite detector is possible. In order to determine its feasibility, the theoretical analyses and experimental study are carried out in the paper. Firstly, the influence factors of laser disturbing satellite detector are analyzed in detail, which including laser power density on the surface of the detector after long distance transmission, and laser power density threshold for disturbing etc. These factors are not only induced by the satellite orbit, but dependence on the following parameters: laser average power in the ground, laser beam quality, tracing and aiming precision and atmospheric transmission. A calculation model is developed by considering all factors which then the power density entering into the detector can be calculated. Secondly, the laser disturbing experiment is performed by using LD (laser diode) with the wavelength 808 nm disturbing CCD 5 kilometer away, which the disturbing threshold value is obtained as 3.55×10-4mW/cm2 that coincides with other researcher's results. Finally, using the theoretical model, the energy density of laser on the photosensitive surface of MSTI-3 satellite detector is estimated as about 100m

  5. Chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: four systematic meta-analyses of individual patient data from 37 randomized trials. Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists' Group.

    PubMed Central

    Aabo, K.; Adams, M.; Adnitt, P.; Alberts, D. S.; Athanazziou, A.; Barley, V.; Bell, D. R.; Bianchi, U.; Bolis, G.; Brady, M. F.; Brodovsky, H. S.; Bruckner, H.; Buyse, M.; Canetta, R.; Chylak, V.; Cohen, C. J.; Colombo, N.; Conte, P. F.; Crowther, D.; Edmonson, J. H.; Gennatas, C.; Gilbey, E.; Gore, M.; Guthrie, D.; Yeap, B. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic study was to provide an up to date and reliable quantitative summary of the relative benefits of various types of chemotherapy (non-platinum vs platinum, single-agent vs combination and carboplatin vs cisplatin) in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. Also, to investigate whether well-defined patient subgroups benefit more or less from cisplatin- or carboplatin-based therapy. Meta-analyses were based on updated individual patient data from all available randomized controlled trials (published and unpublished), including 37 trials, 5667 patients and 4664 deaths. The results suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is better than non-platinum therapy, show a trend in favour of platinum combinations over single-agent platinum, and suggest that cisplatin and carboplatin are equally effective. There is no good evidence that cisplatin is more or less effective than carboplatin in any particular subgroup of patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9836481

  6. 78 FR 39062 - Group Lotus plc; Modification of a Temporary Exemption From an Advanced Air Bag Requirement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Group Lotus plc; Modification of a Temporary Exemption From... Protection. SUMMARY: This notice modifies the temporary exemption granted to Group Lotus plc (Lotus) on March... in the Federal Register a notice granting Group Lotus Plc (Lotus) a temporary exemption from...

  7. ZnCdMgSe as a Materials Platform for Advanced Photonic Devices: Broadband Quantum Cascade Detectors and Green Semiconductor Disk Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jesus, Joel

    The ZnCdMgSe family of II-VI materials has unique and promising characteristics that may be useful in practical applications. For example they can be grown lattice matched to InP substrates with lattice matched bandgaps that span from 2.1 to 3.5 eV, they can be successfully doped n-type, have a large conduction band offset (CBO) with no intervalley scattering present when strained, they have lower average phonon energies, and the InP lattice constant lies in the middle of the ZnSe and CdSe binaries compounds giving room to experiment with tensile and compressive stress. However they have not been studied in detail for use in practical devices. Here we have identified two types of devices that are being currently developed that benefit from the ZnCdMgSe-based material properties. These are the intersubband (ISB) quantum cascade (QC) detectors and optically pumped semiconductor lasers that emit in the visible range. The paucity for semiconductor lasers operating in the green-orange portion of the visible spectrum can be easily overcome with the ZnCdMgSe materials system developed in our research. The non-strain limited, large CBO available allows to expand the operating wavelength of ISB devices providing shorter and longer wavelengths than the currently commercially available devices. This property can also be exploited to develop broadband room temperature operation ISB detectors. The work presented here focused first on using the ZnCdMgSe-based material properties and parameter to understand and predict the interband and intersubband transitions of its heterostructures. We did this by studying an active region of a QC device by contactless electroreflectance, photoluminescence, FTIR transmittance and correlating the measurements to the quantum well structure by transfer matrix modeling. Then we worked on optimizing the ZnCdMgSe material heterostructures quality by studying the effects of growth interruptions on their optical and optoelectronic properties of

  8. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  9. International Working Group-Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT) & European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) consensus response criteria in advanced systemic mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Pardanani, Animesh; Akin, Cem; Reiter, Andreas; George, Tracy; Hermine, Olivier; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Hartmann, Karin; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Brockow, Knut; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Orfao, Alberto; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Arock, Michel; Sotlar, Karl; Horny, Hans-Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Escribano, Luis; Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew; Valent, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by accumulation of neoplastic mast cells and is classified into indolent and aggressive forms. The latter include aggressive SM (ASM), mast cell leukemia (MCL), and SM associated with a myeloid neoplasm wherein 1 or both disease compartments exhibit advanced features. These variants, henceforth collectively referred to as advanced SM for the purposes of this report, are typically characterized by organ damage and shortened survival duration. In contrast to indolent SM, in which symptoms are usually managed by noncytotoxic antimediator therapy, cytoreduction is usually necessary for disease control in advanced SM. Unfortunately, current drug treatment of these patients rarely results in complete clinical and histopathologic remissions or improved survival time. Previously defined response criteria were adapted to the heterogeneous presentations of advanced SM and the limited effects of available drugs. However, recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of SM and the corresponding prospect in targeted therapy make it a priority to modify these criteria. Our current study is the product of an international group of experts and summarizes the challenges in accomplishing this task and forwards a new proposal for response criteria, which builds on prior proposals and should facilitate response evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:23325841

  10. International Working Group-Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT) & European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) consensus response criteria in advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gotlib, Jason; Pardanani, Animesh; Akin, Cem; Reiter, Andreas; George, Tracy; Hermine, Olivier; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Hartmann, Karin; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Brockow, Knut; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Orfao, Alberto; Deangelo, Daniel J; Arock, Michel; Sotlar, Karl; Horny, Hans-Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D; Escribano, Luis; Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew; Valent, Peter

    2013-03-28

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by accumulation of neoplastic mast cells and is classified into indolent and aggressive forms. The latter include aggressive SM (ASM), mast cell leukemia (MCL), and SM associated with a myeloid neoplasm wherein 1 or both disease compartments exhibit advanced features. These variants, henceforth collectively referred to as advanced SM for the purposes of this report, are typically characterized by organ damage and shortened survival duration. In contrast to indolent SM, in which symptoms are usually managed by noncytotoxic antimediator therapy, cytoreduction is usually necessary for disease control in advanced SM. Unfortunately, current drug treatment of these patients rarely results in complete clinical and histopathologic remissions or improved survival time. Previously defined response criteria were adapted to the heterogeneous presentations of advanced SM and the limited effects of available drugs. However, recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of SM and the corresponding prospect in targeted therapy make it a priority to modify these criteria. Our current study is the product of an international group of experts and summarizes the challenges in accomplishing this task and forwards a new proposal for response criteria, which builds on prior proposals and should facilitate response evaluation in clinical trials.

  11. Intruder Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The shadowy prowler is attempting a break-in, unaware that his presence has already been detected and reported by the device in the lower left corner of the photo. It is part of a three-element ntruder Detecti on System developed by NASA's Ames Research Center from technology acquired in the Apollo lunar exploration program. Apollo astronauts left behind on the moon small portable seismic (shock) detectors to record subsurface vibrations and transmit to Earth data on the moon's density and thickness. A similar seismic detector is the key component of the lntruder Detection System. Encased in a stainless steel tube, the detector is implanted in the ground outside the facility being protected-home, bank, industrial or other facilities. The vibration-sensing detector picks up the footstep of anyone within a preset range. The detector is connected by cable to the transmitter, which relays the warning to a portable radio receiver. The radio alerts plant guards or home occupants by emitting an audible tone burst for each footstep.

  12. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  13. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  14. NSF/ESF Workshop on Smart Structures and Advanced Sensors, Santorini Island, Greece, June 26-28, 2005: Structural Actuation and Adaptation Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Tomizuka, Masayoshi; Bergman, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bernie; Salzano, Carmine; Bairrao, rogerio; Deraemaker, Arnaud; Magonette, Georges; Rodellar, Jose; Kadirkamanathan, Visaken

    2005-01-01

    This document is a result of discussions that took place during the workshop. It describes current state of research and development (R&D) in the areas of structural actuation and adaptation in the context of smart structures and advanced sensors (SS&AS), and provides an outlook to guide future R&D efforts to develop technologies needed to build SS&AS. The discussions took place among the members of the Structural Actuation and Adaptation Working Group, as well as in general sessions including all four working groups. Participants included members of academia, industry, and government from the US and Europe, and representatives from China, Japan, and Korea.

  15. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  16. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  17. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  18. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  19. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  20. 77 FR 39564 - Group Lotus Plc, Receipt of Petition for Temporary Exemption From an Advanced Air Bag Requirement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Group Lotus Plc, Receipt of Petition for Temporary Exemption... Crash Protection. SUMMARY: In accordance with the procedures in 49 CFR part 555, Group Lotus Plc has... for its Evora model. The basis for the application is that the petitioner avers compliance would...

  1. Advanced light element and low energy X-ray line analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Palasse, L.; Berlin, J.; Hansen, B.; Terborg, R.; Falke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Characterization at the micro- to nano-scale is crucial for understanding many processes in earth, planetary, material and biological sciences. The composition of thin electron transparent samples can be analyzed in the nm-range using transmission electron microscopes (TEM) or, specific sample holders provided, in the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Nevertheless both methods often require complex sample preparation. An alternative method is to analyze bulk samples with a FE-SEM. In order to decrease the excitation volume for generated X-rays, low accelerating voltages (HV<10) are required. Consequently, only low to intermediate energy X-ray lines can be evaluated and many peak overlaps have to be deconvoluted since the high energy range is not available. Methods: A BRUKER Quantax EDS system with an XFlash Silicon Drift Detector acquired EDS spectra in spectrum images. To separate overlapping peaks, an extended atomic database [1] was used. For single channel EDS the electron beam current, solid angle, take-off angle and exposure time can be optimized to investigate the element composition. Multiple SDD setups ensure an even higher efficiency and larger collection angles for the X-ray analysis than single channel detectors. Shadowing effects are minimized in element distribution maps so that samples can be investigated quickly and sometimes in a close to natural state, with little preparation. A new type of EDS detector, the annular four channel SDD (XFlash 5060F), is placed between the pole piece and sample. It covers a very large solid angle (1.1 sr) and allows sufficient data collection at low beam currents on beam sensitive samples with substantial surface topography. Examples of applications: Results demonstrate that SDD-based EDS analysis contributes essential information on the structure at the micro- to nano scale of the investigated sample types. These include stardust analogue impact experiments [2], Chicxulub asteroid

  2. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, G.; Carini, G.; Carron, S.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.; Hasi, J.; Herrmann, S.; Kenney, C.; Segal, J.; Tomada, A.

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  3. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  4. The MICROMEGEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhali, O.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dewèze, S.; Udo, F.; Van Doninck, W.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Lancker, L.; Zhukov, V.; Boulogne, I.; Daubie, E.

    2001-02-01

    This article introduces the MICROMEGEM detector, a position-sensitive proportional gas counter produced using advanced Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology. The detector is equipped with a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foil placed 50 μm above a plane of pick-up strips. The GEM produces a first gas amplification which is extended below the GEM foil by applying a strong electric field between the strips and the lower electrode of the GEM. The array of strips is used for read-out to obtain 1-D positional information. We present results on the gas gain, the energy resolution and the rate capability. The behaviour in an intense beam of 300 MeV/c pions in presence of heavily ionizing particles has also been investigated.

  5. Low-Power Multi-Aspect Space Radiation Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave; Freeman, Jon C.; Burkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of all of these detector technologies will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the deep space radiation field.

  6. Improved effective-one-body model of spinning, nonprecessing binary black holes for the era of gravitational-wave astrophysics with advanced detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohé, Alejandro; Shao, Lijing; Taracchini, Andrea; Buonanno, Alessandra; Babak, Stanislav; Harry, Ian W.; Hinder, Ian; Ossokine, Serguei; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Chu, Tony; Fong, Heather; Kumar, Prayush; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2017-02-01

    We improve the accuracy of the effective-one-body (EOB) waveforms that were employed during the first observing run of Advanced LIGO for binaries of spinning, nonprecessing black holes by calibrating them to a set of 141 numerical-relativity (NR) waveforms. The NR simulations expand the domain of calibration toward larger mass ratios and spins, as compared to the previous EOBNR model. Merger-ringdown waveforms computed in black-hole perturbation theory for Kerr spins close to extremal provide additional inputs to the calibration. For the inspiral-plunge phase, we use a Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm to efficiently explore the calibration space. For the merger-ringdown phase, we fit the NR signals with phenomenological formulae. After extrapolation of the calibrated model to arbitrary mass ratios and spins, the (dominant-mode) EOBNR waveforms have faithfulness—at design Advanced-LIGO sensitivity—above 99% against all the NR waveforms, including 16 additional waveforms used for validation, when maximizing only on initial phase and time. This implies a negligible loss in event rate due to modeling for these binary configurations. We find that future NR simulations at mass ratios ≳4 and double spin ≳0.8 will be crucial to resolving discrepancies between different ways of extrapolating waveform models. We also find that some of the NR simulations that already exist in such region of parameter space are too short to constrain the low-frequency portion of the models. Finally, we build a reduced-order version of the EOBNR model to speed up waveform generation by orders of magnitude, thus enabling intensive data-analysis applications during the upcoming observation runs of Advanced LIGO.

  7. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  8. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  9. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  10. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  11. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  12. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  13. A randomised trial of MACC chemotherapy with or without lonidamine in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Cuneo Lung Cancer Study Group (CuLCaSG)

    PubMed

    Buccheri, G; Ferrigno, D

    1994-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy with anti-proliferative agents is the usual treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), good performance status and no major clinical contraindications. Lonidamine (LND), a new drug with an innovative mechanism of action, might potentiate anti-cancer activity of conventional cytotoxic drugs, with no increase of specific toxicity. Following a pilot study of feasibility, we now report the results of a randomised trial evaluating MACC chemotherapy, as originally described, versus the same regimen+LND. 151 patients with advanced NSCLC were assigned at random to the two treatment arms. LND 150 mg was given orally three times daily. Treatment was continued until progression of disease, unacceptable toxicity or refusal by the patient (median number of cycles of MACC, three for both arms; median duration of LND administration, 8 weeks in the arm concerned). Actual dose intensities (DI) of MACC and LND were, respectively, 100 and 83% of those intended (median values). There was a negative correlation between duration of chemotherapy and the DI of MACC reached in each patient, but no correlation between the duration of treatment with LND and its DI. DIs of LND and MACC were not correlated with each other. In all, 15 objective responses (one complete and four partial responses in the MACC group, 10 partial responses in patients on MACC+LND) were observed. Median progression-free survivals were 20 weeks (confidence interval, CI 14-22) for the group on LND and 17 weeks (CI 12-17) for the control group (non-significant difference). Median overall survivals were, respectively, 30 weeks (CI 23-40) and 27 weeks (CI 22-34), P = non-significant. Toxicity was as expected by the use of MACC, and similar in both arms, except for more severe anaemia and gastric toxicity in the group on MACC+LND. Other uncommon side-effects, seen only in this latter group, were mild to moderate and reversible and included myalgia, asthenia, testicle

  14. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients. OPALS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Nichol, G; O'Brien, B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Lyver, M B; Luinstra, L G; Dagnone, E; Campeau, T; Ward, R; Anderson, S

    1999-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period (1994-2002). The current article, Part II, describes in detail the rationale and methodology for major trauma and respiratory distress patients and for an economic evaluation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) programs in the OPALS Study. The OPALS Study, using a rigorous controlled methodology and a large sample size, should clearly indicate the benefit in trauma and respiratory distress patient survival and morbidity that results from the widespread introduction of prehospital ALS programs to communities of many different sizes. [Stiell IG, Wells GA, Spaite DW, Nichol G, O'Brien B, Munkley DP, Field BJ, Lyver MB, Luinstra LG, Dagnone E, Campeau T, Ward R, Anderson S, for the OPALS Study Group: The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients.

  15. Advanced SEM/EDS Analysis using Stage Control and an annular Silicon Drift Detector: Applications in Impact Studies from Centimetre below Micrometre Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, Tobias; Berlin, Jana; Terborg, Ralf; Howard, Kieren; Newsom, Horton; Wozniakiewicz, Penny; Price, Mark; Burchell, Mark; Cole, Mike; Kearsley, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: Imaging of ever smaller structures, in situ within large samples, requires low electron beam energy (HV<6 kV) to enhance spatial resolution, and therefore also the use of low energy X-ray lines for element analysis. To separate significantly overlapping peaks e.g. N-K (392 eV) and Ti-Ll (395 eV), the incorporation of line deconvolution algorithms in energy dispersive X-ray software is of crucial importance. Methods: Without adequate X-ray count statistics, deconvolution is unlikely to be effective. We therefore used an annular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD), the Bruker XFlash® 5060F which is placed between the pole piece and sample. High take-off angle and collection of X-rays from four different directions allow data collection across samples with substantial surface topography. Automated stage control and spectrum imaging allow large data sets to be acquired within a short time. Applications: (A) Large area, high resolution images (with tiling or stitching of neighbouring areas) is useful for understanding processes in the formation of tektites [1], revealing flow textures and layering, without destructive section preparation. Coalescence textures formed during the transition from melt to solid, surface pitting produced by micro-impact collisions in the impact plume, and surface etching by chemical attack in the impact plume, or later weathering, can all be revealed. (B) Spectrum imaging of the matrix in the impact melt breccia of the Chicxulub impact crater (Yaxcopoil-1 borehole, Unit 5 861.72 m) reveals secondary mineral formation, such as NaCl (<500 nm) and Fe-Ti-oxides (<150 nm) associated with garnet resorption. It documents the role of multiple episodes of precipitation of Mg-rich phyllosilicates as well as the formation and dissolution of accessory minerals in a relatively high temperature (>300°C) hydrothermal event [2]. (C) In experimental hypervelocity impact craters, spectrum images readily find locations of projectile residue throughout

  16. Proceedings of the Second Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The workshop focused on infrared detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers are organized into the following categories: discrete infrared detectors and readout electronics; advanced bolometers; intrinsic integrated infrared arrays; and extrinsic integrated infrared arrays. Status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) programs are also included.

  17. [Advances in the development of new antitubercular agents from a group of 5-membered heterocyclic compounds containing various heteroatoms].

    PubMed

    Waisser, K; Drhová, L

    1999-09-01

    Tuberculosis and other antimycobacterial diseases are considered to be one of the most important problems of the health service at present. Since 1985, and in particular in the 1990s, a search for new structures of antimycobacterial substances has ranked among the prior fields of chemotherapeutic research. The present review paper links up with the previous communications, and surveys the studies carried out in the field of five-membered heterocyclic compounds containing more heteroatoms since 1984. The most frequently investigated field is thiazole derivatives but the most successful papers originated in the group of oxazoles, where effective antituberculotics for clinical use can be expected in the future. The present research is based on the journal Chemical Abstracts and original papers.

  18. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  19. Neutron detectors for the ESS diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, I.; Christensen, M.; Fenske, J.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Henry, P. F.; Kirstein, O.; Müller, M.; Nowak, G.; Pooley, D.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N.; Šaroun, J.; Schefer, J.; Schooneveld, E.; Sykora, J.; Schweika, W.

    2017-01-01

    The ambitious instrument suite for the future European Spallation Source whose civil construction started recently in Lund, Sweden, demands a set of diverse and challenging requirements for the neutron detectors. For instance, the unprecedented high flux expected on the samples to be investigated in neutron diffraction or reflectometry experiments requires detectors that can handle high counting rates, while the investigation of sub-millimeter protein crystals will only be possible with large-area detectors that can achieve a position resolution as low as 200 μm. This has motivated an extensive research and development campaign to advance the state-of-the-art detector and to find new technologies that can reach maturity by the time the ESS will operate at full potential. This paper presents the key detector requirements for three of the Time-of-Flight (TOF) diffraction instrument concepts selected by the Scientific Advisory Committee to advance into the phase of preliminary engineering design. We discuss the detector technologies commonly employed at the existing similar instruments and their major challenges for ESS. The detector technologies selected by the instrument teams to collect the diffraction patterns are also presented. Analytical calculations, Monte-Carlo simulations, and real experimental data are used to develop a generic method to estimate the event rate in the diffraction detectors. We apply this method to make predictions for the future diffraction instruments, and thus provide additional information that can help the instrument teams with the optimisation of the detector designs.

  20. The response of smoke detectors to pyrolysis and combustion products from aircraft interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, R. G.; Alvares, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following projects were completed as part of the effort to develop and test economically feasible fire-resistant materials for interior furnishings of aircraft as well as detectors of incipient fires in passenger and cargo compartments: (1) determination of the sensitivity of various contemporary gas and smoke detectors to pyrolysis and combustion products from materials commonly used in aircraft interiors and from materials that may be used in the future, (2) assessment of the environmental limitations to detector sensitivity and reliability. The tests were conducted on three groups of materials by exposure to the following three sources of exposure: radiant and Meeker burner flame, heated coil, and radiant source only. The first test series used radiant heat and flame exposures on easily obtainable test materials. Next, four materials were selected from the first group and exposed to an incandescent coil to provide the conditions for smoldering combustion. Finally, radiant heat exposures were used on advanced materials that are not readily available.

  1. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, A.; Mitchell, G.; Vieira, D.; Bredeweg, T.; Ullmann, J.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A.; Keksis, A.; Rundberg, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; O'Donnell, J.; Baramsai, B.; Haight, R.; Wouters, J.; Krticka, M.; Parker, W.; Becker, J.; Agvaanlusan, U.

    2009-10-01

    DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility. The absolute cross sections of the ^89Y(n,γ) reaction was measured for the first time ever in the neutron energy range of 10 eV -- 10 keV and improvements were made in the 10 -- 300 keV range. The error bars were significantly reduced and number of cross section points was increased since the past ^89Y(n,γ) experiments. The ^157Gd(n,γ) cross section was determined at En = 20 eV -- 300 keV by normalizing the experimental DANCE data to a well known resonance taken from the ENDF/B-VII library. Computer simulations of the ^157Gd(n,γ) cascades and DANCE pulse height function were made using DICEBOX and GEANT4 codes and simulated Esum and Eγ spectra are compared to the experimental DANCE data. Values of spin and photon strength function (PSF) of the ^157Gd(n,γ) resonances are provided in the range of En = 2 -- 300 eV using spin dependence upon a γ-ray multiplicity.

  2. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  3. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  4. Combination goserelin and tamoxifen therapy in premenopausal advanced breast cancer: a multicentre study by the ITMO group. Italian Trials in Medical Oncology.

    PubMed Central

    Buzzoni, R.; Biganzoli, L.; Bajetta, E.; Celio, L.; Fornasiero, A.; Mariani, L.; Zilembo, N.; Di Bartolomeo, M.; Di Leo, A.; Arcangeli, G.

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that tamoxifen may improve the efficacy of medical castration with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone analogues, but very few data have so far been published concerning the clinical and endocrinological activity of this therapeutic modality. In this phase II multicentre trial conducted by the Italian Trials in Medical Oncology group (ITMO), 64 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive or unknown breast cancer were treated with monthly s.c. injections of goserelin 3.6 mg, in association with a tamoxifen daily dose of 20 mg, as first-line therapy for their advanced disease. All of the patients were evaluable for efficacy and there was an overall response rate of 41% (95% confidence interval 28-52%), with 7 of the 26 responders achieving complete remission. The median time to response was 4 months (range 2-17), and the median response duration was 13 months (range 6-37 +). Better responses were observed in soft tissues (51%); the response in visceral and bone metastases was respectively 19% and 37%. Serum concentrations of gonadotrophins and oestradiol were significantly decreased by the treatment, oestrogen levels being constantly suppressed to within the range observed in post-menopausal women. No significant change was detected in serum testosterone levels. In our experience, although it was not associated with any increased clinical efficacy, the concurrent use of goserelin and tamoxifen proved to be a feasible approach in the management of premenopausal advanced breast cancer. PMID:7734310

  5. An advanced, new long-legged bird from the Early Cretaceous of the Jehol Group (northeastern China): insights into the temporal divergence of modern birds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Chiappe, Luis M; Zhang, Yuguang; Bell, Alyssa; Meng, Qingjin; Ji, Qiang; Wang, Xuri

    2014-11-14

    We describe a new ornithuromorph bird species, Gansus zheni from the Lower Cretaceous lacustrine deposits of the Jiufotang Formation (Jehol Group), Liaoning Province, China. A cladistic analysis resolves Gansus zheni as the sister taxon of the roughly contemporaneous Gansus yumenensis (Xiagou Formation, Gansu Province), and together as the most immediate outgroup to Ornithurae. Gansus zheni is the most advanced bird known today for the Jehol Biota. Its discovery provides the best-documented case of inter-basinal correlations (Jehol and Changma basins of Liaoning and Gansu provinces, respectively) using low-taxonomic clades of fossil birds. The existence of close relatives of Ornithurae in deposits formed at about 120 million years ago helps to mitigate the long-standing controversy between molecular and paleontological evidence for the temporal divergence of modern birds (Neornithes).

  6. Workshop on detectors for third-generation synchrotron sources: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    The aims of the workshop were (1) to acquaint APS users with current R and D being carried out on detectors, (2) to identify new detector systems possible during the next five years, (3) to identify new detectors theoretically possible in the future, (4) to stimulate interactions between user groups and detector developers, and (5) to obtain recommendations from expert panels on technical issues needing resolution. Development of detectors at ESRF, Spring-8, BNL, CERN and LBL are included.

  7. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; Jan van Doorn, Leen; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-07-15

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For our study, we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2,077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed six single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene, and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia (IM) and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of IM or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared to subjects carrying cagA negative strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95% CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (p=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status.

  8. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status

    PubMed Central

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; van Doorn, Leen Jan; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-01-01

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For this study we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared with subjects carrying cagA− strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95%CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (P=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status. PMID:23319424

  9. Detector level ABI spectral response function: FM4 analysis and comparison for different ABI modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, Boryana; Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Frank; Wu, Xiangqian

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of imaging instruments Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is to be launched aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites - R Series (GOES-R). Four ABI flight modules (FM) are planned to be launched on GOES-R,S,T,U, the first one in the fall of 2016. Pre-launch testing is on-going for FM3 and FM4. ABI has 16 spectral channels, six in the visible/near infrared (VNIR 0.47 - 2.25 μm), and ten in the thermal infrared (TIR 3.9 - 13.3 μm) spectral regions, to be calibrated on-orbit by observing respectively a solar diffuser and a blackbody. Each channel has hundreds of detectors arranged in columns. Operationally one Analytic Generation of Spectral Response (ANGEN) function will be used to represent the spectral response function (SRF) of all detectors in a band. The Vendor conducted prelaunch end-to-end SRF testing to compare to ANGEN; detector specific SRF data was taken for: i) best detector selected (BDS) mode - for FM 2,3, and 4; and ii) all detectors (column mode) - for four spectral bands in FM3 and FM4. The GOES-R calibration working group (CWG) has independently used the SRF test data for FM2 and FM3 to study the potential impact of detector-to-detector SRF differences on the ABI detected Earth view radiances. In this paper we expand the CWG analysis to include the FM4 SRF test data - the results are in agreement with the Vendor analysis, and show excellent instrument performance and compare the detector-to-detector SRF differences and their potential impact on the detected Earth view radiances for all of the tested ABI modules.

  10. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobre, M.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC was ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will deliver of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb ‑1 expected for LHC running by the end of 2018 to 3000 fb ‑1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next. A brief overview is also given on physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV.

  11. Future of Semiconductor Based Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Cheung, C L; Reinhardt, C E; Wang, T F

    2006-02-22

    Thermal neutron detectors have seen only incremental improvements over the last decades. In this paper we overview the current technology of choice for thermal neutron detection--{sup 3}He tubes, which suffer from, moderate to poor fieldability, and low absolute efficiency. The need for improved neutron detection is evident due to this technology gap and the fact that neutrons are a highly specific indicator of fissile material. Recognizing this need, we propose to exploit recent advances in microfabrication technology for building the next generation of semiconductor thermal neutron detectors for national security requirements, for applications requiring excellent fieldability of small devices. We have developed an innovative pathway taking advantage of advanced processing and fabrication technology to produce the proposed device. The crucial advantage of our Pillar Detector is that it can simultaneously meet the requirements of high efficiency and fieldability in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 70%.

  12. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, A. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Grint, A. N.; Harkness, L. J.; Jones, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Slee, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Simpson, J.

    2008-11-11

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4{pi} ball of germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA)[1] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA)[2] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array) asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  13. Enhanced neutron imaging detector using optical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Existing neutron imaging detectors have limited count rates due to inherent property and electronic limitations. The popular multiwire proportional counter is qualified by gas recombination to a count rate of less than 10{sup 5} n/s over the entire array and the neutron Anger camera, even though improved with new fiber optic encoding methods, can only achieve 10{sup 6} cps over a limited array. We present a preliminary design for a new type of neutron imaging detector with a resolution of 2--5 mm and a count rate capability of 10{sup 6} cps pixel element. We propose to combine optical and electronic processing to economically increase the throughput of advanced detector systems while simplifying computing requirements. By placing a scintillator screen ahead of an optical image processor followed by a detector array, a high throughput imaging detector may be constructed.

  14. Advanced Fire Detector for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutzner, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses an optical carbon monoxide sensor for early fire detection. During the sensor development, a concept was implemented to allow reliable carbon monoxide detection in the presence of interfering absorption signals. Methane interference is present in the operating wavelength range of the developed prototype sensor for carbon monoxide detection. The operating parameters of the prototype sensor have been optimized so that interference with methane is minimized. In addition, simultaneous measurement of methane is implemented, and the instrument automatically corrects the carbon monoxide signal at high methane concentrations. This is possible because VCSELs (vertical cavity surface emitting lasers) with extended current tuning capabilities are implemented in the optical device. The tuning capabilities of these new laser sources are sufficient to cover the wavelength range of several absorption lines. The delivered carbon monoxide sensor (COMA 1) reliably measures low carbon monoxide levels even in the presence of high methane signals. The signal bleed-over is determined during system calibration and is then accounted for in the system parameters. The sensor reports carbon monoxide concentrations reliably for (interfering) methane concentrations up to several thousand parts per million.

  15. Expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, a target for high mobility group box 1 protein, and its role in chronic recalcitrant rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Dzaman, Karolina; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J; Molinska-Glura, Marta; Krzeski, Antoni; Zagor, Mariola

    2015-06-01

    A receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has been linked to several chronic diseases, and acts as a trigger for inflammation signaling. Here, we study RAGE and HMGB1 expression in chronic, recalcitrant rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) to determine its potential clinical significance, i.e., disease recurrence and severity. RAGE and HMGB1 expression in CRSwNP was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in epithelial cells of fresh sinonasal mucosa samples obtained from the patients diagnosed with recalcitrant CRSwNP (n = 25) and normal control mucosa (NC) (n = 26). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in tissues were correlated with disease severity assessed by nasal endoscopy, CT scan, number of previous sinus surgeries, allergy status and nasosinusal microbiology. RAGE and HMGB1 were moderately or strongly expressed in CRSwNP tissue. No or weak RAGE expression was found in NC. HMGB1 was equally strongly expressed in NC. We observed a strong correlation between RAGE and disease severity, recurrence, undergone operations, asthma and aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). Elevated RAGE expression is associated with increased disease severity, as well as allergy and AERD in patients with recalcitrant CRSwNP. It is possible that the explanation for recurrent CRSwNP pathogenesis might be related to RAGE overexpression with subsequent sinus mucosa hyperproliferation, necessitating several operations.

  16. Clinical Implications of High-mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) in Cutaneous Malignancy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Detty, Shannon Q; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and the immune system play a role in the development and progression of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting effects of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have been investigated in these cutaneous malignancies. The clinical implication of these molecules is not fully described. The National Library of Medicine database was searched for articles addressing the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and RAGE in melanoma, BCC, and SCC. This systematic review includes nine articles, with six summarizing RAGE in cutaneous malignancies and three involving HMGB1. RAGE has been found to be up-regulated in SCC lesions, as well as melanoma. Levels of RAGE were highest in stage IV melanomas. Lower levels of soluble RAGE have been associated with poor overall survival in melanoma. Sporadic extracellular expression of HMGB1 was evident in BCC and SCC lesions, which could be released by necrotic tumor cells. HMGB1 was found to be a prognostic marker in melanoma, and HMGB1 levels were elevated in patients who were non-responders to ipilimumab treatment. HMGB1 and RAGE could serve as potential prognostic markers or therapeutic targets in treating melanoma, BCC, and SCC, but further research regarding the clinical utility of the HMGB1-RAGE axis in cutaneous malignancies is warranted.

  17. Clinical use of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end products in the prognosis and risk stratification of heart failure: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Amanda M; Nguyen, Austin Huy; Parker, Taylor M; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome that represents the end stage of heart disease and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As heart failure mortality rates remain elevated, additional biomarkers that facilitate early detection or risk stratification in HF is of particularly great interest. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) cause the activation of intracellular signaling, gene expression, and production of inflammatory cytokines and have been linked to many inflammatory disease states such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Few studies have investigated their role in the pathophysiology of HF and any significant correlation remains uncertain. Review of the available literature discussing HMGB1 and RAGE clinical values as independent prognostic variables in HF resulted in the inclusion of 11 studies, which enrolled a total of 2025 heart failure patients. Overall, the data suggests a statistically significant positive correlation between RAGE and HF, with increasing RAGE levels associated with increasing New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class of heart failure. HMGB1 correlations were not as extensively studied, but there is evidence that both HMGB1 and RAGE have a definite potential as biomarkers for the prognosis and risk stratification of HF patients.

  18. Association of high mobility group BOX-1 and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts with clinicopathological features of haematological malignancies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Sheila B.; Riley, Erinn M.; Caponetti, Gabriel C.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2017-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a versatile protein with nuclear and extracellular functions. In the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). The expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE have been described in a variety of cancers. However, the clinical values of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies have yet to be evaluated. A systematic search through PubMed and the Web of Science for articles discussing the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies produced 15 articles. Overexpression of HMGB1 was reported to be associated with malignancy and, in certain studies, poor prognosis and tumour aggressiveness. Only one included study investigated the clinical value of RAGE, in which no significant difference was found between expression of RAGE in CLL neoplastic cells and nonmalignant controls. The discussed associations of HMGB1 and RAGE with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with haematological malignancies warrants further investigation into the prognostic and diagnostic value of both of these molecules. PMID:28239277

  19. The next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, ChunNong; Wen, LinQing; Miao, HaiXing; Cai, RongGen; Gao, JiangRui; Lin, XueChun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, ZongHong; Hammond, Giles; Paik, Ho Jung; Fafone, Viviana; Rocchi, Alessio; Blair, Carl; Ma, YiQiu; Qin, JiaYi; Page, Michael

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy which will be required after the current ground based detectors have completed their initial observations, and probably achieved the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The next detectors will need to have greater sensitivity, while also enabling the world array of detectors to have improved angular resolution to allow localisation of signal sources. Sect. 1 of this paper begins by reviewing proposals for the next ground based detectors, and presents an analysis of the sensitivity of an 8 km armlength detector, which is proposed as a safe and cost-effective means to attain a 4-fold improvement in sensitivity. The scientific benefits of creating a pair of such detectors in China and Australia is emphasised. Sect. 2 of this paper discusses the high performance suspension systems for test masses that will be an essential component for future detectors, while sect. 3 discusses solutions to the problem of Newtonian noise which arise from fluctuations in gravity gradient forces acting on test masses. Such gravitational perturbations cannot be shielded, and set limits to low frequency sensitivity unless measured and suppressed. Sects. 4 and 5 address critical operational technologies that will be ongoing issues in future detectors. Sect. 4 addresses the design of thermal compensation systems needed in all high optical power interferometers operating at room temperature. Parametric instability control is addressed in sect. 5. Only recently proven to occur in Advanced LIGO, parametric instability phenomenon brings both risks and opportunities for future detectors. The path to future enhancements of detectors will come from quantum measurement technologies. Sect. 6 focuses on the use of optomechanical devices for obtaining enhanced sensitivity, while sect. 7 reviews a range of quantum measurement options.

  20. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  1. End-of-life care in advanced kidney disease: ethical and legal issues and key challenges for black and minority ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Antonia J

    2014-09-01

    Advances in modern medical technology have gone so far that it is now possible for machinery to keep people alive. To some extent this has led to a misperception in society that death can almost always be postponed because life-sustaining extracorporeal machinery of some sort or another, for example a dialysis machine, can prevent it. However, for some, being kept alive connected to a dialysis machine for four hours three times a week does not represent or even come close to an existence or quality of life they consider valuable. It may even cause unnecessary distress. This may be because they have reached a point at the end of their lives where they would like the focus of their treatment or care to become that which enables them to live as well as possible until they die. In these circumstances treatment and care should properly be that which enables the supportive and palliative care needs of both patient and family to be identified and met throughout the last phase of life and into bereavement. Identifying and acknowledging the importance of such a paradigm shift in the delivery of healthcare, and above all facilitating it, includes taking on the responsibility, incumbent upon us all, to address the ethical issues that are brought into focus. In this paper, I examine some of these issues. I consider the ways in which underlying theoretical ethical principles have informed the development of professional guidance and highlight the dynamic relationship this guidance has with the law. Finally, I demonstrate the ways in which it can be usefully applied to inform and assist clinical decision-making. Key challenges for BAME groups are addressed.

  2. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  3. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    DOEpatents

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  4. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  5. LGB neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    The double pulse signature of the Gadolinium Lithium Borate Cerium doped plastic detector suggests its effectiveness for analyzing neutrons while providing gamma ray insensitivity. To better understand this detector, a californium gamma/neutron time of flight facility was constructed in our lab. Reported here are efforts to understand the properties and applications of the LGB detector with regards to neutron spectroscopy.

  6. The Status of SalSA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milincic, Radovan

    2007-08-01

    We report on the current status of the Salt dome Shower Array (SalSA) ultra high energy neutrino detector. The astrophysics and particle physics prospects with SalSA detector are discussed as well as result of the calibration measurements of the shower development from ultra high energy particle interaction in rock salt. The 10 km3 water equivalent volume detector provides opportunity to advance measurements from mere detection to actual exploration and characterization of the high energy particles in the energy range above 1017 eV. Our MC simulations show that expected number of GZK neutrino events ranges between 10 and 200 depending on the theoretical models. The angular resolution provides us with the posibility of exploring different scenarios of large extra dimensions. The detector capability to distinguish between different neutrino flavors will result in study of neutrino oscillations in the extreme energy range and with largest L/E ratio.

  7. Life Finder Detectors; Detector Needs and Status for Spectroscopic Biosignature Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; McElwain, Michael W.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Stahle, Carl; Stark, Christopher C.; Thronson, Harley A.

    2016-01-01

    The search for life on other worlds looms large in NASA's future. Outside our solar system, direct spectroscopic biosignature characterization using very large UV-Optical-IR telescopes with coronagraphs or starshades is a core technique to both AURA's High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) concept and NASA's 30-year strategic plan. These giant space observatories require technological advancements in several areas, one of which is detectors. In this presentation, we review the detector requirements for spectroscopic biosignature characterization and discuss the status of some existing and proposed detector technologies for meeting them.

  8. Nuclear Electronics: Superconducting Detectors and Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polushkin, Vladimir

    2004-06-01

    With the commercialisation of superconducting particles and radiation detectors set to occur in the very near future, nuclear analytical instrumentation is taking a big step forward. These new detectors have a high degree of accuracy, stability and speed and are suitable for high-density multiplex integration in nuclear research laboratories and astrophysics. Furthermore, superconducting detectors can also be successfully applied to food safety, airport security systems, medical examinations, doping tests & forensic investigations. This book is the first to address a new generation of analytical tools based on new superconductor detectors demonstrating outstanding performance unsurpassed by any other conventional devices. Presenting the latest research and development in nanometer technologies and biochemistry this book: * Discusses the development of nuclear sensing techniques. * Provides guidance on the design and use of the next generation of detectors. * Describes cryogenic detectors for nuclear measurements and spectrometry. * Covers primary detectors, front-end readout electronics and digital signal processing. * Presents applications in nanotechnology and modern biochemistry including DNA sequencing, proteinomics, microorganisms. * Features examples of two applications in X-ray electron probe nanoanalysis and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This comprehensive treatment is the ideal reference for researchers, industrial engineers and graduate students involved in the development of high precision nuclear measurements, nuclear analytical instrumentation and advanced superconductor primary sensors. This book will also appeal to physicists, electrical and electronic engineers in the nuclear industry.

  9. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. High-mobility group box 1 inhibits HCO3− absorption in medullary thick ascending limb through a basolateral receptor for advanced glycation end products pathway

    PubMed Central

    George, Thampi; Watts, Bruns A.

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a damage-associated molecule implicated in mediating kidney dysfunction in sepsis and sterile inflammatory disorders. HMGB1 is a nuclear protein released extracellularly in response to infection or injury, where it interacts with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and other receptors to mediate inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated that LPS inhibits HCO3- absorption in the medullary thick ascending limb (MTAL) through a basolateral TLR4-ERK pathway (Watts BA III, George T, Sherwood ER, Good DW. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 301: C1296–C1306, 2011). Here, we examined whether HMGB1 could inhibit HCO3- absorption through the same pathway. Adding HMGB1 to the bath decreased HCO3− absorption by 24% in isolated, perfused rat and mouse MTALs. In contrast to LPS, inhibition by HMGB1 was preserved in MTALs from TLR4−/− mice and was unaffected by ERK inhibitors. Inhibition by HMGB1 was eliminated by the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) antagonist FPS-ZM1 and by neutralizing anti-RAGE antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence showed expression of RAGE in the basolateral membrane domain. Inhibition of HCO3−absorption by HMGB1 through RAGE was additive to inhibition by LPS through TLR4 and to inhibition by Gram-positive bacterial molecules through TLR2. Bath amiloride, which selectively prevents inhibition of MTAL HCO3− absorption mediated through Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1), eliminated inhibition by HMGB1. We conclude that HMGB1 inhibits MTAL HCO3− absorption through a RAGE-dependent pathway distinct from TLR4-mediated inhibition by LPS. These studies provide new evidence that HMGB1-RAGE signaling acts directly to impair the transport function of renal tubules. They reveal a novel paradigm for sepsis-induced renal tubule dysfunction, whereby exogenous pathogen-associated molecules and endogenous damage-associated molecules act directly and independently to inhibit MTAL HCO3− absorption through different receptor

  11. Wideband 1.064 micrometer detector evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of several candidate detectors for use as communications detectors in a 400 Mbps 1.064 micrometers laser communication system was evaluated. The results of communication system Bit Error Rate (BER) testing for the best detector of each type are summarized. Complete testing data of each type detector is presented. The 400 Mbps 1.064 micrometers communication system receiver test bed is described. The best communication system results for each detector type are included. Performance comparisons are made at 0.000001 BER, the specification level chosen for satellite laser communication links. The data is presented in two groups. The first indicates the best performance levels that can be expected on normal space laser communication system operation. The second cites the best performance levels which can be achieved by focusing the signal to diffraction limited spots on the photosensitive area.

  12. Improving the data quality of Advanced LIGO based on early engineering run results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, L. K.; Massinger, T. J.; Areeda, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Dwyer, S.; Effler, A.; Fisher, R. P.; Fritschel, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macleod, D. M.; Martynov, D.; McIver, J.; Mullavey, A.; Sigg, D.; Smith, J. R.; Vajente, G.; Williamson, A. R.; Wipf, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors have completed their initial upgrade phase and will enter the first observing run in late 2015, with detector sensitivity expected to improve in future runs. Through the combined efforts of on-site commissioners and the Detector Characterization Group of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, interferometer performance, in terms of data quality, at both LIGO observatories has vastly improved from the start of commissioning efforts to present. Advanced LIGO has already surpassed Enhanced LIGO in sensitivity, and the rate of noise transients, which would negatively impact astrophysical searches, has improved. Here we give details of some of the work which has taken place to better the quality of the LIGO data ahead of the first observing run.

  13. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  14. LHC Olympics: Advanced Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Kyle; Larkoski, Andrew; Gray, Amanda; Ventura, Dan; Walsh, Jon; Schabinger, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The LHC Olympics is a series of workshop aimed at encouraging theorists and experimentalists to prepare for the soon-to-be-online Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. One aspect of the LHC Olympics program consists of the study of simulated data sets which represent various possible new physics signals as they would be seen in LHC detectors. Through this exercise, LHC Olympians learn the phenomenology of possible new physics models and gain experience in analyzing LHC data. Additionally, the LHC Olympics encourages discussion between theorists and experimentalists, and through this collaboration new techniques could be developed. The University of Washington LHC Olympics group consists of several first-year graduate and senior undergraduate students, in both theoretical and experimental particle physics. Presented here is a discussion of some of the more advanced techniques used and the recent results of one such LHC Olympics study.

  15. Detector developments at DESY.

    PubMed

    Wunderer, Cornelia B; Allahgholi, Aschkan; Bayer, Matthias; Bianco, Laura; Correa, Jonathan; Delfs, Annette; Göttlicher, Peter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Jack, Stefanie; Klyuev, Alexander; Lange, Sabine; Marras, Alessandro; Niemann, Magdalena; Pithan, Florian; Reza, Salim; Sheviakov, Igor; Smoljanin, Sergej; Tennert, Maximilian; Trunk, Ulrich; Xia, Qingqing; Zhang, Jiaguo; Zimmer, Manfred; Das, Dipayan; Guerrini, Nicola; Marsh, Ben; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Cautero, Giuseppe; Giuressi, Dario; Menk, Ralf; Khromova, Anastasiya; Pinaroli, Giovanni; Stebel, Luigi; Marchal, Julien; Pedersen, Ulrik; Rees, Nick; Steadman, Paul; Sussmuth, Mark; Tartoni, Nicola; Yousef, Hazem; Hyun, HyoJung; Kim, KyungSook; Rah, Seungyu; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Mezza, Davide; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Krueger, Hans; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joem; Graafsma, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of free-electron lasers (FELs) enabling revolutionary science with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon sensitivity with low probability of false positives and (multi)-megapixels. At DESY, one ongoing development project - in collaboration with RAL/STFC, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Diamond, and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory - is the CMOS-based soft X-ray imager PERCIVAL. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active-pixel sensor back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 cm × 10 cm, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within 27 µm pixels to measure 1 to ∼100000 (500 eV) simultaneously arriving photons. DESY is also leading the development of the AGIPD, a high-speed detector based on hybrid pixel technology intended for use at the European XFEL. This system is being developed in collaboration with PSI, University of Hamburg, and University of Bonn. The AGIPD allows single-pulse imaging at 4.5 MHz frame rate into a 352-frame buffer, with a dynamic range allowing single-photon detection and detection of more than 10000 photons at 12.4 keV in the same image. Modules of 65k pixels each are configured to make up (multi)megapixel cameras. This review describes the AGIPD and the PERCIVAL concepts and systems, including some recent results and a summary of their current status. It also gives a short overview over other FEL-relevant developments where the Photon Science Detector Group at DESY is involved.

  16. CALIFA Barrel prototype detector characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietras, B.; Gascón, M.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Bloch, T.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Durán, I.; Fiori, E.; Gernhäuser, R.; González, D.; Kröll, T.; Le Bleis, T.; Montes, N.; Nácher, E.; Robles, M.; Perea, A.; Vilán, J. A.; Winkel, M.

    2013-11-01

    Well established in the field of scintillator detection, Caesium Iodide remains at the forefront of scintillators for use in modern calorimeters. Recent developments in photosensor technology have lead to the production of Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs), a huge advancement on traditional photosensors in terms of high internal gain, dynamic range, magnetic field insensitivity, high quantum efficiency and fast recovery time. The R3B physics programme has a number of requirements for its calorimeter, one of the most challenging being the dual functionality as both a calorimeter and a spectrometer. This involves the simultaneous detection of ∼300 MeV protons and gamma rays ranging from 0.1 to 20 MeV. This scintillator - photosensor coupling provides an excellent solution in this capacity, in part due to the near perfect match of the LAAPD quantum efficiency peak to the light output wavelength of CsI(Tl). Modern detector development is guided by use of Monte Carlo simulations to predict detector performance, nonetheless it is essential to benchmark these simulations against real data taken with prototype detector arrays. Here follows an account of the performance of two such prototypes representing different polar regions of the Barrel section of the forthcoming CALIFA calorimeter. Measurements were taken for gamma-ray energies up to 15.1 MeV (Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching, Germany) and for direct irradiation with a 180 MeV proton beam (The Svedberg Laboratoriet, Uppsala, Sweden). Results are discussed in light of complementary GEANT4 simulations.

  17. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  18. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  19. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  20. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  1. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, MunSeong Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-15

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  2. Particle Detectors: Research and Development at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    Over the past 15 years a worldwide Detector R and D Programme has made the LHC experiments possible. These experiments operate at a new level of event rate and detection capabilities. Based on these advances, Detector R and D is continuing at CERN in close collaboration with University and Research Institutes. Several main directions are being pursued for solid-state and gaseous tracking devices, advanced crystal and noble liquid calorimetry, particle identification methods, and advanced signal-processing techniques. This effort is directed towards experiments at even higher collision rates at the LHC, the requirements for the next generation of linear electron-positron colliders and for applications outside particle physics, such as medical diagnostics instrumentation. We shall illustrate this challenging, stimulating and creative programme with examples and show how these developments are taking place in close collaboration between CERN and institutions around the globe.

  3. ISABELLE. Volume 4. Detector R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Workshop participants were asked to assess the current status of detector R and D in terms of the specific needs for ISABELLE experiments: the demands of high particle rates, extremely selective triggers on complex and rare events, and the economics of large detector systems. The detailed results of working groups convened to consider specific areas of detector development are presented. The key points of this assessment, as regards the continuing R and D program for ISABELLE are summarized here. Twenty-six items from the volume were prepared separately for the data base, along with five items previously prepared. (GHT)

  4. Design philosophy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory infrared detector test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R.; Blessinger, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    To support the development of advanced infrared remote sensing instrumentation using line and area arrays, a test facility has been developed to characterize the detectors. The necessary performance characteristics of the facility were defined by considering current and projected requirements for detector testing. The completed facility provides the desired level of detector testing capability as well as providing ease of human interaction.

  5. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  6. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  7. Status of LWIR HgCdTe infrared detector technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reine, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    The performance requirements that today's advanced Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays place on the HgCdTe photovoltaic detector array are summarized. The theoretical performance limits for intrinsic LWIR HgCdTe detectors are reviewed as functions of cutoff wavelength and operating temperature. The status of LWIR HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors is reviewed and compared to the focal plane array (FPA) requirements and to the theoretical limits. Emphasis is placed on recent data for two-layer HgCdTe PLE heterojunction photodiodes grown at Loral with cutoff wavelengths ranging between 10 and 19 microns at temperatures of 70 to 80 K. Development trends in LWIR HgCdTe detector technology are outlined, and conclusions are drawn about the ability for photovoltaic HgCdTe detector arrays to satisfy a wide variety of advanced FPA array applications.

  8. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  9. Intelligent Detector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  10. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  11. Detectors (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  12. Detectors (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  13. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  14. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  15. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  16. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  17. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  18. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, A. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Grint, A. N.; Harkness, L. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Jones, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Simpson, J.; Slee, M.; Agata Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray detectors based on high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe) are one of the key workhorses of experimental nuclear science. The technical development of such detector technology has been dramatic in recent years. Large volume, high-granularity, electrically segmented HPGe detectors have been realised and a methodology to improve position sensitivity using pulse-shape analysis coupled with the novel technique of gamma-ray tracking has been developed. Collaborations have been established in Europe (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA)) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) [C.W. Beausang, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003)] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well-defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  19. Detector non-uniformity in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M

    2013-01-01

    A non-uniform response across scanning transmission electron microscope annular detectors has been found experimentally, but is seldom incorporated into simulations. Through case study simulations, we establish the nature and scale of the discrepancies which may arise from failing to account for detector non-uniformity. If standard detectors are used at long camera lengths such that the detector is within or near to the bright field region, we find errors in contrast of the order of 10%, sufficiently small for qualitative work but non-trivial as experiments become more quantitative. In cases where the detector has been characterized in advance, we discuss the detector response normalization and how it may be incorporated in simulations.

  20. Stage IV and age over 45 years are the only prognostic factors of the International Prognostic Score for the outcome of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma in the Spanish Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group series.

    PubMed

    Guisado-Vasco, Pablo; Arranz-Saez, Reyes; Canales, Miguel; Cánovas, Araceli; Garcia-Laraña, José; García-Sanz, Ramón; Lopez, Andrés; López, José Luis; Llanos, Marta; Moraleda, José Maria; Rodriguez, José; Rayón, Consuelo; Sabin, Pilar; Salar, Antonio; Marín-Niebla, Ana; Morente, Manuel; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Tomás, José Francisco; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Victor; Piris, Miguel A; Garcia, Juán F; Montalban, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    The International Prognostic Score (IPS) is the most widely used system to date for identifying risk groups for the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, although important limitations have been recognized. We analyzed the value of the IPS in a series of 311 patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) (Ann Arbor stage III, IV or stage II with B symptoms and/or bulky masses) treated with first-line chemotherapy including adriamycin (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine [ABVD] or equivalent variants). In univariate and multivariate analyses, stage IV disease and age ≥ 45 years were the only factors with independent predictive significance for overall survival (OS) (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). Stage IV was still significant for freedom from progression (FFP) (p = 0.001) and age ≥ 45 years was borderline significant (p = 0.058). IPS separates prognostic groups, as in the original publication, but this is mainly due to the high statistical significance of stage IV and age ≥ 45 years. Moreover, the combination of these two factors enables a simpler system to be constructed that separates groups with different FFP and OS. In conclusion, in our series, stage IV and age ≥ 45 years are the key prognostic factors for the outcome of advanced cHL.

  1. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  2. The Zero-Degree Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Christl, Mark J.; Howell, Leonard W.; Kouznetsov, Evgueni

    2006-01-01

    We will report on a detector system used for accelerator measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross sections. This system consists of two detector planes, each carrying a ring of 8 detectors. Each detector has 64 pads. These two detector planes are arranged facing each other so that the matching detector pads on each plane form a two element charged particle telescope. Each of these telescopes is capable of determining the elemental identity of nuclear fragments passing through it. The system is used to measure light fragment production in the presence of heavier fragments. We will present a detailed discussion of the 64-pad detector design, the substrate design. The front-end electronics used to read out the signals is based on a custom VLSI chip developed for the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter experiment which has been flown successfully twice in Antarctica. Each of these chips has 16 channels and each channel consists of a charge-sensitive preamplifier followed by a shaping amplifier and a track-and-hold circuit. The track-and-hold circuits are connected via a multiplexer to an output line driver. This allows the held signals to be presented, one-by-one via a common data line to a analog-to-digital converter. Because the output line driver can be placed in a high input impedance state when not in use, it is possible to daisy-change many chips on the same common data line. The front-end electronics and data readout scheme will be discussed in detail. The Zero Degree Detector has been used in several accelerator experiments conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory as well as at the HIMAC accelerator in Japan. We will show examples of data taken at these accelerator runs to demonstrate how the system works.

  3. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  4. Final Report for the UNIVERSITY-BASED DETECTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2013-04-22

    The U.S Linear Collider Detector R&D program, supported by the DOE and NSF umbrella grants to the University of Oregon, made significant advances on many critical aspects of the ILC detector program. Progress advanced on vertex detector sensor development, silicon and TPC tracking, calorimetry on candidate technologies, and muon detection, as well as on beamline measurements of luminosity, energy, and polarization.

  5. Front End Spectroscopy ASIC for Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Eric

    Large-area, tracking, semiconductor detectors with excellent spatial and spectral resolution enable exciting new access to soft (0.2-5 MeV) gamma-ray astrophysics. The improvements from semiconductor tracking detectors come with the burden of high density of strips and/or pixels that require high-density, low-power, spectroscopy quality readout electronics. CMOS ASIC technologies are a natural fit to this requirement and have led to high-quality readout systems for all current semiconducting tracking detectors except for germanium detectors. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), formerly NCT, at University of California Berkeley and the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) at Goddard Space Flight Center utilize germanium cross-strip detectors and are on the forefront of NASA's Compton telescope research with funded missions of long duration balloon flights. The development of a readout ASIC for germanium detectors would allow COSI to replace their discrete electronics readout and would enable the proposed Gamma-Ray Explorer (GRX) mission utilizing germanium strip-detectors. We propose a 3-year program to develop and test a germanium readout ASIC to TRL 5 and to integrate the ASIC readout onto a COSI detector allowing a TRL 6 demonstration for the following COSI balloon flight. Our group at NRL led a program, sponsored by another government agency, to produce and integrate a cross-strip silicon detector ASIC, designed and fabricated by Dr. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ASIC was designed to handle the large (>30 pF) capacitance of three 10 cm^2 detectors daisy-chained together. The front-end preamplifier, selectable inverter, shaping times, and gains make this ASIC compatible with a germanium cross-strip detector as well. We therefore have the opportunity and expertise to leverage the previous investment in the silicon ASIC for a new mission. A germanium strip detector ASIC will also require precise timing of the signals at

  6. Topological detector: measuring continuous dosimetric quantities with few-element detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaohui; Brivio, Davide; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    A prototype topological detector was fabricated and investigated for quality assurance of radiation producing medical devices. Unlike a typical array or flat panel detector, a topological detector, while capable of achieving a very high spatial resolution, consists of only a few elements and therefore is much simpler in construction and more cost effective. The key feature allowing this advancement is a geometry-driven design that is customized for a specific dosimetric application. In the current work, a topological detector of two elements was examined for the positioning verification of the radiation collimating devices (jaws, MLCs, and blades etc). The detector was diagonally segmented from a rectangular thin film strip (2.5 cm  ×  15 cm), giving two contiguous but independent detector elements. The segmented area was the central portion of the strip measuring 5 cm in length. Under irradiation, signals from each detector element were separately digitized using a commercial multichannel data acquisition system. The center and size of an x-ray field, which were uniquely determined by the collimator positions, were shown mathematically to relate to the difference and sum of the two signals. As a proof of concept, experiments were carried out using slit x-ray fields ranging from 2 mm to 20 mm in size. It was demonstrated that, the collimator positions can be accurately measured with sub-millimeter precisions.

  7. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software%u2013Detector Response Function

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 GADRAS-DRF contains a suite of capabilities related to radiation detection. Its primary function is the simulation of gamma-ray and neutron detector signals to radiation sources. It also contains limited analysis functionality. GADRAS-DRF is the public version of the full version of GADRAS with capabilities such as radiation transport and advanced analyses removed.

  8. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  9. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  10. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  11. Particle impact location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.

    1974-01-01

    Detector includes delay lines connected to each detector surface strip. When several particles strike different strips simultaneously, pulses generated by each strip are time delayed by certain intervals. Delay time for each strip is known. By observing time delay in pulse, it is possible to locate strip that is struck by particle.

  12. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  13. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  14. Cable-splice detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.; Iufer, E. J.; Giovannetti, A.

    1980-01-01

    Detector has possible uses in aerial cable-car systems, equipment handling in mines, boreholes, and undersea operations, and other applications where moving steel cable must be measured, monitored, or controlled. Detector consists of Hall-effect magnetic sensor located close to cable. Magnetic markings on cable are converted to electrical signals. Signals are filtered, amplified, and can actuate alarm.

  15. Optical proximity detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, W. A.; Johnston, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    Sensitive, relatively inexpensive instrument uses phase-detection techniques to sense presence of objects. Phase-sensitive detectors, LED, photodiode with response matched to LED output, and filtering lens allow detector to operate over narrow radiation band, giving selectivity over stray light.

  16. Advanced Infrared Photodetectors (Materials Review)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    rays by reducing the effective detector area (9]. The lens structure also offers a measure of mechanical protection. 2.3.2 Electronic non...ib.itio’ý I by Availability Codes Philip J. Picone Avail and/ornDist Special SUMMARY The present status of advanced infrared semiconductor detector materials... POSTAL ADDRESS: Director, Surveillance Research Laboratory, PO Box 1500, Salisbury, South Australia, 5108. SRL.0117-RR UNCLASSIFIED SRL - 0117 - RR

  17. The PERDaix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Andreas; Beischer, Bastian; Greim, Roman; Kirn, Thomas; Mai, Carsten; Yearwood, Gregorio Roper; Schael, Stefan; Schug, David; Tholen, Heiner; Wienkenhöver, Jens

    2012-12-01

    The PERDaix (Proton Electron Radiation Detector Aix-la-Chapelle) detector is designed to measure charged particles in cosmic rays. It can distinguish particle species up to 5 GV rigidity. PERDaix was flown on the BEXUS-11 balloon on 23rd November 2010. The detector has the dimensions of 246×400×859 mm3, a geometrical acceptance of 32 cm2sr, a low weight of 40 kg and a low power consumption of 60 W. The spectrometer consists of a time-of-flight system, a scintillating fiber tracking detector, a permanent magnet and a transition radiation detector. Silicon photomultipliers are used as photodetectors in the time-of-flight and the tracker system.

  18. Optimal optoacoustic detector design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengren, L.-G.

    1975-01-01

    Optoacoustic detectors are used to measure pressure changes occurring in enclosed gases, liquids, or solids being excited by intensity or frequency modulated electromagnetic radiation. Radiation absorption spectra, collisional relaxation rates, substance compositions, and reactions can be determined from the time behavior of these pressure changes. Very successful measurements of gaseous air pollutants have, for instance, been performed by using detectors of this type together with different lasers. The measuring instrument consisting of radiation source, modulator, optoacoustic detector, etc. is often called spectrophone. In the present paper, a thorough optoacoustic detector optimization analysis based upon a review of its theory of operation is introduced. New quantitative rules and suggestions explaining how to design detectors with maximal pressure responsivity and over-all sensitivity and minimal background signal are presented.

  19. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  20. Phase 1 Study of Pazopanib in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors and Hepatic Dysfunction: A National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Stephen I; Chung, Vincent; Synold, Timothy; Longmate, Jeffrey; Suttle, A Benjamin; Ottesen, Lone H; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Kummar, Shivaani; Harvey, R Donald; Hamilton, Anne; O’Neil, Bert; Sarantopoulos, John; LoRusso, Patricia; Rudek, Michelle A; Dowlati, Afshin; Mulkerin, Daniel; Belani, Chandra P.; Gandhi, Leena; Lau, Cecilia; Ivy, S. Percy; Newman, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pazopanib is a potent, multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor; however, there is limited information regarding the effects of liver function on pazopanib metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK). The objective of this study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and PK profile of pazopanib in patients with varying degrees of hepatic dysfunction. Experimental Design Patients with any solid tumors or lymphoma were stratified into four groups based on the degree of hepatic dysfunction according to the National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group (NCI ODWG) criteria. Pazopanib was given orally once a day on a 21-day cycle. A modified 3+3 design was used. Results Ninety eight patients were enrolled. Patients in the mild group tolerated 800 mg per day. The moderate and severe groups tolerated 200 mg per day. Pharmacokinetic data in the mild group were similar to the data in the normal group. Comparison of the median Cmax and AUC(0–24) in the moderate or severe groups at 200 mg per day to the values in the normal and mild groups at 800 mg per day indicated less than dose-proportional systemic exposures in patients with moderate and severe hepatic impairment. This suggests that the lower MTD in the moderate and severe group is not due to a decrease in drug clearance or alteration in the proportion of metabolites. Conclusions In patients with mild liver dysfunction, pazopanib is well tolerated at the FDA-approved dose of 800 mg per day. Patients with moderate and severe liver dysfunction tolerated 200 mg per day. PMID:23653147

  1. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    de Masson, Adèle; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Aubin, François; Garciaz, Sylvain; d'Incan, Michel; Dereure, Olivier; Dalle, Stéphane; Dompmartin, Anne; Suarez, Felipe; Battistella, Maxime; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Rivet, Jacqueline; Adamski, Henri; Brice, Pauline; François, Sylvie; Lissandre, Séverine; Turlure, Pascal; Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa; Brissot, Eolia; Dulery, Rémy; Servais, Sophie; Ravinet, Aurélie; Tabrizi, Reza; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Joly, Pascal; Socié, Gérard; Bagot, Martine

    2014-03-01

    The treatment of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas remains challenging. In particular, large-cell transformation of mycosis fungoides is associated with a median overall survival of two years for all stages taken together. Little is known regarding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this context. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 37 cases of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including 20 (54%) transformed mycosis fungoides. Twenty-four patients (65%) had stage IV disease (for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome) or disseminated nodal or visceral involvement (for non-epidermotropic primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas). After a median follow up of 29 months, 19 patients experienced a relapse, leading to a 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 56% (95%CI: 0.38-0.74). Estimated 2-year overall survival was 57% (95%CI: 0.41-0.77) and progression-free survival 31% (95%CI: 0.19-0.53). Six of 19 patients with a post-transplant relapse achieved a subsequent complete remission after salvage therapy, with a median duration of 41 months. A weak residual tumor burden before transplantation was associated with increased progression-free survival (HR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.1-0.8; P=0.01). The use of antithymocyte globulin significantly reduced progression-free survival (HR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.3-6.2; P=0.01) but also transplant-related mortality (HR=10(-7), 95%CI: 4.10(-8)-2.10(-7); P<0.001) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the use of antithymocyte globulin was the only factor significantly associated with decreased progression-free survival (P=0.04). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including transformed mycosis fungoides.

  2. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  3. Using NAI detectors for tomographic gamma scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Melton, S.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examined two approaches for using NaI detectors to perform transmission corrections used in the tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) and segmented gamma scanner (SGS) nondestructive assay methods. They found that a material-basis-set (MBS) fit using empirical logarithmic response spectra is quite accurate. Because this is a gross count technique, it gives sensitivities (for equal numbers of detectors) that are roughly ten times better than those obtained using Germanium detectors. The authors also found that simple continuum subtraction can be used in MBS fits using the energy-group-analysis technique only when the Pu transmission is greater than 10%. Both approaches for using NaI detectors require a knowledge of the Pu (or other) isotopics to obtain full accuracy.

  4. LIGO-India: expanding the international network of gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Balasubramanian

    2015-04-01

    The first detection of Gravitational Waves (GW) by ground based detectors will open up a fundamentally new observational window to the Universe with implications for astrophysics and eventually cosmology and fundamental physics. The realization of GW astronomy requires a global network of Advanced GW detectors including upcoming observatories like KAGRA (Japan) and LIGO-India to provide good sky localization of the GW sources. LIGO-India is expected to play a key role in locating and deciphering the sources contributing to the GW symphony. The current status of LIGO-India project and the exciting future research opportunities of this ambitious Indo-US collaboration in science, technology and computation will be finally indicated. Acknowledge CISA and APS for the Award of a APS Beller Lectureship. BRI supported by the AIRBUS Group Corporate Foundation through a visiting professorship, which is part of the ``Mathematics of Complex Systems'' chair at ICTS.

  5. The Advanced LIGO photon calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, S.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Kandhasamy, S.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Anders, E. H.; Berliner, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Cahillane, C.; Canete, L.; Conley, C.; Daveloza, H. P.; De Lillo, N.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Quetschke, V.; Rodruck, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Schwinberg, P. B.; Sottile, A.; Wade, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; West, M.; Savage, R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The two interferometers of the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves from the mergers of binary black hole systems. Accurate calibration of the output of these detectors was crucial for the observation of these events and the extraction of parameters of the sources. The principal tools used to calibrate the responses of the second-generation (Advanced) LIGO detectors to gravitational waves are systems based on radiation pressure and referred to as photon calibrators. These systems, which were completely redesigned for Advanced LIGO, include several significant upgrades that enable them to meet the calibration requirements of second-generation gravitational wave detectors in the new era of gravitational-wave astronomy. We report on the design, implementation, and operation of these Advanced LIGO photon calibrators that are currently providing fiducial displacements on the order of 1 0-18m /√{Hz } with accuracy and precision of better than 1%.

  6. Shortened intensified multi-agent chemotherapy and non-cross resistant maintenance therapy for advanced lymphoblastic lymphoma in children and adolescents: report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Abromowitch, Minnie; Sposto, Richard; Perkins, Sherrie; Zwick, David; Siegel, Stuart; Finlay, Jonathan; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2008-10-01

    Pediatric lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) has utilized treatment strategies similar to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with prolonged maintenance chemotherapy. We report the results of a pilot study to estimate the feasibility, toxicity and efficacy of a 12-month aggressive multi-agent chemotherapy regimen in children and adolescents with advanced LL. Between July 1994 and June 1997, 85 eligible children and adolescents with advanced LL (Stage III/IV) were enrolled on this pilot study. Patients achieving a complete response following induction and consolidation received six cycles of maintenance chemotherapy for a total duration of 12 months. Grade III/IV toxicities included: hematological (80%), infections (20%), stomatitis and elevated transaminases, (29%). There were a total of 19 events, 13 relapses, two secondary acute myeloid leukaemia and four toxic deaths (5%). The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) was 78 +/- 4.5% and 85 +/- 3.9%, respectively. Relapsed patients had a 5-year OS of only 33 +/- 14%. Multivariate analysis failed to demonstrate age, gender, lactate dehydrogenase level, presence of marrow and/or central nervous system disease to have independent prognostic value. These results suggest that this experimental approach is safe and results in similar outcomes as more prolonged childhood ALL regimens.

  7. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Bouaziz, Jean-David; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Aubin, François; Garciaz, Sylvain; d’Incan, Michel; Dereure, Olivier; Dalle, Stéphane; Dompmartin, Anne; Suarez, Felipe; Battistella, Maxime; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Rivet, Jacqueline; Adamski, Henri; Brice, Pauline; François, Sylvie; Lissandre, Séverine; Turlure, Pascal; Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa; Brissot, Eolia; Dulery, Rémy; Servais, Sophie; Ravinet, Aurélie; Tabrizi, Reza; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Joly, Pascal; Socié, Gérard; Bagot, Martine

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas remains challenging. In particular, large-cell transformation of mycosis fungoides is associated with a median overall survival of two years for all stages taken together. Little is known regarding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this context. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 37 cases of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including 20 (54%) transformed mycosis fungoides. Twenty-four patients (65%) had stage IV disease (for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome) or disseminated nodal or visceral involvement (for non-epidermotropic primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas). After a median follow up of 29 months, 19 patients experienced a relapse, leading to a 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 56% (95%CI: 0.38–0.74). Estimated 2-year overall survival was 57% (95%CI: 0.41–0.77) and progression-free survival 31% (95%CI: 0.19–0.53). Six of 19 patients with a post-transplant relapse achieved a subsequent complete remission after salvage therapy, with a median duration of 41 months. A weak residual tumor burden before transplantation was associated with increased progression-free survival (HR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.1–0.8; P=0.01). The use of antithymocyte globulin significantly reduced progression-free survival (HR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.3–6.2; P=0.01) but also transplant-related mortality (HR=10−7, 95%CI: 4.10−8–2.10−7; P<0.001) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the use of antithymocyte globulin was the only factor significantly associated with decreased progression-free survival (P=0.04). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including transformed mycosis fungoides. PMID:24213148

  8. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  9. The Belle II Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piilonen, Leo; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II detector is now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. This project represents a substantial upgrade of the Belle detector (and the KEKB accelerator). The Belle II experiment will record 50 ab-1 of data, a factor of 50 more than that recorded by Belle. This large data set, combined with the low backgrounds and high trigger efficiencies characteristic of an e+e- experiment, should provide unprecedented sensitivity to new physics signatures in B and D meson decays, and in τ lepton decays. The detector comprises many forefront subsystems. The vertex detector consists of two inner layers of silicon DEPFET pixels and four outer layers of double-sided silicon strips. These layers surround a beryllium beam pipe having a radius of only 10 mm. Outside of the vertex detector is a large-radius, small-cell drift chamber, an ``imaging time-of-propagation'' detector based on Cerenkov radiation for particle identification, and scintillating fibers and resistive plate chambers used to identify muons. The detector will begin commissioning in 2017.

  10. Randomized Phase III Trial of ABVD Versus Stanford V With or Without Radiation Therapy in Locally Extensive and Advanced-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: An Intergroup Study Coordinated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (E2496)

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Leo I.; Hong, Fangxin; Fisher, Richard I.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Connors, Joseph M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Wagner, Henry; Stiff, Patrick J.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Advani, Ranjana; Kahl, Brad S.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Blum, Kristie A.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Tuscano, Joseph M.; Hoppe, Richard T.; Horning, Sandra J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) has been established as the standard of care in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, newer regimens have been investigated, which have appeared superior in early phase II studies. Our aim was to determine if failure-free survival was superior in patients treated with the Stanford V regimen compared with ABVD. Patients and Methods The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, along with the Cancer and Leukemia Group B, the Southwest Oncology Group, and the Canadian NCIC Clinical Trials Group, conducted this randomized phase III trial in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma. Stratification factors included extent of disease (localized v extensive) and International Prognostic Factors Project Score (0 to 2 v 3 to 7). The primary end point was failure-free survival (FFS), defined as the time from random assignment to progression, relapse, or death, whichever occurred first. Overall survival, a secondary end point, was measured from random assignment to death as a result of any cause. This design provided 87% power to detect a 33% reduction in FFS hazard rate, or a difference in 5-year FFS of 64% versus 74% at two-sided .05 significance level. Results There was no significant difference in the overall response rate between the two arms, with complete remission and clinical complete remission rates of 73% for ABVD and 69% for Stanford V. At a median follow-up of 6.4 years, there was no difference in FFS: 74% for ABVD and 71% for Stanford V at 5 years (P = .32). Conclusion ABVD remains the standard of care for patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:23182987

  11. Risk Factors for GI Adverse Events in a Phase III Randomized Trial of Bevacizumab in First-Line Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Robert A.; Brady, Mark F.; Bookman, Michael A.; Monk, Bradley J.; Walker, Joan L.; Homesley, Howard D.; Fowler, Jeffrey; Greer, Benjamin E.; Boente, Matthew; Fleming, Gini F.; Lim, Peter C.; Rubin, Stephen C.; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Liang, Sharon X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate risk factors for GI adverse events (AEs) within a phase III trial of bevacizumab in first-line ovarian cancer therapy. Patients and Methods Women with previously untreated advanced disease after surgery were randomly allocated to six cycles of platinum-taxane chemotherapy plus placebo cycles (C)2 to C22 (R1); chemotherapy plus bevacizumab C2 to C6 plus placebo C7 to C22 (R2); or chemotherapy plus bevacizumab C2 to C22 (R3). Patients were evaluated for history or on-study development of potential risk factors for GI AEs defined as grade ≥ 2 perforation, fistula, necrosis, or hemorrhage. Results Of 1,873 patients enrolled, 1,759 (94%) were evaluable, and 2.8% (50 of 1,759) experienced a GI AE: 10 of 587 (1.7%, R1), 20 of 587 (3.4%, R2), and 20 of 585 (3.4%, R3). Univariable analyses indicated that previous treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P = .005) and small bowel resection (SBR; P = .032) or large bowel resection (LBR; P = .012) at primary surgery were significantly associated with a GI AE. The multivariable estimated relative odds of a GI AE were 13.4 (95% CI, 3.44 to 52.3; P < .001) for IBD; 2.05 (95% CI, 1.09 to 3.88; P = .026) for LBR; 1.95 (95% CI, 0.894 to 4.25; P = .093) for SBR; and 2.15 for bevacizumab exposure (aggregated 95% CI, 1.05 to 4.40; P = .036). Conclusion History of treatment for IBD, and bowel resection at primary surgery, increase the odds of GI AEs in patients receiving first-line platinum-taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer. After accounting for these risk factors, concurrent bevacizumab doubles the odds of a GI AE, but is not appreciably increased by continuation beyond chemotherapy. PMID:24637999

  12. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  13. Advancing allele group-specific amplification of the complete HLA-C gene--isolation of novel alleles from three allele groups (C*04, C*07 and C*08).

    PubMed

    Cisneros, E; Martínez-Pomar, N; Vilches, M; Martín, P; de Pablo, R; Nuñez Del Prado, N; Nieto, A; Matamoros, N; Moraru, M; Vilches, C

    2013-10-01

    A variety of strategies have been designed for sequence-based HLA typing (SBT) and for the isolation of new human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, but unambiguous characterization of complete genomic sequences remains a challenge. We recently reported a simple method for the group-specific amplification (GSA) and sequencing of a full-length C*04 genomic sequence in isolation from the accompanying allele. Here we build on this strategy and present homologous methods that enable the isolation of HLA-C alleles belonging to another two allele groups. Using this approach, which can be applied to sequence-based typing in some clinical settings, we have successfully characterized three novel HLA-C alleles (C*04:128, C*07:01:01:02, and C*08:62).

  14. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  15. Flat detectors and their clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Martin

    2005-09-01

    Diagnostic and interventional flat detector X-ray systems are penetrating the market in all application segments. First introduced in radiography and mammography, they have conquered cardiac and general angiography and are getting increasing attention in fluoroscopy. Two flat detector technologies prevail. The dominating method is based on an indirect X-ray conversion process, using cesium iodide scintillators. It offers considerable advantages in radiography, angiography and fluoroscopy. The other method employs a direct converter such as selenium which is particularly suitable for mammography. Both flat detector technologies are based on amorphous silicon active pixel matrices. Flat detectors facilitate the clinical workflow in radiographic rooms, foster improved image quality and provide the potential to reduce dose. This added value is based on their large dynamic range, their high sensitivity to X-rays and the instant availability of the image. Advanced image processing is instrumental in these improvements and expand the range of conventional diagnostic methods. In angiography and fluoroscopy the transition from image intensifiers to flat detectors is facilitated by ample advantages they offer, such as distortion-free images, excellent coarse contrast, large dynamic range and high X-ray sensitivity. These characteristics and their compatibility with strong magnetic fields are the basis for improved diagnostic methods and innovative interventional applications.

  16. Pelvic Lymph Node Status Assessed by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Low-Risk Group for Distant Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sokbom; Park, Jung-Yeol; Lim, Myung-Chul; Song, Yong-Joong; Park, Se-Hyun; Kim, Seok-Ki; Chung, Dae-Chul; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a prediction model to identify a low-risk group for distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Prospectively, 62 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were recruited as a training cohort. Clinical variables and parameters obtained from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed by logistic regression. For the test set, 54 patients were recruited independently. To identify the low-risk group, negative likelihood ratio (LR) less than 0.2 was set to be a cutoff. Results: Among the training cohort, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and a high serum squamous cancer cell (SCC) antigen level were significant risk factors (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively). Using the two parameters, criteria to determine a low-risk subset for distant recurrence were postulated: (1) FIGO Stage IIB or less and (2) pretreatment SCC < 2.4 (Model A). Positive pelvic node on PET completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and thus was considered as another prediction model (Model B). In the test cohort, although Model A did not showed diagnostic performance, Model B completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and showed a sensitivity of 100% with negative LR of 0. Across the training and test cohort (n = 116), the false negative rate was 0 (95% confidence interval 0%-7.6%). Conclusions: Positive pelvic node on PET is a useful marker in prediction of distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who are treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  17. Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors for the Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Stock, J.; Marsh, D.

    1992-01-01

    There has been significant progress over the last few years in the development of technologies for microchannel plate imaging detectors in the Ultraviolet (UV). Areas where significant developments have occurred include enhancements of quantum detection efficiency through improved photocathodes, advances in microchannel plate performance characteristics, and development of high performance image readout techniques. The current developments in these areas are summarized, with their applications in astrophysical instrumentation.

  18. Study of improved resins for advanced supersonic technology composites. Part 1: Heteroaromatic polymers containing ether groups. Part 2: Curing chemistry of aromatic polymers and composite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takekoshi, T.; Hillig, W. B.; Mellinger, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Fourteen ether-containing, aromatic dianhydrides have been synthesized from N-phenyl-3 or 4-nitrophthalimide and various bisphenols. The process involves nucleophilic displacement of activated nitro groups with bisphenolate ions. Ether-containing dianhydrides were indefinitely stable in the presence of atmospheric moisture. One-step, high temperature solution polymerization of the ether-containing dianhydrides with m-phenylene diamine, 4,4'-oxydianiline and 1, 3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene afforded 42 polyetherimides. The polyetherimides were all soluble in m-cresol except two which were found to be crystalline. The glass transition temperatures of the polyetherimides ranged from 178 to 277 C. Soluble polybenzimidazopyrrolones containing ether groups were also prepared from the same ether-containing dianhydrides and aromatic tetraamines by one-step solution polymerization. Using low molecular weight polyetherimides, various thermoset resin systems were developed and tested as matrices for fiber-reinforced composites. The curing chemistry involving reaction of the phthalonitrile group and the o-diaminophenyl group was found to be generally applicable to crosslinking various aromatic polymers other than polyimides.

  19. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  20. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas; Klann, Raymond

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  1. Modular optical detector system

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Brent A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  2. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  3. Inverter ratio failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  4. Lightning Current Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Lightning Current Detector (LCD) was developed to monitor the magnitude of lightning strikes. Information it supplies is useful in evaluating lightning protection designs for such systems as telephone cables, radio broadcast towers, power transmission equipment and oil well towers.

  5. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  6. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  7. PHENIX detector overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcox, K.; Adler, S. S.; Aizama, M.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akikawa, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Allen, M.; Alley, G.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Arai, Y.; Archuleta, J. B.; Archuleta, J. R.; Armendariz, R.; Armijo, V.; Aronson, S. H.; Autrey, D.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Baldisseri, A.; Banning, J.; Barish, K. N.; Barker, A. B.; Barnes, P. D.; Barrette, J.; Barta, F.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V. V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Begay, R.; Behrendt, J.; Belikov, S.; Belkin, R.; Bellaiche, F. G.; Belyaev, S. T.; Bennett, M. J.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhaganatula, S.; Biggs, J. C.; Bland, A. W.; Blume, C.; Bobrek, M.; Boissevain, J. G.; Boose, S.; Borel, H.; Borland, D.; Bosze, E.; Botelho, S.; Bowers, J.; Britton, C.; Britton, L.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, A. W.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bryan, W. L.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J.; Butsyk, S. A.; Cafferty, M. M.; Carey, T. A.; Chai, J. S.; Chand, P.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chappell, R. B.; Chavez, L. L.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Chollet, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christ, T.; Chujo, T.; Chung, M. S.; Chung, P.; Cianciolo, V.; Clark, D. J.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; Conway, R.; Cook, K. C.; Crook, D. W.; Cunitz, H.; Cunningham, R.; Cutshaw, M.; D'Enterria, D. G.; Dabrowski, C. M.; Danby, G.; Daniels, S.; Danmura, A.; David, G.; Debraine, A.; Delagrange, H.; Demoss, J.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dinesh, B. V.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Ebisu, K.; Echave, M. A.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Emery, M. S.; Engo, D.; Enokizono, A.; Enosawa, K.; En'yo, H.; Ericson, N.; Esumi, S.; Evseev, V. A.; Ewell, L.; Fackler, O.; Fellenstein, J.; Ferdousi, T.; Ferrierra, J.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frank, S.; Franz, A.; Frantz, J. E.; Frawley, A. D.; Fried, J.; Freidberg, J. P.; Fujisawa, E.; Funahashi, H.; Fung, S.-Y.; Gadrat, S.; Gannon, J.; Garpman, S.; Gastaldi, F.; Gee, T. F.; Gentry, R.; Ghosh, T. K.; Giannotti, P.; Glenn, A.; Godoi, A. L.; Gonin, M.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Greene, S. V.; Griffin, V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gupta, S. K.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, S.; Halliwell, J.; Hamagaki, H.; Hance, R. H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hara, H.; Harder, J.; Hart, G. W.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, A.; Hawkins, L.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayashi, H.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heine, N.; Heistermann, F.; Held, S.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hicks, J. S.; Higuchi, R.; Hill, J. C.; Hirano, T.; Ho, D. S.; Hoade, R.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Honaguchi, T.; Hunter, C. T.; Hurst, D. E.; Hutter, R.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M. S.; Davis Isenhower, L.; Donald Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanov, V. I.; Jacak, B. V.; Jackson, G.; Jackson, J.; Jaffe, D.; Jagadish, U.; Jang, W. Y.; Jayakumar, R.; Jia, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, S. C.; Jones, J. P.; Jones, K.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kandasamy, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kann, M. R.; Kapoor, S. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karadjev, K. V.; Kashikhin, V.; Kato, S.; Katou, K.; Kehayias, H.-J.; Kelley, M. A.; Kelly, S.; Kennedy, M.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Khomutnikov, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.-W.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Klinksiek, S.; Kluberg, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Komkov, B. G.; Kopytine, M. L.; Koseki, K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotchetkov, D.; Koutcheryaev, Iou. A.; Kozlov, A.; Kozlov, V. S.; Kravtsov, P. A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kudin, L. G.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Kuriatkov, V. V.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Labounty, J. J.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lebedev, V. A.; Lebedev, V. D.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Lenz, M.; Lenz, W.; Li, X. H.; Li, Z.; Libby, B.; Libkind, M.; Liccardi, W.; Lim, D. J.; Lin, S.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockner, E.; Longbotham, N.; Lopez, J. D.; Machnowski, R.; Maguire, C. F.; Mahon, J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Marino, S.; Mark, S. K.; Markacs, S.; Markushin, D. G.; Martinez, G.; Martinez, X. B.; Marx, M. D.; Masaike, A.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; McCain, M. C.; Mead, J.; Melnikov, E.; Melnikov, Y.; Meng, W. Z.; Merschmeyer, M.; Messer, F.; Messer, M.; Miake, Y.; Miftakhov, N. M.; Migluolio, S.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Minuzzo, K.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montoya, B. C.; Moore, A.; Moore, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moscone, G. G.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Murray, M. M.; Musrock, M.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakada, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Negrin, J.; Newby, J.; Nikkinen, L.; Nikolaev, S. A.; Nilsson, P.; Nishimura, S.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; O'Conner, P.; Obenshain, F.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Paffrath, L.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pancake, C. E.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Petersen, R.; Petridis, A. N.; Pinkenburg, C. H.; Pisani, R. P.; Pitukhin, P.; Plagge, T.; Plasil, F.; Pollack, M.; Pope, K.; Prigl, R.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qualls, J. M.; Rankowitz, S.; Rao, G.; Rao, R.; Rau, M.; Ravinovich, I.; Raynis, R.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, G.; Riabov, V. G.; Riabov, Yu. G.; Robinson, S. H.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Roschin, E. V.; Rose, A. A.; Rosnet, P.; Roth, R.; Ruggiero, R.; Ryu, S. S.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sako, H.; Sakuma, T.; Salomone, S.; Samsonov, V. M.; Sandhoff, W. F.; Sanfratello, L.; Sangster, T. C.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Savino, R.; Sawada, S.; Schlei, B. R.; Schleuter, R.; Schutz, Y.; Sekimoto, M.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Severgin, Y.; Shajii, A.; Shangin, V.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shelikhov, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Shimada, T.; Shin, Y. H.; Sibiriak, I. G.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Simpson, M.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sippach, W.; Sivertz, M.; Skank, H. D.; Skutnik, S.; Sleege, G. A.; Smith, D. C.; Smith, G. D.; Smith, M.; Soldatov, A.; Solodov, G. P.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S.; Sourikova, I.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Starinsky, N.; Steffens, S.; Stein, E. M.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stewering, J.; Stokes, W.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugioka, M.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sumi, Y.; Sun, Z.; Suzuki-Nara, M.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taniguchi, E.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarakanov, V. I.; Tarasenkova, O. P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thern, R.; Thomas, J. H.; Thomas, J. L.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, W. D.; Thornton, G. W.; Tian, W.; Todd, R.; Tojo, J.; Toldo, F.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tradeski, J.; Trofimov, V. A.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tsvetkov, A. A.; Tuli, S. K.; Turner, G.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Urasawa, S.; Usachev, A.; Ushiroda, T.; van Hecke, H. W.; van Lith, M.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Vasiliev, V.; Vassent, M.; Velissaris, C.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Verhoeven, W.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Vishnevskii, V. I.; Volkov, M. A.; von Achen, W.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vznuzdaev, E. A.; Vznuzdaev, M.; Walker, J. W.; Wan, Y.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Watkins, L. C.; Weimer, T.; White, S. N.; Whitus, B. R.; Williams, C.; Willis, P. S.; Wintenberg, A. L.; Witzig, C.; Wohn, F. K.; Wolniewicz, K.; Wong-Swanson, B. G.; Wood, L.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, L. W.; Wu, J.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Yagi, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Yang, Y.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yokota, Y.; Yoneyama, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, S.; Phenix Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The PHENIX detector is designed to perform a broad study of A-A, p-A, and p-p collisions to investigate nuclear matter under extreme conditions. A wide variety of probes, sensitive to all timescales, are used to study systematic variations with species and energy as well as to measure the spin structure of the nucleon. Designing for the needs of the heavy-ion and polarized-proton programs has produced a detector with unparalleled capabilities. PHENIX measures electron and muon pairs, photons, and hadrons with excellent energy and momentum resolution. The detector consists of a large number of subsystems that are discussed in other papers in this volume. The overall design parameters of the detector are presented.

  8. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  9. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  10. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  11. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  12. Consensus on the management of advanced radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer on behalf of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology Thyroid Cancer Working Group (GTSEEN) and Spanish Rare Cancer Working Group (GETHI).

    PubMed

    Capdevila, J; Galofré, J C; Grande, E; Zafón Llopis, C; Ramón Y Cajal Asensio, T; Navarro González, E; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; Santamaría Sandi, J; Gómez Sáez, J M; Riesco Eizaguirre, G

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the single most prevalent endocrine malignancy; differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) accounts for more than 90 % of all malignancies and its incidence has been rising steadily. For more patients, surgical treatment, radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy achieve an overall survival (OS) rate of 97.7 % at 5 years. Nevertheless, locoregional recurrence occurs in up to 20 % and distant metastases in approximately 10 % at 10 years. Two-thirds of these patients will never be cured with radioactive iodine therapy and will become RAI-refractory, with a 3-year OS rate of less than 50 %. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made in the management of RAI-refractory DTC. Given the controversy in some areas, the Spanish Task Force for Thyroid Cancer on behalf of Spanish Society of Endocrinology Thyroid Cancer Working Group (GTSEEN) and the Spanish Rare Cancer Working Group (GETHI) have created a national joint task force to reach a consensus addressing the most challenging aspects of management in these patients. In this way, multidisciplinary management should be mandatory and nuclear medicine targeted therapy, novel molecular targeted agents, and combinations are currently changing the natural history of RAI-refractory DTC.

  13. Fetal blood group genotyping from DNA from maternal plasma: an important advance in the management and prevention of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G; Finning, K; Martin, P; Soothill, P

    2004-11-01

    The cloning of blood group genes and subsequent identification of the molecular bases of blood group polymorphisms has made it possible to predict blood group phenotypes from DNA with a reasonable degree of accuracy. The major application of this technology, which has now become the standard of care, is the determination of a fetal RHD genotype in women with anti-D, to assess whether the fetus is at risk of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Initially, the procurement of fetal DNA required the invasive procedures of amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Since the discovery of fetal DNA in maternal plasma in 1997, the technology of detecting an RHD gene in this very small quantity of fetal DNA has developed rapidly, so that non-invasive fetal D typing can now be provided as a diagnostic service for D-negative pregnant women with anti-D. Within a few years, it is probable that fetuses of all D-negative pregnant women will be tested for RHD, to establish whether the mother requires antenatal anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis.

  14. Design and endpoints of clinical and translational trials in advanced colorectal cancer. a proposal from GROUP Español Multidisciplinar en Cancer Digestivo (GEMCAD).

    PubMed

    Carrera, Gemma; Garcia-Albeniz, Xabier; Ayuso, Juan Ramón; Aparicio, Jorge; Castells, Antoni; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Feliu, Jaime; Fuster, David; Gallego, Rosa; Pagés, Mario; Torres, Ferran; Maurel, Joan

    2011-05-01

    Meta-analytic reviews of Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) have reached contradictory conclusions regarding the benefit of medical interventions in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ACRC). Surrogate markers of survival benefit, such as response rate (RR) and progression free-survival (PFS) often show contradictory and highly variable correlations. These contradictions can be due to differences in 1) the studies analysed (sources), 2) the quality of clinical trials (intrinsic bias in the design, biased data analysis, heterogeneous PFS definitions) and 3) the second-line strategies between arms. PFS is a more vulnerable target than overall survival (OS), but the latter can also be affected by different biases and additional medical interventions such as secondary resection of metastases or second-line therapies. Therefore the correlation between PFS and survival must be clearly stated if PFS is to be considered as a primary endpoint. Of the differences between studies, only the quality of clinical trials can be improved by a deeper knowledge of both the area of study (i.e. colorectal cancer) and the methodology needed (i.e., clinical and translational trials). The aim of this manuscript is to offer the basic resources to develop experimental trials in ACRC. To this end, techniques for diagnosis and for response assessment are discussed, prognostic factors and treatment standards are critically exposed, and notes about how to design useful translational studies are provided.

  15. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  16. The Belle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Morgan, N.; Piilonen, L.; Schrenk, S.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Alexander, J. P.; Aoki, K.; Behari, S.; Doi, Y.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.; Fujita, Y.; Funahashi, Y.; Haba, J.; Hamasaki, H.; Haruyama, T.; Hayashi, K.; Higashi, Y.; Hitomi, N.; Igarashi, S.; Igarashi, Y.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Hitomi; Itoh, R.; Iwai, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joo, K. K.; Kasami, K.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, M.; Kichimi, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Koike, S.; Kondo, Y.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Manabe, A.; Matsuda, T.; Murakami, T.; Nagayama, S.; Nakao, M.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, K.; Ohkubo, R.; Ohnishi, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, N.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, J. I.; Suzuki, S.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tatomi, T.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukada, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Ujiie, N.; Uno, S.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamaoka, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhao, H.; Abe, R.; Iwai, G.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyata, H.; Shimada, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tamura, N.; Abe, K.; Hanada, H.; Nagamine, T.; Nakajima, M.; Nakajima, T.; Narita, S.; Sanpei, M.; Takayama, T.; Ueki, M.; Yamaga, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ahn, B. S.; Kang, J. S.; Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Ahn, H. S.; Jang, H. K.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. H.; Park, C. S.; Won, E.; Aihara, H.; Higuchi, T.; Kawai, H.; Matsubara, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Tajima, H.; Tanaka, J.; Tomura, T.; Yokoyama, M.; Akatsu, M.; Fujimoto, K.; Hirose, M.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itami, S.; Kani, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagai, I.; Okabe, T.; Oshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Sugi, A.; Sugiyama, A.; Suitoh, S.; Suzuki, S.; Tomoto, M.; Yoshida, K.; Akhmetshin, R.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, Y. Q.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Huang, H. C.; Huang, T. J.; Lee, M. C.; Lu, R. S.; Peng, J. C.; Peng, K. C.; Sahu, S.; Sung, H. F.; Tsai, K. L.; Ueno, K.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Alimonti, G.; Browder, T. E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Fang, F.; Guler, H.; Jones, M.; Li, Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Peters, M.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Rosen, M.; Swain, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Varner, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Zheng, Y. H.; An, Q.; Chen, H. F.; Wang, Y. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Ye, S. W.; Zhang, Z. P.; Asai, M.; Asano, Y.; Mori, S.; Stanič, S.; Tsujita, Y.; Zhang, J.; Žontar, D.; Aso, T.; Aulchenko, V.; Beiline, D.; Bondar, A.; Dneprovsky, L.; Eidelman, S.; Garmash, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Romanov, L.; Root, N.; Shwartz, B.; Sidorov, A.; Sidorov, V.; Usov, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Peak, L. S.; Varvell, K. E.; Banas, E.; Bozek, A.; Jalocha, P.; Kapusta, P.; Natkaniec, Z.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palka, H.; Rozanka, M.; Rybicki, K.; Behera, P. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Satapathy, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. S.; Dong, L. Y.; Li, J.; Liu, H. M.; Mao, Z. P.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zheng, Z. P.; Cheon, B. G.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D. W.; Nam, J. W.; Chidzik, S.; Korotuschenko, K.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Liu, T.; Marlow, D.; Mindas, C.; Prebys, E.; Rabberman, R.; Sands, W.; Wixted, R.; Choi, S.; Dragic, J.; Everton, C. W.; Gordon, A.; Hastings, N. C.; Heenan, E. M.; Moffitt, L. C.; Moloney, G. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Sevior, M. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Tovey, S. N.; Drutskoy, A.; Kagan, R.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Fukunaga, C.; Suda, R.; Fukushima, M.; Goriletsky, V. I.; Grinyov, B. V.; Lyubinsky, V. R.; Panova, A. I.; Shakhova, K. V.; Shpilinskaya, L. I.; Vinograd, E. L.; Zaslavsky, B. G.; Guo, R. S.; Haitani, F.; Hoshi, Y.; Neichi, K.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hazumi, M.; Hojo, T.; Jackson, D.; Miyake, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Ryuko, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Takita, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Hayashii, H.; Miyabayashi, K.; Noguchi, S.; Hikita, S.; Hirano, H.; Hoshina, K.; Mamada, H.; Nitoh, O.; Okazaki, N.; Yokoyama, T.; Ishino, H.; Ichizawa, S.; Hirai, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kaneko, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ohshima, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yanaka, S.; Inoue, Y.; Nakano, E.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Heejong; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kawai, H.; Kurihara, E.; Ooba, T.; Suzuki, K.; Unno, Y.; Kawamura, N.; Yuta, H.; Kinoshita, K.; Satpathy, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuniya, T.; Murakami, A.; Tsukamoto, T.; Kumar, S.; Singh, J.; Lange, J.; Stock, R.; Matsumoto, S.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nishida, S.; Nomura, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sasao, N.; Ushiroda, Y.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Hanagaki, K.; Okuno, S.; Shen, D. Z.; Yan, D. S.; Yin, Z. W.; Tan, N.; Wang, C. H.; Yamaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The Belle detector was designed and constructed to carry out quantitative studies of rare B-meson decay modes with very small branching fractions using an asymmetric e +e - collider operating at the ϒ(4S) resonance, the KEK-B-factory. Such studies require data samples containing ˜10 7 B-meson decays. The Belle detector is configured around a 1.5 T superconducting solenoid and iron structure surrounding the KEK-B beams at the Tsukuba interaction region. B-meson decay vertices are measured by a silicon vertex detector situated just outside of a cylindrical beryllium beam pipe. Charged particle tracking is performed by a wire drift chamber (CDC). Particle identification is provided by d E/d x measurements in CDC, aerogel threshold Cherenkov counter and time-of-flight counter placed radially outside of CDC. Electromagnetic showers are detected in an array of CsI( Tl) crystals located inside the solenoid coil. Muons and K L mesons are identified by arrays of resistive plate counters interspersed in the iron yoke. The detector covers the θ region extending from 17° to 150°. The part of the uncovered small-angle region is instrumented with a pair of BGO crystal arrays placed on the surfaces of the QCS cryostats in the forward and backward directions. Details of the design and development works of the detector subsystems, which include trigger, data acquisition and computer systems, are described. Results of performance of the detector subsystems are also presented.

  17. Gamma ray detector modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  18. Thoughts on VCD-145 Detector Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W V

    2005-02-10

    In 1980, Don Smith requested that the EG&G Detector Group in North Las Vegas provide a summary of calibrated sensitivities for the VCD-145 detector. The &sired information was provided in a memorandum from Sam Egdorf (Reference 1). A memo from Brent Davis issued a week later described the effect on VCD-145 detector sensitivity that resulted from changing the thickness of the stainless steel entrance window (Reference 2). This memo is intended first to effectively archive those two references, and second to record thoughts about the significance of their contents. Reference 1 lists a total of 118 calibrated values for 80 different VCD-145 detectors, from 1977 to 1980. With only four exceptions, all of the serial numbers from V004 to V087 were included. The earlier calibrations were for detectors with 1-mil entrance windows, and the later ones were for detectors with 2-mil entrance windows. Three of the earlier units were calibrated at both thicknesses by temporarily placing an extra 1-mil sheet of stainless steel across the window. Altogether six different collimator diameters were used, from 60 mm to 95 mm. Some units were calibrated for more than one collimator diameter, and 14 were at some point designated as backup detectors for a second event. Reference 2 describes the effect of window thickness on calibrated sensitivity. Quoting that reference: ''To demonstrate that the sensitivity decrease is solely a function of the window thickness, a standard VCD-145 detector with a 0.001-inch thick window was calibrated with the {sup 60}Co source. Then without changing detector or geometry, a 0.001 -inch thick stainless steel foil (same material as that of the window) was placed directly in front of the detector window, effectively making a 0.002-inch thick entrance window. The detector was again calibrated. This technique was repeated until the detector had an entrance window equivalent to 0.010-inches thick.'' There are multiple reasons to suspect that the accuracy of

  19. Issues and directions in IR detector readout electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction to the major issues encountered in the readout of imaging detector arrays in the infrared are presented. These include circuit issues such as multiplexing, buffering, and noise, as well as materials issues. Future directions in infrared readout electronics will also be discussed. These include on-chip signal processing and advanced hybridization schemes. Finally, recent work at Columbia on 2DEG-charge coupled devices for IR detector multiplexing are described.

  20. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  1. Cadmium mercury telluride infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. T.

    Signal Processing In The Element (SPITE) detectors used in high performance thermal imaging systems are discussed. Developments to improve spatial and temperature resolution are outlined. Focal plane arrays of electronically scanned two-dimensional arrays of CMT detectors are treated. Use of photovoltaic CMT detectors hybridized with silicon addressing circuits is reported. Research to raise the operating temperature of infrared detectors is summarized.

  2. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  3. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  4. Infrared Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-05

    group realized small microstrip devices, the next iteration of which may narrow the line width to below 100 nm, entering the single-photon detection...and will explore superconducting detectors with integrated waveguide circuits and novel deposition techniques. 15. SUBJECT...world record quantum cryptography demonstrations [9] and operation of quantum waveguide circuits at telecom wavelengths [10]. Beyond the quantum

  5. ISABELLE. Volume 3. Experimental areas, large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This section presents the papers which resulted from work in the Experimental Areas portion of the Workshop. The immediate task of the group was to address three topics. The topics were dictated by the present state of ISABELLE experimental areas construction, the possibility of a phased ISABELLE and trends in physics and detectors.

  6. Novel, broad-spectrum anticonvulsants containing a sulfamide group: advancement of N-((benzo[b]thien-3-yl)methyl)sulfamide (JNJ-26990990) into human clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael H; Smith-Swintosky, Virginia L; McComsey, David F; Huang, Yifang; Brenneman, Douglas; Klein, Brian; Malatynska, Ewa; White, H Steve; Milewski, Michael E; Herb, Mark; Finley, Michael F A; Liu, Yi; Lubin, Mary Lou; Qin, Ning; Iannucci, Robert; Leclercq, Laurent; Cuyckens, Filip; Reitz, Allen B; Maryanoff, Bruce E

    2009-12-10

    In seeking broad-spectrum anticonvulsants to treat epilepsy and other neurological disorders, we synthesized and tested a group of sulfamide derivatives (4a-k, 5), which led to the clinical development of 4a (JNJ-26990990). This compound exhibited excellent anticonvulsant activity in rodents against audiogenic, electrically induced, and chemically induced seizures, with very weak inhibition of human carbonic anhydrase-II (IC(50) = 110 microM). The pharmacological profile for 4a supports its potential in the treatment of multiple forms of epilepsy, including pharmacoresistant variants. Mechanistically, 4a inhibited voltage-gated Na(+) channels and N-type Ca(2+) channels but was not effective as a K(+) channel opener. The pharmacokinetics and metabolic properties of 4a are discussed.

  7. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

  8. Independent Testing of JWST Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Rauscher, Bernie J.; Regan, Michael W.; Morse, Ernie; Balleza, Jesus; Bergeron, Louis; Stockman, H. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) is jointly operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and is assisting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors. The JWST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. JWST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z is approximately 10-20). To achieve this goal, the JWST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype JWST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the JWST program within the 0.6-5 micron bandpass and in an ultra-low background (less than 0.01 e(-)/s/pixel) environment. We describe results from the JWST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the LDTL. In this project, we are measuring first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

  9. Independent Testing of JWST Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figer, D. F.; Rauscher, B. J.; Regan, M. W.; Balleza, J.; Bergeron, L.; Morse, E.; Stockman, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) is jointly operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (MU), and is assisting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors under a NASA Grant. The JWST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. JWST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z approx. 10 - 20). To achieve this goal, the JWST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype JWST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the JWST program within the 0.6 - 5 approx. mum bandpass and in an ultra-low background (less than 0.01 e'/s/pixel) environment. We describe results from the JWST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the IDTL. In this project, we are measuring first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

  10. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Evans, Andrew J; Delahunt, Brett; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; van der Kwast, Theo H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars L; Humphrey, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a disease), bladder neck invasion, lymphovascular invasion and the definition of pT4 were coordinated by working group 3. It was agreed that prostate cancer can be categorized as pT3a in the absence of adipose tissue involvement when cancer bulges beyond the contour of the gland or beyond the condensed smooth muscle of the prostate at posterior and posterolateral sites. Extraprostatic extension can also be identified anteriorly. It was agreed that the location of extraprostatic extension should be reported. Although there was consensus that the amount of extraprostatic extension should be quantitated, there was no agreement as to which method of quantitation should be employed. There was overwhelming consensus that microscopic urinary bladder neck invasion by carcinoma should be reported as stage pT3a and that lymphovascular invasion by carcinoma should be reported. It is recommended that these elements are considered in the development of practice guidelines and in the daily practice of urological surgical pathology.

  11. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  12. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  13. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eric Y.; Flory, Adam E.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  14. Novel integrated paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) as a miniaturized photometric detector in HPLC.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Martina; Lau, King-Tong; Shazmann, Benjamin; Shepherd, Roderick; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-08-01

    A novel low power, low cost, highly sensitive, miniaturized light emitting diode (LED) based flow detector has been used as optical detector for the detection of sample components in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This colorimetric detector employs two LEDs, one operating in normal mode as a light source and the other is reverse biased to work as a light detector. Instead of measuring the photocurrent directly, a simple timer circuit is used to measure the time taken for the photocurrent generated by the emitter LED (lambda(max) 500 nm) to discharge the detector LED (lambda(max) 621 nm) from 5 V (logic 1) to 1.7 V (logic 0) to give digital output directly without using an A/D converter. Employing a post-column reagent method, a Nucleosil 100-7 column (functionalized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) groups) was used to separate a mixture of transition metal complexes, manganese(II) and cobalt(II) in 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR). All optical measurements were taken by using both the in-built HPLC variable wavelength detector and the proposed paired-emitter-detector-diode (PEDD) optical detector configured in-line for data comparison. The concentration range investigated using the PEDD was found to give a linear response to the Mn(II) and Co(II) PAR complexes. The effects of flow rate and emitter LED light source intensity were investigated. Under optimised conditions the PEDD detector offered a linear range of 0.9-100 microM and LOD of 0.09 microM for Mn-PAR complex. A linear range of 0.2-100 microM and LOD of 0.09 microM for Co-PAR complex was achieved.

  15. CMOS Hybrid Pixel Detectors for Scientific, Industrial and Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Crystallography is the principal technique for determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution and uses advantageously the high intensity of 3rd generation synchrotron X-ray sources . Macromolecular crystallography experiments benefit from excellent beamline equipment, recent software advances and modern X-ray detectors. However, the latter do not take full advantage of the brightness of modern synchrotron sources. CMOS Hybrid pixel array detectors, originally developed for high energy physics experiments, meet these requirements. X-rays are recorded in single photon counting mode and data thus are stored digitally at the earliest possible stage. This architecture leads to several advantages over current detectors: No detector noise is added to the signal. Readout time is reduced to a few milliseconds. The counting rates are matched to beam intensities at protein crystallography beamlines at 3rd generation synchrotrons. The detector is not sensitive to X-rays during readout; therefore no mechanical shutter is required. The detector has a very sharp point spread function (PSF) of one pixel, which allows better resolution of adjacent reflections. Low energy X-rays can be suppressed by the comparator At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland the first and largest array based on this technology was constructed: The Pilatus 6M detector. The detector covers an area of 43.1 x 44.8 cm2 , has 6 million pixels and is read out noise free in 3.7 ms. Since June 2007 the detector is in routine operation at the beamline 6S of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The company DETCRIS Ltd, has licensed the technology from PSI and is commercially offering the PILATUS detectors. Examples of the wide application range of the detectors will be shown.

  16. Misonidazole and unconventional radiation in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a phase II study of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Ydrach, A.A.; Marcial, V.A.; Parsons, J.; Concannon, J.; Asbell, S.O.; George, F.

    1982-03-01

    This is a report on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Protocol78-32, a Phase I/II prospective study aimed at determining tolerance, tumor response, and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus treated with unorthodox fractionation radiotherapy combined with misonidazole. Misonidazole was administered by mouth 4 to 6 hr prior to radiation, at a dose of 1.0 to 1.25 Gm/.m/sup 2/; blood levels were measured at about 4 hr after intake of the drug and reported in micrograms/ml. Radiotherapy was administered at 4 to 6 hr post-misonidazole dose and given with 400 rad fractions, alternating 2 or 3 times/week, up to 4,800 rad. A total of 43 patients were entered; 26 are evaluated for survival at 1 year post accession. Thirty patients (88%) received the planned radiation course. Twenty-eight patients (78%) received the planned misonidazole dosage. Tumor response, evaluated in 18 patients, showed a complete regression (C.R.) in only 2 patients (11%); and partial response (P.R.) in 6 patients (33%). Eight patients (44%) showed no tumor response to planned therapy. Toxicity was acceptable and in 38 evaluated patients only 4 reported (11%) nausea and vomiting, 7 reported mild paresthesias (18%). The median survival was only five months. In 26 patients evaluated for 1 year survival determination, only 1 survived (3.8%) this period. In view of the poor tumor response and low survival observed, we do not recommend that this particular fractionation regimen with misonidazole be used in a Phase III randomized trial in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

  17. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  18. Glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2002-01-01

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured.

  19. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  20. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  1. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  2. Radiation Detectors and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Andrea

    The use of radiation detectors in the analysis of art objects represents a very special application in a true interdisciplinary field. Radiation detectors employed in this field detect, e.g., x-rays, γ-rays, β particles, and protons. Analyzed materials range from stones, metals, over porcelain to paintings. The available nondestructive and noninvasive analytical methods cover a broad range of techniques. Hence, for the sake of brevity, this chapter will concentrate on few techniques: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE).

  3. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Smith, James L.; Sullivan, Clair J.; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Lashley, Jason Charles

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  4. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  5. Astrophysical calibration of gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkin, M.; Messenger, C.; Wright, L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a method to assess the validity of gravitational-wave detector calibration through the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard sirens. Such signals, as measured via gravitational-wave observations, provide an estimated luminosity distance that is subject to uncertainties in the calibration of the data. If a host galaxy is identified for a given source then its redshift can be combined with current knowledge of the cosmological parameters yielding the true luminosity distance. This will then allow a direct comparison with the estimated value and can validate the accuracy of the original calibration. We use simulations of individual detectable gravitational-wave signals from binary neutron star (BNS) or neutron star-black hole systems, which we assume to be found in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts, to estimate any discrepancy in the overall scaling of the calibration for detectors in the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo network. We find that the amplitude scaling of the calibration for the LIGO instruments could on average be confirmed to within ˜10 % for a BNS source within 100 Mpc. This result is largely independent of the current detector calibration method and gives an uncertainty that is competitive with that expected in the current calibration procedure. Confirmation of the calibration accuracy to within ˜20 % can be found with BNS sources out to ˜500 Mpc .

  6. High performance pyroelectric infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xu; Luo, Haosu; Ji, Yulong; Yang, Chunli

    2015-10-01

    Single infrared detector made with Relaxative ferroelectric crystal(PMNT) present excellence performance. In this paper include detector capacitance, characteristic of frequency--response, characteristic of detectivity. The measure result show that detectivity of detector made with relaxative ferroelectric crystal(PMNT) exceed three times than made with LT, the D*achieved than 1*109cmHz0.5W-1. The detector will be applied on NDIR spectrograph, FFT spectrograph and so on. The high performance pyroelectric infrared detector be developed that will be broadened application area of infrared detector.

  7. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  8. Fast Detector Simulation Using Lelaps, Detector Descriptions in GODL

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-07-06

    Lelaps is a fast detector simulation program which reads StdHep generator files and produces SIO or LCIO output files. It swims particles through detectors taking into account magnetic fields, multiple scattering and dE/dx energy loss. It simulates parameterized showers in EM and hadronic calorimeters and supports gamma conversions and decays. In addition to three built-in detector configurations, detector descriptions can also be read from files in the new GODL file format.

  9. Large-Area Liquid Scintillation Detector Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, M. F.; Gurr, H. S.; Hruschka, A. A.; Jenkins, T. L.; Kropp, W. P.; Reines, P.; Sobel, H.

    The following sections are included: * SUMMARY * INTRODUCTION * DETECTOR RESPONSE FUNCTION F(z) AND EVENT POSITION DETERMINATION * REFINEMENTS IN THE DETECTOR CONFIGURATION DESIGN * DETECTOR PERFORMANCE * APPENDIX * REFERENCES

  10. Gaseous wire detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations.

  11. Optimizing WIMP directional detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2007-03-01

    We study the dependence of the exposure required to directly detect a WIMP directional recoil signal on the capabilities of a directional detector. Specifically we consider variations in the nuclear recoil energy threshold, the background rate, whether the detector measures the recoil momentum vector in two or three dimensions and whether or not the sense of the momentum vector can be determined. We find that the property with the biggest effect on the required exposure is the measurement of the momentum vector sense. If the detector cannot determine the recoil sense, the exposure required is increased by an order of magnitude for 3-d read-out and two orders of magnitude for 2-d read-out. For 2-d read-out the required exposure, in particular if the senses cannot be measured, can be significantly reduced by analyzing the reduced angles with the, time dependent, projected direction of solar motion subtracted. The background rate effectively places a lower limit on the WIMP cross-section to which the detector is sensitive; it will be very difficult to detect WIMPs with a signal rate more than an order of magnitude below the background rate. Lowering the energy threshold also reduces the required exposure, but only for thresholds above 20 keV.

  12. Optimizing WIMP Directional Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Morgan, B.

    2007-08-01

    We study the dependence of the number of events required to directly detect a WIMP directional recoil signal on the capabilities of a directional detector. We consider variations in the nuclear recoil energy threshold, the background rate, whether the detector measures the recoil momentum vector in 2 or 3 dimensions and whether or not the sense of the momentum vector can be determined. The property with the biggest effect on the required exposure is the measurement of the momentum vector sense. If the detector cannot determine the recoil sense, the exposure required is increased by an order of magnitude for 3-d read-out and two orders of magnitude for 2-d read-out. For 2-d read-out the required exposure, in particular if the senses can not be measured, can be significantly reduced by analyzing the reduced angles with the, time dependent, projected direction of solar motion subtracted. The background rate effectively places a lower limit on the WIMP cross-section to which the detector is sensitive; it will be very difficult to detect WIMPs with a signal rate more than an order of magnitude below the background rate. Lowering the energy threshold also reduces the required exposure, but only for thresholds above 20 keV.

  13. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  14. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  15. Detectors and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptman, John

    2016-11-01

    The talks in the Program and the Conference parallel sessions make clear that high quality pixel vertex chambers are presently well developed and with continuing improvements (M. Caccia,1 X. Sun,2 M. Stanitzki,3 J. Qian4); that there are at least two major tracking chambers that are well studied, a TPC and silicon-strip chambers (H. Qi,5,6 C. Young,7,8 A. de Roeck9,10); that the energy measurement of photons and electrons is generally very good (H. Yang,11 S. Franchino12); and, that the last remaining detector that has not yet achieved the high precision required for good e+e- physics is the hadronic calorimeter for the measurement of jets, most importantly, jets from the decays of W and Z to quarks (S. Lee,13,14 M. Cascella,15 A. de Roeck16). The relationship of the detectors to physics and the overall design of detectors was addressed and questioned (Y. Gao,17 M. Ruan,18 G. Tonelli,19 H. Zhu,20 M. Mangano,21 C. Quigg22) in addition to precision time measurements in detectors (C. Tully23).

  16. Gas Detectors, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The report contains annotated references on gas detectors compiled from the Defense Documentation Center's data bank. The range of the topics deals with detection of toxic propellants, odors, gas leaks, oxygen, etc. Included with the bibliographic reference are the corporate author-monitoring agency, subject, and title indexes. (Author/JR)

  17. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdin, K.

    2015-03-24

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, in which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.

  18. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  19. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Kamdin, K.

    2015-03-24

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, inmore » which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.« less

  20. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  1. The Friendship Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Scott

    2012-01-01

    After years of using Rube Goldberg-inspired projects to teach concepts of simple machines, the author sought a comparable project to reinforce electricity lessons in his ninth-grade Science and Technology course. The Friendship Detector gives students a chance to design, test, and build a complex circuit with multiple switches and battery-powered…

  2. The Watchman Detector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazeley, Steven

    2014-03-01

    The Watchman collaboration is proposing a kiloton scale antineutrino detector of reactor-based antineutrinos for non-proliferation purposes. As an added bonus the detector will also have the capability to search for evidence of sterile neutrino oscillation, super-nova antineutrinos and, in a second phase, measure the neutrino mass hierarchy. Despite that fact that KamLAND demonstrated the feasibility of kiloton scale, long distance antineutrino detection with liquid scintillator, similar detectors at the megaton scale remain problematic for environmental, cost and light attenuation reasons. Water, with gadolinium added for neutron sensitivity, may be the detection medium of choice if its efficiency can be shown to be competitive with scintillator. The goal of the Watchman project, therefore, is to demonstrate medium distance reactor antineutrino detection, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of moving to water-based megaton scale antineutrino detectors in the future. In this talk I will describe the scope of the experiment, the physics and engineering challenges involved, the proposed design and the predicted performance of the experimental non-proliferation and high-energy physics program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-648381.

  3. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  4. Leak detector uses ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Keir, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Probe located on outer wall of vacuum-jacketed fluid lines detects leaks on inner wall. Probe picks up and amplifies vibrations that occur when gas rushes through leak and converts them to audible signal or CRT display. System is considerably simpler to use than helium leak detectors and allows rapid checks to be made as part of routine maintenance.

  5. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  6. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, K.

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, in which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.

  7. Carbon monoxide detector. [electrochemical gas detector for spacecraft use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Bradspies, J. L.; Brummer, S. B.; Nelsen, L. L.

    1973-01-01

    A sensitive carbon monoxide detector, developed specifically for spacecraft use, is described. An instrument range of 0 to 60 ppm CO in air was devised. The fuel cell type detector is used as a highly sensitive electrolysis cell for electrochemically detecting gases. The concept of an electrochemical CO detector is discussed and the CO oxidation behavior in phosphoric and sulfuric acid electrolytes is reported.

  8. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  9. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  10. Neutron detectors at IPNS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.; Ostrowski, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    The heart of each time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument is its complement of detectors and the associated encoding and counting electronics. Currently there are ten fully-scheduled neutron scattering instruments in operation at IPNS, with three more instruments under development. Six of these instruments use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs) of various types. These PSDs include a 30 cm {times} 30 cm, {approximately}3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm dia, {approximately}0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm {times} 20 cm, {approximately}5 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a 40 cm {times} 40 cm, {approximately}4 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a flat 25 cm long, {approximately}1.6 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in dia and 60 cm long and has {approximately}14 mm resolution. In addition to these PSDs, {approximately}750 standard cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counters of various sizes are utilized on IPNS instruments, and {approximately}20 BF{sub 3} pulsed ion chambers are in use as beam monitors. This paper discusses these various detectors and associated electronics, with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of detectors. Observed performance of these detectors is also discussed. 19 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Infrared SWAP detectors: pushing the limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Taalat, R.; Brunner, A.; Rubaldo, L.; Augey, T.; Kerlain, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Manissadjian, A.; Gravrand, O.; Castelein, P.; Destéfanis, G.

    2015-06-01

    The growing demand for compact and low consumption infrared cooled detectors is driven by different products segments. Hand Held Thermal Imagers, UAV, small gimbals are some of them. End users are requiring devices easy to use with fast cool down time, excellent portability, low acoustic noise with no trade-offs in reliability and performance. These requirements are pushing the technology developments toward constant innovations on detectors, coolers, read out circuits and proximity electronic boards. In this paper we are discussing the different figures of merit and highlighting the challenges for the different components. An update on the developments of HOT technology for most advanced pixel pitch will be presented. Very compact products are driving the developments for innovative coolers and cryogenic solutions. A low power compact architecture is a must for electronic boards to optimize the overall system power consumption. Finally a look to the future requirements for further shrink will be addressed.

  12. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossington, Carolyn Sally

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the Star Wars nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  13. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  14. Fundamental principles of particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper goes through the fundamental physics of particles-matter interactions which is necessary for the detection of these particles with detectors. A listing of 41 concepts and detector principles are given. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  15. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  16. Cooled and uncooled infrared detectors for missile seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, Rami; Haski, Jacob; Mizrahi, Udi; Shkedy, Lior; Shtrichman, Itay; Pinsky, Ephi

    2014-06-01

    Electro-optical missile seekers pose exceptional requirements for infrared (IR) detectors. These requirements include: very short mission readiness (time-to-image), one-time and relatively short mission duration, extreme ambient conditions, high sensitivity, fast frame rate, and in some cases small size and cost. SCD is engaged in the development and production of IR detectors for missile seeker applications for many years. 0D, 1D and 2D InSb focal plane arrays (FPAs) are packaged in specially designed fast cool-down Dewars and integrated with Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers. These cooled MWIR detectors were integrated in numerous seekers of various missile types, for short and long range applications, and are combat proven. New technologies for the MWIR, such as epi-InSb and XBn-InAsSb, enable faster cool-down time and higher sensitivity for the next generation seekers. The uncooled micro-bolometer technology for IR detectors has advanced significantly over the last decade, and high resolution - high sensitivity FPAs are now available for different applications. Their much smaller size and cost with regard to the cooled detectors makes these uncooled LWIR detectors natural candidates for short and mid-range missile seekers. In this work we will present SCD's cooled and uncooled solutions for advanced electro-optical missile seekers.

  17. ADC common noise correction and zero suppression in the PIBETA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frlež, E.; Počanić, D.; Ritt, S.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a simple procedure for reducing Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) common noise in modular detectors that does not require additional hardware. A method using detector noise groups should work well for modular particle detectors such as segmented electromagnetic calorimeters, plastic scintillator hodoscopes, cathode strip wire chambers, segmented active targets, and the like. We demonstrate a "second pedestal noise correction" method by comparing representative ADC pedestal spectra for various elements of the PIBETA detector before and after the applied correction.

  18. Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector Technologies and RD51 Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim; Ropelewski, Leszek

    2013-04-01

    Discoveries in particle physics vitally depend on parallel advances in radiation-detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements — the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1992. This invention revolutionized particle detection which moved from optical-readout devices (cloud chamber, emulsion or bubble chambers) to the electronics era. Over the past two decades advances in photo-lithography, microelectronics and printed-circuit board (PCB) techniques triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to the Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts. The excellent spatial and time resolution, high rate capability, low mass, large active areas, and radiation hardness make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the frontiers of research. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel devices where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout serve as an "electronic bubble chamber" allowing to record space points and tracks in 3D. In 2008, the RD51 collaboration at CERN has been established to further advance technological developments of MPGDs and associated electronic-readout systems, for applications in basic and applied research. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of the MPGD technologies and summarizes ongoing activities within the framework of the RD51 collaboration.

  19. Subspace Detectors: Efficient Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B; Paik, T

    2006-07-26

    The optimum detector for a known signal in white Gaussian background noise is the matched filter, also known as a correlation detector [Van Trees, 1968]. Correlation detectors offer exquisite sensitivity (high probability of detection at a fixed false alarm rate), but require perfect knowledge of the signal. The sensitivity of correlation detectors is increased by the availability of multichannel data, something common in seismic applications due to the prevalence of three-component stations and arrays. When the signal is imperfectly known, an extension of the correlation detector, the subspace detector, may be able to capture much of the performance of a matched filter [Harris, 2006]. In order to apply a subspace detector, the signal to be detected must be known to lie in a signal subspace of dimension d {ge} 1, which is defined by a set of d linearly-independent basis waveforms. The basis is constructed to span the range of signals anticipated to be emitted by a source of interest. Correlation detectors operate by computing a running correlation coefficient between a template waveform (the signal to be detected) and the data from a window sliding continuously along a data stream. The template waveform and the continuous data stream may be multichannel, as would be true for a three-component seismic station or an array. In such cases, the appropriate correlation operation computes the individual correlations channel-for-channel and sums the result (Figure 1). Both the waveform matching that occurs when a target signal is present and the cross-channel stacking provide processing gain. For a three-component station processing gain occurs from matching the time-history of the signals and their polarization structure. The projection operation that is at the heart of the subspace detector can be expensive to compute if implemented in a straightforward manner, i.e. with direct-form convolutions. The purpose of this report is to indicate how the projection can be

  20. A robot-based detector manipulator system for a hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D., Maser, J., Holt, M. , Winarski, R., Preissner, C.,Lai, B., Vogt, S., Stephenson, G.B.

    2007-11-11

    This paper presents the design of a robot-based detector manipulator for microdiffraction applications with a hard X-ray nanoprobe instrument system being constructed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Applications for detectors weighing from 1.5 to 100 kg were discussed in three configurations.

  1. Enhanced security for multi-detector quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Zanforlin, Ugo; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Quantum random number generators (QRNG) represent an advanced solution for randomness generation, which is essential in every cryptographic application. In this context, integrated arrays of single-photon detectors have promising applications as QRNGs based on the spatial detection of photons. For the employment of QRNGs in cryptography, it is necessary to have efficient methods to evaluate the so-called quantum min-entropy that corresponds to the amount of the true extractable quantum randomness from the QRNG. Here, we present an efficient method that allows the estimation of the quantum min-entropy for a multi-detector QRNG. In particular, we consider a scenario in which an attacker can control the efficiency of the detectors and knows the emitted number of photons. Eventually, we apply the method to a QRNG with 103 detectors.

  2. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  3. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  4. Grouping for Inequity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macqueen, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The inequity of streaming as a method of organising classes was established by research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. While the practice produces small advantages for limited groups of students, it hinders the academic and social advancement of the majority. Although streaming has declined, new forms of achievement grouping have emerged, with…

  5. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  6. CZT Detector Development for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, Alfred, III; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M.; Bose, R.; Burger, A.; Dowkonnt, P.; Groza, M.; Simburger, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2008-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has proven itself as an excellent material for detection of hard X-rays. Advances in crystal growth have increased the quality and size of available single CZT crystals. We report on our ongoing development and characterization of CZT detector systems. With our dedicated class-100 cleanroom, we fabricate detectors using CZT crystals from different manufactures. Using photolithography and e-beam evaporation, we can produce detectors with different contact designs (pixellated, strip, monolithic, steering grid), contact dimensions (down to 50 microns), and contact materials (In, Ti, Au, etc.) . In addition, we develop ASIC readouts for various CZT detector applications, including our characterization of the detectors. We measure I-V and C-V curves for the detectors as well as their spectroscopic performance. We compare measured results with those from detailed modelling and simulations. The CZT detector systems can then be optimized for applications such as X-ray imaging and polarimetry with satellite or balloon-borne instruments.

  7. CZT Detector Development for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B., III; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M.; Bose, R.; Burger, A.; Dowkonnt, P.; Groza, M.; Simburger, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2008-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has proven itself as an excellent material for detection of hard X-rays. Advances in crystal growth have increased the quality and size of available single CZT crystals. We report on our ongoing development and characterization of CZT detector systems. With our dedicated class-100 cleanroom, we fabricate detectors using CZT crystals from different manufactures. Using photolithography and e-beam evaporation, we can produce detectors with different contact designs (pixellated, strip, monolithic, steering grid), contact dimensions (down to 50 microns), and contact materials (In, Ti, Au, etc.) . In addition, we develop ASIC readouts for various CZT detector applications, including our characterization of the detectors. We measure I-V and C-V curves for the detectors as well as their spectroscopic performance. We compare measured results with those from detailed modelling and simulations. The CZT detector systems can then be optimized for applications such as X-ray imaging and polarimetry with satellite or balloon-borne instruments.

  8. Event sequence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An event sequence detector is described with input units, each associated with a row of bistable elements arranged in an array of rows and columns. The detector also includes a shift register which is responsive to clock pulses from any of the units to sequentially provide signals on its output lines each of which is connected to the bistable elements in a corresponding column. When the event-indicating signal is received by an input unit it provides a clock pulse to the shift register to provide the signal on one of its output lines. The input unit also enables all its bistable elements so that the particular element in the column supplied with the signal from the register is driven to an event-indicating state.

  9. Underwater radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.; McKnight, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

  10. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  11. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  12. Stable glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2004-05-18

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) stable glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The stable glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma and a solid rod electrode. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured. The solid rod electrode provides greater stability and thus easier alignment.

  13. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  14. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  15. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  16. Terahertz sources and detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Thomas W.; Porterfield, David W.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Bishop, William L.; Kurtz, David S.; Hui, Kai

    2005-05-01

    Through the support of the US Army Research Office we are developing terahertz sources and detectors suitable for use in the spectroscopy of chemical and biological materials as well as for use in imaging systems to detect concealed weapons. Our technology relies on nonlinear diodes to translate the functionality achieved at microwave frequencies to the terahertz band. Basic building blocks that have been developed for this application include low-noise mixers, frequency multipliers, sideband generators and direct detectors. These components rely on planar Schottky diodes and integrated diode circuits and are therefore easy to assemble and robust. They require no mechanical tuners to achieve high efficiency and broad bandwidth. This paper will review the range of performance that has been achieved with these terahertz components and briefly discuss preliminary results achieved with a spectroscopy system and the development of sources for imaging systems.

  17. Continuous fluid level detector

    SciTech Connect

    LeVert, F.E.

    1989-02-21

    A fluid level detector is described which consists of: a junctionless thermocouple cable consisting of two thermoelectric elements enclosed in a metallic sheath wherein a negative resistance temperature coefficient insulant is interpositioned between the thermoelectric elements and the inner surface of the metallic sheath thereby providing electrical insulation and thermal energy transfer between the thermoelectric elements; a metallic sheathed resistance heater, which is used to input thermal energy to the fluid level detector; an outer metallic cylindrical tube capable of being sealed on one end, into which the juctionless thermocouple cable and resistance heater are inserted and held in place by mechanically swaging or drawing, to reduce the outer diameter of the metallic cylindrical tube; separate means for supplying electric currents to the thermoelectric elements and to the resistance heater; and electronic and computing means for measuring the loop resistance of the thermoelectric elements with a temporary junction.

  18. Triac failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A failure detector is provided for detecting unidirectional failures in triacs, particularly as used in power factor controllers for induction motors. In a first embodiment, the triac voltage waveform is sensed and upon detection of an unbalanced signal, corresponding to failure of the triac in either the positive or negative direction, the triac is turned full on in both directions. In a second embodiment, a pair of pulsed signals are derived, the pulse durations of which are proportional to the phase difference between the load current and voltage for each half cycle, and the triac is turned full on responsive to a difference in pulse duration between the half cycle signals. An unidirectional open circuit detector is adapted to use a signal from either of the first and second embodiment to turn the triac off in response to an open circuit failure in either direction.

  19. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  20. Metrology with Unknown Detectors.

    PubMed

    Altorio, Matteo; Genoni, Marco G; Somma, Fabrizia; Barbieri, Marco

    2016-03-11

    The best possible precision is one of the key figures in metrology, but this is established by the exact response of the detection apparatus, which is often unknown. There exist techniques for detector characterization that have been introduced in the context of quantum technologies but apply as well for ordinary classical coherence; these techniques, though, rely on intense data processing. Here, we show that one can make use of the simpler approach of data fitting patterns in order to obtain an estimate of the Cramér-Rao bound allowed by an unknown detector, and we present applications in polarimetry. Further, we show how this formalism provides a useful calculation tool in an estimation problem involving a continuous-variable quantum state, i.e., a quantum harmonic oscillator.

  1. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tshishiku, Eugene M.

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  2. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  3. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  4. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  5. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  6. Portable Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, General Pneumatics Corporation's Western Research Center satisfied a NASA need for a non-clogging Joule-Thomson cryostat to provide very low temperature cooling for various sensors. This NASA-supported cryostat development played a key part in the development of more portable high-purity geranium gamma-ray detectors. Such are necessary to discern between the radionuclides in medical, fuel, weapon, and waste materials. The outcome of the SBIR project is a cryostat that can cool gamma-ray detectors, without vibration, using compressed gas that can be stored compactly and indefinitely in a standby mode. General Pneumatics also produces custom J-T cryostats for other government, commercial and medical applications.

  7. Integrated Dual Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of image detector was designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging detector (IDID) consists of a lenslet array and a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a commercial charge coupled device (CCD). The IDID simplifies the design and operation of solar vector magnetographs and the imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmosphere and solar research. When used in a solar telescope, the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface. Other applications include environmental monitoring, robot vision, and medical diagnoses (through the eye). Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 5) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout and display of both images; and (4) laptop computer signal processing to produce polarization maps in field situations.

  8. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.; Burger, Arnold

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  9. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  10. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  11. Vertex Detector Cable Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    Vertex detector cable requirements are considered within the context of the SiD concept. Cable material should be limited so that the number of radiation lengths represented is consistent with the material budget. In order to take advantage of the proposed accelerator beam structure and allow cooling by flow of dry gas, 'pulsed power' is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described.

  12. The STEIN Particle Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-27

    associated with solar disturbances, magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. AF-STEIN has several distinct advantages over standard detectors flown on...low-earth- orbit (LEO) satellites. AF-STEIN provides the sensitivity, temporal resolution, energy resolution (~1 keV FWHM), dynamic range, and energy...essentially all important suprathermal (~4 to 200 keV) particle populations associated with solar disturbances, magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms

  13. Scintillating pad detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, B.; Borcherding, F.

    1996-12-31

    We have been investigating the performance of scintillating pad detectors, individual small tiles of scintillator that are read out with wavelength-shifting fibers and visible light photon counters, for application in high luminosity colliding beam experiments such as the D0 Upgrade. Such structures could provide {open_quotes}pixel{close_quotes} type readout over large fiducial volumes for tracking, preshower detection and triggering.

  14. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  15. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  16. Biological detector and method

    SciTech Connect

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  17. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  18. Development of Portable Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the “Contractor”) and Sense Holdings, Inc. (the “Participant”) was for the development of hand-held detectors with high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of explosives, toxic industrial chemicals and materials, and other materials of interest for security applications. The two parties built a series of demonstration and prototype handheld sensors based upon micoelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with electronic readout.

  19. Laser beam methane detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Instrument uses infrared absorption to determine methane concentration in liquid natural gas vapor. Two sensors measure intensity of 3.39 mm laser beam after it passes through gas; absorption is proportional to concentration of methane. Instrument is used in modeling spread of LNG clouds and as leak detector on LNG carriers and installations. Unit includes wheels for mobility and is both vertically and horizontally operable.

  20. Borehole Muon Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Flygare, J.; Kouzes, R.; Lintereur, A.; Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Varner, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations have spurred investigation into carbon sequestration methods. One of the possibilities being considered, storing super-critical CO2 in underground reservoirs, has drawn more attention and pilot projects are being supported worldwide. Monitoring of the post-injection fate of CO2 is of utmost importance. Generally, monitoring options are active methods, such as 4D seismic reflection or pressure measurements in monitoring wells. We propose here to develop a 4-D density tomography of subsurface CO2 reservoirs using cosmic-ray muon detectors deployed in a borehole. Muon detection is a relatively mature field of particle physics and there are many muon detector designs, though most are quite large and not designed for subsurface measurements. The primary technical challenge preventing deployment of this technology in the subsurface is the lack of miniaturized muon-tracking detectors capable of fitting in standard boreholes and that will resist the harsh underground conditions. A detector with these capabilities is being developed by a collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Current simulations based on a Monte Carlo modeling code predict that the incoming muon angle can be resolved with an error of approximately two degrees, using either underground or sea level spectra. The robustness of the design comes primarily from the use of scintillating rods as opposed to drift tubes. The rods are arrayed in alternating layers to provide a coordinate scheme. Preliminary testing and measurements are currently being performed to test and enhance the performance of the scintillating rods, in both a laboratory and a shallow underground facility. The simulation predictions and data from the experiments will be presented.

  1. Design and Construction of Prototype Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Fisher

    2012-03-23

    The Lepton Quark Studies (LQS) group is engaged in searching for dark matter using the Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Carlsbad, NM). DMTPC is a direction-sensitive dark matter detector designed to measure the recoil direction and energy deposited by fluorine nuclei recoiling from the interaction with incident WIMPs. In the past year, the major areas of progress have been: to publish the first dark matter search results from a surface run of the DMTPC prototype detector, to build and install the 10L prototype in the underground laboratory at WIPP which will house the 1 m{sup 3} detector, and to demonstrate charge and PMT readout of the TPC using prototype detectors, which allow triggering and {Delta}z measurement to be used in the 1 m{sup 3} detector under development.

  2. Recent astronomical detector development at the University of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The University of Arizona Imaging Technology Laboratory (ITL) has been developing back illuminated detectors and detector technologies for several astronomical projects in recent years. These projects include the WIYN telescope One Degree Imager (ODI) mosaic of Orthogonal Transfer Array CCDs, the VIRUS detectors for the University of Texas' Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), detector and packaging development for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and 10kx10k and 4kx4k CCDs for several instruments. In this paper we discuss these projects with an emphasis on backside processing issues and detector characterization results which may be relevant to other groups. We will also focus packaging techniques and metrology for achieving very flat and stable focal planes. Results will include device flatness at cryogenic temperatures, process yield, photo-response non-uniformity and cosmetics, quantum efficiency, read noise, linearity, charge transfer efficiency, and photon transfer data.

  3. The DAMPE Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Tao, Ma; Yongyi, Huang

    2016-07-01

    The first Chinese space observatory DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) was successfully launched on Dec. 17th, 2015. One major scientific object of DAMPE is to measure electrons between 5GeV to 10TeV with excellent energy resolution (1.5% at 800GeV) to search for possible dark matter signatures. The detector consists of four subsystems: a plastic scintillator detector (PSD), a silicon-tungsten tracker (STK), a BGO calorimeter (BGO), and a neutron detector (NUD). The NUD on board DAMPE is designed to detect moderated neutrons via the boron capture of thermal neutrons in boron-doped plastics. Given the fact that hadron showers initiated in the BGO calorimeter by incident nuclei tend to be followed by significantly more neutron activities comparing to electromagnetic cascades triggered by electrons, the NUD provides an additional order of magnitude hadron rejection capability to improve the overall e/p discrimination of DAMPE up to 10 ^{5}. Preliminary analysis of the in-orbit data is given, together with comparisons to the results obtained by a detailed GEANT4 simulation of the NUD instrument.

  4. The STAR PXL detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contin, G.

    2016-12-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. Designed to extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, it took data in Au+Au collisions, p+p and p+Au collisions at 0√sNN=20 GeV at RHIC, during the period 2014-2016. The PXL detector is based on 50 μm-thin MAPS sensors with a pitch of 20.7 μm. Each sensor includes an array of nearly 1 million pixels, read out in rolling shutter mode in 185.6 μs. The 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation allows for air cooling and contributes to reduce the global material budget to 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. Experience and lessons learned from construction and operations will be presented in this paper. Detector performance and results from 2014 Au+Au data analysis, demonstrating the STAR capabilities of charm reconstruction, will be shown.

  5. Detector Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Transceiver and methods are included that are especially suitable for detecting metallic materials, such as metallic mines, within an environment. The transceiver includes a digital waveform generator used to transmit a signal into the environment and a receiver that produces a digital received signal. A tracking module preferably compares an in-phase and quadrature transmitted signal with an in-phase and quadrature received signal to produce a spectral transfer function of the magnetic transceiver over a selected range of frequencies. The transceiver initially preferably creates a reference transfer function which is then stored in a memory. Subsequently measured transfer functions will vary depending on the presence of metal in the environment which was not in the environment when the reference transfer function was determined. The system may be utilized in the presence of other antennas, metal, and electronics which may comprise a plastic mine detector for detecting plastic mines. Despite the additional antennas and other metallic materials that may be in the environment due to the plastic mine detector, the magnetic transceiver remains highly sensitive to metallic material which may be located in various portions of the environment and which may be detected by sweeping the detector over ground that may contain metals or mines.

  6. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  7. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  8. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  9. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  10. Commissioning the SNO+ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Freija; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the successor to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), in which SNO's heavy water is replaced by approximately 780T of liquid scintillator (LAB). The combination of the 2km underground location, the use of ultra-clean materials and the high light-yield of the liquid scintillator means that a low background level and a low energy threshold can be achieved. This creates a new multipurpose neutrino detector with the potential to address a diverse set of physics goals, including the detection of reactor, solar, geo- and supernova neutrinos. A main physics goal of SNO+ is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. By loading the liquid scintillator with 0.5% of natural Tellurium, resulting in about 1300kg of 130Te (isotopic abundance is slightly over 34%), a competitive sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass can be reached. This talk will present the status of the SNO+ detector, specifically the results and status of the detector commissioning with water.

  11. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  12. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

  13. Nanowire-based detector

    DOEpatents

    Berggren, Karl K; Hu, Xiaolong; Masciarelli, Daniele

    2014-06-24

    Systems, articles, and methods are provided related to nanowire-based detectors, which can be used for light detection in, for example, single-photon detectors. In one aspect, a variety of detectors are provided, for example one including an electrically superconductive nanowire or nanowires constructed and arranged to interact with photons to produce a detectable signal. In another aspect, fabrication methods are provided, including techniques to precisely reproduce patterns in subsequently formed layers of material using a relatively small number of fabrication steps. By precisely reproducing patterns in multiple material layers, one can form electrically insulating materials and electrically conductive materials in shapes such that incoming photons are redirected toward a nearby electrically superconductive materials (e.g., electrically superconductive nanowire(s)). For example, one or more resonance structures (e.g., comprising an electrically insulating material), which can trap electromagnetic radiation within its boundaries, can be positioned proximate the nanowire(s). The resonance structure can include, at its boundaries, electrically conductive material positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire such that light that would otherwise be transmitted through the sensor is redirected toward the nanowire(s) and detected. In addition, electrically conductive material can be positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire (e.g. at the aperture of the resonant structure), such that light is directed by scattering from this structure into the nanowire.

  14. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llope, W. J.; Zhou, J.; Nussbaum, T.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Asselta, K.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Butterworth, J.; Camarda, T.; Christie, W.; Crawford, H. J.; Dong, X.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Geurts, F.; Hammond, J.; Judd, E.; McDonald, D. L.; Perkins, C.; Ruan, L.; Scheblein, J.; Schambach, J. J.; Soja, R.; Xin, K.; Yang, C.

    2014-09-01

    The 2×3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2×19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

  15. Economic analysis of a phase III clinical trial evaluating the addition of total androgen suppression to radiation versus radiation alone for locally advanced prostate cancer (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 86-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre . E-mail: a_konski@fccc.edu; Sherman, Eric; Krahn, Murray; Bremner, Karen; Beck, J. Robert; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Pilepich, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding hormone therapy to radiation for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, using a Monte Carlo simulation of a Markov Model. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 86-10 randomized patients to receive radiation therapy (RT) alone or RT plus total androgen suppression (RTHormones) 2 months before and during RT for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. A Markov model was designed with Data Pro (TreeAge Software, Williamstown, MA). The analysis took a payer's perspective. Transition probabilities from one state of health (i.e., with no disease progression or with hormone-responsive metastatic disease) to another were calculated from published rates pertaining to RTOG 86-10. Patients remained in one state of health for 1 year. Utility values for each health state and treatment were obtained from the literature. Distributions were sampled at random from the treatment utilities according to a second-order Monte Carlo simulation technique. Results: The mean expected cost for the RT-only treatments was $29,240 (range, $29,138-$29,403). The mean effectiveness for the RT-only treatment was 5.48 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (range, 5.47-5.50). The mean expected cost for RTHormones was $31,286 (range, $31,058-$31,555). The mean effectiveness was 6.43 QALYs (range, 6.42-6.44). Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed RTHormones to be within the range of cost-effectiveness at $2,153/QALY. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis resulted in a >80% probability that RTHormones is cost-effective. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that adding hormonal treatment to RT improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range.

  16. Effects of low-dose oral enoximone administration on mortality, morbidity, and exercise capacity in patients with advanced heart failure: the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group ESSENTIAL trials

    PubMed Central

    Metra, Marco; Eichhorn, Eric; Abraham, William T.; Linseman, Jennifer; Böhm, Michael; Corbalan, Ramon; DeMets, David; De Marco, Teresa; Elkayam, Uri; Gerber, Michael; Komajda, Michel; Liu, Peter; Mareev, Vyacheslev; Perrone, Sergio V.; Poole-Wilson, Philip; Roecker, Ellen; Stewart, Jennifer; Swedberg, Karl; Tendera, Michal; Wiens, Brian; Bristow, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Use of inotropic agents in patients with heart failure (HF) has been limited by adverse effects on outcomes. However, administration of positive inotropes at lower doses and concomitant treatment with beta-blockers might increase benefit–risk ratio. We investigated the effects of low doses of the positive inotrope enoximone on symptoms, exercise capacity, and major clinical outcomes in patients with advanced HF who were also treated with beta-blockers and other guideline-recommended background therapy. Methods and results The Studies of Oral Enoximone Therapy in Advanced HF (ESSENTIAL) programme consisted of two identical, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that differed only by geographic location (North and South America: ESSENTIAL-I; Europe: ESSENTIAL-II). Patients with New York Heart Association class III–IV HF symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤30%, and one hospitalization or two ambulatory visits for worsening HF in the previous year were eligible for participation in the trials. The trials had three co-primary endpoints: (i) the composite of time to all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization, analysed in the two ESSENTIAL trials combined; (ii) the 6 month change from baseline in the 6 min walk test distance (6MWTD); and (iii) the Patient Global Assessment (PGA) at 6 months, both analysed in each trial separately. ESSENTIAL-I and -II randomized 1854 subjects at 211 sites in 16 countries. In the combined trials, all-cause mortality and the composite, first co-primary endpoint did not differ between the two treatment groups [hazard ratio (HR) 0.97; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80–1.17; and HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.86–1.12, respectively, for enoximone vs. placebo]. The two other co-primary endpoints were analysed separately in the two ESSENTIAL trials, as prospectively designed in the protocol. The 6MWTD increased with enoximone, compared with placebo, in ESSENTIAL-I (P = 0.025, not reaching, however, the pre

  17. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.

    2011-09-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  18. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  19. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software - Detector Response Function

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-13

    GADRAS-DRF uses a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the response of gamma-ray detectors incident radiation. The application includes provision for plotting measured and computed spectra and for characterizing detector response parameters based on measurements of a series of calibration sources (e.g., Ba-133, Cs-137, Co-60, and Th-228). An application program interface enables other programs to access the dynamic-link library that is used to compute spectra.

  20. Multi-spectral black meta-infrared detectors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    There is an increased emphasis on obtaining imaging systems with on-demand spectro-polarimetric information at the pixel level. Meta-infrared detectors in which infrared detectors are combined with metamaterials are a promising way to realize this. The infrared region is appealing due to the low metallic loss, large penetration depth of the localized field and the larger feature sizes compared to the visible region. I will discuss approaches to realize multispectral detectors including our recent work on double metal meta-material design combined with Type II superlattices that have demonstrated enhanced quantum efficiency (collaboration with Padilla group at Duke University).