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Sample records for advanced disc degeneration

  1. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  2. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Bowden, Anton E; Roeder, Beverly L; Robinson, Todd F; Holland, Jacob G; Christensen, S Loyd; Beatty, Amanda M; Bridgewater, Laura C; Eggett, Dennis L; Wendel, John D; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Taylor, Meredith D

    2015-12-01

    Animal models have historically provided an appropriate benchmark for understanding human pathology, treatment, and healing, but few animals are known to naturally develop intervertebral disc degeneration. The study of degenerative disc disease and its treatment would greatly benefit from a more comprehensive, and comparable animal model. Alpacas have recently been presented as a potential large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration due to similarities in spinal posture, disc size, biomechanical flexibility, and natural disc pathology. This research further investigated alpacas by determining the prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration among an aging alpaca population. Twenty healthy female alpacas comprised two age subgroups (5 young: 2-6 years; and 15 older: 10+ years) and were rated according to the Pfirrmann-grade for degeneration of the cervical intervertebral discs. Incidence rates of degeneration showed strong correlations with age and spinal level: younger alpacas were nearly immune to developing disc degeneration, and in older animals, disc degeneration had an increased incidence rate and severity at lower cervical levels. Advanced disc degeneration was present in at least one of the cervical intervertebral discs of 47% of the older alpacas, and it was most common at the two lowest cervical intervertebral discs. The prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration encourages further investigation and application of the lower cervical spine of alpacas and similar camelids as a large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  3. Genetic Factors in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Egan, Brian; Wang, Jinxi

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of disability and imposes huge economic burdens on human society worldwide. Among many factors responsible for LBP, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common disorder and is a target for intervention. The etiology of IDD is complex and its mechanism is still not completely understood. Many factors such as aging, spine deformities and diseases, spine injuries, and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of IDD. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in studies on the most promising and extensively examined genetic factors associated with IDD in humans. A number of genetic defects have been correlated with structural and functional changes within the intervertebral disc (IVD), which may compromise the disc’s mechanical properties and metabolic activities. These genetic and proteomic studies have begun to shed light on the molecular basis of IDD, suggesting that genetic factors are important contributors to the onset and progression of IDD. By continuing to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IDD, specific early diagnosis and more effective treatments for this disabling disease will be possible in the future. PMID:27617275

  4. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  5. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  6. Biological treatment strategies for disc degeneration: potentials and shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, Andreas G.; Boos, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology, cell biology and material sciences have opened a new emerging field of techniques for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. These new treatment modalities aim for biological repair of the affected tissues by introducing cell-based tissue replacements, genetic modifications of resident cells or a combination thereof. So far, these techniques have been successfully applied to various tissues such as bone and cartilage. However, application of these treatment modalities to cure intervertebral disc degeneration is in its very early stages and mostly limited to experimental studies in vitro or in animal studies. We will discuss the potential and possible shortcomings of current approaches to biologically cure disc degeneration by gene therapy or tissue engineering. Despite the increasing number of studies examining the therapeutic potential of biological treatment strategies, a practicable solution to routinely cure disc degeneration might not be available in the near future. However, knowledge gained from these attempts might be applied in a foreseeable future to cure the low back pain that often accompanies disc degeneration and therefore be beneficial for the patient. PMID:16983559

  7. Inflammation in intervertebral disc degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molinos, Maria; Almeida, Catarina R.; Caldeira, Joana; Cunha, Carla; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain, a problem with a heavy economic burden, which has been increasing in prevalence as populations age. Deeper knowledge of the complex spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular interactions and extracellular matrix remodelling is critical to improve current IVD therapies, which have so far proved unsatisfactory. Inflammation has been correlated with degenerative disc disease but its role in discogenic pain and hernia regression remains controversial. The inflammatory response may be involved in the onset of disease, but it is also crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, if properly balanced it may contribute to tissue repair/regeneration as has already been demonstrated in other tissues. In this review, we focus on how inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration by describing observational and in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal models. Finally, we provide an overview of IVD regenerative therapies that target key inflammatory players. PMID:25673296

  8. Notochord Cells in Intervertebral Disc Development and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Matthew R.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a complex structure responsible for flexibility, multi-axial motion, and load transmission throughout the spine. Importantly, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is thought to be an initiating factor for back pain. Due to a lack of understanding of the pathways that govern disc degeneration, there are currently no disease-modifying treatments to delay or prevent degenerative disc disease. This review presents an overview of our current understanding of the developmental processes that regulate intervertebral disc formation, with particular emphasis on the role of the notochord and notochord-derived cells in disc homeostasis and how their loss can result in degeneration. We then describe the role of small animal models in understanding the development of the disc and their use to interrogate disc degeneration and associated pathologies. Finally, we highlight essential development pathways that are associated with disc degeneration and/or implicated in the reparative response of the tissue that might serve as targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27252900

  9. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, C.; Ganey, T. M.; Minkus, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  10. RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DISC DEGENERATION IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Emiliano; Vialle, Luiz Roberto; Arruda, André de Oliveira; Riet, Ricardo Nascimento; Krieger, Antônio Bernardo de Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To validate radiographic evaluation of a rabbit model for disc degeneration. Methods: Lumbar intervertebral discs of New Zealand rabbits were stabbed three times with a 18G needle at a limited depth of 5mm, through lateral approach. Serial radiographic images were taken on the early pre-and postoperative periods, and after four, eight and 12 weeks of the procedure, with subsequent analysis of disc height, osteophyte formation, endplate sclerosis, and presence of disc degeneration. The statistical analysis of data was validated by the Kappa coefficient, with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. Results: A significant reduction of disc space was found on AP X-ray images after 12 postoperative weeks, with Kappa = 0.489 for CI 95% (0.25-0.72) with p < 0.001. X-ray signs of disc degeneration also presented Kappa = 0.63 for CI 95% (0.39-0.86) with p < 0.001. The remaining assessed criteria showed positive results, but with a lower Kappa value. Conclusion: The disc degeneration model using rabbits as proposed in this study was shown to be feasible, with positive X-ray correlation between pre- and postoperative images, validating the potential to induce disc degeneration in this animal model for future studies. PMID:27022512

  11. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  12. Human Intervertebral Disc Internal Strain in Compression: The Effect of Disc Region, Loading Position, and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Grace D.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the disc is mechanical; therefore, degenerative changes in disc mechanics and the interactions between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) in nondegenerate and degenerate discs are important to functional evaluation. The disc experiences complex loading conditions, including mechanical interactions between the pressurized NP and the surrounding fiber-reinforced AF. Our objective was to noninvasively evaluate the internal deformations of nondegenerate and degenerate human discs under axial compression with flexion, neutral, and extension positions using magnetic resonance imaging and image correlation. The side of applied bending (e.g., anterior AF in flexion) had higher tensile radial and compressive axial strains, and the opposite side of bending exhibited tensile axial strains even though the disc was loaded under axial compression. Degenerated discs exhibited higher compressive axial and tensile radial strains, which suggest that load distribution through the disc subcomponents are altered with degeneration, likely due to the depressurized NP placing more of the applied load directly on the AF. The posterior AF exhibited higher compressive axial and higher tensile radial strains than the other AF regions, and the strains were not correlated with degeneration, suggesting this region undergoes high strains throughout life, which may predispose it to failure and tears. In addition to understanding internal disc mechanics, this study provides important new data into the changes in internal strain with degeneration, data for validation of finite element models, and provides a technique and baseline data for evaluating surgical treatments. PMID:21337394

  13. Does lumbar facet arthrosis precede disc degeneration? A postmortem study.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Lee, Michael J; Cassinelli, Ezequiel; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2007-11-01

    It is believed lumbar degeneration begins in the disc, where desiccation and collapse lead to instability and compensatory facet arthrosis. We explored the contrary contention that facet degeneration precedes disc degeneration by examining 647 skeletal lumbar spines. Using facet osteophytosis as a measure of facet degeneration and vertebral rim osteophytosis as a measure of disc degeneration, we assumed bone degeneration in both locations equally reflected the progression of those in the soft tissues. We graded arthrosis Grade 0 to 4 on a continuum from no arthritis to ankylosis. The data were analyzed for different age groups to examine patterns of degeneration with age. Specimens younger than 30 years of age had a higher prevalence of facet osteophytosis compared with vertebral rim osteophotosis at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Specimens aged 30 to 39 years showed more facet osteophytosis than vertebral rim osteophytosis at L4-L5. Specimens older than 40 years, however, showed more vertebral rim osteophytosis compared with facet osteophytosis at all levels except L4-L5 and L5-S1. This skeletal study suggests facet osteophytosis appears early in the degenerative process, preceding vertebral rim osteophytosis of degenerating intervertebral discs. However, once facets begin deteriorating with age, vertebral rim osteophytosis overtakes continued facet osteophytosis. These data challenge the belief that facet osteophytosis follows vertebral rim osteophytosis; rather, it appears vertebral rim osteophytosis progresses more rapidly in later years, but facet osteophotosis occurs early, predominating in younger individuals.

  14. Genetic Association Studies in Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Eskola, Pasi J.; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per; Solovieva, Svetlana; Männikkö, Minna; Tommerup, Niels; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.; Chan, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990–2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. Results Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat), COL11A1 (rs1676486), GDF5 (rs143383), SKT (rs16924573), THBS2 (rs9406328) and MMP9 (rs17576). Conclusions Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration. PMID:23185509

  15. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-04-04

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  16. Disc in Flames: Roles of TNF-α and IL-1β in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Zariel I.; Schoepflin, Zachary R.; Choi, Hyowon; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an important mechanical structure that allows range of motion of the spinal column. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc, incited by aging, traumatic insult, genetic predisposition, or other factors, is often defined by functional and structural changes in the tissue, including excessive breakdown of the extracellular matrix, increased disc cell senescence and death, and compromised biomechanical function of the tissue. Intervertebral disc degeneration is strongly correlated with low back pain, which is a highly prevalent and costly condition, significantly contributing to loss in productivity and health care costs. Disc degeneration is a chronic, progressive condition, and current therapies are limited and often focused on symptomatic pain relief rather than curtailing the progression of the disease. Inflammatory processes, exacerbated by cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β are believed to be key mediators of disc degeneration and low back pain. In this review, we describe the contributions of TNF-α and IL-1β to changes seen during disc degeneration at the cellular and tissue level, new evidence suggesting a link between infection of the spine and low back pain, and the emerging therapeutic modalities aimed at combating these processes. PMID:26388614

  17. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    David, Gh; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor level measurements, as elements in the process of appreciating the disc angiogenesis. Also, pre–surgery and post–surgery QOL has been measured, as well as the intensity of the pain syndrome. We have identified factors capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth (VEGF, FGF–2) for the examined disc material, but histological examination did not show angiogenesis. The process of angiogenesis at the degenerated intervertebral disc level affects the patient's quality of life both pre and postoperatively, and may be a predictive factor for the post–operative results. Patients can prevent the appearance of angiogenesis type degenerative processes of the intervertebral disc by avoiding angiogenesis correlated factors (weight control, physical effort, and smoking). PMID:20968201

  18. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 provokes interleukin-18-induced human intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, S.; Ju, B.; Wang, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a regulatory cytokine that degrades the disc matrix. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) stimulates synthesis of the disc extracellular matrix. However, the combined effects of BMP-2 and IL-18 on human intervertebral disc degeneration have not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the anabolic cytokine BMP-2 and the catabolic cytokine IL-18 on human nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells and, therefore, to identify potential therapeutic and clinical benefits of recombinant human (rh)BMP-2 in intervertebral disc degeneration. Methods Levels of IL-18 were measured in the blood of patients with intervertebral disc degenerative disease and in control patients. Human NP and AF cells were cultured in a NP cell medium and treated with IL-18 or IL-18 plus BMP-2. mRNA levels of target genes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels of aggrecan, type II collagen, SOX6, and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were assessed by western blot analysis. Results The serum level of patients (IL-18) increased significantly with the grade of IVD degeneration. There was a dramatic alteration in IL-18 level between the advanced degeneration (Grade III to V) group and the normal group (p = 0.008) Furthermore, IL-18 induced upregulation of the catabolic regulator MMP13 and downregulation of the anabolic regulators aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6 at 24 hours, contributing to degradation of disc matrix enzymes. However, BMP-2 antagonised the IL-18 induced upregulation of aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6, resulting in reversal of IL-18 mediated disc degeneration. Conclusions BMP-2 is anti-catabolic in human NP and AF cells, and its effects are partially mediated through provocation of the catabolic effect of IL-18. These findings indicate that BMP-2 may be a unique therapeutic option for prevention and reversal of disc degeneration. Cite this article: S. Ye

  19. Disc cell senescence in intervertebral disc degeneration: Causes and molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chencheng; Liu, Huan; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accumulation of senescent disc cells in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) suggests the detrimental roles of cell senescence in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Disc cell senescence decreased the number of functional cells in IVD. Moreover, the senescent disc cells were supposed to accelerate the process of IDD via their aberrant paracrine effects by which senescent cells cause the senescence of neighboring cells and enhance the matrix catabolism and inflammation in IVD. Thus, anti-senescence has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for IDD. However, the development of anti-senescence therapy is based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence. In this review, we focused on the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence, including the causes and various molecular pathways. We found that, during the process of IDD, age-related damages together with degenerative external stimuli activated both p53-p21-Rb and p16-Rb pathways to induce disc cell senescence. Meanwhile, disc cell senescence was regulated by multiple signaling pathways, suggesting the complex regulating network of disc cell senescence. To understand the mechanism of disc cell senescence better contributes to developing the anti-senescence-based therapies for IDD. PMID:27192096

  20. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  1. Molecular mechanisms of cell death in intervertebral disc degeneration (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FAN; ZHAO, XUELING; SHEN, HONGXING; ZHANG, CAIGUO

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are complex structures that consist of three parts, namely, nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus and cartilage endplates. With aging, IVDs gradually degenerate as a consequence of many factors, such as microenvironment changes and cell death. Human clinical trial and animal model studies have documented that cell death, particularly apoptosis and autophagy, significantly contribute to IVD degeneration. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon include the activation of apoptotic pathways and the regulation of autophagy in response to nutrient deprivation and multiple stresses. In this review, we briefly summarize recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of apoptosis and autophagy signaling pathways. In particular, we focus on studies that reveal the functional mechanisms of these pathways in IVD degeneration. PMID:27121482

  2. Biological repair of the degenerated intervertebral disc by the injection of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The homeostasis of intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues is accomplished through a complex and precise coordination of a variety of substances, including cytokines, growth factors, enzymes and enzyme inhibitors. Recent biological therapeutic strategies for disc degeneration have included attempts to up-regulate the production of key matrix proteins or to down-regulate the catabolic events induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Several approaches to deliver these therapeutic biologic agents have been proposed and tested in a preclinical setting. One of the most advanced biological therapeutic approaches to regenerate or repair a degenerated disc is the injection of a recombinant growth factor. Abundant evidence for the efficacy of growth factor injection therapy for the treatment of IVD degeneration can be found in preclinical animal studies. Recent data obtained from animal studies on changes in cytokine expression following growth factor injection illustrate the great potential for patients with chronic discogenic low back pain. The first clinical trial for growth factor injection has been initiated and the results of that study may prove the usefulness of growth factor injection for treating the symptoms of patients with degenerative disc diseases. The focus of this review article is the effects of an in vivo injection of growth factors on the biological repair of the degenerated intervertebral disc in animal models. The effects of growth factor injection on the symptoms of patients with low back pain, the therapeutic target of growth factor injection and the limitations of the efficacy of growth factor therapy are also reviewed. Further quantitative studies on the effect of growth factor injection on pain generation and the long term effects on the endplate and cell survival after an injection using large animals are needed. An international academic-industrial consortium addressing these aims, such as was achieved for osteoarthritis (The Osteoarthritis Initiative

  3. Modeling and optimization of an elastic arthroplastic disc for a degenerated disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouchani, Azadeh; Ravari, Mohammad; Mahmoudi, Farid

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the L3-L4 motion segment using ABAQUS v 6.9 has been developed. The model took into account the material nonlinearities and is imposed different loading conditions. In this study, we validated the model by comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data. Disc deformation under compression and segmental rotational motions under moment loads for the normal disc model agreed well with the corresponding in vivo studies. By linking ABAQUS with MATLAB 2010.a, we determined the optimal Young s modulus as well as the Poisson's ratio for the artificial disc under different physiologic loading conditions. The results of the present study confirmed that a well-designed elastic arthroplastic disc preferably has an annulus modulus of 19.1 MPa and 1.24 MPa for nucleus section and Poisson ratio of 0.41 and 0.47 respectively. Elastic artificial disc with such properties can then achieve the goal of restoring the disc height and mechanical function of intact disc under different loading conditions and so can reduce low back pain which is mostly caused due to disc degeneration.

  4. Effect of intervertebral disc degeneration on disc cell viability: a numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Galbusera, Fabio; Mietsch, Antje; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc may be initiated and supported by impairment of the nutrition processes of the disc cells. The effects of degenerative changes on cell nutrition are, however, only partially understood. In this work, a finite volume model was used to investigate the effect of endplate calcification, water loss, reduction of disc height and cyclic mechanical loading on the sustainability of the disc cell population. Oxygen, lactate and glucose diffusion, production and consumption were modelled with non-linear coupled partial differential equations. Oxygen and glucose consumption and lactate production were expressed as a function of local oxygen concentration, pH and cell density. The cell viability criteria were based on local glucose concentration and pH. Considering a disc with normal water content, cell death was initiated in the centre of the nucleus for oxygen, glucose, and lactate diffusivities in the cartilaginous endplate below 20% of the physiological values. The initial cell population could not be sustained even in the non-calcified endplates when a reduction of diffusion inside the disc due to water loss was modelled. Alterations in the disc shape such as height loss, which shortens the transport route between the nutrient sources and the cells, and cyclic mechanical loads, could enhance cell nutrition processes. PMID:21970697

  5. A Review of Animal Models of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pathophysiology, Regeneration, and Translation to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Daly, Chris; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham; Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Discogenic pain secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration is a significant cause of low back pain. Disc degeneration is a complex multifactorial process. Animal models are essential to furthering understanding of the degenerative process and testing potential therapies. The adult human lumbar intervertebral disc is characterized by the loss of notochordal cells, relatively large size, essentially avascular nature, and exposure to biomechanical stresses influenced by bipedalism. Animal models are compared with regard to the above characteristics. Numerous methods of inducing disc degeneration are reported. Broadly these can be considered under the categories of spontaneous degeneration, mechanical and structural models. The purpose of such animal models is to further our understanding and, ultimately, improve treatment of disc degeneration. The role of animal models of disc degeneration in translational research leading to clinical trials of novel cellular therapies is explored. PMID:27314030

  6. A Review of Animal Models of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pathophysiology, Regeneration, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Discogenic pain secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration is a significant cause of low back pain. Disc degeneration is a complex multifactorial process. Animal models are essential to furthering understanding of the degenerative process and testing potential therapies. The adult human lumbar intervertebral disc is characterized by the loss of notochordal cells, relatively large size, essentially avascular nature, and exposure to biomechanical stresses influenced by bipedalism. Animal models are compared with regard to the above characteristics. Numerous methods of inducing disc degeneration are reported. Broadly these can be considered under the categories of spontaneous degeneration, mechanical and structural models. The purpose of such animal models is to further our understanding and, ultimately, improve treatment of disc degeneration. The role of animal models of disc degeneration in translational research leading to clinical trials of novel cellular therapies is explored. PMID:27314030

  7. Assessment of Functional and Behavioral Changes Sensitive to Painful Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alon; Moon, Andrew; Purmessur, Devina; Skovrlj, Branko; Winkelstein, Beth A.; Cho, Samuel K.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Iatridis, James C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an in vivo rodent discogenic pain model can provide insight into mechanisms for painful disc degeneration. Painful disc degeneration in rodents can be inferred by examining responses to external stimuli, observing pain-related behaviors, and measuring functional performance. This study compared the sensitivity of multiple pain and functional assessment methods to disc disruption for identifying the parameters sensitive to painful disc degeneration in rats. Disc degeneration was induced in rats by annular injury with saline injection. The severity of disc degeneration, pain sensitivity, and functional performance were compared to sham and näve control rats. Saline injection induced disc degeneration with decreased disc height and MRI signal intensity as well as more fibrous nucleus pulposus, disorganized annular lamellae and decreased proteoglycan. Rats also demonstrated increased painful behaviors including decreased hindpaw mechanical and thermal sensitivities, increased grooming, and altered gait patterns with hindpaw mechanical hyperalgesia and duration of grooming tests being most sensitive. This is the first study to compare sensitivities of different pain assessment methods in an in vivo rat model of disc degeneration. Hindpaw mechanical sensitivity and duration of grooming were the most sensitive parameters to surgically induced degenerative changes and overall results were suggestive of disc degeneration associated pain. PMID:25731955

  8. Clinical Impact of Sagittal Spinopelvic Parameters on Disc Degeneration in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The sagittal balance plays an important role in the determination of shear and compressive forces applied on the anterior (vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs) and posterior (facet joints) elements of the lumbar vertebral column. Many studies have also examined the effect of structural changes in the disc on the biomechanical characteristics of the spinal segment. Nevertheless, the relationship between sagittal balance and the degree of disc degeneration has not been extensively explored. Thus, here we investigated the relationships between various sagittal spinopelvic parameters and the degree of disc degeneration in young adults. A total of 278 young adult male patients were included in this study (age range: 18–24 years old). Multiple sagittal spinopelvic parameters, including pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral inclination (SI), lumbosacral angle (LSA), and sacral table angle (STA), were measured from standing lateral lumbosacral radiographs. The degree of intervertebral disc degeneration was classified using a modified Pfirrmann scale. To assess the pain intensity of each patient, the visual analogue scale (VAS) score for low back pain (LBP) was obtained from all the patients. Finally, the relationships between these spinopelvic parameters and the degree of disc degeneration in young adults were analyzed. Also, we performed multiple logistic regression study. Out of all the spinopelvic parameters measured in this study, a low STA and a low SI were the only significant risk factors that were associated with disc degeneration in young adults. It means that patients with disc degeneration tend to have more severe sacral kyphosis and vertical sacrum. We found that patients with disc degeneration showed a lower SI and lower STA compared with patients without disc degeneration in young adults. Therefore, we suggest that the patients with disc degeneration tend to have more vertical sacrum, more

  9. Experimental model of intervertebral disc degeneration by needle puncture in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Issy, A.C.; Castania, V.; Castania, M.; Salmon, C.E.G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, M.H.; Bel, E. Del; Defino, H.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of intervertebral disc degeneration play an important role in clarifying the physiopathological mechanisms and testing novel therapeutic strategies. The objective of the present study is to describe a simple animal model of disc degeneration involving Wistar rats to be used for research studies. Disc degeneration was confirmed and classified by radiography, magnetic resonance and histological evaluation. Adult male Wistar rats were anesthetized and submitted to percutaneous disc puncture with a 20-gauge needle on levels 6-7 and 8-9 of the coccygeal vertebrae. The needle was inserted into the discs guided by fluoroscopy and its tip was positioned crossing the nucleus pulposus up to the contralateral annulus fibrosus, rotated 360° twice, and held for 30 s. To grade the severity of intervertebral disc degeneration, we measured the intervertebral disc height from radiographic images 7 and 30 days after the injury, and the signal intensity T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin-eosin and collagen fiber orientation using picrosirius red staining and polarized light microscopy. Imaging and histological score analyses revealed significant disc degeneration both 7 and 30 days after the lesion, without deaths or systemic complications. Interobserver histological evaluation showed significant agreement. There was a significant positive correlation between histological score and intervertebral disc height 7 and 30 days after the lesion. We conclude that the tail disc puncture method using Wistar rats is a simple, cost-effective and reproducible model for inducing disc degeneration. PMID:23532265

  10. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment for Discogenic Low Back Pain and Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zeckser, Jeffrey; Wolff, Michael; Tucker, Jason; Goodwin, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain with resultant loss of function, decreased productivity, and high economic costs is burdensome for both the individual and the society. Evidence suggests that intervertebral disc pathology is a major contributor to spine-related pain and degeneration. When commonly used conservative therapies fail, traditional percutaneous or surgical options may be beneficial for pain relief but are suboptimal because of their inability to alter disc microenvironment catabolism, restore disc tissue, and/or preserve native spine biomechanics. Percutaneously injected Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) therapy has recently gained clinical interest for its potential to revolutionarily treat disc-generated (discogenic) pain and associated disc degeneration. Unlike previous therapies to date, MSCs may uniquely offer the ability to improve discogenic pain and provide more sustained improvement by reducing disc microenvironment catabolism and regenerating disc tissue. Consistent treatment success has the potential to create a paradigm shift with regards to the treatment of discogenic pain and disc degeneration. PMID:26880958

  11. Investigation of intervertebral disc degeneration using multivariate FTIR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mader, Kerstin T; Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theo H; Le Maitre, Christine L; Sammon, Chris

    2016-06-23

    Traditionally tissue samples are analysed using protein or enzyme specific stains on serial sections to build up a picture of the distribution of components contained within them. In this study we investigated the potential of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to deconvolute 2nd derivative spectra of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images measured in transflectance mode of goat and human paraffin embedded intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue sections, to see if this methodology can provide analogous information to that provided by immunohistochemical stains and bioassays but from a single section. MCR-ALS analysis of non-degenerate and enzymatically in vivo degenerated goat IVDs reveals five matrix components displaying distribution maps matching histological stains for collagen, elastin and proteoglycan (PG), as well as immunohistochemical stains for collagen type I and II. Interestingly, two components exhibiting characteristic spectral and distribution profiles of proteoglycans were found, and relative component/tissue maps of these components (labelled PG1 and PG2) showed distinct distributions in non-degenerate versus mildly degenerate goat samples. MCR-ALS analysis of human IVD sections resulted in comparable spectral profiles to those observed in the goat samples, highlighting the inter species transferability of the presented methodology. Multivariate FTIR image analysis of a set of 43 goat IVD sections allowed the extraction of semi-quantitative information from component/tissue gradients taken across the IVD width of collagen type I, collagen type II, PG1 and PG2. Regional component/tissue parameters were calculated and significant correlations were found between histological grades of degeneration and PG parameters (PG1: p = 0.0003, PG2: p < 0.0001); glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0055, PG2: p = 0.0001); and MRI T2* measurements and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0021, PG2: p < 0.0001). Additionally

  12. The role of interleukin-1 in the pathogenesis of human Intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony J; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the hypotheses that in human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration there is local production of the cytokine IL-1, and that this locally produced cytokine can induce the cellular and matrix changes of IVD degeneration. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize five members of the IL-1 family (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1Ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), IL-1RI (IL-1 receptor, type I), and ICE (IL-1β-converting enzyme)) in non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. In addition, cells derived from non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs were challenged with IL-1 agonists and the response was investigated using real-time PCR for a number of matrix-degrading enzymes, matrix proteins, and members of the IL-1 family. This study has shown that native disc cells from non-degenerate and degenerate discs produced the IL-1 agonists, antagonist, the active receptor, and IL-1β-converting enzyme. In addition, immunopositivity for these proteins, with the exception of IL-1Ra, increased with severity of degeneration. We have also shown that IL-1 treatment of human IVD cells resulted in increased gene expression for the matrix-degrading enzymes (MMP 3 (matrix metalloproteinase 3), MMP 13 (matrix metalloproteinase 13), and ADAMTS-4 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs)) and a decrease in the gene expression for matrix genes (aggrecan, collagen II, collagen I, and SOX6). In conclusion we have shown that IL-1 is produced in the degenerate IVD. It is synthesized by native disc cells, and treatment of human disc cells with IL-1 induces an imbalance between catabolic and anabolic events, responses that represent the changes seen during disc degeneration. Therefore, inhibiting IL-1 could be an important therapeutic target for preventing and reversing disc degeneration. PMID:15987475

  13. Modic Changes and Disc Degeneration Caused by Inoculation of Propionibacterium acnes inside Intervertebral Discs of Rabbits: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Zheng, Yuehuan; Yuan, Ye; Jiao, Yucheng; Xiao, Jiaqi; Zhou, Zezhu; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether P. acnes could induce disc degeneration and Modic changes when inoculated into the discs of rabbits. Method. A wild-type strain of P. acnes isolated from a patient associated with Modic change and disc degeneration was inoculated into the intervertebral discs of rabbits. Meanwhile, S. aureus was injected into the discs to establish a model of discitis as the comparison and a standard strain of P. acnes was inoculated as the control. MRI and histological change were observed. Results. Both the P. acnes-inoculated and S. aureus-inoculated rabbits showed hyperintense signals at endplates and hypointense signals at nucleus pulposus on T2WI. However, P. acnes only resulted in moderate disc degeneration and endplates rupture in histological examination, which was different from the pathological change of discitis caused by S. aureus. In addition, higher death rates (2/3 versus 0/5) were observed in S. aureus-inoculated rabbits. Conclusion. Compared to S. aureus, the pathological change caused by P. acnes would be considered as Modic-I change and disc degeneration rather than a discitis. PMID:26925420

  14. Human cartilage endplate permeability varies with degeneration and intervertebral disc site.

    PubMed

    DeLucca, John F; Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; Vresilovic, Edward J; Duncan, Randall L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-02-29

    Despite the critical functions the human cartilage endplate (CEP) plays in the intervertebral disc, little is known about its structural and mechanical properties and their changes with degeneration. Quantifying these changes with degeneration is important for understanding how the CEP contributes to the function and pathology of the disc. Therefore the objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of disc degeneration on human CEP mechanical properties, determine the influence of superior and inferior disc site on mechanics and composition, and simulate the role of collagen fibers in CEP and disc mechanics using a validated finite element model. Confined compression data and biochemical composition data were used in a biphasic-swelling model to calculate compressive extrafibrillar elastic and permeability properties. Tensile properties were obtained by applying published tensile test data to an ellipsoidal fiber distribution. Results showed that with degeneration CEP permeability decreased 50-60% suggesting that transport is inhibited in the degenerate disc. CEP fibers are organized parallel to the vertebrae and nucleus pulposus and may contribute to large shear strains (0.1-0.2) and delamination failure of the CEP commonly seen in herniated disc tissue. Fiber-reinforcement also reduces CEP axial strains thereby enhancing fluid flux by a factor of 1.8. Collectively, these results suggest that the structure and mechanics of the CEP may play critical roles in the solute transport and disc mechanics. PMID:26874969

  15. Transplantation of goat bone marrow stromal cells to the degenerating intervertebral disc in a goat disc-injury model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yejia; Drapeau, Susan; An, Howard S.; Thonar, Eugene J-M.A.; Anderson, D. Greg

    2010-01-01

    Study Design In vivo randomized controlled study in the goat intervertebral disc (IVD) injury model. Objective To define the effects of allogeneic bone marrow-derived stromal cell injected into the degenerating goat IVDs. Summary of Background Data Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells to the degenerating disc has been suggested as a means to correct the biologic incompetence of the disc. However, large animal models with IVDs similar in shape and size to those of humans are needed to define the efficacy and safety of this approach. Methods Goat IVD degeneration was induced by stabbing with a #15 blade. One month after disc injury, the injured discs were randomly selected to receive goat bone marrow-derived stromal cell (suspended in hydrogel), saline (control), or hydrogel (control) injections. Three and 6 months after stem cell transplantation, goats were euthanized and the IVD were examined for biochemical content and tissue morphology. MR images at 3- and 6-month time points were also examined. Results The goat large animal model shows early degenerative changes following disc injury. Degenerating IVDs injected with bone marrow stromal cells showed significantly increased proteoglycan (PG) accumulation within their nucleus pulposus (NP) region. However, collagen content, MRI grade and histology did not show statistically significant differences between the cell-treated and control IVDs. Conclusions Following transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells, NP tissue contained more PG than control discs. Although this result was promising, the rate and severity of degeneration in this goat disc injury were modest, suggesting that a more severe injury and a larger sample size is indicated for future studies to better define the utility of cell therapies in this model. PMID:20890267

  16. Glucosamine Supplementation Demonstrates a Negative Effect On Intervertebral Disc Matrix in an Animal Model of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lloydine; Vo, Nam; Coehlo, J. Paulo; Dong, Qing; Bechara, Bernard; Woods, Barrett; Hempen, Eric; Hartman, Robert; Preuss, Harry; Balk, Judith; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Laboratory based controlled in vivo study Objective To determine the in vivo effects of oral glucosamine sulfate on intervertebral disc degeneration Summary of Background Data Although glucosamine has demonstrated beneficial effect in articular cartilage, clinical benefit is uncertain. A CDC report from 2009 reported that many patients are using glucosamine supplementation for low back pain (LBP), without significant evidence to support its use. Because disc degeneration is a major contributor of LBP, we explored the effects of glucosamine on disc matrix homeostasis in an animal model of disc degeneration. Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: control, annular puncture, glucosamine, and annular puncture+glucosamine. Glucosamine treated rabbits received daily oral supplementation with 107mg/day (weight based equivalent to human 1500mg/day). Annular puncture surgery involved puncturing the annulus fibrosus (AF) of 3 lumbar discs with a 16G needle to induce degeneration. Serial MRIs were obtained at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. Discs were harvested at 20 weeks for determination of glycosaminoglycan(GAG) content, relative gene expression measured by RT-PCR, and histological analyses. Results The MRI index and NP area of injured discs of glucosamine treated animals with annular puncture was found to be lower than that of degenerated discs from rabbits not supplemented with glucosamine. Consistent with this, decreased glycosaminoglycan was demonstrated in glucosamine fed animals, as determined by both histological and GAG content. Gene expression was consistent with a detrimental effect on matrix. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the net effect on matrix in an animal model in vivo, as measured by gene expression, MRI, histology, and total proteoglycan is anti-anabolic. This raises concern over this commonly used supplement, and future research is needed to establish the clinical relevance of these

  17. Evidence for an Important Role of Smad-7 in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Su, Yi-Jun; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Yang, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Sheng-Dan

    2015-01-01

    Smad-7 inhibited the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)-induced proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes and completely antagonized the effect of TGF-β on the proliferation of the cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of Smad-7 to the pathophysiology of disc degeneration by determining the expression of Smad-7 in the degenerative intervertebral discs and its effect on the extracellular matrix metabolism of disc cells. Instability of the lumbar spine produced by imbalanced dynamic and static forces was used to induce intervertebral disc degeneration in rats. The expression of Smad-7 was assessed by the immunohistochemical method. Disc cell apoptosis was detected by in situ TUNEL staining. The effect of Smad-7 overexpression on the matrix metabolism of disc cells was analyzed in vitro by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Finally, intradiscal injection of the Smad-7 overexpression lentivirus was performed to evaluate the in vivo effect of Smad-7 on disc degeneration. Radiographic and histomorphological examinations showed that lumbar disc degeneration became more and more severe in the rats with induced instability. Immunohistochemical observation demonstrated increasing protein expression of Smad-7 in the degenerative discs. A significantly positive correlation was found between Smad-7 expression and the degree of disc degeneration and between Smad-7 expression and disc cell apoptosis. Overexpression of Smad-7 in disc cells inhibited the expression of TGF-β1, collagen type-I, collagen type-II, and aggrecan and promoted the expression of MMP-13, but did not change the expression of ADAMTS-5. The in vivo findings illustrated that intradiscal injection of lentivirus vector with Smad-7 overexpression accelerated the progress of disc degeneration. In conclusion, Smad-7 was highly expressed in the degenerative discs. Overexpression of Smad-7 weakened the protective role of TGF-β and accelerated the progress of

  18. In Vivo Mouse Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Model Based on a New Histological Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Sudo, Hideki; Iwasaki, Koji; Tsujimoto, Takeru; Ito, Yoichi M.; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Although human intervertebral disc degeneration can lead to several spinal diseases, its pathogenesis remains unclear. This study aimed to create a new histological classification applicable to an in vivo mouse intervertebral disc degeneration model induced by needle puncture. One hundred six mice were operated and the L4/5 intervertebral disc was punctured with a 35- or 33-gauge needle. Micro-computed tomography scanning was performed, and the punctured region was confirmed. Evaluation was performed by using magnetic resonance imaging and histology by employing our classification scoring system. Our histological classification scores correlated well with the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and could detect degenerative progression, irrespective of the punctured region. However, the magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that there was no significant degenerative intervertebral disc change between the ventrally punctured and non-punctured control groups. To induce significant degeneration in the lumbar intervertebral discs, the central or dorsal region should be punctured instead of the ventral region. PMID:27482708

  19. Protective Effects of Cannabidiol on Lesion-Induced Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, João W.; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A.; Salmon, Carlos E. G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Defino, Helton L. A.; Bel, Elaine Del

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25517414

  20. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Silveira, João W; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A; Salmon, Carlos E G; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Guimarães, Francisco S; Defino, Helton L A; Del Bel, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  1. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Silveira, João W; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A; Salmon, Carlos E G; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Guimarães, Francisco S; Defino, Helton L A; Del Bel, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25517414

  2. Lumbar intervertebral disc puncture under C-arm fluoroscopy: a new rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Yang, Huilin; Huang, Yonghui; Wu, Yan; Sun, Taicun; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To establish a minimally invasive rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) to better understand the pathophysiology of the human condition. The annulus fibrosus of lumbar level 4-5 (L4-5) and L5-6 discs were punctured by 27-gauge needles using the posterior approach under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after disc puncture surgery to determine the degree of degeneration. All sixty discs (thirty rats) were punctured successfully. Only two of thirty rats subjected to the procedure exhibited immediate neurological symptoms. The MRI results indicated a gradual increase in Pfirrmann grade from 4 to 8 weeks post-surgery (P<0.05), and H&E staining demonstrated a parallel increase in histological grade (P<0.05). Expression levels of aggrecan, type II collagen (Col2), and Sox9 mRNAs, which encode disc components, decreased gradually post-surgery. In contrast, mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col1), an indicator of fibrosis, increased (P<0.05). The procedure of annular puncture using a 27-gauge needle under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance had a high success rate. Histological, MRI, and RT-PCR results revealed that the rat model of disc degeneration is a progressive pathological process that is similar to human IDD.

  3. Soft tissue ossification and condylar cartilage degeneration following TMJ disc perforation in a rabbit pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Iwaoka, George M.; Kong, Danielle; Martin, Brittany N.; Patel, Ryan K.; Lee, Andrew; Nathan, John M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Safarov, Aram; Koslovsky, David A; Koch, Alia; Romanov, Alex; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are limited clinical treatments for temporomandibular joint pathologies, including degenerative disease, disc perforation and heterotopic ossification. One barrier hindering the development of new therapies is that animal models recapitulating TMJ diseases are poorly established. The objective of this study was to develop an animal model for TMJ cartilage degeneration and disc pathology, including disc perforation and soft tissue heterotopic ossification. Methods New Zealand white rabbits (n=9 rabbits) underwent unilateral TMJ disc perforation surgery and sham surgery on the contralateral side. A 2.5 mm defect was created using a punch biopsy in rabbit TMJ disc. The TMJ condyles and discs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Condyles were blindly scored by 4 independent observers using OARSI recommendations for macroscopic and histopathological scoring of osteoarthritis in rabbit tissues. Results Histological evidence of TMJ condylar cartilage degeneration was apparent in experimental condyles following disc perforation relative to sham controls after 4 and 8 weeks, including surface fissures and loss of Safranin O staining. At 12 weeks, OARSI scores indicated experimental condylar cartilage erosion into the subchondral bone. Most strikingly, heterotopic ossification occurred within the TMJ disc upon perforation injury in 6 rabbits after 8 and 12 weeks. Conclusion We report for the first time a rabbit TMJ injury model that demonstrates condylar cartilage degeneration and disc ossification, which is indispensible for testing the efficacy of potential TMJ therapies. PMID:25573797

  4. MRI quantification of human spine cartilage endplate geometry: Comparison with age, degeneration, level, and disc geometry.

    PubMed

    DeLucca, John F; Peloquin, John M; Smith, Lachlan J; Wright, Alexander C; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-08-01

    Geometry is an important indicator of disc mechanical function and degeneration. While the geometry and associated degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus are well-defined, the geometry of the cartilage endplate (CEP) and its relationship to disc degeneration are unknown. The objectives of this study were to quantify CEP geometry in three dimensions using an MRI FLASH imaging sequence and evaluate relationships between CEP geometry and age, degeneration, spinal level, and overall disc geometry. To do so, we assessed the MRI-based measurements for accuracy and repeatability. Next, we measured CEP geometry across a larger sample set and correlated CEP geometric parameters to age, disc degeneration, level, and disc geometry. The MRI-based measures resulted in thicknesses (0.3-1 mm) that are comparable to prior measurements of CEP thickness. CEP thickness was greatest at the anterior/posterior (A/P) margins and smallest in the center. The CEP A/P thickness, axial area, and lateral width decreased with age but were not related to disc degeneration. Age-related, but not degeneration-related, changes in geometry suggest that the CEP may not follow the progression of disc degeneration. Ultimately, if the CEP undergoes significant geometric changes with aging and if these can be related to low back pain, a clinically feasible translation of the FLASH MRI-based measurement of CEP geometry presented in this study may prove a useful diagnostic tool. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1410-1417, 2016.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Disc Degeneration Using Axial T2 Mapping in a Percutaneous Annular Puncture Model in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jee Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Su-Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate T2 relaxation time change using axial T2 mapping in a rabbit degenerated disc model and determine the most correlated variable with histologic score among T2 relaxation time, disc height index, and Pfirrmann grade. Materials and Methods Degenerated disc model was made in 4 lumbar discs of 11 rabbits (n = 44) by percutaneous annular puncture with various severities of an injury. Lumbar spine lateral radiograph, MR T2 sagittal scan and MR axial T2 mapping were obtained at baseline and 2 weeks and 4 weeks after the injury in 7 rabbits and at baseline and 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks after the injury in 4 rabbits. Generalized estimating equations were used for a longitudinal analysis of changes in T2 relaxation time in degenerated disc model. T2 relaxation time, disc height index and Pfirrmann grade were correlated with the histologic scoring of disc degeneration using Spearman's rho test. Results There was a significant difference in T2 relaxation time between uninjured and injured discs after annular puncture. Progressive decrease in T2 relaxation time was observed in injured discs throughout the study period. Lower T2 relaxation time was observed in the more severely injured discs. T2 relaxation time showed the strongest inverse correlation with the histologic score among the variables investigated (r = -0.811, p < 0.001). Conclusion T2 relaxation time measured with axial T2 mapping in degenerated discs is a potential method to assess disc degeneration. PMID:26798222

  6. Human L3L4 intervertebral disc mean 3D shape, modes of variation, and their relationship to degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, John M.; Yoder, Jonathon H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Moon, Sung M.; Wright, Alexander C.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc mechanics are affected by both disc shape and disc degeneration, which in turn each affect the other; disc mechanics additionally have a role in the etiology of disc degeneration. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a favored tool to investigate these relationships, but limited data for intervertebral disc 3D shape has forced the use of simplified or single-subject geometries, with the effect of inter-individual shape variation investigated only in specialized studies. Similarly, most data on disc shape variation with degeneration is based on 2D mid-sagittal images, which incompletely define 3D shape changes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify inter-individual disc shape variation in 3D, classify this variation into independently-occurring modes using a statistical shape model, and identify correlations between disc shape and degeneration. Three-dimensional disc shapes were obtained from MRI of 13 human male cadaver L3L4 discs. An average disc shape and four major modes of shape variation (representing 90% of the variance) were identified. The first mode represented disc axial area and was significantly correlated to degeneration (R2 = 0.44), indicating larger axial area in degenerate discs. Disc height variation occurred in three distinct modes, each also involving non-height variation. The statistical shape model provides an average L3L4 disc shape for FEA that is fully defined in 3D, and makes it convenient to generate a set of shapes with which to represent aggregate inter-individual variation. Degeneration grade-specific shapes can also be generated. To facilitate application, the model is included in this paper’s supplemental content. PMID:24792581

  7. Human L3L4 intervertebral disc mean 3D shape, modes of variation, and their relationship to degeneration.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Yoder, Jonathon H; Jacobs, Nathan T; Moon, Sung M; Wright, Alexander C; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-07-18

    Intervertebral disc mechanics are affected by both disc shape and disc degeneration, which in turn each affect the other; disc mechanics additionally have a role in the etiology of disc degeneration. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a favored tool to investigate these relationships, but limited data for intervertebral disc 3D shape has forced the use of simplified or single-subject geometries, with the effect of inter-individual shape variation investigated only in specialized studies. Similarly, most data on disc shape variation with degeneration is based on 2D mid-sagittal images, which incompletely define 3D shape changes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify inter-individual disc shape variation in 3D, classify this variation into independently-occurring modes using a statistical shape model, and identify correlations between disc shape and degeneration. Three-dimensional disc shapes were obtained from MRI of 13 human male cadaver L3L4 discs. An average disc shape and four major modes of shape variation (representing 90% of the variance) were identified. The first mode represented disc axial area and was significantly correlated to degeneration (R(2)=0.44), indicating larger axial area in degenerate discs. Disc height variation occurred in three distinct modes, each also involving non-height variation. The statistical shape model provides an average L3L4 disc shape for FEA that is fully defined in 3D, and makes it convenient to generate a set of shapes with which to represent aggregate inter-individual variation. Degeneration grade-specific shapes can also be generated. To facilitate application, the model is included in this paper׳s supplemental content. PMID:24792581

  8. Advances in Susceptibility Genetics of Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin'gang; Sun, Zhengming; Liu, Jiangtao; Guo, Xiong

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that the etiology of lumbar disc herniation is primarily due to age, gender, occupation, smoking and exposure to vehicular vibration dominated much of the last century. Recent research indicates that heredity may be largely responsible for the degeneration as well as herniation of intervertebral discs. Since 1998, genetic influences have been confirmed by the identification of several genes forms associated with disc degeneration. These researches are paving the way for a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms. Now, many researchers unanimously agree that lumbar disc herniation appears to be similar to other complex diseases, whose etiology has both environmental and hereditary influence, each with a part of contribution and relative risk. Then addressing the etiological of lumbar disc herniation, it is important to integrate heredity with the environment factors. For the purpose of this review, we have limited our discussion to several susceptibility genes associated with disc degeneration. PMID:18781226

  9. Effects of Tobacco Smoking on the Degeneration of the Intervertebral Disc: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Elmasry, Shady; Asfour, Shihab; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Travascio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Compelling experimental evidence associates smoking to the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In particular, it has been shown that nicotine down-regulates both the proliferation rate and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis of disc cells. Moreover, tobacco smoking causes the constriction of the vascular network surrounding the IVD, thus reducing the exchange of nutrients and anabolic agents from the blood vessels to the disc. It has been hypothesized that both nicotine presence in the IVD and the reduced solute exchange are responsible for the degeneration of the disc due to tobacco smoking, but their effects on tissue homeostasis have never been quantified. In this study, a previously presented computational model describing the homeostasis of the IVD was deployed to investigate the effects of impaired solute supply and nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell proliferation and biosynthetic activity on the health of the disc. We found that the nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell anabolism mostly affected the GAG concentration at the cartilage endplate, reducing it up to 65% of the value attained in normal physiological conditions. In contrast, the reduction of solutes exchange between blood vessels and disc tissue mostly affected the nucleus pulposus, whose cell density and GAG levels were reduced up to 50% of their normal physiological levels. The effectiveness of quitting smoking on the regeneration of a degenerated IVD was also investigated, and showed to have limited benefit on the health of the disc. A cell-based therapy in conjunction with smoke cessation provided significant improvements in disc health, suggesting that, besides quitting smoking, additional treatments should be implemented in the attempt to recover the health of an IVD degenerated by tobacco smoking.

  10. Effects of Tobacco Smoking on the Degeneration of the Intervertebral Disc: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Elmasry, Shady; Asfour, Shihab; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Travascio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Compelling experimental evidence associates smoking to the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In particular, it has been shown that nicotine down-regulates both the proliferation rate and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis of disc cells. Moreover, tobacco smoking causes the constriction of the vascular network surrounding the IVD, thus reducing the exchange of nutrients and anabolic agents from the blood vessels to the disc. It has been hypothesized that both nicotine presence in the IVD and the reduced solute exchange are responsible for the degeneration of the disc due to tobacco smoking, but their effects on tissue homeostasis have never been quantified. In this study, a previously presented computational model describing the homeostasis of the IVD was deployed to investigate the effects of impaired solute supply and nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell proliferation and biosynthetic activity on the health of the disc. We found that the nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell anabolism mostly affected the GAG concentration at the cartilage endplate, reducing it up to 65% of the value attained in normal physiological conditions. In contrast, the reduction of solutes exchange between blood vessels and disc tissue mostly affected the nucleus pulposus, whose cell density and GAG levels were reduced up to 50% of their normal physiological levels. The effectiveness of quitting smoking on the regeneration of a degenerated IVD was also investigated, and showed to have limited benefit on the health of the disc. A cell-based therapy in conjunction with smoke cessation provided significant improvements in disc health, suggesting that, besides quitting smoking, additional treatments should be implemented in the attempt to recover the health of an IVD degenerated by tobacco smoking. PMID:26301590

  11. Stem Cell Therapies for Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Immune Privilege Reinforcement by Fas/FasL Regulating Machinery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi-Jiao; Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    As a main contributing factor to low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the fundamental basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. The pros and cons of current treatment modalities necessitate biological treatment strategies targeting for reversing or altering the degeneration process in terms of molecules or genes. The advances in stem cell research facilitate the studies aiming for possible clinical application of stem cell therapies for IDD. Human NP cells are versatile with cell morphology full of variety, capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix components, engulfing substances by autophagy and phagocytosis, mitochondrial vacuolization indicating dysfunction, expressing Fas and FasL as significant omens of immune privileged sites. Human discs belong to immune privilege organs with functional FasL expression, which can interact with invasive immune cells by Fas-FasL regulatory machinery. IDD is characterized by decreased expression level of FasL with dysfunctional FasL, which in turn unbalances the interaction between NP cells and immune cells. Certain modulation factors might play a role in the process, such as miR-155. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas-FasL network expresses in a variety of stem cells. Given the expression of functional FasL and insensitive Fas in stem cells (we term as FasL privilege), transplantation of stem cells into the disc may regenerate the degenerative disc by not only differentiating into NP-like cells, increasing extracellular matrix, but also reinforce immune privilege via interaction with immune cells by Fas-FasL network.

  12. Prevalence and pattern of radiographic intervertebral disc degeneration in Vietnamese: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Pham, Hoa N; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2015-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet few data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic IDD in a Vietnamese population. This population-based cross-sectional investigation involved 170 men and 488 women aged ≥40 years, who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Anthropometric data, clinical history and self-reported back and neck pain were ascertained by a questionnaire. Plain radiographs (from the cervical spine, thoracic spine to the lumbar spine) were examined for the presence of disc space narrowing and/or osteophytosis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. The presence of radiographic IDD was defined if the KL grade was 2 or greater in at least one disc. The prevalence of radiographic IDD was 62.4% (n = 106) in men and 54.7% (n = 267) in women. The most frequently affected site was the lumbar spine with prevalence being 50.6 and 43.2% in men and women, respectively. The prevalence of IDD increased with advancing age: 18.8% among those aged 40-49 years, and increased to 83.4% in those aged ≥60 years. Self-reported neck pain and lower back pain were found in 30 and 44% of individuals, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between self-reported neck pain and cervical spine OA. These data suggest that radiographic IDD is highly prevalent in the Vietnamese population, and that self-reported back pain is not a sensitive indicator of IDD.

  13. Prevalence and pattern of radiographic intervertebral disc degeneration in Vietnamese: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Pham, Hoa N; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2015-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of the most common skeletal disorders, yet few data are available in Asian populations. We sought to assess the prevalence and pattern of radiographic IDD in a Vietnamese population. This population-based cross-sectional investigation involved 170 men and 488 women aged ≥40 years, who were randomly sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Anthropometric data, clinical history and self-reported back and neck pain were ascertained by a questionnaire. Plain radiographs (from the cervical spine, thoracic spine to the lumbar spine) were examined for the presence of disc space narrowing and/or osteophytosis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. The presence of radiographic IDD was defined if the KL grade was 2 or greater in at least one disc. The prevalence of radiographic IDD was 62.4% (n = 106) in men and 54.7% (n = 267) in women. The most frequently affected site was the lumbar spine with prevalence being 50.6 and 43.2% in men and women, respectively. The prevalence of IDD increased with advancing age: 18.8% among those aged 40-49 years, and increased to 83.4% in those aged ≥60 years. Self-reported neck pain and lower back pain were found in 30 and 44% of individuals, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between self-reported neck pain and cervical spine OA. These data suggest that radiographic IDD is highly prevalent in the Vietnamese population, and that self-reported back pain is not a sensitive indicator of IDD. PMID:25791571

  14. High mechanical strain of primary intervertebral disc cells promotes secretion of inflammatory factors associated with disc degeneration and pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Excessive mechanical loading of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is thought to alter matrix properties and influence disc cell metabolism, contributing to degenerative disc disease and development of discogenic pain. However, little is known about how mechanical strain induces these changes. This study investigated the cellular and molecular changes as well as which inflammatory receptors and cytokines were upregulated in human intervertebral disc cells exposed to high mechanical strain (HMS) at low frequency. The impact of these metabolic changes on neuronal differentiation was also explored to determine a role in the development of disc degeneration and discogenic pain. Methods Isolated human annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were exposed to HMS (20% cyclical stretch at 0.001 Hz) on high-extension silicone rubber dishes coupled to a mechanical stretching apparatus and compared to static control cultures. Gene expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), neuronal growth factor (NGF) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) was assessed. Collected conditioned media were analysed for cytokine content and applied to rat pheocromocytoma PC12 cells for neuronal differentiation assessment. Results HMS caused upregulation of TLR2, TLR4, NGF and TNFα gene expression in IVD cells. Medium from HMS cultures contained elevated levels of growth-related oncogene, interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), MCP-3, monokine induced by γ interferon, transforming growth factor β1, TNFα and NGF. Exposure of PC12 cells to HMS-conditioned media resulted in both increased neurite sprouting and cell death. Conclusions HMS culture of IVD cells in vitro drives cytokine and inflammatory responses associated with degenerative disc disease and low-back pain. This study provides evidence for a direct link between cellular strain, secretory factors, neoinnervation and potential degeneration and discogenic pain in vivo. PMID:24457003

  15. Class 3 semaphorins expression and association with innervation and angiogenesis within the degenerate human intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Anthony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-07-30

    Nerve and blood vessel ingrowth during intervertebral disc degeneration, is thought to be a major cause of low back pain, however the regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression and regulation of a subclass of axonal guidance molecules known as the class 3 semaphorins, and their receptors; plexins and neuropilins within human NP tissue and their regulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly this determined whether semaphorin expression was associated with the presence of nerves and blood vessels in tissues from human intervertebral discs. The study demonstrated that semaphorin3A, 3C, 3D, 3E and 3F and their receptors were expressed by native NP cells and further demonstrated their expression was regulated by IL-1β but to a lesser extent by IL-6 and TNFα. This is the first study to identify sema3C, sema3D and their receptors within the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. Immunopositivity shows significant increases in semaphorin3C, 3D and their receptor neuropilin-2 in degenerate samples which were shown to contain nerves and blood vessels, compared to non-degenerate samples without nerves and blood vessels. Therefore data presented here suggests that semaphorin3C may have a role in promoting innervation and vascularisation during degeneration, which may go on to cause low back pain.

  16. Calcium pentosan polysulfate and sodium pentosan polysulfate may be used to treat intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Wang, Jia; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Sheng-Fei; Qi, Feng; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a major health problem world-wide, and several spinal disorders are closely associated with it. Although people have invested a great deal of time and effort, how to prevent and reverse the IDD for the researchers is still a difficult and hot issue. Intervertebral disc belongs to cartilage tissue, and IDD also is the cartilage degeneration disease. A large quantity of studies have shown that Calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) and sodium pentosan polysulfate (NaPPS) possess chondroprotective activities and play an important role in maintaining cartilage integrity. We reasonably hypothesize that NaPPS and CaPPS may be used to treat IDD. The possible mechanism may include that: (1) the significant effects of NaPPS and CaPPS in improving capillary blood flow could maintain nutritional supply to intervertebral disc, and preserve intervertebral disc tissue against degeneration; (2) CaPPS and NaPPS preserve cartilage integrity, proteoglycan synthesis, and improve cartilage biomechanical properties; (3) as the multifaceted exosite inhibitors of proteinases NaPPS and CaPPS strongly impede the activity and production of proteinases; (4) promotion of the balance between proteinases and TIMPs also may be involved in treating IDD; (5) NaPPS and CaPPS exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, and then reduce inflammation-induced IDD. If the hypothesis were conformed, the symptoms caused by IDD and its related diseases would be a corresponding alleviation or even disappearance, which could greatly alleviate the suffering of patients from disc degeneration diseases. Certainly, many roles of CaPPS and NaPPS, such as effectiveness, safety and side effects, need to be tested, and further works such as animal model and clinical trial, need to be done to prove this hypothesis.

  17. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    SciTech Connect

    Purmessur, D.; Walter, B.A.; Roughley, P.J.; Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C.; Iatridis, James

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  18. Spontaneous disc degeneration in the baboon model: magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Platenberg, R C; Hubbard, G B; Ehler, W J; Hixson, C J

    2001-10-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of disability in humans. The baboon model is an excellent natural disease model to study comparable human disease, because baboons are relatively large (adult males 20-26 kg, adult females 12-17 kg), long-lived (30-45 years), well defined, easy to use, and closely related to humans. Published investigations with plain radiographs of disc degeneration in baboons indicated vertebral anatomy and changes that were remarkably similar to those seen in humans, and it would be valuable to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluation would be useful methods for studying the model, as MRI allows multi-planar visualization of tissues without the use of intravenous contrast and it is superior for evaluating disc hydration, annulus tears, and herniations. The thoracolumbar junctions from 47 randomly selected baboons, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 34 years, were evaluated with MRI and histopathology. Excellent correlation with MRI was observed for changes in disc desiccation, height, and age (P < 0.001). The pathologic analysis demonstrated P values of < 0.001 when comparing histopathology with age and MRI results. All severely degenerated discs seen by MRI were in baboons 14 years of age or older.

  19. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  20. Catabolic effects of endothelial cell-derived microparticles on disc cells: Implications in intervertebral disc neovascularization and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Pedro H I; Lozito, Thomas P; Cuperman, Thais; Yurube, Takashi; Moon, Hong J; Ngo, Kevin; Tuan, Rocky S; St Croix, Claudette; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Rodrigues, Luciano M R; Kang, James D; Vo, Nam V

    2016-08-01

    Neovascularization of intervertebral discs, a phenomenon considered pathological since normal discs are primarily avascular structures, occurs most frequently in annulus fibrosus (AF) of degenerated discs. Endothelial cells (ECs) are involved in this process, but the mechanism of the interaction between AF and endothelial cells is unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effects on matrix catabolic activity of AF cells by the extracellular endothelial microparticles (EMPs) and soluble protein factors (SUP fraction) produced from ECs. Passage 1 human AF cells grown in monolayer cultures were treated for 72 h with 250 µg of EMPs or SUP fraction isolated from culture of the microvascular endothelial cell line, HEMC-I. Live-cell imaging revealed uptake of EMPs by AF cells. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-1 (50.3-fold), MMP-3 (4.5-fold) and MMP-13 (5.5-fold) in AF cell cultures treated with EMPs compared to untreated control. Western analysis also demonstrated increased MMP protein expression in EMP-treated AF cells. AF cells treated with the SUP fraction also exhibited a dramatic increase in MMP mRNA and protein expression. Increased MMP expression is primarily due to EMP or SUP stimulation of AF cells since EMPs or SUP fraction alone contained negligible amount of MMPs. Interestingly, MMP activity was elevated in AF cell cultures treated with EMPs but not with SUP. This study revealed enhanced matrix catabolism as a molecular consequence of action of ECs on AF cells via EMPs, which might be expected during neo-angiogenesis of degenerating disc. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1466-1474, 2016. PMID:27246627

  1. Altered Helical Axis Patterns of the Lumbar Spine Indicate Increased Instability with Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Nuckley, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the causes of low back pain are poorly defined and indistinct, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is most often implicated as the origin of pain. The biochemical and mechanical changes associated with degeneration result in the discs’ inability to maintain structure and function, leading to spinal instability and ultimately pain. Traditionally, a clinical exam assessing functional range-of-motion coupled with T2-weighted MRI revealing disc morphology are used to evaluate spinal health; however, these subjective measures fail to correlate well with pain or provide useful patient stratification. Therefore, improved quantification of spinal motion and objective MRI measures of disc health are necessary. An instantaneous helical axis (IHA) approach provides rich temporal three-dimensional data describing the pathway of motion, which is easily visualized. Eighteen cadaveric osteoligamentous lumbar spines (L4-5) from throughout the degenerative spectrum were tested in a pure moment fashion. IHA were calculated for flexion-extension and lateral bending. A correlational study design was used to determine the relationship between disc measurements from quantitative T2* MRI and IHA metrics. Increased instability and out-of-plane rotation with diminished disc health was observed during lateral bending, but not flexion-extension. This new analysis strategy examines the entire pathway of motion, rather than simplifying spinal kinematics to its terminal ends of motion and provides a more sensitive kinematic measurement of disc health. Ultimately, through the use of 3D dynamic fluoroscopy or similar methods, a patient's functional IHA in lateral bending may be measured and used to assess their disc health for diagnosis, progression tracking, and treatment evaluation. PMID:25481221

  2. MSC response to pH levels found in degenerating intervertebral discs

    SciTech Connect

    Wuertz, Karin Godburn, Karolyn; Iatridis, James C.

    2009-02-20

    Painful degenerative disc disease is a major health problem and for successful tissue regeneration, MSCs must endure and thrive in a harsh disc microenvironment that includes matrix acidity as a critical factor. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of Sprague-Dawley rats from two different age groups (<1 month, n = 6 and 4-5 months, n = 6) and cultured under four different pH conditions representative of the healthy, mildly or severely degenerated intervertebral disc (pH 7.4, 7.1, 6.8, and 6.5) for 5 days. Acidity caused an inhibition of aggrecan, collagen-1, and TIMP-3 expression, as well as a decrease in proliferation and viability and was associated with a change in cell morphology. Ageing had generally minor effects but young MSCs maintained greater mRNA expression levels. As acidic pH levels are typical of increasingly degenerated discs, our findings demonstrate the importance of early interventions and predifferentiation when planning to use MSCs for reparative treatments.

  3. Lumbar disc degeneration below a long arthrodesis (performed for scoliosis in adults) to L4 or L5.

    PubMed

    Harding, Ian J; Charosky, Sebastian; Vialle, Raphael; Chopin, Daniel H

    2008-02-01

    A retrospective analysis of adults treated with long instrumented fusion for scoliosis from the thoracic spine proximally to L4 or L5. To evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes as well as radiological changes in distal unfused mobile segments and to evaluate factors that may predispose to distal disc degeneration and/or poor outcome. A total of 151 mobile segments in 85 patients (65 female), mean age 43.2 (range 21-68), were studied. Curve type, number of fused levels and pelvic incidence were recorded. Clinical outcome was measured using the Whitecloud function scale and disc degeneration using the UCLA disc degeneration score. Spinal balance, local segmental angulations and lumbar lordosis were measured pre- and post-operatively as well as at the most recent follow up--mean 9.3 years (range 7-19). A total of 62% of patients had a good or excellent outcome. Eleven had a poor outcome of which ten underwent extension of fusion--five for pain alone, three for pain with stenosis and two for pseudarthroses. Pre-operative disc degeneration was often asymmetric and was slightly greater in older patients. Overall, there was a significant deterioration in disc degeneration (P < 0.0001) that did not correlate with clinical outcome. Disc degeneration correlated with the recent sagittal balance (Anova F = 14.285, P < 0.001) and the most recent lordosis (Anova F = 4.057, P = 0.048). The post-operative sagittal balance and local L5-S1 sagittal angulation correlated to L4 and L5 degeneration, respectively. There was no correlation between degeneration and age, pre-operative degenerative score, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, number of fused levels or distal level of fusion. Disc degeneration does occur below an arthrodesis for scoliosis in adults which does not correlate with clinical outcome. The correlation of loss of sagittal balance with disc degeneration may be as a result of degeneration causing the loss of balance or vice versa, i.e. sagittal imbalance causing

  4. The Involvement of Protease Nexin-1 (PN1) in the Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc (IVD) Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Liu, Wei; Duan, Zhenfeng; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Song, Yu; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Protease nexin-1 (PN-1) is a serine protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin superfamily. This study was undertaken to investigate the regulatory role of PN-1 in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration. Expression of PN-1 was detected in human IVD tissue of varying grades. Expression of both PN-1 mRNA and protein was significantly decreased in degenerated IVD, and the expression levels of PN-1 were correlated with the grade of disc degeneration. Moreover, a decrease in PN-1 expression in primary NP cells was confirmed. On induction by IL-1β, the expression of PN-1 in NP cells was decreased at day 7, 14, and 21, as shown by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. PN-1 administration decreased IL-1β-induced MMPs and ADAMTS production and the loss of Agg and Col II in NP cell cultures through the ERK1/2/NF-kB signaling pathway. The changes in PN-1 expression are involved in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. Our findings indicate that PN-1 administration could antagonize IL-1β-induced MMPs and ADAMTS, potentially preventing degeneration of IVD tissue. This study also revealed new insights into the regulation of PN-1 expression via the ERK1/2/NF-kB signaling pathway and the role of PN-1 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:27460424

  5. Reconstitution of degenerated ovine lumbar discs by STRO-3-positive allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells combined with pentosan polysulfate.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Ghosh, Peter; Goldschlager, Tony; Itescu, Silviu; Shimon, Susan; Wu, Jiehua; McDonald, Courtney; Troupis, John M; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Jenkin, Graham

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Disc degeneration and associated low-back pain are major causes of suffering and disability. The authors examined the potential of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs), when formulated with pentosan polysulfate (PPS), to ameliorate disc degeneration in an ovine model. METHODS Twenty-four sheep had annular incisions made at L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 to induce degeneration. Twelve weeks after injury, the nucleus pulposus of a degenerated disc in each animal was injected with ProFreeze and PPS formulated with either a low dose (0.1 million MPCs) or a high dose (0.5 million MPCs) of cells. The 2 adjacent injured discs in each spine were either injected with PPS and ProFreeze (PPS control) or not injected (nil-injected control). The adjacent noninjured L1-2 and L5-6 discs served as noninjured control discs. Disc height indices (DHIs) were obtained at baseline, before injection, and at planned death. After necropsy, 24 weeks after injection, the spines were subjected to MRI and morphological, histological, and biochemical analyses. RESULTS Twelve weeks after the annular injury, all the injured discs exhibited a significant reduction in mean DHI (low-dose group 17.19%; high-dose group 18.01% [p < 0.01]). Twenty-four weeks after injections, the discs injected with the low-dose MPC+PPS formulation recovered disc height, and their mean DHI was significantly greater than the DHI of PPS- and nil-injected discs (p < 0.001). Although the mean Pfirrmann MRI disc degeneration score for the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected discs was lower than that for the nil- and PPS-injected discs, the differences were not significant. The disc morphology scores for the nil- and PPS-injected discs were significantly higher than the normal control disc scores (p < 0.005), whereas the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected disc scores were not significantly different from those of the normal controls. The mean glycosaminoglycan content of the nuclei pulposus of the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected discs was significantly

  6. Advances in the management of macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current management of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be divided into two categories: first, anti-vasoendothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection for wet macular degeneration; second, anti-oxidant vitamins for dry macular degeneration. New therapies are being developed for both of these diseases using novel technologies and different modes of administration. The hope is that some of these therapies will achieve significant improvement to current management and prevent future loss of vision in this devastating eye condition. PMID:24860651

  7. Correlation of serum trace elements and melatonin levels to radiological, biochemical, and histological assessment of degeneration in patients with intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Yenisey, Cigdem; Akyüz, Orhan; Ozsunar, Yelda; Erkus, Muhan; Biçakçi, Tuncay

    2006-02-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the blood concentrations of some trace elements and melatonin (MLT) in patients with intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) and to investigate the interaction of histological and biochemical degeneration findings with aging. The present study was carried out on 13 subjects (8 women and 5 men) diagnosed with IDH. They were divided into three groups according to their ages. Nighttime serum MLT, zinc (Zn), and magnesium (Mg) levels were determined in all patients. In addition, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the lumbar spine were obtained in this study. The Zn level and Zn/Mg ratio showed a decline in patients with IDH with aging, whereas the serum Mg level and tissue hydroxyproline content increased. A positive correlation between serum Zn and MLT concentrations was found (r=0.104, p=0.734). In addition, there was a positive correlation between serum Zn level and Zn/Mg ratio (r=0.835 and p<0.01), and a negative correlation between serum Mg level and Zn/Mg ratio (r=-0.571, p<0.05). On CT study, both volume percentage of calcified pineal gland and density of calcification were found to increase progressively with advancing age. The results of semiquantitative evaluation of disc tissues of patients with IDH for histological degeneration findings showed that 66.7% of discs treated had slight degeneration in younger age group, but 75.0% and 100% of discs had moderate or marked degeneration in older age groups. Our data indicated that there is a close relationship between MLT and Zn or Mg levels in the serum samples of patients with IDH, and the levels of these elements might be affected by the presence of degeneration process and serum MLT level, or vice versa. PMID:16444002

  8. High Prevalence of Disc Degeneration and Spondylolysis in the Lumbar Spine of Professional Beach Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Külling, Fabrice A.; Florianz, Hannes; Reepschläger, Bastian; Gasser, Johann; Jost, Bernhard; Lajtai, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background: Beach volleyball is an intensive sport with high impact on the lumbar spine. Low back pain (LBP) is frequent among elite players. Increased prevalence of pathological changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lumbar spine of elite athletes has been reported. Hypothesis: There is an increased prevalence of disc degeneration and spondylolysis in the MRI of the lumbar spine of professional beach volleyball players. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-nine fully competitive professional male volleyball players (mean age, 28 years) completed outcomes questionnaires and underwent a complete clinical examination and an MRI of their lumbar spine. Results: Whereas 86% of players suffered from LBP during their career, the incidence of LBP in the last 4 weeks was 35%. Pain rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) averaged 3 points (range, 0-8). Twenty-three of 29 players (79%) had at least 1 degenerated disc of Pfirrmann grade ≥3. The most affected spinal levels were L4-5 in 14 (48%) and L5-S1 in 15 players (52%); both levels were involved in 5 players (17%). Six of 29 (21%) players showed a spondylolysis grade 4 according to the Hollenburg classification; there was evidence of spondylolisthesis in 2 players. There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities. Conclusion: In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%. Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population. Abnormal MRI findings did not correlate with LBP, thus MRIs have to be interpreted with caution. PMID:26535316

  9. Stemming the Degeneration: IVD Stem Cells and Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivakamasundari, V; Lufkin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is immensely important for the integrity of vertebral column function. The highly specialized IVD functions to confer flexibility and tensile strength to the spine and endures various types of biomechanical force. Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder and is the major cause of low back pain and includes the more severe degenerative lumbar scoliosis, disc herniation and spinal stenosis. DDD is a multifactorial disorder whereby an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic factors, or alterations to cellular composition, or biophysical stimuli and genetic background can all play a role in its genesis. However, our comprehension of IVD formation and theetiology of disc degeneration (DD) are far from being complete, hampering efforts to formulate appropriate therapies to tackle DD. Knowledge of the stem cells and various techniques to manipulate and direct them to particular fates have been promising in adopting a stem-cell based regenerative approach to DD. Moreover, new evidence on the residence of stem/progenitor cells within particular IVD niches has emerged holding promise for future therapeutic applications. Existing issues pertaining to current therapeutic approaches are also covered in this review. PMID:23951558

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment.

  12. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  13. Role of biomechanics on intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapies: What needs repairing in the disc and what are promising biomaterials for its repair?

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Nicoll, Steven B.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Walter, Benjamin A.; Gupta, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Context Degeneration and injuries of the intervertebral disc result in large alterations in biomechanical behaviors. Repair strategies using biomaterials can be optimized based on biomechanical and biological requirements. Purpose To review current literature on 1) effects of degeneration, simulated degeneration, and injury on biomechanics of the intervertebral disc with special attention paid to needle puncture injuries which are a pathway for diagnostics and regenerative therapies; and 2) promising biomaterials for disc repair with a focus on how those biomaterials may promote biomechanical repair. Study Design/Setting A narrative review to evaluate the role of biomechanics on disc degeneration and regenerative therapies with a focus on what biomechanical properties need to be repaired and how to evaluate and accomplish such repairs using biomaterials. Model systems for screening of such repair strategies are also briefly described. Methods Papers were selected from two main Pubmed searches using keywords: intervertebral AND biomechanics (1823 articles) and intervertebral AND biomaterials (361 articles). Additional keywords (injury, needle puncture, nucleus pressurization, biomaterials, hydrogel, sealant, tissue engineering) were used to narrow articles to the topics most relevant to this review. Results Degeneration and acute disc injuries have the capacity to influence nucleus pulposus pressurization and annulus fibrosus integrity, which are necessary for effective disc function, and therefore, require repair. Needle injection injuries are of particular clinical relevance with potential to influence disc biomechanics, cellularity, and metabolism, yet these effects are localized or small, and more research is required to evaluate and reduce potential clinical morbidity using such techniques. NP replacement strategies, such as hydrogels, are required to restore NP pressurization or lost volume. AF repair strategies, including crosslinked hydrogels

  14. [MicroRNAs: a type of novel regulative factor for intervertebral disc degeneration].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Wenjun; Yang, Wei; Yu, Xiaohua; Yan, Yiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-03-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is one of major causes for intervertebral disc degenerative diseases, and patients with IDD usually suffer from serious low back pain. The current treatments for patients with IDD only relieve the clinical symptom rather than restore biological balance of IDD, leading to inadequate and unsatisfactory results. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNA molecules, which regulate the gene expression at the post-transcription levels. Research evidences support the involvement of miRNAs in many biological processes, such as lipid metabolism, apoptosis, differentiation and organ development. Accumulating evidences indicate that the expressions of miRNAs change significantly in degenerative tissues. In addition, dysregulated miRNAs contribute to multiple pathological process of IDD, including proliferation and apoptosis of nucleus pulposus and extracellular matrix components, inflammatory response and cartilage endplates degeneration. In this review article, we summarize the expression profiles and roles of miRNAs in IDD, which may provide a novel strategy of biological therapy for the disease. PMID:27273991

  15. Three-dimensional morphological and signal intensity features for detection of intervertebral disc degeneration from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, A; Fripp, J; Engstrom, C; Walker, D; Weber, M-A; Schwarz, R; Crozier, S

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Advances in MRI hardware and sequences are continually increasing the amount and complexity of data such as those generated in high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) scanning of the spine. Efficient informatics tools offer considerable opportunities for research and clinically based analyses of magnetic resonance studies. In this work, we present and validate a suite of informatics tools for automated detection of degenerative changes in lumbar intervertebral discs (IVD) from both 3D isotropic and routine two-dimensional (2D) clinical T2-weighted MRI. Materials and methods An automated segmentation approach was used to extract morphological (traditional 2D radiological measures and novel 3D shape descriptors) and signal appearance (extracted from signal intensity histograms) features. The features were validated against manual reference, compared between 2D and 3D MRI scans and used for quantification and classification of IVD degeneration across magnetic resonance datasets containing IVD with early and advanced stages of degeneration. Results and conclusions Combination of the novel 3D-based shape and signal intensity features on 3D (area under receiver operating curve (AUC) 0.984) and 2D (AUC 0.988) magnetic resonance data deliver a significant improvement in automated classification of IVD degeneration, compared to the combination of previously used 2D radiological measurement and signal intensity features (AUC 0.976 and 0.983, respectively). Further work is required regarding the usefulness of 2D and 3D shape data in relation to clinical scores of lower back pain. The results reveal the potential of the proposed informatics system for computer-aided IVD diagnosis from MRI in large-scale research studies and as a possible adjunct for clinical diagnosis. PMID:23813538

  16. Transplantation of CXCR4 Overexpressed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Regeneration in Degenerated Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji-Nan; Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao; Liu, Lei; Hong, Xin; Tang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals play important roles in regulating the stem cell-based tissue regeneration. The aim of this research is to evaluate whether high expression of CXCR4 enhances the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and increases the efficiency of intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. MSCs overexpressing CXCR (CXCR4-MSC) were created by lentiviral-CXCR4-vect transfection, labeled with SPIO, and transplanted into rabbit degenerative IVD induced by annulus puncture. X-ray and T2-weighted MR images of the spine were obtained at 0, 8, and 16 weeks post-transplantation. The transplanted stem cells were traced by both MR imaging and Prussian blue staining. The stem cell-based IVD degeneration was evaluated by quantifying the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen. The in vitro chemotaxis test was performed to study the migration of CXCR4-MSCs to the supplement of SDF-1. The CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs stably elevated the expression of CXCR4 and increased the migration to SDF-1. The SPIO-labeled CXCR4-MSC could be detected within the IVD by MRI till 16 weeks post-transplantation. Prussian blue staining evidenced more SPIO-positive cells within the IVD transplanted with CXCR4-MSCs. Compared to the control group, loss of disc height was slowed while the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was increased by MSC transplantation, especially in the IVD supplemented with CXCR4-MSCs. CXCR4 overexpression promoted MSC retention within the IVD and enhanced the stem cell-based IVD regeneration. The SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals might help provide a new perspective to understand stem cell migration and infiltration within the degenerated IVD. PMID:26788981

  17. Organ Culture Bioreactors – Platforms to Study Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration and Regenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Chan, Samantha CW; Walser, Jochen; Haglund, Lisbet; Ferguson, Stephen J; Iatridis, James C; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the application of bioreactors has revolutionized the concept of culturing tissues and organs that require mechanical loading. In intervertebral disc (IVD) research, collaborative efforts of biomedical engineering, biology and mechatronics have led to the innovation of new loading devices that can maintain viable IVD organ explants from large animals and human cadavers in precisely defined nutritional and mechanical environments over extended culture periods. Particularly in spine and IVD research, these organ culture models offer appealing alternatives, as large bipedal animal models with naturally occurring IVD degeneration and a genetic background similar to the human condition do not exist. Latest research has demonstrated important concepts including the potential of homing of mesenchymal stem cells to nutritionally or mechanically stressed IVDs, and the regenerative potential of “smart” biomaterials for nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus repair. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about cell therapy, injection of cytokines and short peptides to rescue the degenerating IVD. We further stress that most bioreactor systems simplify the real in vivo conditions providing a useful proof of concept. Limitations are that certain aspects of the immune host response and pain assessments cannot be addressed with ex vivo systems. Coccygeal animal disc models are commonly used because of their availability and similarity to human IVDs. Although in vitro loading environments are not identical to the human in vivo situation, 3D ex vivo organ culture models of large animal coccygeal and human lumbar IVDs should be seen as valid alternatives for screening and feasibility testing to augment existing small animal, large animal, and human clinical trial experiments. PMID:25764196

  18. Organ culture bioreactors--platforms to study human intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Chan, Samantha C W; Walser, Jochen; Haglund, Lisbet; Ferguson, Stephen J; Iatridis, James C; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the application of bioreactors has revolutionized the concept of culturing tissues and organs that require mechanical loading. In intervertebral disc (IVD) research, collaborative efforts of biomedical engineering, biology and mechatronics have led to the innovation of new loading devices that can maintain viable IVD organ explants from large animals and human cadavers in precisely defined nutritional and mechanical environments over extended culture periods. Particularly in spine and IVD research, these organ culture models offer appealing alternatives, as large bipedal animal models with naturally occurring IVD degeneration and a genetic background similar to the human condition do not exist. Latest research has demonstrated important concepts including the potential of homing of mesenchymal stem cells to nutritionally or mechanically stressed IVDs, and the regenerative potential of "smart" biomaterials for nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus repair. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about cell therapy, injection of cytokines and short peptides to rescue the degenerating IVD. We further stress that most bioreactor systems simplify the real in vivo conditions providing a useful proof of concept. Limitations are that certain aspects of the immune host response and pain assessments cannot be addressed with ex vivo systems. Coccygeal animal disc models are commonly used because of their availability and similarity to human IVDs. Although in vitro loading environments are not identical to the human in vivo situation, 3D ex vivo organ culture models of large animal coccygeal and human lumbar IVDs should be seen as valid alternatives for screening and feasibility testing to augment existing small animal, large animal, and human clinical trial experiments.

  19. Oestrogen and parathyroid hormone alleviate lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in ovariectomized rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haobo; Ma, Jianxiong; Lv, Jianwei; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Yang; Tian, Aixian; Wang, Ying; Sun, Lei; Xu, Liyan; Fu, Lin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mitigation effect and mechanism of oestrogen and PTH on disc degeneration in rats after ovariectomy, as well as on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, thirty 3-month-old rats were ovariectomized and divided into three groups. Ten additional rats were used as controls. Eight weeks later, the rats were administered oestrogen or PTH for 12 weeks, and then discs were collected for tests. Results showed that nucleus pulposus cells in the Sham group were mostly notochord cells, while in the OVX group, cells gradually developed into chondrocyte-like cells. Oestrogen or PTH could partly recover the notochord cell number. After ovariectomy, the endplate roughened and endplate porosity decreased. After oestrogen or PTH treatment, the smoothness and porosity of endplate recovered. Compared with the Sham group, Aggrecan, Col2a and Wnt/β-catenin pathway expression in OVX group decreased, and either oestrogen or PTH treatment improved their expression. The biomechanical properties of intervertebral disc significantly changed after ovariectomy, and oestrogen or PTH treatment partly recovered them. Disc degeneration occurred with low oestrogen, and the underlying mechanisms involve nutrition supply disorders, cell type changes and decreased Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Oestrogen and PTH can retard disc degeneration in OVX rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in nucleus pulposus. PMID:27279629

  20. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 signal pathway in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chuqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Le; Tang, Long; Li, Shuangqing; Yang, Yixi; Yang, Fuguo; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is a common and remitting problem. One of the primary causes of LBP is thought to be degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88)-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal pathway in the mechanism of IVD degeneration. IVD nucleus pulposus cells isolated and cultured from the lumbar vertebrae of Wistar rats were stimulated by various doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml) to simulate IVD degeneration. Cells were rinsed and cultured in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h of incubation. Additionally, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses were used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα, and IL-1β protein expression after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. The levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β mRNA all increased in the cells stimulated by 10 µg/ml LPS at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P<0.001). Furthermore, the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β protein all increased at 24, 48 and 72 h (all P<0.001). Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β increased significantly in the cells stimulated by 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml LPS compared with the control group, and reached a peak in the 10 µg/ml LPS group (all P<0.001). These results suggest that the MyD88-dependent TLR4 signal pathway is a target pathway in IVD degeneration. This pathway is time phase- and dose-dependent, and when activated can lead to the release of inflammatory factors that participate in IVD degeneration. PMID:27446251

  1. Aquaporin 3 protects against lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huanxin; Jing, Yongbin; Xia, Jingjun; Wang, Xintao; You, Changcheng; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water channel which promotes glycerol permeability and water transport across cell membranes, is reduced in degenerative lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues. However, the role of AQP3 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration has not recieved much scholarly attention. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of AQP3 on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in human nucleus pulposus cells (hNPCs) using gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments, and to determine whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in the effect of AQP3 on IVD degeneration. hNPCs were transfected with the AQP3-pcDNA3.1 plasmid or AQP3 siRNA to overexpress or suppress AQP3. An MTT assay was performed to determine cell proliferation, and we found that AQP3 promoted hNPC proliferation. The expression of aggrecan, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)4 and ADAMTS5 was detected using western blot analysis, to examine the effect of AQP3 on ECM degradation in hNPCs. The results revealed that AQP3 inhibited ECM degradation in hNPCs. In addition, we found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling was suppressed by AQP3. However, the effect of AQP3 on hNPC proliferation and ECM degradation was reversed by treatment with lithium chloride, a known activator of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling. In conclusion, using in vitro and in vivo tests, we have reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AQP3 exerts protective effects against IVD degeneration, and these are effected, at least partially, through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26820815

  2. Allogeneic Articular Chondrocyte Transplantation Down Regulates IL-8 Gene Expression in the Degenerating Rabbit Intervertebral Disc in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yejia; Chee, Ana; Shi, Peng; Wang, Rui; Moss, Isaac; Chen, Er-Yun; He, Tong-Chuan; An, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate if repopulating the degenerating intervertebral disc (IVD) with articular chondrocytes (ACs) will decrease inflammation and restore disc structure. In this study, we aimed to determine if well-differentiated AC alone or transduced with adenovirus overexpressing BMP-7 gene may survive and inhibit inflammation or repair disc structure in the degenerating rabbit IVD. Design This was a biological study in a rabbit IVD-injury model in vivo. Dual cell tracking methods (IR dye-labeling and adenovirus transduction) were used to demonstrate the viability of allogeneic AC injected into degenerating rabbit IVDs. Interleukin (IL)-8 gene expression was determined via real-time PCR. Infiltrating inflammatory cells (macrophages, T-cells or neutrophils) were examined with immunohistochemistry. The IVDs were also examined by routine histology. Results ACs labeled with infrared (IR) dye were detected in the degenerating IVDs at both 2 and 8 weeks after injection. At the 2-week time point, IL-8 gene expression was comparable in IVDs injected with chondrocytes and in intact discs as control (P=0.647), while its expression in IVDs injected with saline increased 50fold (p=0.028). Transgene expression of red fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, and BMP-7 diminished at 8 weeks post injection. IVDs injected with chondrocytes overexpressing hBMP-7 did not show lower IL-8 gene expression or improved histology. Macrophages were consistently detected by immunohistochemistry in the cartilage formation around the needle insertion sites in both the saline and chondrocyte groups, while neither T cells nor neutrophils were detected. Conclusions Allogeneic rabbit AC survived in the degenerating rabbit IVDs for at least 8 weeks. Cell treatment resulted in reduced IVD inflammation, but did not significantly improve IVD structure. PMID:25133623

  3. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration. A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case–control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed. The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05). One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  4. Interleukin 1 Polymorphisms Contribute to Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Changfeng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis to assess association between interleukin 1 (IL-1) polymorphisms and the risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration (IDD). Background A series of studies have investigated the association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-1 and IDD risk; however, the overall results are inconclusive. Methods Two independent investigators conducted a systematic search for relevant available studies. Allele frequencies were extracted from each study. The association between the IL-1α (+889C/T) or IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism and IDD risk was measured by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results Five and six studies, respectively, were ultimately included in the meta-analysis for the IL-1α (+889C/T) and IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism. The combined results showed that the IL-1α (+889C/T) polymorphism was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to IDD, particularly in Caucasians (TT versus CC: OR = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.45, 6.04; Pheterogeneity = 0.82; TT versus CC/CT: OR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.18, 4.47; Pheterogeneity = 0.20). In contrast, the IL-1β (+3954C/T) polymorphism showed a trend towards increased risk in Caucasians but no association in Asians. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggested that the IL-1α (+889C/T) polymorphism is significantly associated with risk of IDD, especially in Caucasian populations. PMID:27253397

  5. Extent of Disc Degeneration after Single-Level Cervical Anterior Microforaminotomy Analyzed with Long-Term Radiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prove the extents and details of cervical degeneration after anterior microforaminotomy (AMF) with 6-years follow-up. Methods A retrospective study of 24 patients, underwent single-level AMF, was performed. Clinical and radiologic data were analyzed with office charts, questionaires, and picture achieving and communication system images. Results According to Odom's criteria, 91.6% achieved favorable outcome. The mean visual analog scale score was improved from 8.6 to 3, and the mean neck disability index was improved from 27.9 to 7.3 (p<0.01). Eighteen cases (75%) showed disc height (DH) decrease. The disc invasion was correlated with DH decrease (p<0.05). The disc height decrease correlated with static, dynamic changes of shell angle and spur formation (p<0.05). Any radiological parameters did not affect the clinical outcome. Conclusion AMF is an effective technique for treating unilateral cervical radiculopathy. It showed excellent surgical outcomes even in long-term follow-ups. However, a decrease in DH occurred in a considerable number of patients. Disc invasion during surgery may be the trigger of sequential degeneration. PMID:25368761

  6. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Merrill, Amy E.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb–/–mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb–/–mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb–/–mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  7. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M; Cohn, Daniel H; Merrill, Amy E; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb-/-mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb-/-mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb-/-mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  8. Vitamin D Receptor Gene, Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Polymorphisms and the Risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Susceptibility: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongjing; Zhao, Shujie; Xu, Nanwei

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated the association between vitamin D receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. The findings were inconsistent. This meta-analysis aimed to systematically assess the association between vitamin D receptor, MMP-3 polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. A search of various databases was done covering all papers published until December 31th, 2014. Eight, 4, 3 studies were finally included that addressed the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility and vitamin D receptor FokI (rs2228570), ApaI (rs7975232), and MMP-3 (rs731236) polymorphisms, respectively. FokI (f vs. F: summary odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76–1.69; ff vs. FF: OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.59–1.77; ff vs. Ff/FF: OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.70–1.58), ApaI (a vs. A: OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.45–1.19; aa vs. AA: OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.22–1.25 p=0.14; aa vs. AA/Aa: OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53–0.89) in the vitamin D receptor gene and MMP3 polymorphisms (5A vs. 6A: OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.77–4.80; 5A5A vs. 6A6A: OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 0.75–6.24; 5A5A vs. 5A6A/6A6A: OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.72–3.44) were not obviously associated with risk of intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. FokI, ApaI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene and MMP-3 polymorphism are not obvious risk factors for intervertebral disc degeneration susceptibility. PMID:27790329

  9. Correlations between quantitative T2 and T1ρ MRI, mechanical properties and biochemical composition in a rabbit lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration model.

    PubMed

    Gullbrand, Sarah E; Ashinsky, Beth G; Martin, John T; Pickup, Stephen; Smith, Lachlan J; Mauck, Robert L; Smith, Harvey E

    2016-08-01

    Improved diagnostic measures for intervertebral disc degeneration are necessary to facilitate early detection and treatment. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in mechanical and biochemical properties with the quantitative MRI parameters T2 and T1ρ in rabbit lumbar discs using an ex vivo chymopapain digestion model. Rabbit lumbar spinal motion segments from animals less than 6 months of age were injected with 100 μl of saline (control) or chymopapain at 3, 15, or 100 U/ml (n = 5 per group). T2 and T1ρ MRI series were obtained at 4.7T. Specimens were mechanically tested in tension-compression and creep. Normalized nucleus pulposus (NP) water and GAG contents were quantified. Stepwise multiple linear regression was performed to determine which parameters contributed significantly to changes in NP T2 and T1ρ. When all groups were included, multiple regression yielded a model with GAG, compressive modulus, and the creep time constants as variables significantly impacting T2 (multiple r(2)  = 0.64, p = 0.006). GAG and neutral zone (NZ) modulus were identified as variables contributing to T1ρ (multiple r(2)  = 0.28, p = 0.08). When specimens with advanced degeneration were excluded from the multiple regression analysis, T2 was significantly predicted by compressive modulus, τ1, and water content (multiple r(2)  = 0.71, p = 0.009), while no variables were significant predictors in the model for T1ρ. These results indicate that quantitative MRI can detect changes in the mechanical and biochemical properties of the degenerated disc. T2 may be more sensitive to early stage degenerative changes than T1ρ, while both quantitative MRI parameters are sensitive to advanced degeneration. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1382-1388, 2016. PMID:27105019

  10. Novel genetic variants associated with lumbar disc degeneration in northern Europeans: a meta-analysis of 4600 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Frances M K; Bansal, Aruna T; van Meurs, Joyce B; Bell, Jordana T; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Suri, Pradeep; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sambrook, Philip N; Hofman, Albert; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita; Menni, Cristina; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Slagboom, P Eline; Hunter, David J; MacGregor, Alex J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Spector, Tim D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is an important cause of low back pain, which is a common and costly problem. LDD is characterised by disc space narrowing and osteophyte growth at the circumference of the disc. To date, the agnostic search of the genome by genome-wide association (GWA) to identify common variants associated with LDD has not been fruitful. This study is the first GWA meta-analysis of LDD. Methods We have developed a continuous trait based on disc space narrowing and osteophytes growth which is measurable on all forms of imaging (plain radiograph, CT scan and MRI) and performed a meta-analysis of five cohorts of Northern European extraction each having GWA data imputed to HapMap V.2. Results This study of 4600 individuals identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms with p<5×10−8, the threshold set for genome-wide significance. We identified a variant in the PARK2 gene (p=2.8×10−8) associated with LDD. Differential methylation at one CpG island of the PARK2 promoter was observed in a small subset of subjects (β=8.74×10−4, p=0.006). Conclusions LDD accounts for a considerable proportion of low back pain and the pathogenesis of LDD is poorly understood. This work provides evidence of association of the PARK2 gene and suggests that methylation of the PARK2 promoter may influence degeneration of the intervertebral disc. This gene has not previously been considered a candidate in LDD and further functional work is needed on this hitherto unsuspected pathway. PMID:22993228

  11. The correlation between microvessel pathological changes of the endplate and degeneration of the intervertebral disc in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, SEN; LIAO, MEIMEI; LI, JIANPING; PENG, HAO; XIONG, MIN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the pathological microvessel changes to the endplate and the degeneration of the intervertebral disc of diabetic rats were examined in order to identify the possible mechanism by which diabetes mellitus (DM) induces degeneration of the intervertebral disc. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups. DM was induced in one of the groups by streptozotocin (STZ) administration. The rats were sacrificed 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Five rats from each group were sacrificed at each time interval and lumbar disc and endplate tissue were obtained from each rat. The histological changes, collagen expression, microvessel density (MVD) and apoptosis of the disc were investigated by different methods. The expression of collagen I in the diabetic DM group was higher compared to the control group at the three time points (P<0.01), in contrast to the expression of collagen II. The factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII RAg) was expressed in the control and DM groups, while its expression was relatively low in the DM group. The MVD of the DM group was smaller compared to that of the control group at the three time points (P<0.01). The apoptotic index (AI) in the diabetic group was significantly higher compared to that of the control group at the three time points (P<0.01). A negative correlation was observed between the MVD of the endplates and the notochordal cell AI in the two groups. Compared to the control group, the endplate MVD decreased and the cavity became smaller or disappeared in the diabetic rats. In conclusion, there was a negative correlation between MVD and degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc in diabetic rats. PMID:23408796

  12. Notochordal cells protect nucleus pulposus cells from degradation and apoptosis: implications for the mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The relative resistance of non-chondrodystrophic (NCD) canines to degenerative disc disease (DDD) may be due to a combination of anabolic and anti-catabolic factors secreted by notochordal cells within the intervertebral disc (IVD) nucleus pulposus (NP). Factors known to induce DDD include interleukin-1 beta (IL-1ß) and/or Fas-Ligand (Fas-L). Therefore we evaluated the ability of notochordal cell conditioned medium (NCCM) to protect NP cells from IL-1ß and IL-1ß +FasL-mediated cell death and degeneration. Methods We cultured bovine NP cells with IL-1ß or IL-1ß+FasL under hypoxic serum-free conditions (3.5% O2) and treated the cells with either serum-free NCCM or basal medium (Advanced DMEM/F-12). We used flow cytometry to evaluate cell death and real-time (RT-)PCR to determine the gene expression of aggrecan, collagen 2, and link protein, mediators of matrix degradation ADAMTS-4 and MMP3, the matrix protection molecule TIMP1, the cluster of differentiation (CD)44 receptor, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and Ank. We then determined the expression of specific apoptotic pathways in bovine NP cells by characterizing the expression of activated caspases-3, -8 and -9 in the presence of IL-1ß+FasL when cultured with NCCM, conditioned medium obtained using bovine NP cells (BCCM), and basal medium all supplemented with 2% FBS. Results NCCM inhibits bovine NP cell death and apoptosis via suppression of activated caspase-9 and caspase-3/7. Furthermore, NCCM protects NP cells from the degradative effects of IL-1ß and IL-1ß+Fas-L by up-regulating the expression of anabolic/matrix protective genes (aggrecan, collagen type 2, CD44, link protein and TIMP-1) and down-regulating matrix degrading genes such as MMP-3. Expression of ADAMTS-4, which encodes a protein for aggrecan remodeling, is increased. NCCM also protects against IL-1+FasL-mediated down-regulation of Ank expression. Furthermore, NP cells treated with NCCM in the presence of IL-1ß+Fas-L down

  13. A pilot study of the prevalence of lumbar disc degeneration in elite athletes with lower back pain at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

    PubMed Central

    Ong, A; Anderson, J; Roche, J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the prevalence of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in elite athletes as compared with published literature of changes seen in non-athletes—that is, normal population. Methods: The lumbar spines of 31 Olympic athletes who presented to the Olympic Polyclinic with low back pain and/or sciatica were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. Three criteria were looked at: (a) the loss of disc signal intensity; (b) the loss of disc height; (c) the presence of disc displacement. The results were then recorded and correlated with the lumbar levels. Results: The disc signal intensity was progressively reduced the more caudal the disc space. It was most common at the L5/S1 level, and, of the abnormal group, 36% (n = 11) showed the most degenerative change. Disc height reduction was also found to be most common at the L5/S1 level. However, the most common height reduction was only mild. A similar trend of increased prevalence of disc herniation was noted with more caudal levels. At the L5/S1 level, 58% were found to have an element of disc displacement, most of which were disc bulges. Compared with changes seen in the normal population (non-athletes) as described in the literature, disc degeneration defined by the above criteria was found to be significantly more severe in these Olympic athletes. Conclusions: Although the study was limited, the results suggest that elite athletes have a greater prevalence and greater degree of lumbar disc degeneration than the normal population. A more detailed follow up study should be considered to investigate which particular training activities have the most impact on the lumbar spine, and how to modify training methods so as to avoid the long term sequelae of degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:12782554

  14. Aging, vertebral density, and disc degeneration alter the tensile stress-strain characteristics of the human anterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P; Ekström, L A; Keller, T S; Perry, L; Hansson, T H

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the human lumbar anterior longitudinal ligament were investigated, and the influence of aging, disc degeneration, and vertebral bone density on these properties was determined. Tensile mechanical properties of the vertebra-anterior longitudinal ligament-vertebra complex were determined for 16 segments from cadavera of individuals who had been 21-79 years old (mean, 52.1 years) at the time of death. Regional strain patterns associated with three sites across the width and three sites along the length of the anterior longitudinal ligament were measured with use of a video-based motion analysis system. In the young, normal anterior longitudinal ligament, the elastic moduli of the insertion and substance regions of the ligament were similar (approximately 500 MPa). During aging (21-79 years), the elastic modulus of the substance region increased 2-fold, whereas the elastic modulus of the insertion decreased 3-fold; this resulted in an approximately 5-fold difference in elastic modulus between these regions in the older spine. The strength of the bone-ligament complex decreased approximately 2-fold (from 29 to 13 MPa) over this same age range. The outer portion of the anterior longitudinal ligament consistently had the highest peak tensile strains (11.8 +/- 2.7%) in all of the specimens examined. Preparations with nondegenerated discs and high bone density were significantly stronger (66%) and failed in the ligament substance; in contrast, segments from older individuals with degenerated discs and lower bone density failed in the ligament insertion regions.

  15. The imbalance between TIMP3 and matrix-degrading enzymes plays an important role in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Kang; Han, Xiuguo; Mao, Chuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Tengfei; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-15

    It is well-known that one of the most important features of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Collagen and aggrecan are major components of ECM; the degradation of ECM in intervertebral discs (IVDs) is closely related to the activities of collagenase and aggrecanase. TIMP-3 is the most efficient inhibitor of aggrecanase in IVD. However, only few studies focus on the potential relationship between TIMP-3 and IDD. In our study, we found TIMP-3 gene expression was decreased after stimulating with LPS in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Then we used a lentivirus vector to reconstruct rat NP cells which high expressed TIMP-3 gene (LV-TIMP3). The upregulation of MMPs and ADAMTSs induced by LPS was significantly inhibited in LV-TIMP3 cells. After overexpression of TIMP-3, the aggrecan breakdown caused by LPS was also reduced in both monolayer culture and three-dimension culture model. To further study the relation between TIMP-3 and IDD, we collected human NP tissue samples of different degenerative degrees. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression of TIMP-3 was negatively correlated with the degree of intervertebral disc degeneration, while MMP-1 and ADAMTS-4 were markedly increased in degenerative IVD. Taken together, our results suggest that the imbalance between aggrecanase and TIMP-3 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IDD and therefore be a potential therapeutic target for treating IDD. PMID:26686417

  16. Development and Kinematic Verification of a Finite Element Model for the Lumbar Spine: Application to Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ibarz, Elena; Herrera, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the lumbar spine biomechanics is essential for clinical applications. Due to the difficulties to experiment on living people and the irregular results published, simulation based on finite elements (FE) has been developed, making it possible to adequately reproduce the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. A 3D FE model of the complete lumbar spine (vertebrae, discs, and ligaments) has been developed. To verify the model, radiological images (X-rays) were taken over a group of 25 healthy, male individuals with average age of 27.4 and average weight of 78.6 kg with the corresponding informed consent. A maximum angle of 34.40° is achieved in flexion and of 35.58° in extension with a flexion-extension angle of 69.98°. The radiological measurements were 33.94 ± 4.91°, 38.73 ± 4.29°, and 72.67°, respectively. In lateral bending, the maximum angles were 19.33° and 23.40 ± 2.39, respectively. In rotation a maximum angle of 9.96° was obtained. The model incorporates a precise geometrical characterization of several elements (vertebrae, discs, and ligaments), respecting anatomical features and being capable of reproducing a wide range of physiological movements. Application to disc degeneration (L5-S1) allows predicting the affection in the mobility of the different lumbar segments, by means of parametric studies for different ranges of degeneration. PMID:23509766

  17. Prevalence of adjacent segment disc degeneration in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion based on pre-operative MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Lundine, Kristopher M; Davis, Gavin; Rogers, Myron; Staples, Margaret; Quan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical treatment for symptomatic cervical spondylosis. Some patients develop symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration, occasionally requiring further treatment. The cause and prevalence of adjacent segment degeneration and disease is unclear at present. Proponents for motion preserving surgery such as disc arthroplasty argue that this technique may decrease the "strain" on adjacent discs and thus decrease the incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of this study was to assess the pre-operative prevalence of adjacent segment degeneration in patients undergoing ACDF. A database review of three surgeons' practice was carried out to identify patients who had undergone a one- or two-level ACDF for degenerative disc disease. Patients were excluded if they were operated on for recent trauma, had an inflammatory arthropathy (for example, rheumatoid arthritis), or had previous spine surgery. The pre-operative MRI of each patient was reviewed and graded using a standardised methodology. One hundred and six patient MRI studies were reviewed. All patients showed some evidence of intervertebral disc degeneration adjacent to the planned operative segment(s). Increased severity of disc degeneration was associated with increased age and operative level, but was not associated with sagittal alignment. Disc degeneration was more common at levels adjacent to the surgical level than at non-adjacent segments, and was more severe at the superior adjacent level compared with the inferior adjacent level. These findings support the theory that adjacent segment degeneration following ACDF is due in part to the natural history of cervical spondylosis.

  18. Photochemically crosslinked collagen annulus plug: a potential solution solving the leakage problem of cell-based therapies for disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chik, T K; Ma, X Y; Choy, T H; Li, Y Y; Diao, H J; Teng, W K; Han, S J; Cheung, K M C; Chan, B P

    2013-09-01

    Intra-disc injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat disc degeneration may lead to unfavorable complications, particularly osteophyte formation. Development of an effective method to block the injection portal, prevent the leakage of injected cells and materials and, hence, prevent osteophyte formation is of the utmost importance before MSC-based therapies can be applied in a clinical setting. Here we seek to alleviate the cell leakage problem and the associated complication osteophyte formation by developing an injectable annulus plug to block the injection portal during intra-disc delivery. Specifically, we fabricated a needle-shaped collagen plug by photochemical crosslinking and successfully delivered it intra-discally, in association with MSCs in collagen microsphere carriers, using a custom-made delivery device. The mechanical performance of the plug and its effectiveness in reducing cell leakage were evaluated ex vivo under compression and in torsion push-out tests. The results demonstrate that the plug survived physiologically relevant loadings and significantly reduced leakage and enhanced retention of the injected materials. Finally, a pilot in vivo study in rabbits was conducted to evaluate the performance of the plug. Microcomputed tomography imaging and histology revealed that the plug significantly reduced osteophyte formation. This work suggests the potential of the annulus plug as an adjunct or annulus closure device for intra-disc delivery of cells and materials.

  19. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  20. Single-nucleotide polymorphism in the hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1) gene is associated with spinal osteophyte formation and disc degeneration in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Urano, Tomohiko; Narusawa, Ken'ichiro; Shiraki, Masataka; Sasaki, Noriko; Hosoi, Takayuki; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Inoue, Satoshi

    2011-04-01

    Spinal osteoarthritis including disc degeneration is a very common condition in the axial skeletons of aged people. Recently, spinal osteoarthritis has been shown to be influenced by specific genetic risk factors. Vertebral osteophytes, endplate sclerosis, and intervertebral disc narrowing are recognized as radiographic features of spinal disc degeneration. HAPLN1 is a key component of the cartilage extracellular matrix; thus, variations in this gene may affect the pathogenesis of cartilage-related diseases such as spinal degeneration. Here, we examine the association between an HAPLN1 gene polymorphism and the radiographic features of spinal degeneration. We evaluated the degree of endplate sclerosis, osteophyte formation, and disc space narrowing in 622 Japanese postmenopausal women. Four SNPs in the HAPLN1 gene-in the 5' flanking region, intron 1, intron 2, and intron 4-were analyzed using the TaqMan polymerase chain reaction method. We found that compared to subjects with the CC or CT genotype, those with the TT genotype for an SNP at intron 2 (rs179851) were significantly overrepresented among the subjects with higher scores for osteophyte formation (P = 0.0001; odds ratio 2.12; 95% confidence interval 1.45-3.11, as determined by logistic regression analysis) and disc space narrowing (P = 0.0057; odds ratio 1.83; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.83). Consistent with the involvement of the HAPLN1 gene in cartilage metabolism, a variation in a specific HAPLN1 gene locus may be associated with spinal degeneration.

  1. A prospective randomised study on the long-term effect of lumbar fusion on adjacent disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Per; Möller, Hans; Shalabi, Adel; Yu, Yiang Xiao; Hedlund, Rune

    2009-08-01

    The existence and importance of an accelerated adjacent segment disc degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion have previously not been demonstrated by RCTs. The objectives of this study were, to determine whether lumbar fusion in the long term accelerates degenerative changes in the adjacent disc and whether this affects the outcome, by using a prospective randomised design. A total of 111 patients, aged 18-55, with isthmic spondylolisthesis were randomised to exercise (EX, n = 34) or posterolateral fusion (PLF, n = 77), with (n = 37) or without pedicle screw instrumentation (n = 40). The minimum 10 years FU rate was 72%, with a mean FU time of 12.6 years (range 10-17 years). Three radiographic methods of ASD quantification were used, i.e. two digital radiographic measurement methods and the semi quantitative UCLA grading scale. One digital measurement method showed a mean disc height reduction by 2% in the EX group and by 15% in the PLF group (p = 0.0016), and the other showed 0.5 mm more disc height reduction in the PLF compared to the Ex group (ns). The UCLA grading scale showed normal discs in 100% of patients in the EX group, compared to 62% in the PLF group (p = 0.026). There were no significant differences between instrumented and non-instrumented patients. In patients with laminectomy we found a significantly higher incidence of ASD compared to non laminectomised patients (22/47 vs. 2/16 respectively, p = 0.015). In the longitudinal analysis, the posterior and anterior disc heights were significantly reduced in the PLF group, whereas in the EX group only the posterior disc height was significantly reduced. Except for global outcome, which was significantly better for patients without ASD, the clinical outcome was not statistically different in patients with and without ASD. In conclusion, the long-term RCT shows that fusion accelerates degenerative changes at the adjacent level compared with natural history. The study suggests that not only fusion, but also

  2. Comparison of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy and open lumbar surgery for adjacent segment degeneration and recurrent disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Chieh; Lee, Chih-Hsun; Wei, Li; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Tien-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients) or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients), due to ASD or recurrence of disc herniation at L3-4, L4-5, or L5-S1 level, were assigned to different groups according to the surgical approaches. Clinical data were assessed and compared. Results. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Hospital stay and mean operating time were shorter significantly in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Immediate postoperative pain improvement in VAS was 3.5 in the PELD group and -0.56 in the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. For ASD and recurrent lumbar disc herniation, PELD had more advantages over open lumbar surgery in terms of reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, operating time, fewer complications, and less postoperative discomfort.

  3. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  4. Dual release of dexamethasone and TGF-β3 from polymeric microspheres for stem cell matrix accumulation in a rat disc degeneration model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cheng-zhen; Li, Hao; Tao, Yi-qing; Peng, Li-hua; Gao, Jian-qing; Wu, Jing-jun; Li, Fang-cai; Hua, Jian-ming; Chen, Qi-xin

    2013-12-01

    Low back pain is frequently caused by nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration. Tissue engineering is a powerful therapeutic strategy which could restore the normal biomechanical motion of the human spine. Previously we reported that a new nanostructured three-dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microsphere, which is loaded with dexamethasone and growth factor embedded heparin/poly(l-lysine) nanoparticles via a layer-by-layer system, was an effective cell carrier in vitro for NP tissue engineering. This study aimed to investigate whether the implantation of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-seeded PLGA microspheres into the rat intervertebral disc could regenerate the degenerated disc. Changes in disc height by plain radiograph, T2-weighted signal intensity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histology, immunohistochemistry and matrix-associated gene expression were evaluated in normal controls (NCs) (without operations), a degeneration control (DC) group (with needle puncture, injected only with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium), a PLGA microspheres (PMs) treatment group (with needle puncture, PLGA microspheres only injection), and PLGA microspheres loaded with ADSCs treatment (PMA) group (with needle puncture, PLGA microspheres loaded with ADSC injection) for a 24-week period. The results showed that at 24 weeks post-transplantation, the PM and PMA groups regained disc height values of ∼63% and 76% and MRI signal intensities of ∼47% and 76%, respectively, compared to the NC group. Biochemistry, immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis also indicated the restoration of proteoglycan accumulation in the discs of the PM and PMA groups. However, there was almost no restoration of proteoglycan accumulation in the discs of the DC group compared with the PM and PMA groups. Taken together, these data suggest that ADSC-seeded PLGA microspheres could partly regenerate the degenerated disc in vivo after implantation into the rat degenerative intervertebral

  5. Matrix stiffness promotes cartilage endplate chondrocyte calcification in disc degeneration via miR-20a targeting ANKH expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Han; Sun, Chao; Yao, Yuan; Fan, Xin; Liu, Huan; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical environment is crucial for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cartilage endplate (CEP) calcification by altered matrix stiffness remain unclear. In this study, we found that matrix stiffness of CEP was positively correlated with the degree of IDD, and stiff matrix, which mimicked the severe degeneration of CEP, promoted inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Co-expression analysis of the miRNA and mRNA profiles showed that increasing stiffness resulted in up-regulation of miR-20a and down-regulation of decreased ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH) during inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Through a dual luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that miR-20a directly targets 3′-untranslated regions of ANKH. The inhibition of miR-20a attenuated the calcium deposition and calcification-related gene expression, whereas the overexpression of miR-20a enhanced calcification in CEP chondrocytes on stiff matrix. The rescue of ANKH expression restored the decreased pyrophosphate efflux and inhibited calcification. In clinical samples, the levels of ANKH expression were inversely associated with the degeneration degree of CEP. Thus, our findings demonstrate that the miR-20a/ANKH axis mediates the stiff matrix- promoted CEP calcification, suggesting that miR-20a and ANKH are potential targets in restraining the progression of IDD. PMID:27142968

  6. Matrix stiffness promotes cartilage endplate chondrocyte calcification in disc degeneration via miR-20a targeting ANKH expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Han; Sun, Chao; Yao, Yuan; Fan, Xin; Liu, Huan; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-05-04

    The mechanical environment is crucial for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cartilage endplate (CEP) calcification by altered matrix stiffness remain unclear. In this study, we found that matrix stiffness of CEP was positively correlated with the degree of IDD, and stiff matrix, which mimicked the severe degeneration of CEP, promoted inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Co-expression analysis of the miRNA and mRNA profiles showed that increasing stiffness resulted in up-regulation of miR-20a and down-regulation of decreased ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH) during inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Through a dual luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that miR-20a directly targets 3'-untranslated regions of ANKH. The inhibition of miR-20a attenuated the calcium deposition and calcification-related gene expression, whereas the overexpression of miR-20a enhanced calcification in CEP chondrocytes on stiff matrix. The rescue of ANKH expression restored the decreased pyrophosphate efflux and inhibited calcification. In clinical samples, the levels of ANKH expression were inversely associated with the degeneration degree of CEP. Thus, our findings demonstrate that the miR-20a/ANKH axis mediates the stiff matrix- promoted CEP calcification, suggesting that miR-20a and ANKH are potential targets in restraining the progression of IDD.

  7. Longitudinal Comparison of Enzyme- and Laser-Treated Intervertebral Disc by MRI, X-Ray, and Histological Analyses Reveals Discrepancies in the Progression of Disc Degeneration: A Rabbit Study

    PubMed Central

    Colombier, Pauline; Lesoeur, Julie; Youl, Samy; Madec, Stéphane; Gauthier, Olivier; Hamel, Olivier; Guicheux, Jérôme; Clouet, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is considered an attractive prospect for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. To assess the efficacy of the regenerative approach, animal models of IVD degeneration are needed. Among these animal models, chemonucleolysis based on the enzymatic degradation of the Nucleus Pulposus (NP) is often used, but this technique remains far from the natural physiopathological process of IVD degeneration. Recently, we developed an innovative animal model of IVD degeneration based on the use of a laser beam. In the present study, this laser model was compared with the chemonucleolysis model in a longitudinal study in rabbits. The effects of the treatments were studied by MRI (T2-weighted signal intensity (T2wsi)), radiography (IVD height index), and histology (NP area and Boos' scoring). The results showed that both treatments induced a degeneration of the IVD with a decrease in IVD height and T2wsi as well as NP area and an increase in Boos' scoring. The enzyme treatment leads to a rapid and acute process of IVD degeneration. Conversely, laser radiation induced more progressive and less pronounced degeneration. It can be concluded that laser treatment provides an instrumental in vivo model of slowly evolving IVD degenerative disease that can be of preclinical relevance for assessing new prophylactic biological treatments of disc degeneration. PMID:27247937

  8. Longitudinal Comparison of Enzyme- and Laser-Treated Intervertebral Disc by MRI, X-Ray, and Histological Analyses Reveals Discrepancies in the Progression of Disc Degeneration: A Rabbit Study.

    PubMed

    Fusellier, Marion; Colombier, Pauline; Lesoeur, Julie; Youl, Samy; Madec, Stéphane; Gauthier, Olivier; Hamel, Olivier; Guicheux, Jérôme; Clouet, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is considered an attractive prospect for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. To assess the efficacy of the regenerative approach, animal models of IVD degeneration are needed. Among these animal models, chemonucleolysis based on the enzymatic degradation of the Nucleus Pulposus (NP) is often used, but this technique remains far from the natural physiopathological process of IVD degeneration. Recently, we developed an innovative animal model of IVD degeneration based on the use of a laser beam. In the present study, this laser model was compared with the chemonucleolysis model in a longitudinal study in rabbits. The effects of the treatments were studied by MRI (T2-weighted signal intensity (T2wsi)), radiography (IVD height index), and histology (NP area and Boos' scoring). The results showed that both treatments induced a degeneration of the IVD with a decrease in IVD height and T2wsi as well as NP area and an increase in Boos' scoring. The enzyme treatment leads to a rapid and acute process of IVD degeneration. Conversely, laser radiation induced more progressive and less pronounced degeneration. It can be concluded that laser treatment provides an instrumental in vivo model of slowly evolving IVD degenerative disease that can be of preclinical relevance for assessing new prophylactic biological treatments of disc degeneration. PMID:27247937

  9. Is the Transport of a Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent Decreased in a Degenerated or Aged Disc? A Post Contrast MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tibiletti, Marta; Galbusera, Fabio; Ciavarro, Cristina; Brayda-Bruno, Marco

    2013-01-01

    A post contrast magnetic resonance imaging study has been performed in a wide population of low back pain patients to investigate which radiological and phenotypic characteristics influence the penetration of the contrast agent in lumbar discs in vivo. 37 patients affected by different pathologies (disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis, central canal stenosis) were enrolled in the study. The selected population included 26 male and 11 female subjects, with a mean age of 42.4±9.3 years (range 18–60). Magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner (Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with a phased-array back coil. A paramagnetic non–ionic contrast agent was injected with a dose of 0.4 ml/kg. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were subsequently acquired at 5 time points, 5 and 10 minutes, 2, 4 and 6 hours after injection. Endplates presented clear enhancement already 5 minutes after injection, and showed an increase in the next 2 hours followed by a decrease. At 5 and 10 minutes, virtually no contrast medium was present inside the intervertebral disc; afterwards, enhancement significantly increased. Highly degenerated discs showed higher enhancement in comparison with low and medium degenerated discs. Discs classified as Pfirrmann 5 showed a statistically significant higher enhancement than Pfirrmann 1, 2 and 3 at all time points but the first one, possibly due to vascularization. Disc height collapse and Modic changes significantly increased enhancement. Presence of endplate defects did not show any significant influence on post contrast enhancement, but the lack of a clear classification of endplate defects as seen on magnetic resonance scans may be shadowing some effects. In conclusion, disc height, high level of degeneration and presence of Modic changes are factors which increase post contrast enhancement in the intervertebral disc. The effect of age could not be demonstrated. PMID:24146913

  10. Injection of human umbilical tissue–derived cells into the nucleus pulposus alters the course of intervertebral disc degeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, Steven K.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Bechara, Bernard P.; Hartman, Robert A.; Coelho, Joao Paulo; Witt, William T.; Dong, Qing D.; Bowman, Brent W.; Bell, Kevin M.; Vo, Nam V.; Kramer, Brian C.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background context Patients often present to spine clinic with evidence of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). If conservative management fails, a safe and effective injection directly into the disc might be preferable to the risks and morbidity of surgery. Purpose To determine whether injecting human umbilical tissue–derived cells (hUTC) into the nucleus pulposus (NP) might improve the course of IDD. Design Prospective, randomized, blinded placebo–controlled in vivo study. Patient sample Skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits. Outcome measures Degree of IDD based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biomechanics, and histology. Methods Thirty skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits were used in a previously validated rabbit annulotomy model for IDD. Discs L2–L3, L3–L4, and L4–L5 were surgically exposed and punctured to induce degeneration and then 3 weeks later the same discs were injected with hUTC with or without a hydrogel carrier. Serial MRIs obtained at 0, 3, 6, and 12 weeks were analyzed for evidence of degeneration qualitatively and quantitatively via NP area and MRI Index. The rabbits were sacrificed at 12 weeks and discs L4–L5 were analyzed histologically. The L3–L4 discs were fixed to a robotic arm and subjected to uniaxial compression, and viscoelastic displacement curves were generated. Results Qualitatively, the MRIs demonstrated no evidence of degeneration in the control group over the course of 12 weeks. The punctured group yielded MRIs with the evidence of disc height loss and darkening, suggestive of degeneration. The three treatment groups (cells alone, carrier alone, or cells+carrier) generated MRIs with less qualitative evidence of degeneration than the punctured group. MRI Index and area for the cell and the cell+carrier groups were significantly distinct from the punctured group at 12 weeks. The carrier group generated MRI data that fell between control and punctured values but failed to reach a statistically

  11. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration associated with axial and radiating low back pain in ageing SPARC-null mice.

    PubMed

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Naso, Lina; Sage, E Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2012-06-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with unclear underlying mechanisms. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and signs of LBP. The current study investigates the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. SPARC-null and age-matched control mice ranging from 6 to 78 weeks of age were evaluated in this study. X-ray and histologic analysis revealed reduced IVD height, increased wedging, and signs of degeneration (bulging and herniation). Cutaneous sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were used as measures of referred (low back and tail) and radiating pain (hind paw). Region specificity was assessed by measuring icilin- and capsaicin-evoked behaviour after subcutaneous injection into the hind paw or upper lip. Axial discomfort was measured by the tail suspension and grip force assays. Motor impairment was determined by the accelerating rotarod. Physical function was evaluated by voluntary activity after axial strain or during ambulation with forced lateral flexion. SPARC-null mice developed (1) region-specific, age-dependent hypersensitivity to cold, icilin, and capsaicin (hind paw only), (2) axial discomfort, (3) motor impairment, and (4) reduced physical function. Morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cutaneous sensitivity and alleviated axial discomfort in SPARC-null mice. Ageing SPARC-null mice mirror many aspects of the complex and challenging nature of LBP in humans and incorporate both anatomic and functional components of the disease. The current study supports the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP.

  12. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  13. BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 Heterodimers Conjugated to a Fibrin/Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel in a Large Animal Model of Mild Intervertebral Disc Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E L; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Smit, Theo H; Yayon, Avner; Weber, Franz E; Helder, Marco N

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is etiologically associated with low back pain and is currently only treated in severe cases with spinal fusion. Regenerative medicine attempts to restore degenerated tissue by means of cells, hydrogels, and/or growth factors and can therefore be used to slow, halt, or reverse the degeneration of the IVD in a minimally invasive manner. Previously, the growth factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 7 (BMP-2, -7) were shown to enhance disc regeneration, in vitro and in vivo. Since BMPs have only a short in vivo half-life, and to prevent heterotopic ossification, we evaluated the use of a slow release system for BMP-2 homodimers and BMP-2/7 heterodimers for IVD regeneration. BMP growth factors were conjugated to a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel and intradiscally injected in a goat model of mild IVD degeneration to study safety and efficacy. Mild degeneration was induced in five lumbar discs of seven adult Dutch milk goats, by injections with the enzyme chondroitinase ABC. After 12 weeks, discs were treated with either FB/HA-hydrogel only or supplemented with 1 or 5 μg/mL of BMP-2 or BMP-2/7. BMPs were linked to the FB/HA hydrogels using a transglutaminase moiety, to be released through an incorporated plasmin cleavage site. After another 12 weeks, goats were sacrificed and discs were assessed using radiography, MRI T2* mapping, and biochemical and histological analyses. All animals maintained weight throughout the study and no heterotopic bone formation or other adverse effects were noted during follow-up. Radiographs showed significant disc height loss upon induction of mild degeneration. MRI T2* mapping showed strong and significant correlations with biochemistry and histology as shown before. Surprisingly, no differences could be demonstrated in any parameter between intervention groups. To our knowledge, this is the first large animal study evaluating BMPs conjugated to an FB/HA-hydrogel for the treatment of

  14. BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 Heterodimers Conjugated to a Fibrin/Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel in a Large Animal Model of Mild Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E.L.; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S.; Smit, Theo H.; Yayon, Avner; Weber, Franz E.; Helder, Marco N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is etiologically associated with low back pain and is currently only treated in severe cases with spinal fusion. Regenerative medicine attempts to restore degenerated tissue by means of cells, hydrogels, and/or growth factors and can therefore be used to slow, halt, or reverse the degeneration of the IVD in a minimally invasive manner. Previously, the growth factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 7 (BMP-2, -7) were shown to enhance disc regeneration, in vitro and in vivo. Since BMPs have only a short in vivo half-life, and to prevent heterotopic ossification, we evaluated the use of a slow release system for BMP-2 homodimers and BMP-2/7 heterodimers for IVD regeneration. BMP growth factors were conjugated to a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel and intradiscally injected in a goat model of mild IVD degeneration to study safety and efficacy. Mild degeneration was induced in five lumbar discs of seven adult Dutch milk goats, by injections with the enzyme chondroitinase ABC. After 12 weeks, discs were treated with either FB/HA-hydrogel only or supplemented with 1 or 5 μg/mL of BMP-2 or BMP-2/7. BMPs were linked to the FB/HA hydrogels using a transglutaminase moiety, to be released through an incorporated plasmin cleavage site. After another 12 weeks, goats were sacrificed and discs were assessed using radiography, MRI T2* mapping, and biochemical and histological analyses. All animals maintained weight throughout the study and no heterotopic bone formation or other adverse effects were noted during follow-up. Radiographs showed significant disc height loss upon induction of mild degeneration. MRI T2* mapping showed strong and significant correlations with biochemistry and histology as shown before. Surprisingly, no differences could be demonstrated in any parameter between intervention groups. To our knowledge, this is the first large animal study evaluating BMPs conjugated to an FB/HA-hydrogel for the

  15. Treatment outcome of chronic low back pain and radiographic lumbar disc degeneration are associated with inflammatory and matrix degrading gene variants: a prospective genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory and matrix degrading gene variants have been reported to be associated with disc degeneration. Some of these variants also modulate peripheral pain. This study examines the association of these genetic variants with radiographic lumbar disc degeneration and changes in pain and disability at long-term after surgical and cognitive behavioural management. Methods 93 unrelated patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) for duration of >1 year and lumbar disc degeneration were treated with lumbar fusion or cognitive intervention and exercises. Standardised questionnaires included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual Analog Score (VAS) for CLBP, were filled in by patients both at baseline and at 9 years follow-up. Degenerative changes at baseline Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography scans, were graded as moderate and severe (N=79). Yield and quality of blood and saliva DNA was assessed by nano drop spectrophotometry. Eight SNPs in 5 inflammatory and matrix degrading genes were successfully genotyped. Single marker and haplotype association with severity of degeneration, number of discs involved, changes in ODI and VAS CLBP, was done using Haploview, linear regression and R-package Haplostats. Results Association analysis of individual SNPs revealed association of IL18RAP polymorphism rs1420100 with severe degeneration (p = 0.05) and more than one degenerated disc (p = 0.02). From the same gene two SNPs, rs917997 and rs1420106, were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) and were associated with post treatment improvement in disability (p = 0.02). Haplotype association analysis of 5 SNPs spanning across IL18RAP, IL18R1 and IL1A genes revealed significant associations with improvement in disability (p=0.02) and reduction in pain (p=0.04). An association was found between MMP3 polymorphism rs72520913 and improvement in pain (p = 0.03) and with severe degeneration (p = 0.006). Conclusions The findings of the

  16. Expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in degenerated lumbar intervertebral discs and their correlation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-GANG; HOU, HONG-WEI; LIU, YI-LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression and roles of interleukin (IL)-17 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) and to identify the association between the effects of IL-17 and TNF-α in IDD. This may increase understanding of the pathogenic mechanism underlying IDD, and aid the development of alternative therapies. The experimental group consisted of 40 samples of nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of patients with IDD by surgical intervention, and was further divided into an annulus fibrosus disrupted group, comprising 18 patients in which the external annulus was ruptured, and an annulus fibrosus intact group comprising 22 patients. The control group consisted of 20 samples of nucleus pulposus tissue from the IVDs of patients with traumatic lumbar disc fractures. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the 50 tissue samples were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, and the results were statistically analyzed. The IL-17 and TNF-α protein and mRNA expression levels in the annulus fibrosus disrupted and annulus fibrosus intact groups were both higher compared with those in the control group. In addition, the expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the annulus fibrosus disrupted group were significantly higher compared with those in the annulus fibrosus intact group (P<0.01). A positive correlation was identified between the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-17 and TNF-α in the experimental group (r=0.957, P<0.01). IL-17 and TNF-α may therefore be involved in the progression of human IDD, and may have synergistic effects in the development of IDD. PMID:27284317

  17. Enhancement of Lumbar Fusion and Alleviation of Adjacent Segment Disc Degeneration by Intermittent PTH(1-34) in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuang; Tian, Fa-Ming; Gou, Yu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Heng; Song, Hui-Ping; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Zhang, Liu

    2016-04-01

    Osteoporosis, which is prevalent in postmenopausal or aged populations, is thought to be a contributing factor to adjacent segment disc degeneration (ASDD), and the incidence and extent of ASDD may be augmented by osteopenia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-34) has already been shown to be beneficial in osteoporosis, lumbar fusion and matrix homeostasis of intervertebral discs. However, whether PTH(1-34) has a reversing or retarding effect on ASDD in osteopenia has not been confirmed. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of intermittent PTH(1-34) on ASDD in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. One hundred 3-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent L4 -L5 posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) with spinous-process wire fixation 4 weeks after OVX surgery. Control groups were established accordingly. PTH(1-34) was intermittently administered immediately after PLF surgery and lasted for 8 weeks using the following groups (n = 20) (V = vehicle): Sham+V, OVX+V, Sham+PLF+V, OVX+PLF+V, OVX+PLF+PTH. The fused segments showed clear evidence of eliminated motion on the fusion-segment based on manual palpation. Greater new bone formation in histology was observed in PTH-treated animals compared to the control group. The extent of ASDD was significantly increased by ovariotomy. Intermittent PTH(1-34) significantly alleviated ASDD by preserving disc height, microvessel density, relative area of vascular buds, endplate thickness and the relative area of endplate calcification. Moreover, protein expression results showed that PTH(1-34) not only inhibited matrix degradation by decreasing MMP-13, ADAMTS-4 and Col-I, but also promote matrix synthesis by increasing Col-II and Aggrecan. In conclusion, PTH(1-34), which effectively improves lumbar fusion and alleviates ASDD in ovariectomized rats, may be a potential candidate to ameliorate the prognosis of lumbar fusion in osteopenia.

  18. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1β, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  19. The role of TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway in platelet-rich plasma in retarding intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huilin; Yuan, Chenxi; Wu, Chunshen; Qian, Jiale; Shi, Qing; Li, Xuefeng; Zhu, Xuesong; Zou, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are an effective way to retard intervertebral disc degeneration, but the mechanism of action is unclear. Activated platelets release some growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which positively modulate the extracellular matrix of nucleus pulposus cells. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism underlying the PRP-mediated inhibition of intervertebral disc degeneration. In an in vitro study, we found that the proliferation of nucleus pulposus cells was greatly enhanced with 2.5% PRP treatment. The TGF-β1 concentration was much higher after PRP treatment. PRP administration effectively increased the collagen II, aggrecan and sox-9 mRNA levels and decreased collagen X levels. However, Western blotting demonstrated that specifically inhibiting TGF-β1 signalling could significantly prevent nucleus pulpous cellular expression of Smad2/3 and matrix protein. In a rabbit study, magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant recovery signal intensity in the intervertebral discs of the PRP injection group compared with the very low signal intensity in the control groups. Histologically, the PRP plus inhibitor injection group had significantly lower expression levels of Smad2/3 and collagen II than the PRP group. These results demonstrated that a high TGF-β1 content in the platelets retarded disc degeneration in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway could prevent this recovery by inactivating Smad2/3 and down-regulating the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the TGF-β1/Smad2/3 pathway might play a critical role in the ability of PRP to retard intervertebral disc degeneration.

  20. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration.A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case-control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed.The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05).One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  1. Treatment of Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Degeneration with the VariLift-L Interbody Fusion System: Retrospective Review of 470 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Warren F.; Fichtel, Frank; del Monaco, Diana Cardenas

    2016-01-01

    Background Many first generation stand-alone fusion cages required endplate decortication and surgical impaction during the procedure resulting in segmental subsidence, implant migration and loss of lordosis postoperatively. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate radiographically, in a large series of patients, whether engineering and design modifications incorporated in a specific stand-alone, expandable interbody fusion device (VariLift®-L) adequately addressed previously recognized deficiencies of stand-alone interbody cages. Methods In this retrospective chart review of 470 patients (642 treated levels), we evaluated radiographic evidence of fusion, subsidence and migration following a one- or two-level PLIF procedure utilizing this stand-alone expandable interbody fusion device. A secondary objective was to corroborate the low morbidity and symptomatic improvements achieved with previous interbody cage devices used to treat symptomatic disc degeneration. Results The average postoperative followup was 3.9 ± 1.8 years and a solid fusion rate of 94% was achieved among patients with ≥ 9 months of radiographic followup. Subsidence > 3 mm was noted at 10 levels with no cases of device migration. Composite back pain severity scores improved from 8.5 ± 1.5 preoperatively to 0.8 ± 1.5 at final followup (p<0.001) and 94% of patients met or exceeded the minimal clinical important difference of 3.8 points. Eighteen patients required reoperation following the index procedure; 16 of these patients were treated for adjacent segment disease. Conclusions (LOE) The VariLift-L device has excellent clinical and technical performance characteristics, providing adequate stabilization of the anterior column without the need for supplemental posterior instrumentation. Level of Evidence IV. IRB Approval: Expedited Federal Register Categories 5& 7: Methodist IRB 3/30/2011; Informed Consent statement: retrospective data collection, patients signed consent forms

  2. Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-29

    FTLD; Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP); Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD); Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD); PPA Syndrome; Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD); Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (svPPA); Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (nfvPPA); FTD With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FTD/ALS); Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Oligosymptomatic PSP (oPSP); Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS)

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of interleukin-1 alpha and the vitamin d receptor in mexican mestizo patients with intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cervin Serrano, Salvador; González Villareal, Dalia; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Romero-Navarro, Jose Guillermo; Romero Quintana, Jose Geovanni; Arámbula Meraz, Eliakym; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Picos-Cárdenas, Veronica; Granados, Julio; Estrada-García, Iris; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common diagnosis in patients with back pain, a leading cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Several conditions, such as occupational activities, gender, age, and obesity, have been associated with IDD. However, the development of this disease has strong genetic determinants. In this study, we explore the possible association between rs1800587 (c.-949C>T) of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and rs2228570 (c.2T>V) and rs731236 (c.1056T>C) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and the development of IDD in northwestern Mexican Mestizo population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, in two groups matched by age and gender: patients with symptomatic lumbar IDD (n = 100) and subjects with normal lumbar-spine MRI-scans (n = 100). Distribution of the mutated alleles in patients and controls was 27.0% versus 28.0% (P = 0.455) for T of rs1800587 (IL1A); 53.0% versus 58.0% (P = 0.183) for V of rs2228570 (VDR); and 18.0% versus 21.0% (P = 0.262) for C of rs731236 (VDR). Our results showed no association between the studied polymorphisms and IDD in this population. This is the first report on the contribution of gene polymorphisms on IDD in a Mexican population.

  4. Genetic Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 Alpha and the Vitamin D Receptor in Mexican Mestizo Patients with Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cervin Serrano, Salvador; González Villareal, Dalia; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Romero-Navarro, Jose Guillermo; Romero Quintana, Jose Geovanni; Arámbula Meraz, Eliakym; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Picos-Cárdenas, Veronica; Granados, Julio; Estrada-García, Iris; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common diagnosis in patients with back pain, a leading cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Several conditions, such as occupational activities, gender, age, and obesity, have been associated with IDD. However, the development of this disease has strong genetic determinants. In this study, we explore the possible association between rs1800587 (c.-949C>T) of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and rs2228570 (c.2T>V) and rs731236 (c.1056T>C) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and the development of IDD in northwestern Mexican Mestizo population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, in two groups matched by age and gender: patients with symptomatic lumbar IDD (n = 100) and subjects with normal lumbar-spine MRI-scans (n = 100). Distribution of the mutated alleles in patients and controls was 27.0% versus 28.0% (P = 0.455) for T of rs1800587 (IL1A); 53.0% versus 58.0% (P = 0.183) for V of rs2228570 (VDR); and 18.0% versus 21.0% (P = 0.262) for C of rs731236 (VDR). Our results showed no association between the studied polymorphisms and IDD in this population. This is the first report on the contribution of gene polymorphisms on IDD in a Mexican population. PMID:25506053

  5. An Association Study of Interleukin 18 Receptor Genes (IL18R1 and IL18RAP) in Lumbar Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Omair, Ahmad; Lie, Benedicte Alexandra; Reikeras, Olav; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine association of candidate genetic variants in structural, inflammatory, matrix modifying, vitamin D receptor genes and variants associated with osteoarthritis, with surgical candidates and surgical patients with lumbar disc degeneration (LDD), in light of their previously reported susceptibility for LDD. Methods: Genotyping of 146 Norwegian LDD patients and 188 Norwegian controls was performed for 20 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from collagen, aggrecan, interleukin, VDR, MMP3 and COX2 genes and 7 SNPs from osteoarthritic genes. Results: The neighboring genes IL18R1 and IL18RAP polymorphisms (rs2287037 and rs1420100), showed a statistically non-significant risk for developing LDD (OR 1.36 [95 % CI 0.99 – 1.87]; p=0.06 and OR 1.33 [95 % CI 0.98-1.81]; p=0.07). Homozygosity of these risk alleles was associated with LDD (p=0.023 and p=0.027). The non-risk alleles at these SNPs were situated on a haplotype negatively associated with LDD (p=0.008). Carriage of at least one non-risk allele at both loci also reduces the risk of developing LDD (OR 0.51 [95 % CI 0.33-0.80]; p=0.003). Conclusion: Our findings support the polygenic nature of LDD and suggest that variation in interleukin 18 receptor genes could affect the risk of severe LDD and associated low back pain. PMID:22550553

  6. Degenerated intervertebral disc prolapse and its association of collagen I alpha 1 Spl gene polymorphism: A preliminary case control study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Anjankar, Shailendra D; Poornima, Subhadra; Raju, Subodh; Jaleel, MA; Bhiladvala, Dilnavaz; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Degenerated disc disease (DDD) is a common disorder responsible for increased morbidity in a productive age group. Its etiology is multifactorial and genetic factors have been predominantly implicated. Disc prolapse results due to tear in the annulus, which is a fibrous structure composed largely of type I collagen. Functional polymorphism at the Sp1 site of the collagen I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene has shown a positive association with DDD in Dutch and Greek populations. The purpose of this study was to assess COL1A1 Sp1 gene polymorphism in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Fifty clinically and radiologically proven patients with disc prolapse requiring surgery were included as cases and 50 healthy, age-matched volunteers served as controls. After isolating DNA from their blood sample, genotyping for COL1A1 polymorphism (rs1800012) was performed and identified as GG, GT, and TT. Results: The mean age and body mass index in cases and controls were similar. 76% of the patients were males. The most common site of disc degeneration was L4–L5 (36%), followed by L5–S1 (34%). Homozygous–GG, heterozygous GT, and homozygous TT genotypes were seen in 38 (76%), 10 (20%) and 2 (4%) cases respectively, controls had similar percentage of genotypes as well. The alleles in cases and the control group showed no significant difference (P = 0.6744) and followed the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in the study population. Conclusion: The COL1A1 (rs1800012) is in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the present subset of Indian population. But taken as a single factor, it was not found to be associated with DDD in this preliminary study. Disc degeneration is multifactorial and also anticipated to be a result of multiple genes involvement and gene-gene interaction. PMID:26806964

  7. Aquaporin 1 and 5 expression decreases during human intervertebral disc degeneration: Novel HIF-1-mediated regulation of aquaporins in NP cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Zariel I; Gogate, Shilpa S; Day, Rebecca; Binch, Abbie; Markova, Dessislava Z; Chiverton, Neil; Cole, Ashley; Conner, Matt; Shapiro, Irving M; Le Maitre, Christine L; Risbud, Makarand V

    2015-05-20

    Objectives of this study were to investigate whether AQP1 and AQP5 expression is altered during intervertebral disc degeneration and if hypoxia and HIF-1 regulate their expression in NP cells. AQP expression was measured in human tissues from different degenerative grades; regulation by hypoxia and HIF-1 was studied using promoter analysis and gain- and loss-of-function experiments. We show that both AQPs are expressed in the disc and that mRNA and protein levels decline with human disease severity. Bioinformatic analyses of AQP promoters showed multiple evolutionarily conserved HREs. Surprisingly, hypoxia failed to induce promoter activity or expression of either AQP. While genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation showed limited binding of HIF-1α to conserved HREs, their mutation did not suppress promoter activities. Stable HIF-1α suppression significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of both AQPs, but HIF-1α failed to induce AQP levels following accumulation. Together, our results demonstrate that AQP1 and AQP5 expression is sensitive to human disc degeneration and that HIF-1α uniquely maintains basal expression of both AQPs in NP cells, independent of oxemic tension and HIF-1 binding to promoter HREs. Diminished HIF-1 activity during degeneration may suppress AQP levels in NP cells, compromising their ability to respond to extracellular osmolarity changes. PMID:25844601

  8. Aquaporin 1 and 5 expression decreases during human intervertebral disc degeneration: novel HIF-1-mediated regulation of aquaporins in NP cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Rebecca; Binch, Abbie; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Chiverton, Neil; Cole, Ashley; Conner, Matt; Shapiro, Irving M.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives of this study were to investigate whether AQP1 and AQP5 expression is altered during intervertebral disc degeneration and if hypoxia and HIF-1 regulate their expression in NP cells. AQP expression was measured in human tissues from different degenerative grades; regulation by hypoxia and HIF-1 was studied using promoter analysis and gain- and loss-of-function experiments. We show that both AQPs are expressed in the disc and that mRNA and protein levels decline with human disease severity. Bioinformatic analyses of AQP promoters showed multiple evolutionarily conserved HREs. Surprisingly, hypoxia failed to induce promoter activity or expression of either AQP. While genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation showed limited binding of HIF-1α to conserved HREs, their mutation did not suppress promoter activities. Stable HIF-1α suppression significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of both AQPs, but HIF-1α failed to induce AQP levels following accumulation. Together, our results demonstrate that AQP1 and AQP5 expression is sensitive to human disc degeneration and that HIF-1α uniquely maintains basal expression of both AQPs in NP cells, independent of oxemic tension and HIF-1 binding to promoter HREs. Diminished HIF-1 activity during degeneration may suppress AQP levels in NP cells, compromising their ability to respond to extracellular osmolarity changes. PMID:25844601

  9. Glucosamine loaded injectable silk-in-silk integrated system modulate mechanical properties in bovine ex-vivo degenerated intervertebral disc model.

    PubMed

    Murab, Sumit; Samal, Juhi; Shrivastava, Akshay; Ray, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Abhay; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels offer a tremendous potential for treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc due to their ability to withstand complex loading, conforming precisely to the defect spaces and eliminating the need for invasive surgical procedures. We have developed an injectable hydrogel platform of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) loaded silk hollow spheres embedded in silk hydrogel for in situ therapeutic release and enhanced mechanical strength. The assembled silk hydrogel provided adequate structural support to the ex vivo degenerated disc model in a cyclic compression test at par with the native tissue. Spatiotemporal release of GlcNAc in a controlled manner from the silk hollow microspheres trigger enhanced proteoglycan production from ADSCs embedded in the composite system. Role of MAPK and SMAD pathways in increasing proteoglycan production have been explored by immunohistological analysis as a result of the action of GlcNAc on the cells, elucidating the potential of injectable silk microsphere-in-silk hydrogel for the regeneration of degenerated disc tissue. PMID:25934453

  10. ISSLS PRIZE WINNER: INHIBITION OF NF-κB ACTIVITY AMELIORATES AGE-ASSOCIATED DISC DEGENERATION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ACCELERATED AGING

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria R.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Pola, Enrico; Lee, Joon Y.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James D.; Robbins, Paul D.; Vo, Nam V.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design NF-κB activity was pharmacologically and genetically blocked in an accelerated aging mouse model to mitigate age-related disc degenerative changes. Objective To study the mediatory role of NF-κB signaling pathway in age-dependent intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Background Data Aging is a major contributor to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but the molecular mechanism behind this process is poorly understood. NF-κB is a family of transcription factors which play a central role in mediating cellular response to damage, stress, and inflammation. Growing evidence implicates chronic NF-κB activation as a culprit in many aging-related diseases, but its role in aging-related IDD has not been adequately explored. We studied the effects of NF-κB inhibition on IDD using a DNA repair-deficient mouse model of accelerated aging (Ercc1-/Δ mice) previously been reported to exhibit age-related IDD. Methods Systemic inhibition of NF-κB activation was achieved either genetically by deletion of one allele of the NF-κB subunit p65 (Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice) or pharmacologically by chronic intra-peritoneal administration of the Nemo Binding Domain (8K-NBD) peptide to block the formation of the upstream activator of NF-κB, IκB Inducible Kinase (IKK), in Ercc1-/Δ mice. Disc cellularity, total proteoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis of treated mice and untreated controls were assessed. Results Decreased disc matrix proteoglycan content, a hallmark feature of IDD, and elevated disc NF-κB activity were observed in discs of progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice and naturally aged wild-type compared to young WT mice. Systemic inhibition of NF-κB by the 8K-NBD peptide in Ercc1-/Δ mice increased disc proteoglycan synthesis and ameriolated loss disc cellularity and matrix proteoglycan. These results were confirmed genetically by using the p65 haploinsufficient Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway

  11. OPG rs2073617 polymorphism is associated with upregulated OPG protein expression and an increased risk of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Xin-Li; Wang, Wen-Jun; Yan, Yi-Guo; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the associations between three distinct osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A total of 200 IDD patients and 200 healthy controls were recruited from the Department of Spine Surgery at the First Affiliated Hospital of the University of South China (Hengyang, China) between January 2013 and May 2014. The allele, genotype and haplotype frequency distributions of three OPG polymorphisms in the study and control populations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction prior to restriction fragment length polymorphism or high resolution melting assays. In addition, serum OPG levels were measured via an ELISA. The genotype and allele frequencies of the OPG rs2073617 polymorphisms were significantly higher in the IDD patients, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Furthermore, carriers of the C allele exhibited a higher risk of IDD, as compared with carriers of the T allele (P<0.001). Conversely, the genotype and allele frequencies of the two other gene polymorphisms, rs2073618 and rs3102735, showed no significant differences between the patients and controls (P>0.05). The serum OPG levels were significantly higher in IDD patients with TT, TC and CC genotypes at the OPG rs2073617 polymorphism, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Logistic-regression analysis suggested that high serum levels of OPG were positively correlated with IDD risk, whereas the T-C-A, T-G-A and T-G-G haplotypes were negatively correlated with IDD risk (P<0.05). Furthermore, the G-T-G haplotype was associated with protection against IDD (P=0.008), whereas the G-C-G haplotype was associated with an elevated susceptibility to IDD (P=0.007). The results of the present study suggested that OPG rs2073617 polymorphisms and upregulated serum levels of OPG were associated with an increased risk of IDD, whereas the T-C-A, T-G-A and T-G-G haplotypes were protective factors for IDD. The results of the

  12. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  13. Adjacent segment degeneration after single-level anterior cervical decompression and fusion: disc space distraction and its impact on clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Yongqian; Kong, Fanlong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to find whether excessive distraction of the disc space for cage insertion was a risk factor for adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for single-level cervical disc herniation between June 2006 and November 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative, postoperative and final follow-up disc height (DH), sagittal segmental alignment (SSA), and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS) were measured and compared between the ASD group and non-ASD group. In 116 patients, ASD was radiographically proven in 28 (24.1%) patients. The clinical outcomes were significantly improved compared to the preoperative scores in both groups. However, the postoperative and final follow-up DH of the ASD group were significantly higher than in the non-ASD group (p<0.05). In addition, the postoperative DH was significantly correlated with the postoperative or final follow-up SSA (p<0.05). However, postoperative DH was not found to significantly correlate with postoperative or final follow-up SACS (p=0.072 and p=0.096, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that postoperative DH was the most significant risk factor for ASD. The clinical outcomes of ACDF for single-level degenerative cervical disc disease were satisfactory. Postoperative DH (the distracted distance) had the greatest impact on the incidence of ASD. Excessive disc space distraction is a considerable risk factor for the development of radiographic ASD.

  14. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  15. Effects of initial boost with TGF-beta 1 and grade of intervertebral disc degeneration on 3D culture of human annulus fibrosus cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) culture in porous biomaterials as well as stimulation with growth factors are known to be supportive for intervertebral disc cell differentiation and tissue formation. Unless sophisticated releasing systems are used, however, effective concentrations of growth factors are maintained only for a very limited amount of time in in vivo applications. Therefore, we investigated, if an initial boost with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is capable to induce a lasting effect of superior cartilaginous differentiation in slightly and severely degenerated human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. Methods Human AF tissue was harvested during surgical treatment of six adult patients with lumbar spinal diseases. Grading of disc degeneration was performed with magnet resonance imaging. AF cells were isolated and expanded in monolayer culture and rearranged three-dimensionally in a porous biomaterial consisting of stepwise absorbable poly-glycolic acid and poly-(lactic-co-glycolic) acid and a supportive fine net of non-absorbable polyvinylidene fluoride. An initial boost of TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 1 and hyaluronan was applied and compared with controls. Matrix formation was assessed at days 7 and 21 by (1) histological staining of the typical extracellular matrix molecules proteoglycan and type I and type II collagens and by (2) real-time gene expression analysis of aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, type I, II, III, and X collagens as well as of catabolic matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-13. Results An initial boost with TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 1 and hyaluronan did not enhance the expression of characteristic AF matrix molecules in our 3D culture system. AF cells showed high viability in the progressively degrading biomaterial. Stratification by grade of intervertebral disc degeneration showed that AF cells from both, slightly degenerated, or severely degenerated tissue are capable of significant up-regulations of characteristic matrix

  16. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a regulates the survival of nucleus pulposus cells in the acidic environment of degenerated intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Hong, Xin; Xie, Xin-Hui; Shi, Rui; Xie, Zhi-Yang; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Activation of acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is responsible for tissue injury caused by acidosis in nervous systems. But its physiological and pathological roles in nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) are unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ASIC1a regulates the survival of NPCs in the acidic environment of degenerated discs. Materials and Methods: NPCs were isolated and cultured followed by immunofluorescent staining and Western-blot analysis for ASIC1a. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) was determined by Ca2+-imaging using Fura-2-AM. Cell necrosis, apoptosis, and senescence following acid exposure were determined using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide dual-staining and cell cycle analysis, respectively, followed by Western-blot analysis for apoptosis-related proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3) and senescence-related proteins (p53, p21, and p16). Effects of treatment with psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1, blocker of ASIC1a) on [Ca2+]i and cell survival were investigated. Results: ASIC1a was detected in healthy NPCs, and its expression was significantly higher in degenerated cells. When NPCs were treated with PcTX1, acid-induced increases in [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited. PcTX1 treatment also resulted in decreased LDH release, cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in acid condition. Acid exposure decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and senescence-related proteins (p53, p21, and p16), which was inhibited by PcTX1. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that further understanding of ASIC1a functionality may provide not only a novel insight into intervertebral disc biology but also a novel therapeutic target for intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:27746861

  17. Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Aggrecan Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration — A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinlin; Han, Luo

    2012-01-01

    Background A series of studies have been conducted to evaluate the associations between vitamin D receptor (VDR) and aggrecan variable numbers of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but produced conflicting results. Objective we performed a meta-analysis to address a more accurate estimation of the associations between the above gene polymorphisms and the risk of IDD. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all the relevant studies. The fixed or random effect model was selected based on the heterogeneity test among studies evaluated using the I2. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plots and Egger's regression test. Results A total of 9, 5, 3, and 7 studies were finally included in the analyses for the associations between the VDR TaqI (rs731236), FokI (rs2228570), ApaI (rs7975232), or aggrecan VNTR polymorphisms and the risk of IDD, respectively. The combined results showed that none of the VDR (TaqI, FokI, ApaI) polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of IDD. In contrast, the alleles with shorter VNTR length was found to significantly increase the risk of IDD (≦25 vs. >25: OR = 1.850, 95%CI 1.477–2.318; ≦23 vs. >23: OR = 1.955, 95%CI 1.41–2.703). Subgroup analysis confirmed the above results. After excluding studies deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in controls, no other studies were found to significantly influence the pooled effects in each genetic model. No potential publication bias was detected. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggested that the alleles with shorter VNTR length significantly increased the risk of IDD, while the VDR (TaqI, FokI, ApaI) gene polymorphisms were not significantly associated with the risk of IDD. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:23209686

  18. Potential Role of lncRNAs in Contributing to Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Based on Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Ni, Haijian; Zhao, Yingchuan; Chen, Kai; Li, Ming; Li, Cheng; Zhu, Xiaodong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Our study intended to identify potential long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and genes, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Material/Methods The microarray of GSE56081 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 5 human control nucleus pulposus tissues and 5 degenerative nucleus pulposus tissues, which was on the basis of GPL15314 platform. Identification of differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were performed between the 2 groups. Then, gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed to analyze the biological functions and pathways for the differentially expressed mRNAs. Simultaneously, lncRNA-mRNA weighted coexpression network was constructed using the WGCNA package, followed by GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses for the genes in the modules. Finally, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized. Results A total of 135 significantly up- and 170 down-regulated lncRNAs and 2133 significantly up- and 1098 down-regulated mRNAs were identified. Additionally, UBA52 (ubiquitin A-52 residue ribosomal protein fusion product 1), with the highest connectivity degree in PPI network, was remarkably enriched in the pathway of metabolism of proteins. Eight lncRNAs – LINC00917, CTD-2246P4.1, CTC-523E23.5, RP4-639J15.1, RP11-363G2.4, AC005082.12, MIR132, and RP11-38F22.1 – were observed in the modules of lncRNA-mRNA weighted coexpression network. Moreover, SPHK1 in the green-yellow module was significantly enriched in positive regulation of cell migration. Conclusions LncRNAs LINC00917, CTD-2246P4.1, CTC-523E23.5, RP4-639J15.1, RP11-363G2.4, AC005082.12, MIR132, and RP11-38F22.1 were differentially expressed and might play important roles in the development of IDD. Key genes, such as UBA52 and SPHK1, may be pivotal biomarkers for IDD. PMID:26556537

  19. Foveal-Sparing Scotomas in Advanced Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunness, Janet S.; Rubin, Gary S.; Zuckerbrod, Abraham; Applegate, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Foveal-sparing scotomas are common in advanced dry macular degeneration (geographic atrophy). Foveal preservation may be present for a number of years. Despite good visual acuity, these patients have reduced reading rates. Magnification may not be effective if the text becomes too large to "fit" within the central spared area. (Contains 2 tables…

  20. Quantitative MRI as a diagnostic tool of intervertebral disc matrix composition and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Iatridis, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease has been implicated as a major component of spine pathology. The current major clinical procedures for treating disc degeneration have been disappointing, because of altered spinal mechanics leading to subsequent degeneration at adjacent disc levels. Disc pathology treatment is shifting toward prevention and treatment of underlying etiologic processes at the level of the disc matrix composition and integrity and the biomechanics of the disc. The ability to perform such treatment relies on one’s ability to accurately and objectively assess the state of the matrix and the effectiveness of treatment by a non-invasive technique. In this review, we will summarize our advances in efforts to develop an objective, accurate, non-invasive diagnostic tool (quantitative MRI) in the detection and quantification of matrix composition and integrity and of biomechanical changes in early intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:19005703

  1. Proteomic identification of unique photoreceptor disc components reveals the presence of PRCD, a protein linked to retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Skiba, Nikolai P.; Spencer, William J.; Salinas, Raquel Y.; Lieu, Eric C.; Thompson, J. Will; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    2013-01-01

    Visual signal transduction takes place on the surface of flat membrane vesicles called photoreceptor discs, which reside inside the light-sensitive outer segment organelle of vertebrate photoreceptor cells. While biochemical studies have indicated that discs are built with a handful of highly specialized proteins, proteomic studies have yielded databases consisting of hundreds of entries. We addressed this controversy by employing protein correlation profiling which allows identification of unique components of organelles that can be fractionated but not purified to absolute homogeneity. We subjected discs to sequential steps of fractionation and identified the relative amounts of proteins in each fraction by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry. This analysis demonstrated that the photoreceptor disc proteome contains only eleven components, which satisfy the hallmark criterion for being unique disc-resident components: the retention of a constant molar ratio among themselves across fractionation steps. Remarkably, one of them is PRCD, a protein whose mutations have been shown to cause blindness, yet cellular localization remained completely unknown. Identification of PRCD as a novel disc-specific protein facilitates understanding its functional role and the pathobiological significance of its mutations. Our study provides a striking example how protein correlation profiling allows a distinction between constitutive components of cellular organelles and their inevitable contaminants. PMID:23672200

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  3. CELL THERAPY FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC REPAIR: ADVANCING CELL THERAPY FROM BENCH TO CLINICS

    PubMed Central

    Benneker, L.M.; Andersson, G.; Iatridis, J.C.; Sakai, D.; Härtl, R.; Ito, K.; Grad, S.

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encourageing results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium “Where Science meets Clinics”, sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5–7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imageing methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neurogenesis. Discogenic pain, originating from “black discs” or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in outline order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects. PMID:24802611

  4. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cimarolli, Verena R; Casten, Robin J; Rovner, Barry W; Heyl, Vera; Sörensen, Silvia; Horowitz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options – remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to screen for these two prevalent mental health problems and how to facilitate appropriate treatment for patients with AMD. PMID:26766899

  5. Temporo-spatial distribution of blood vessels in human lumbar intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Rainer; Wälchli, Beat; Boos, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    While there is consensus in the literature that blood vessels are confined to the outer anulus fibrosus of normal adult intervertebral disc, debate continues whether there is a vascular in-growths into inner parts of the intervertebral disc during degeneration. We therefore tested the hypothesis that vascular in-growth is not a distinct feature of disc degeneration. The specific endothelial cell marker CD 31 (PECAM) was used to immunohistochemically investigate 42 paraffin-embedded complete mid-sagittal human intervertebral disc sections of various ages (0–86 years) and varying extent of histomorphological degeneration. Additionally, 20 surgical disc samples from individuals (26–69 years) were included in this study. In discs of fetal to infantile age, blood vessels perforated the cartilaginous end plate and extended into the inner and outer anulus fibrosus, but not into the nucleus pulposus. In adolescents and adults, no blood vessels were seen except for the outer zone of the anulus fibrosus adjacent to the insertion to ligaments. The cartilaginous end plate remained free of vessels, except for areas with circumscribed destruction of the end plate. In advanced disc degeneration, no vessels were observed except for those few cases with complete, scar-like disc destruction. However, some rim lesions and occasionally major clefts were surrounded by a small network of capillary blood vessels extending into deeper zones of the anulus fibrosus. A subsequent morphometric analysis, revealed slightly “deeper” blood vessel extension in juvenile/adolescent discs when compared to young, mature and senile adult individuals with significantly “deeper” extension in the posterior than anterior anulus. The analysis of the surgical specimens showed that only sparse capillary blood vessels which did not extend into the nucleus pulposus even in major disc disruption. Our results show that vascular invasion deeper than the periphery was not observed during disc

  6. Lack of association of CFD polymorphisms with advanced age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jiexi; Chen, Yuhong; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhou, Xinrong; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Kevin; Hughes, Guy; Kasuga, Daniel; Bedell, Matthew; Lee, Clara; Ferreyra, Henry; Kozak, Igor; Haw, Weldon; Guan, Jean; Shaw, Robert; Stevenson, William; Weishaar, Paul D.; Nelson, Mark H.; Tang, Luosheng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible central vision loss worldwide. Research has linked AMD susceptibility with dysregulation of the complement cascade. Typically, complement factor H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3) are associated with AMD. In this paper, we investigated the association between complement factor D (CFD), another factor of the complement system, and advanced AMD in a Caucasian population. Methods Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1683564, rs35186399, rs1683563, rs3826945, rs34337649, and rs1651896, across the region covering CFD, were chosen for this study. One hundred and seventy-eight patients with advanced AMD and 161 age-matched normal controls were genotyped. Potential positive signals were further tested in another independent 445 advanced AMD patients and 190 controls. χ2 tests were performed to compare the allele frequencies between case and control groups. Results None of the six SNPs of CFD was found to be significantly associated with advanced AMD in our study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CFD may not play a major role in the genetic susceptibility to AMD because no association was found between the six SNPs analyzed in the CFD region and advanced AMD. PMID:21139680

  7. Body mass index is associated with lumbar disc degeneration in young Finnish males: subsample of Northern Finland birth cohort study 1986

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of environmental factors in lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (DD) in young adults is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether body mass index (BMI), smoking, and physical activity are associated with lumbar DD among young adults. Methods The Oulu Back Study (OBS) is a subpopulation of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC 1986) and it originally included 2,969 children. The OBS subjects received a postal questionnaire, and those who responded (N = 1,987) were invited to the physical examination. The participants (N = 874) were invited to lumbar MRI study. A total of 558 young adults (325 females and 233 males) underwent MRI that used a 1.5-T scanner at the mean age of 21. Each lumbar intervertebral disc was graded as normal (0), mildly (1), moderately (2), or severely (3) degenerated. We calculated a sum score of the lumbar DD, and analyzed the associations between environmental risk factors (smoking, physical activity and weight-related factors assessed at 16 and 19 years) and DD using ordinal logistic regression, the results being expressed as cumulative odds ratios (COR). All analyses were stratified by gender. Results Of the 558 subjects, 256 (46%) had no DD, 117 (21%) had sum score of one, 93 (17%) sum score of two, and 92 (17%) sum score of three or higher. In the multivariate ordinal logistic regression model, BMI at 16 years (highest vs. lowest quartile) was associated with DD sum score among males (COR 2.35; 95% CI 1.19-4.65) but not among females (COR 1.29; 95% CI 0.72-2.32). Smoking of at least four pack-years was associated with DD among males, but not among females (COR 2.41; 95% CI 0.99-5.86 and 1.59; 95% 0.67-3.76, respectively). Self-reported physical activity was not associated with DD. Conclusions High BMI at 16 years was associated with lumbar DD at 21 years among young males but not among females. High pack-years of smoking showed a comparable association in males, while physical activity had

  8. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grace D; Leach, J Kent; Klineberg, Eric O

    2015-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  9. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Leach, J. Kent; Klineberg, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential application in intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bojiang; Williams, Lisa; Diwan, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the leading public health problems in developed countries. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a major pathological process implicated in low back pain, which is characterized by cellular apoptosis and senescence with reduced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Currently, there is no clinical therapy targeting the reversal of disc degeneration. Recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have provided an exciting approach to disc regeneration that focuses on the delivery of viable cells to the degenerative disc. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells with self-renewal capacities and are able to differentiate into diverse specialized cell types, including chondrocyte lineages. The potential of stem cell therapy in disc degeneration is to repopulate the disc with viable cells capable of producing the ECM and restoring damaged tissue. The present literature review summarizes recent advances in basic research and clinical trials of MSCs to provide an outline of the key roles of MSCs therapies in disc repair. The review also discusses the controversies, challenges and therapeutic concepts for the future. PMID:26835326

  11. Clinical and radiological outcome of anterior–posterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for symptomatic disc degeneration: a retrospective comparative study of 133 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, James D.; Safriel, Yair; Gilbert, Thomas J.; Mehbod, Amir A.; Denis, Francis; Transfeldt, Ensor E.; Wroblewski, Jill M.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant data are available for direct anterior/posterior spine fusion (APF) and some for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), but only few studies from one institution compares the two techniques. One-hundred and thirty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed, 68 having APF and 65 having TLIF. All patients had symptomatic disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Only those with one or two-level surgeries were included. Clinical chart and radiologic reviews were done, fusion solidity assessed, and functional outcomes determined by pre- and postoperative SF-36 and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and a satisfaction questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 24 months. The mean operating room time and hospital length of stay were less in the TLIF group. The blood loss was slightly less in the TLIF group (409 vs. 480 cc.). Intra-operative complications were higher in the APF group, mostly due to vein lacerations in the anterior retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative complications were higher in the TLIF group due to graft material extruding against the nerve root or wound drainage. The pseudarthrosis rate was statistically equal (APF 17.6% and TLIF 23.1%) and was higher than most published reports. Significant improvements were noted in both groups for the SF-36 questionnaires. The mean ODI scores at follow-up were 33.5 for the APF and 39.5 for the TLIF group. The patient satisfaction rate was equal for the two groups. PMID:19125304

  12. Differential expression of p38 MAPK α, β, γ, δ isoforms in nucleus pulposus modulates macrophage polarization in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Cao, Peng; Gao, Yang; Wu, Ming; Lin, Yun; Tian, Ye; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    P38MAPK mediates cytokine induced inflammation in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and involves in multiple cellular processes which are related to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression, activation and function of p38 MAPK isoforms (α,β, γ and δ) in degenerative NP and the effect of p38 activation in NP cells on macrophage polarization. P38 α, β and δ isoforms are preferential expressed, whereas the p38γ isoform is absent in human NP tissue. LV-sh-p38α, sh-p38β transfection in NP cells significantly decreased the ADAMTS-4,-5, MMP-13,CCL3 expression and restored collagen-II and aggrecan expression upon IL-1β stimulation. As compared with p38α and p38β, p38δ exhibited an opposite effect on ADAMTS-4,-5, MMP-13 and aggrecan expression in NP cells. Furthermore, the production of GM-CSF and IFNγ which were trigged by p38α or p38β in NP cells induced macrophage polarization into M1 phenotype. Our finding indicates that p38 MAPK α, β and δ isoform are predominantly expressed and activated in IDD. P38 positive NP cells modulate macrophage polarization through the production of GM-CSF and IFNγ. Hence, Our study suggests that selectively targeting p38 isoforms could ameliorate the inflammation in IDD and regard IDD progression. PMID:26911458

  13. Design and fabrication of 3D-printed anatomically shaped lumbar cage for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration treatment.

    PubMed

    Serra, T; Capelli, C; Toumpaniari, R; Orriss, I R; Leong, J J H; Dalgarno, K; Kalaskar, D M

    2016-01-01

    Spinal fusion is the gold standard surgical procedure for degenerative spinal conditions when conservative therapies have been unsuccessful in rehabilitation of patients. Novel strategies are required to improve biocompatibility and osseointegration of traditionally used materials for lumbar cages. Furthermore, new design and technologies are needed to bridge the gap due to the shortage of optimal implant sizes to fill the intervertebral disc defect. Within this context, additive manufacturing technology presents an excellent opportunity to fabricate ergonomic shape medical implants. The goal of this study is to design and manufacture a 3D-printed lumbar cage for lumbar interbody fusion. Optimisations of the proposed implant design and its printing parameters were achieved via in silico analysis. The final construct was characterised via scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, x-ray micro computed tomography (μCT), atomic force microscopy, and compressive test. Preliminary in vitro cell culture tests such as morphological assessment and metabolic activities were performed to access biocompatibility of 3D-printed constructs. Results of in silico analysis provided a useful platform to test preliminary cage design and to find an optimal value of filling density for 3D printing process. Surface characterisation confirmed a uniform coating of nHAp with nanoscale topography. Mechanical evaluation showed mechanical properties of final cage design similar to that of trabecular bone. Preliminary cell culture results showed promising results in terms of cell growth and activity confirming biocompatibility of constructs. Thus for the first time, design optimisation based on computational and experimental analysis combined with the 3D-printing technique for intervertebral fusion cage has been reported in a single study. 3D-printing is a promising technique for medical applications and this study paves the way for future development of customised implants in spinal

  14. Advanced Science/Event-based Data Service Framework at GES DISC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, C. L.; Shen, S.; Kempler, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) has provided numerous Earth science data, information, and services to various research communities and general publics for decades. To maintain an overall fine service including improving serving our users with advanced data services has been our primary goal. We are developing an advanced science/event-based data service framework. The framework aims to effectively provide users with a sophisticatedly integrated data package via user-friendly discovering and selecting a system-preset science/event topic (e.g., hurricane, volcano, etc.) from an in-developing knowledge database of the framework. A data recipe page related to the Hurricane topic has been developed to demo the concept. More showcases of various subjects such as Volcano, Dust Storm, and Forest Fire are also under development. This framework is in developing on top of existing data services at GES DISC, such as Mirador (data search engine), Giovanni (visualization), OPeNDAP, and data recipes. It also involves other data tools, such as Panoply, GrADS, IDL, etc. The Hurricane Sandy (Oct 22-31 2012) event is used here for a sample description. As Hurricane Sandy being selected as a user case, a table containing nine system-preset data variables (i.e., precipitation, winds, sea surface temperature, sea level pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, aerosols, soil moisture and surface runoff, and trace gases) linked to the respective data products with fine temporal and spatial resolutions from various in-house sources is provided. The "bundled" variable data can thus be readily downloaded through Mirador. The in-house Giovanni is accessible for users to acquire quick views of Level 3 (gridded) variables. For Level 2 (swath) or the Giovanni-unavailable Level 3 data, the system provides a link to data recipes that give a how-to guide to read and visualize the data using offline tools, such as Panoply, GrADS, or IDL.

  15. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  16. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  17. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  18. Cost-Utility Analyses of Cataract Surgery in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyan; Huang, Jiannan; Zhu, Bijun; Sun, Qian; Miao, Yuyu; Zou, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To explore the cost-utility of cataract surgery in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Patients who were diagnosed as having and treated for age-related cataract and with a history of advanced AMD at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, were included in the study. All of the participants underwent successful phacoemulsification with foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation under retrobulbar anesthesia. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and utility value elicited by time trade-off method from patients at 3-month postoperative time were compared with those before surgery. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained in a lifetime were calculated at a 3% annual discounted rate. Costs per QALY gained were calculated using the bootstrap method, and probabilities of being cost-effective were presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results Mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA in the operated eye increased from 1.37 ± 0.5 (Snellen, 20/469) to 0.98 ± 0.25 (Snellen, 20/191) (p < 0.001); BCVA in the weighted average from both eyes (=75% better eye + 25% worse eye) was changed from 1.13 ± 0.22 (Snellen, 20/270) to 0.96 ± 0.17 (Snellen, 20/182) (p < 0.001). Utility values from both patients and doctors increased significantly after surgery (p < 0.001 and p = 0.007). Patients gained 1.17 QALYs by cataract surgery in their lifetime. The cost per QALY was 8835 Chinese yuan (CNY) (1400 U.S. dollars [USD]). It is cost-effective at the threshold of 115,062 CNY (18,235 USD) per QALY in China recommended by the World Health Organization. The cost per QALY varied from 7045 CNY (1116 USD) to 94,178 CNY (14,925 USD) in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Visual acuity and quality of life assessed by utility value improved significantly after surgery

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging in Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam V.; Hartman, Robert A.; Patil, Prashanti R.; Risbud, Makarand V.; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. PMID:26890203

  20. MECHANICAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the inability of current clinical practices to restore function to degenerated intervertebral discs, the arena of disc tissue engineering has received substantial attention in recent years. Despite tremendous growth and progress in this field, translation to clinical implementation has been hindered by a lack of well-defined functional benchmarks. Because successful replacement of the disc is contingent upon replication of some or all of its complex mechanical behaviour, it is critically important that disc mechanics be well characterized in order to establish discrete functional goals for tissue engineering. In this review, the key functional signatures of the intervertebral disc are discussed and used to propose a series of native tissue benchmarks to guide the development of engineered replacement tissues. These benchmarks include measures of mechanical function under tensile, compressive and shear deformations for the disc and its substructures. In some cases, important functional measures are identified that have yet to be measured in the native tissue. Ultimately, native tissue benchmark values are compared to measurements that have been made on engineered disc tissues, identifying measures where functional equivalence was achieved, and others where there remain opportunities for advancement. Several excellent reviews exist regarding disc composition and structure, as well as recent tissue engineering strategies; therefore this review will remain focused on the functional aspects of disc tissue engineering. PMID:20080239

  1. Outer Retinal Tubulation in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Optical Coherence Tomographic Findings Correspond to Histology

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Karen B.; Freund, K. Bailey; Litts, Katie M.; Zhang, Yuhua; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histology of outer retinal tubulation (ORT) secondary to advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in patients and in post-mortem specimens, with particular attention to the basis of the hyper-reflective border of ORT. Method A private referral practice (imaging) and an academic research laboratory (histology) collaborated on two retrospective case series. High-resolution OCT raster scans of 43 eyes (34 patients) manifesting ORT secondary to advanced AMD were compared to high-resolution histological sections through the fovea and superior perifovea of donor eyes (13 atrophic AMD and 40 neovascular AMD) preserved ≤4 hours after death. Results ORT seen on OCT corresponded to histologic findings of tubular structures comprised largely of cones lacking outer segments (OS) and lacking inner segments (IS). Four phases of cone degeneration were histologically distinguishable in ORT lumenal walls, nascent, mature, degenerate, and end-stage (IS and OS; IS only; no IS; no photoreceptors and only Müller cells forming external limiting membrane, ELM, respectively). Mitochondria, which are normally long and bundled within IS ellipsoids, were small and scattered within shrunken IS and cell bodies of surviving cones. A lumenal border was delimited by an ELM. ORT observed in closed and open configurations were distinguishable from cysts and photoreceptor islands on both OCT and histology. Hyper-reflective lumenal material seen on OCT represents trapped retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and non-RPE cells. Conclusions The defining OCT features of ORT are location in the outer nuclear layer (ONL), a hyper-reflective band differentiating it from cysts, and RPE that is either dysmorphic or absent. ORT histologic and OCT findings corresponded in regard to composition, location, shape, and stages of formation. The reflectivity of ORT lumenal walls on OCT apparently does not require an OS or an IS/OS junction, indicating an

  2. Investigation of intervertebral disc degeneration using multivariate FTIR spectroscopic imaging† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5fd00160a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Mirte; Detiger, Suzanne E. L.; Helder, Marco N.; Smit, Theo H.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sammon, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally tissue samples are analysed using protein or enzyme specific stains on serial sections to build up a picture of the distribution of components contained within them. In this study we investigated the potential of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to deconvolute 2nd derivative spectra of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images measured in transflectance mode of goat and human paraffin embedded intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue sections, to see if this methodology can provide analogous information to that provided by immunohistochemical stains and bioassays but from a single section. MCR-ALS analysis of non-degenerate and enzymatically in vivo degenerated goat IVDs reveals five matrix components displaying distribution maps matching histological stains for collagen, elastin and proteoglycan (PG), as well as immunohistochemical stains for collagen type I and II. Interestingly, two components exhibiting characteristic spectral and distribution profiles of proteoglycans were found, and relative component/tissue maps of these components (labelled PG1 and PG2) showed distinct distributions in non-degenerate versus mildly degenerate goat samples. MCR-ALS analysis of human IVD sections resulted in comparable spectral profiles to those observed in the goat samples, highlighting the inter species transferability of the presented methodology. Multivariate FTIR image analysis of a set of 43 goat IVD sections allowed the extraction of semi-quantitative information from component/tissue gradients taken across the IVD width of collagen type I, collagen type II, PG1 and PG2. Regional component/tissue parameters were calculated and significant correlations were found between histological grades of degeneration and PG parameters (PG1: p = 0.0003, PG2: p < 0.0001); glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0055, PG2: p = 0.0001); and MRI T2* measurements and PGs (PG1: p = 0.0021, PG2: p < 0.0001). Additionally

  3. Cervical Arthroplasty for Moderate to Severe Disc Degeneration: Clinical and Radiological Assessments after a Minimum Follow-Up of 18 Months: Pfirrmann Grade and Cervical Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Do Yeon; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Kim, Yeo Ju; Hyun, Dongkeun; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Hyeonseon; Park, Hyeong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical outcomes and radiologic results after cervical arthroplasty have been reported in many articles, yet relatively few studies after cervical arthroplasty have been conducted in severe degenerative cervical disc disease. Materials and Methods Sixty patients who underwent cervical arthroplasty (Mobi-C®) between April 2006 and November 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 18 months were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to Pfirrmann classification on preoperative cervical MR images: group A (Pfirrmann disc grade III, n=38) and group B (Pfirrmann disc grades IV or V, n=22). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of neck and arm pain, modified Oswestry Disability Index (mODI) score, and radiological results including cervical range of motion (ROM) were assessed before and after surgery. Results VAS and mean mODI scores decreased after surgery from 5.1 and 57.6 to 2.7 and 31.5 in group A and from 6.1 and 59.9 to 3.7 and 38.4 in group B, respectively. In both groups, VAS and mODI scores significantly improved postoperatively (p<0.001), although no significant intergroup differences were found. Also, cervical dynamic ROM was preserved or gradually improved up to 18 months after cervical arthroplasty in both groups. Global, segmental and adjacent ROM was similar for both groups during follow-up. No cases of device subsidence or extrusion were recorded. Conclusion Clinical and radiological results following cervical arthroplasty in patients with severe degenerative cervical disc disease were no different from those in patients with mild degenerative cervical disc disease after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24954339

  4. The artificial disc: theory, design and materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Q B; McCullen, G M; Higham, P A; Dumbleton, J H; Yuan, H A

    1996-06-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common medical conditions in the Western world. Disc degeneration, an inevitable process of aging, of variable rate and degree, is one of the major causes of low back pain. Currently, there are two major surgical interventions for treating conditions related to the degenerative disc: discectomy and fusion. Although discectomy and fusion produce a relatively good short-term clinical result in relieving pain, both these surgical treatments alter the biomechanics of the spine, possibly leading to further degeneration of the surrounding tissues and the discs at adjacent levels. Over the past 35 years, a tremendous effort has been made to develop an artificial disc to replace the degenerated disc. The goal is the restoration of the natural biomechanics of the segment after disc excision, thus relieving pain and preventing further degeneration at adjacent segments. However, the artificial disc faces a complex biomechanical environment which makes replication of the biomechanics difficult and long-term survival challenging to designs and materials. The purpose of this article is to examine the factors of importance in designing a disc replacement. Topics covered include the structure and function of the natural disc, the changes that occur with disc degeneration and existing methods of treatment for the degenerative spine. The progress in achieving a functional, long-lasting disc replacement is outlined.

  5. Mechanism of parathyroid hormone-mediated suppression of calcification markers in human intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, P; Gawri, R; Wang, H; Antoniou, J; Mwale, F

    2013-01-01

    In degenerative intervertebral discs (IVD), type X collagen (COL X) expression (associated with hypertrophic differentiation) and calcification has been demonstrated. Suppression of COL X expression and calcification during disc degeneration can be therapeutic. In the present study we investigated the potential of human parathyroid hormone 1-34 (PTH) in suppressing indicators of calcification potential (alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Ca(2+), inorganic phosphate (Pi)), and COL X expression. Further, we sought to elucidate the mechanism of PTH action in annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from human lumbar IVDs with moderate to advanced degeneration. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling and alterations in the markers of calcification potential were analysed. PTH increased type II collagen (COL II) expression in AF (~200 %) and NP cells (~163 %) and decreased COL X levels both in AF and NP cells (~75 %). These changes in the expression of collagens were preceded by MAPK phosphorylation, which was increased in both AF and NP cells by PTH after 30 min. MAPK signalling inhibitor U0126 and protein kinase-A inhibitor H-89 DCH attenuated PTH stimulated COL II expression in both cell types. PTH decreased ALP activity and increased Ca(2+) release only in NP cells. The present study demonstrates that PTH can potentially retard IVD degeneration by stimulating matrix synthesis and suppressing markers of calcification potential in degenerated disc cells via both MAPK and PKA signalling pathways. Inhibition of further mineral deposition may therefore be a viable therapeutic option for improving the status of degenerating discs.

  6. The Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS): 10. Variability among academic glaucoma subspecialists in assessing optic disc notching.

    PubMed Central

    Gaasterland, D E; Blackwell, B; Dally, L G; Caprioli, J; Katz, L J; Ederer, F

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An analysis of data from the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS) has found eyes reported to have partial optic disc rim notching (not to the edge) at baseline to have less risk of subsequent visual field loss than eyes with no notching. Because this is counterintuitive and because classification of notching had not been defined in the AGIS protocol, we have assessed AGIS ophthalmologists interobserver and intraobserver agreement on notching. METHODS: Fourteen glaucoma subspecialists classified notching in 26 pairs of stereoscopic disc photographs of eyes with mild to severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. They classified images as showing either no notching, notching not to the edge, or notching to the edge. Several hours later, 10 of them classified the same images a second time. RESULTS: In an analysis of interobserver agreement, of 26 stereoscopic images, a plurality of ophthalmologists classified notching as absent in 9 (35%), as present but not to the edge in 7 (27%), and as present and not to the edge in 10 (38%). All 14 ophthalmologists (100%) agreed on the classification of 7 (27%) of the images, and 13 of the 14 ophthalmologists (93%) agreed on the classification of 4 additional images (15%). Of these 11 images with at least 93% agreement, notching was reported as absent in 3 (27%) and to the edge in 8 (73%). In the remaining 15 images, there was substantial disagreement about whether notching was present and, if so, whether it was to the edge. In an analysis of intraobserver agreement, none of the 10 ophthalmologists who completed the viewing a second time classified all eyes exactly the same as the first time, though 5 ophthalmologists made 4 or fewer reclassifications. Overall, 80% of the original classifications were reproduced on second reading. Of the initial classifications that were not reproduced, slightly more than half were first classified as having notching not to the edge. CONCLUSION: Without definitions or examples of optic

  7. Advanced AC permanent magnet axial flux disc motor for electric passenger vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliman, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    An ac permanent magnet axial flux disc motor was developed to operate with a thyristor load commutated inverter as part of an electric vehicle drive system. The motor was required to deliver 29.8 kW (40 hp) peak and 10.4 kW (14 hp) average with a maximum speed of 11,000 rpm. It was also required to run at leading power factor to commutate the inverter. Three motors were built.

  8. Update on Recent Molecular and Genetic Advances in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Eileen H.

    2009-01-01

    Great strides have been made in the last 2 years in the field of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), particularly with respect to the genetics and molecular biology of FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions. It is now clear that most cases of familial FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions have mutations in the progranulin gene, located on chromosome 17. It is also clear that most ubiquitinated inclusions in FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions are composed primarily of TAR DNA-binding protein-43. Thus, FTLDs can be separated into 2 major groups (i.e. tauopathies and ubiquitinopathies), and most of the ubiquitinopathies can now be defined as TAR DNA-binding protein-43 proteinopathies. Many of the familial FTLDs are linked to chromosome 17, including both the familial tauopathies and the familial TAR DNA-binding protein-43 proteinopathies with progranulin mutations. This review highlights the neuropathologic features and the most important discoveries of the last 2 years and places these findings into the historical context of FTLD. PMID:18596549

  9. [Research advances of three-dimension printing technology in vertebrae and intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zechuan; Li, Chunde; Sun, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is characterized by "inside-out" stack manufacturing. Compared with conventional technologies, 3D printing has the advantage of personalization and precision. Therefore, the shape and internal structure of the scaffolds made by 3D printing technology are highly biomimetic. Besides, 3D bioprinting can precisely deposit the biomaterials, seeding cells and cytokines at the same time, which is a breakthrough in printing technique and material science. With the development of 3D printing, it will make great contributions to the reconstruction of vertebrae and intervertebral disc in the future. PMID:27273987

  10. [Research advances of three-dimension printing technology in vertebrae and intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zechuan; Li, Chunde; Sun, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is characterized by "inside-out" stack manufacturing. Compared with conventional technologies, 3D printing has the advantage of personalization and precision. Therefore, the shape and internal structure of the scaffolds made by 3D printing technology are highly biomimetic. Besides, 3D bioprinting can precisely deposit the biomaterials, seeding cells and cytokines at the same time, which is a breakthrough in printing technique and material science. With the development of 3D printing, it will make great contributions to the reconstruction of vertebrae and intervertebral disc in the future.

  11. Advancing therapeutic strategies for inherited retinal degeneration: recommendations from the Monaciano Symposium.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Debra A; Ali, Robin R; Banin, Eyal; Branham, Kari E; Flannery, John G; Gamm, David M; Hauswirth, William W; Heckenlively, John R; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Jayasundera, K Thiran; Khan, Naheed W; Molday, Robert S; Pennesi, Mark E; Reh, Thomas A; Weleber, Richard G; Zacks, David N

    2015-02-09

    Although rare in the general population, retinal dystrophies occupy a central position in current efforts to develop innovative therapies for blinding diseases. This status derives, in part, from the unique biology, accessibility, and function of the retina, as well as from the synergy between molecular discoveries and transformative advances in functional assessment and retinal imaging. The combination of these factors has fueled remarkable progress in the field, while at the same time creating complex challenges for organizing collective efforts aimed at advancing translational research. The present position paper outlines recent progress in gene therapy and cell therapy for this group of disorders, and presents a set of recommendations for addressing the challenges remaining for the coming decade. It is hoped that the formulation of these recommendations will stimulate discussions among researchers, funding agencies, industry, and policy makers that will accelerate the development of safe and effective treatments for retinal dystrophies and related diseases.

  12. Advancing Therapeutic Strategies for Inherited Retinal Degeneration: Recommendations From the Monaciano Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Debra A.; Ali, Robin R.; Banin, Eyal; Branham, Kari E.; Flannery, John G.; Gamm, David M.; Hauswirth, William W.; Heckenlively, John R.; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Jayasundera, K. Thiran; Khan, Naheed W.; Molday, Robert S.; Pennesi, Mark E.; Reh, Thomas A.; Weleber, Richard G.; Zacks, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Although rare in the general population, retinal dystrophies occupy a central position in current efforts to develop innovative therapies for blinding diseases. This status derives, in part, from the unique biology, accessibility, and function of the retina, as well as from the synergy between molecular discoveries and transformative advances in functional assessment and retinal imaging. The combination of these factors has fueled remarkable progress in the field, while at the same time creating complex challenges for organizing collective efforts aimed at advancing translational research. The present position paper outlines recent progress in gene therapy and cell therapy for this group of disorders, and presents a set of recommendations for addressing the challenges remaining for the coming decade. It is hoped that the formulation of these recommendations will stimulate discussions among researchers, funding agencies, industry, and policy makers that will accelerate the development of safe and effective treatments for retinal dystrophies and related diseases. PMID:25667399

  13. Macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating ... choroid layer of blood vessels behind the retina. Macular degeneration results in the loss of central vision only.

  14. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  15. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG) versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD). Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8) years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05), neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30) and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55). Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage), sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain), previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78%) patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11%) classified the surgical result as a failure. Patient satisfaction

  16. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  17. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony; Ghosh, Peter; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed. PMID:26074979

  18. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony; Ghosh, Peter; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed. PMID:26074979

  19. Intervertebral disc regeneration: from the degenerative cascade to molecular therapy and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Di Martino, Alberto; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Low back pain is one of the major health problems in industrialized countries, as a leading source of disability in the working population. Intervertebral disc degeneration has been identified as its main cause, being a progressive process mainly characterized by alteration of extracellular matrix composition and water content. Many factors are involved in the degenerative cascade, such as anabolism/catabolism imbalance, reduction of nutrition supply and progressive cell loss. Currently available treatments are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consisting of disc removal are often necessary. Recent advances in our understanding of intervertebral disc biology led to an increased interest in the development of novel biological treatments aimed at disc regeneration. Growth factors, gene therapy, stem cell transplantation and biomaterials-based tissue engineering might support intervertebral disc regeneration by overcoming the limitation of the self-renewal mechanism. The aim of this paper is to overview the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge from the degenerative cascade of the intervertebral disc to the latest molecular, cell-based therapies and tissue-engineering strategies for disc regeneration.

  20. Accelerated Aging of Intervertebral Discs in a Mouse Model of Progeria

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Bentley, Douglas; Taylor, Lauren; Studer, Rebecca; Usas, Arvydas; Huard, Johnny; Alber, Sean; Watkins, Simon C.; Lee, Joon; Coehlo, Paulo; Wang, Dong; Loppini, Mattia; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a common and debilitating disorder that results in reduced flexibility of the spine, pain, and reduced mobility. Risk factors for IDD include age, genetic predisposition, injury, and other environmental factors such as smoking. Loss of proteoglycans (PGs) contributes to IDD with advancing age. Currently there is a lack of a model for rapid investigation of disc aging and evaluation of therapeutic interventions. Here we examined progression of disc aging in a murine model of a human progeroid syndrome caused by deficiency of the DNA repair endonuclease, ERCC1–XPF (Ercc1−/Δ mice). The ERCC1-deficient mice showed loss of disc height and degenerative structural changes in their vertebral bodies similar to those reported for old rodents. Compared to their wild-type littermates, Ercc1−/Δ mice also exhibit other age-related IDD characteristics, including premature loss of disc PG, reduced matrix PG synthesis, and enhanced apoptosis and cell senescence. Finally, the onset of age-associated disc pathologies was further accelerated in Ercc1−/Δ mice following chronic treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent mechlorethamine. These results demonstrate that Ercc1−/Δ mice represent an accurate and rapid model of disc aging and provide novel evidence that DNA damage negatively impacts PG synthesis. PMID:20973062

  1. Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Ralph E.; Ilharreborde, Brice; Zhao, Kristin D.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; Bronfort, Gert; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT The intervertebral disc is a common source of low back pain. Prospective studies suggest that treatments that intermittently distract the disc might be beneficial for chronic low back pain. Although the potential exists for distraction therapies to affect the disc biomechanically their effect on intradiscal stress is debated. PURPOSE To determine if distraction alone, distraction combined with flexion or distraction combined with extension can reduce nucleus pulposus pressure and posterior anulus compressive stress in cadaveric lumbar discs compared to simulated standing or lying. STUDY DESIGN Laboratory study using single cadaveric motion segments. OUTCOME MEASURES Strain gauge measures of nucleus pulposus pressure and compressive stress in the anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus METHODS Intradiscal stress profilometry was performed on 15 motion segments during 5 simulated conditions: standing, lying, and 3 distracted conditions. Disc degeneration was graded by inspection from 1 (normal) to 4 (severe degeneration). RESULTS All distraction conditions markedly reduced nucleus pressure compared to either simulated standing or lying. There was no difference between distraction with flexion and distraction with extension in regard to posterior annulus compressive stress. Discs with little or no degeneration appeared to distributed compressive stress differently than those with moderate or severe degeneration. CONCLUSIONS Distraction appears to predictably reduce nucleus pulposus pressure. The effect of distraction therapy on the distribution of compressive stress may be dependent in part on the health of the disc. PMID:17981092

  2. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  3. Peripheral disc margin shape and internal disc derangement: imaging correlation in significantly painful discs identified at provocation lumbar discography.

    PubMed

    Bartynski, W S; Rothfus, W E

    2012-06-01

    Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  4. Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease ...

  5. Progressive Wallerian Degeneration of the Corpus Callosal Splenium in a Patient with Alexia Without Agraphia: Advanced MR Findings.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Kriti; Gillihan, Laura; Wozniak, Marcella A; Zhuo, Jiachen; Raghavan, Prashant

    2014-12-01

    The corpus callosal splenium is an uncommon location for Wallerian degeneration (WD), which may be mistaken for new pathology on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We describe the case of a 69-year-old woman with a left posterior cerebral artery infarct in whom progressive WD of the splenium of the corpus callosum seen on MRI was misinterpreted as new infarction or neoplasm. We address how magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion MRI, diffusion tensor MRI, and serial imaging were utilized in establishing the correct diagnosis. Interestingly, the patient also presented with alexia without agraphia, which has never been reported in association with splenial WD. It is conceivable that WD affected critical splenial association fibers resulting in this uncommon dissociation syndrome. PMID:25489886

  6. Leukocyte telomere length is associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hong; Kan, Mengyuan; Ye, Junyi; Liu, Fatao; Wang, Ting; Deng, Jiaying; Tan, Yanfang; He, Lin; Liu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Telomeres located at the ends of chromosomes are involved in genomic stability and play a key role in various cancers and age-related diseases. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a late-onset, age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disease, which includes the geographic atrophy (GA) subtype and the choroidal neovascularization (CNV) subtype. To better understand how leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is related to AMD, we conducted an association study in 197 AMD patients and 259 healthy controls using the established quantitative PCR technique. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association of LTL and AMD with the age-adjusted ratio of the telomere length to the copy number of a single-copy gene (T/S). Notably, we found a significant association between AMD and LTL (OR=2.24; 95% CI=1.68-3.07; P=0.0001) after adjusting for age and sex. Furthermore, the results showed a strongly significant association between the GA subtype and the LTL (OR=4.81; 95% CI=3.15-7.82; P=0.0001) after adjusting for age and sex. Our findings provide evidence of the role that LTL plays in the pathological mechanisms of AMD, mainly in the GA subgroup but not the CNV subgroup.

  7. Use of adipose stem cells and polylactide discs for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Katja; Ellä, Ville; Mauno, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Suuronen, Riitta; Ylikomi, Timo; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no suitable replacement for damaged temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs after discectomy. In the present study, we fabricated bilayer biodegradable polylactide (PLA) discs comprising a non-woven mat of poly(L/D)lactide (P(L/D)LA) 96/4 and a P(L/DL)LA 70/30 membrane plate. The PLA disc was examined in combination with adipose stem cells (ASCs) for tissue engineering of the fibrocartilaginous TMJ disc in vitro. ASCs were cultured in parallel in control and chondrogenic medium for a maximum of six weeks. Relative expression of the genes, aggrecan, type I collagen and type II collagen present in the TMJ disc extracellular matrix increased in the ASC-seeded PLA discs in the chondrogenic medium. The hypertrophic marker, type X collagen, was moderately induced. Alcian blue staining showed accumulation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans. ASC differentiation in the PLA discs was close to that observed in pellet cultures. Comparison of the mRNA levels revealed that the degree of ASC differentiation was lower than that in TMJ disc-derived cells and tissue. The pellet format supported the phenotype of the TMJ disc-derived cells under chondrogenic conditions and also enhanced their hyalinization potential, which is considered part of the TMJ disc degeneration process. Accordingly, the combination of ASCs and PLA discs has potential for the development of a tissue-engineered TMJ disc replacement. PMID:19474082

  8. Spinal disc rehabilitation: a new technology.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C J

    1998-01-01

    Low back pain and "computer neck" are frequent complaints during visits to a physician. Back and neck pain affects up to 60% of all employees at some time in their careers and is personally and financially devastating. Repetitive mechanical stress leads to disc degeneration, loss of disc height, and other abnormalities. The PT machine, which is controlled and coordinated by onboard computer and fiberoptic feedback sensors, is the first biorobotic system that alleviates intradiscal pressure and myospasm.

  9. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. PMID:24412045

  10. Geographic atrophy in patients with advanced dry age-related macular degeneration: current challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Danis, Ronald P; Lavine, Jeremy A; Domalpally, Amitha

    2015-01-01

    Geographic atrophy (GA) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a devastating complication of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). GA may be classified as drusen-related (drusen-associated GA) or neovascularization-related (neovascular-associated GA). Drusen-related GA remains a large public health concern due to the burden of blindness it produces, but pathophysiology of the condition is obscure and there are no proven treatment options. Genotyping, cell biology, and clinical imaging point to upregulation of parainflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and choroidal sclerosis as contributors, among other factors. Onset and monitoring of progression is accomplished through clinical imaging instrumentation such as optical coherence tomography, photography, and autofluorescence, which are the tools most helpful in determining end points for clinical trials at present. A number of treatment approaches with diverse targets are in development at this time, some of which are in human clinical trials. Neovascular-associated GA is a consequence of RPE loss after development of neovascular AMD. The neovascular process leads to a plethora of cellular stresses such as ischemia, inflammation, and dramatic changes in cell environment that further taxes RPE cells already dysfunctional from drusen-associated changes. GA may therefore develop secondary to the neovascular process de novo or preexisting drusen-associated GA may continue to worsen with the development of neovascular AMD. Neovascular-associated GA is a prominent cause of continued vision loss in patients with otherwise successfully treated neovascular AMD. Clearly, treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors early in the course of the neovascular disease is of great clinical benefit. However, there is a rationale and some suggestive evidence that anti-VEGF agents themselves could be toxic to RPE and enhance neovascular-associated GA. The increasing prevalence of legal blindness from this

  11. Rare genetic variants in the CFI gene are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration and commonly result in reduced serum factor I levels

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, David; Yu, Yi; Schramm, Elizabeth C.; Triebwasser, Michael; Wagner, Erin K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Daly, Mark J.; Atkinson, John P.; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    To assess a potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sequenced the complement factor I gene (CFI) in 2266 individuals with AMD and 1400 without, identifying 231 individuals with rare genetic variants. We evaluated the functional impact by measuring circulating serum factor I (FI) protein levels in individuals with and without rare CFI variants. The burden of very rare (frequency <1/1000) variants in CFI was strongly associated with disease (P = 1.1 × 10−8). In addition, we examined eight coding variants with counts ≥5 and saw evidence for association with AMD in three variants. Individuals with advanced AMD carrying a rare CFI variant had lower mean FI compared with non-AMD subjects carrying a variant (P < 0.001). Further new evidence that FI levels drive AMD risk comes from analyses showing individuals with a CFI rare variant and low FI were more likely to have advanced AMD (P = 5.6 × 10−5). Controlling for covariates, low FI increased the risk of advanced AMD among those with a variant compared with individuals without advanced AMD with a rare CFI variant (OR 13.6, P = 1.6 × 10−4), and also compared with control individuals without a rare CFI variant (OR 19.0, P = 1.1 × 10−5). Thus, low FI levels are strongly associated with rare CFI variants and AMD. Enhancing FI activity may be therapeutic and measuring FI provides a screening tool for identifying patients who are most likely to benefit from complement inhibitory therapy. PMID:25788521

  12. The effects of technological advances on outcomes for elderly persons with exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Frank A; Hanrahan, Brian W

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Exudative age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the major cause of blindness among US elderly. Developing effective therapies for this disease has been difficult. OBJECTIVES To assess the effects of introducing new therapies for treating exudative ARMD on vision of the affected population and other outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed as having ARMD. DESIGN The study used data from a 5% sample of Medicare claims and enrollment data with a combination of a regression discontinuity design and propensity score matching to assess the effects on the introduction or receipt of new technologies on study outcomes during a 2-year follow-up period. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS The analysis was based on longitudinal data for the United States, January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2011, for Medicare beneficiaries with fee-for-service coverage. The sample was limited to beneficiaries 68 years or older newly diagnosed as having exudative ARMD as indicated by beneficiaries having no claims with this diagnosis in a 3-year look-back period. EXPOSURES The comparisons with vision outcomes were after vs before the introduction of photodynamic therapy and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy. The comparisons for depression and long-term care facility admission were between beneficiaries newly diagnosed as having exudative ARMD who received photodynamic therapy or anti-VEGF therapy compared with beneficiaries having the diagnosis who received no therapy for this disease. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Onset of decrease in vision, vision loss or blindness, depression, and admission to a long-term care facility. RESULTS Among beneficiaries newly diagnosed as having exudative ARMD, the introduction of anti-VEGF therapy reduced vision loss by 41% (95% CI, 52%-68%) and onset of severe vision loss and blindness by 46% (95% CI, 47%-63%). Such beneficiaries who received anti-VEGF therapy and were not admitted to a long-term care facility during the look

  13. Strategies for regeneration of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Kalson, N S; Richardson, S; Hoyland, J A

    2008-09-01

    Low back pain resulting from degenerative disc disease is the most common cause of disability in the UK. Current low back pain treatments are aimed at either treating the symptoms of pain, or removing the source of pain itself, but do not address the biological basis of the disease. Our increasing understanding of the molecular biological basis for degenerative disc disease has enabled the development of strategies aimed at tackling the causes of degeneration. Here we review the progress that has been made in strategies using cells, biomaterials and growth factors aimed at regenerating the human intervertebral disc.

  14. Macular degeneration (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina that affects the macula in the back of the eye. ... see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  15. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM.

  16. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM. PMID:26771371

  17. American Macular Degeneration Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to content Contact DONATE Search for: Search Saving sight through research and education American Macular Degeneration Foundation Saving Sight Through Research and Education Menu About Macular Degeneration ...

  18. Current trends in biologics delivery to restore intervertebral disc anabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianluca; See, Eugene; Pandit, Abhay

    2015-04-01

    Low back pain is generally attributed to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. This is a multifactorial disease induced by genetic and environmental factors and that progresses with aging. Disc degeneration is characterized by a limited ability of IVD cells to produce functional matrix while producing abnormal amounts of matrix-degrading enzymes. The prolonged imbalance between anabolism and catabolism in degenerative discs alters their composition and hydration. In turn, this results in increased angiogenesis and the loss of the disc's ability to maintain its aneural condition. Inflammation in the IVD, in particular the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines, was found to favor innervation and also sensitization of the nociceptive pathways, thereby exacerbating degenerative symptoms. In this review, we discuss anti-inflammatory approaches to encounter disc catabolism, potential treatments to lower discogenic pain and pro-anabolic approaches in the form of protein delivery, gene therapy and cell delivery, to trigger regeneration in the IVD.

  19. [Hepatolenticular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Zudenigo, D; Relja, M

    1990-01-01

    Hepatolenticular degeneration (Wilson's disease) is a hereditary disease in which metabolic disorder of copper leads to its accumulation in the liver, brain, cornea and kidneys with consequent pathologic changes in those organs. Hereditary mechanism of the disease is autosomal recessive with prevalence of 30-100 per 1,000,000 inhabitants. Etiology of this disease is not yet explained. There are two hypotheses. The first one is that it is the disorder of ceruloplasmine metabolism caused by insufficient synthesis of normal ceruloplasmine, or synthesis of functionally abnormal ceruloplasmine. The second one is: the block of copper biliar excretion which is the consequence of the liver lysosomes functional defect. Pathogenetic mechanism of disease is firstly long-term accumulation of copper in the liver, and later, when the liver depo is full, its releasing in circulation and accumulation in the brain, cornea, kidneys and bones, which causes adequate pathologic changes. Toxic activity of copper is the consequence of its activity on enzymes, particularly on those with -SH group. There are two basic clinical forms of the disease: liver disease or neurologic disease. Before puberty the liver damage is more frequent, while in adolescents and young adults neurologic form of the disease is usual. The liver disease is nonspecific and characterized by symptoms of cirrhosis and chronic aggressive hepatitis. The only specificity is hemolytic anemia which, in combination with previous symptoms, is important for diagnosis of the disease. Neurologic symptoms are the most frequent consequence of pathologic changes in the basal ganglia. In our patients the most frequent symptoms were tremor (63%); dysarthria, choreoathetosis and rigor (38%); ataxia and mental disorders (31%); dysphagia and dystonia (12%), diplopia, hypersalivation, nystagmus and Babinski's sign (6%). Among pathologic changes in other tissues and organs the most important is the finding of Kayser-Fleischer ring in the

  20. Axon degeneration: context defines distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Geden, Matthew J; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-08-01

    Axon degeneration is an essential part of development, plasticity, and injury response and has been primarily studied in mammalian models in three contexts: 1) Axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration, 2) Apoptosis-induced axon degeneration (axon apoptosis), and 3) Axon pruning. These three contexts dictate engagement of distinct pathways for axon degeneration. Recent advances have identified the importance of SARM1, NMNATs, NAD+ depletion, and MAPK signaling in axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration. Interestingly, apoptosis-induced axon degeneration and axon pruning have many shared mechanisms both in signaling (e.g. DLK, JNKs, GSK3α/β) and execution (e.g. Puma, Bax, caspase-9, caspase-3). However, the specific mechanisms by which caspases are activated during apoptosis versus pruning appear distinct, with apoptosis requiring Apaf-1 but not caspase-6 while pruning requires caspase-6 but not Apaf-1. PMID:27197022

  1. Efficacy of a Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Patients Undergoing Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  2. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat this condition, alternatives to disc replacement include fusion, nonoperative care or no treatment. Typically, surgery is ... operative treatment for disc pain has been spinal fusion. This is a surgical procedure in which disc ...

  3. The Application of Fiber-Reinforced Materials in Disc Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-Qing; Li, Hui; Zhu, Gang; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo; Wu, Shu-Qin

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc degeneration and injury are the most common spinal diseases with tremendous financial and social implications. Regenerative therapies for disc repair are promising treatments. Fiber-reinforced materials (FRMs) are a kind of composites by embedding the fibers into the matrix materials. FRMs can maintain the original properties of the matrix and enhance the mechanical properties. By now, there are still some problems for disc repair such as the unsatisfied static strength and dynamic properties for disc implants. The application of FRMs may resolve these problems to some extent. In this review, six parts such as background of FRMs in tissue repair, the comparison of mechanical properties between natural disc and some typical FRMs, the repair standard and FRMs applications in disc repair, and the possible research directions for FRMs' in the future are stated. PMID:24383057

  4. Macular Degeneration Partnership

    MedlinePlus

    AMD Macular Degeneration Partnership High Contrast Original + Font Size – Home About AMD Dry AMD Wet AMD Experience AMD Living with ... vision on a daily basis. AMD (Age Related Macular Degeneration) Partnership Listen AMD Month Public Service Announcement To ...

  5. A new pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-long

    2015-02-01

    Lumbar disc protrusion is common. Its clinical manifestations and treatments are closely related to the pathological changes; however, the pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion is controversial. This article introduces a new pathological classification comprising four types of lumbar disc protrusion according to intraoperative findings. The damage-herniation type is probably caused by injury and is characterized by soft herniation, the capsule can easily be cut and the broken disc tissue blocks overflow or is easily removed. The broken disc substances should be completely removed; satisfactory results can be achieved by minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. The degeneration-protrusion type is characterized by hard and tough protrusions and the pathological process by degeneration and proliferative reaction. The nerve should be decompressed and relaxed with minimally invasive removal of the posterior wall; the bulged or protruded disc often need not be excised. The posterior vertebral osteochondrosis with disc protrusion type is characterized by deformity of the posterior vertebral body, osteochondral nodules and intervertebral disc protrusion. The herniated and fragmented disc tissue should be removed with partially protruding osteochondral nodules. Intervertebral disc cyst is of uncertain pathogenesis and is characterized by a cyst that communicates with the disc. Resection of the cyst under microscopic or endoscopic control can achieve good results; and whether the affected disc needs to be simultaneously resected is controversial. The new pathological classification proposed here is will aid better understanding of pathological changes and pathogenesis of lumbar disc protrusion and provides a reference for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25708029

  6. Redundant disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barack, W. N.; Domas, P. A.; Beekman, S. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A rotatable disc is described that consists of parallel plates tightly joined together for rotation about a hub. Each plate is provided with several angularly projecting spaced lands. The lands of each plate are interposed in alternating relationship between the lands of the next adjacent plate. In this manner, circumferential displacement of adjacent sectors in any one plate is prevented in the event that a crack develops. Each plate is redundantly sized so that, in event of structural failure of one plate, the remaining plates support a proportionate share of the load of the failed plate. The plates are prevented from separating laterally through the inclusion of generally radially extending splines which are inserted to interlock cooperating, circumferentially adjacent lands.

  7. Macular Degeneration: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalifoux, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents information on macular degeneration for professionals helping persons with this disease adjust to their visual loss. It covers types of macular degeneration, the etiology of the disease, and its treatment. Also considered are psychosocial problems and other difficulties that persons with age-related macular degeneration face.…

  8. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  9. [Principles of intervertebral disc assessment in private accident insurance].

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, M; Dittrich, V; Röser, K

    2015-09-01

    Due to the spread of intervertebral disc degeneration, insurance companies and experts are regularly confronted with related assessments of insured persons under their private accident insurance. These claims pose a particular challenge for experts, since, in addition to the clinical assessment of the facts, extensive knowledge of general accident insurance conditions, case law and current study findings is required. Each case can only be properly assessed through simultaneous consideration of both the medical and legal facts. These guidelines serve as the basis for experts and claims.managers with respect to the appropriate individual factual assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration in private accident insurance. PMID:26548005

  10. No evidence of association between variant rs2075650 in lipid metabolism-related locus APOE/TOMM40 and advanced age-related macular degeneration in Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Mengyuan; Weng, Xiaoling; Wang, Ting; Liu, Fatao; Ye, Junyi; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Mingqing; Zhou, Daizhan

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a late-onset, neurodegenerative disease. Genes related to lipid metabolism are important in AMD pathogenesis. Recently, a variant rs2075650 located in lipid metabolism-related locus APOE/TOMM40 was identified to be associated with advanced AMD and early AMD, respectively, in two genome-wide association studies with European ancestry, while no association study between rs2075650 and overall advanced AMD in Chinese population has been conducted before. We evaluated the potential effect of this variant on advanced AMD in a Han Chinese cohort with 204 advanced AMD patients and 1536 healthy controls. The results suggested that rs2075650 was neither associated with advanced AMD in allele level (P = 0.348) nor in genotype level (P = 0.890 under additive model with age and sex adjusted). In conclusion, our study did not confirm the impact of rs2075650 on advanced AMD risk, indicating that rs2075650 is unlikely a superior marker for APOE/TOMM40 susceptible region with advanced AMD in Han Chinese population. PMID:25304313

  11. Human Disc Nucleus Properties and Vertebral Endplate Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Azucena G.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Acosta, Frank L.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Study of human cadaveric discs quantifying endplate permeability and porosity and correlating these with measures of disc quality: cell density, proteoglycan content, and overall degeneration. Permeability and porosity increased with age and were not correlated with cell density or overall degeneration, suggesting that endplate calcification may not accelerate disc degeneration. Study Design Experimental quantification of relationships between vertebral endplate morphology, permeability, disc cell density, glycosaminoglycan content and degeneration in samples harvested from human cadaveric spines. Objective To test the hypothesis that variation in endplate permeability and porosity contribute to changes in intervertebral disc cell density and overall degeneration. Summary of Background Data Cells within the intervertebral disc are dependent on diffusive exchange with capillaries in the adjacent vertebral bone. Previous findings suggest that blocked routes of transport negatively affect disc quality, yet there are no quantitative relationships between human vertebral endplate permeability, porosity, cell density and disc degeneration. Such relationships would be valuable for clarifying degeneration risk factors, and patient features that may impede efforts at disc tissue engineering. Methods Fifty-one motion segments were harvested from 13 frozen cadaveric human lumbar spines (32 to 85 years) and classified for degeneration using the MRI-based Pfirrmann scale. A cylindrical core was harvested from the center of each motion segment that included vertebral bony and cartilage endplates along with adjacent nucleus tissue. The endplate mobility, a type of permeability, was measured directly using a custom-made permeameter before and after the cartilage endplate was removed. Cell density within the nucleus tissue was estimated using the picogreen method while the nuclear GAG content was quantified using the DMMB technique. Specimens were imaged at 8 μm resolution using

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell tracking in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Charles; Goldschlager, Tony; Oehme, David; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a common clinical problem, which leads to significant social, economic and public health costs. Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is accepted as a common cause of low back pain. Initially, this is characterized by a loss of proteoglycans from the nucleus pulposus resulting in loss of tissue hydration and hydrostatic pressure. Conservative management, including analgesia and physiotherapy often fails and surgical treatment, such as spinal fusion, is required. Stem cells offer an exciting possible regenerative approach to IVD disease. Preclinical research has demonstrated promising biochemical, histological and radiological results in restoring degenerate IVDs. Cell tracking provides an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of stem cell survival, differentiation and migration, enabling optimization of stem cell treatment. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality with high spatial resolution, ideally suited for stem cell tracking. Furthermore, novel MRI sequences have the potential to quantitatively assess IVD disease, providing an improved method to review response to biological treatment. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively researched for the purpose of cell tracking. These particles are biocompatible, non-toxic and act as excellent MRI contrast agents. This review will explore recent advances and issues in stem cell tracking and molecular imaging in relation to the IVD. PMID:25621106

  13. Disc-planet interactions in subkeplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: One class of protoplanetary disc models, the X-wind model, predicts strongly subkeplerian orbital gas velocities, a configuration that can be sustained by magnetic tension. Aims: We investigate disc-planet interactions in these subkeplerian discs, focusing on orbital migration for low-mass planets and gap formation for high-mass planets. Methods: We use linear calculations and nonlinear hydrodynamical simulations to measure the torque and look at gap formation. In both cases, the subkeplerian nature of the disc is treated as a fixed external constraint. Results: We show that, depending on the degree to which the disc is subkeplerian, the torque on low-mass planets varies between the usual type I torque and the one-sided outer Lindblad torque, which is also negative but an order of magnitude stronger. In strongly subkeplerian discs, corotation effects can be ignored, making migration fast and inward. Gap formation near the planet's orbit is more difficult in such discs, since there are no resonances close to the planet accommodating angular momentum transport. The location of the gap is shifted inwards with respect to the planet, leaving the planet on the outside of a surface density depression. Conclusions: Depending on the degree to which a protoplanetary disc is subkeplerian, disc-planet interactions can be very different from the usual Keplerian picture, making these discs in general more hazardous for young planets.

  14. Use of Annular Closure Device (Barricaid®) for Preventing Lumbar Disc Reherniation: One-Year Results of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Bang Sang; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Moon, Bongju; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum

    2014-01-01

    Although lumbar discectomy is an effective treatment for lumbar disc herniation, complications exist, including postoperative disc height loss, facet joint degeneration, and recurrent disc herniation. To solve these problems, annular closure devices have been utilized in other countries, producing satisfactory results, but there has been no report of annular closure device use in our country. Here, we demonstrate the preliminary reports of Barricaid® insertion in 3 patients who underwent surgery for lumbar disc herniation. PMID:27169045

  15. Computer aided diagnosis of degenerative intervertebral disc diseases from lumbar MR images.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Ayse Betul; Albayrak, Nur Banu; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the automated diagnosis of the degenerative intervertebral disc disease in midsagittal MR images. The approach is based on combining distinct disc features under a machine learning framework. The discs in the lumbar MR images are first localized and segmented. Then, intensity, shape, context, and texture features of the discs are extracted with various techniques. A Support Vector Machine classifier is applied to classify the discs as normal or degenerated. The method is tested and validated on a clinical lumbar spine dataset containing 102 subjects and the results are comparable to the state of the art.

  16. Lumbar disc herniation: Is there an association between histological and magnetic resonance imaging findings?

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Shiju A; Seshadrinath, N Arun Kumar; Binoy, Kavitha Ravi; Raji, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although validated radiological scoring systems and histological scoring system of surgically removed degenerated disc are used in assessment of progression of intervertebral disc degeneration, there have not been many studies that integrate these two aspects of assessments. The data available in this respect are very limited. This clinical study was designed to find the correlation between quantitative radiological score (Pfirmann grading system and Modic changes [MC]) and quantitative histological degeneration score (HDS). Materials and Methods: A cohort of 77 patients (45 males, 32 females; mean age of 38 years [range 18–58 years]) who presented with complaints of discogenic pain or radiculopathy at single level were assessed radiologically. They were graded according to the radiological pattern. The surgically excised disc specimen was graded according to HDS. The degree of radiological changes were correlated with the degree of histological changes. Results: Though the overall HDS (0–15) did not show statistically significant correlation with Pfirmann grading system, there were positive association found between mucoid degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation with the Pfirmann grading and mucoid degeneration, which were statistically significant. Female sex also had a higher association with instability pattern. Conclusion: The study shows that the Pfirmann grading system, MCs and HDS can reliably be used as scoring systems for assessing lumbar disc degeneration. The radiological assessment can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess the probable change in content rather than the microstructure of a disc undergoing degeneration. PMID:27293282

  17. Dynamics of Astrophysical Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Preface; Names and addresses of participants; Conference photograph; 1. Spiral waves in Saturn's rings; 2. Structure of the Uranian rings; 3. Planetary rings: theory; 4. Simulations of light scattering in planetary rings; 5. Accretion discs around young stellar objects and the proto-Sun; 6. The ß Pictoris disc: a planetary rather than a protoplanetary one; 7. Optical polarimetry and thermal imaging of the disc axound ß Pictoris; 8. Observations of discs around protostars and young stars; 9. VLA observations of ammonia towaxd moleculax outflow sources; 10. Derivation of the physical properties of molecular discs by an MEM method; 11. Masers associated with discs around young stars; 12. The nature of polarisation discs axound young stars; 13. The correlation between the main parameters of the interstellar gas (including Salpeter's spectrum of masses) as a result of the development of turbulent Rossby waves; 14. Discs in cataclysmic variables and X-ray binaries; 15. A disc instability model for soft X-ray transients containing black holes; 16. X-ray variability from the accretion disc of NGC 5548; 17. Viscously heated coronae and winds around accretion discs; 18. Optical emission line profiles of symbiotic stars; 19. The effect of formation of Fell in winds confined to discs for luminous stars; 20. Observational evidence for accretion discs in active galactic nuclei; 21. The fuelling of active galactic nuclei by non-axisynlinetric instabilities; 22. The circum-nuclear disc in the Galactic centre; 23. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in thin self-gravitating differentially rotating gaseous discs; 24. Non-linear evolution of non-axisymmetric perturbations in thin self-gravitating gaseous discs; 25. Eccentric gravitational instabilities in nearly Keplerian discs; 26. Gravity mode instabilities in accretion tori; 27. The stability of viscous supersonic shear flows - critical Reynolds numbers and their implications for accretion discs; 28. Asymptotic analysis of overstable

  18. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    needle can give additional information of needle position, assuring the needle tip is directed into intervertebral disc material. Spectroscopic analysis of intervertebral disc removed during open surgery, creates background for further investigation on intervertebral disc degeneration spectral classification.

  19. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    1999-03-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  20. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    2010-08-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  1. Nonlinear finite element analysis of anular lesions in the L4/5 intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Little, J P; Adam, C J; Evans, J H; Pettet, G J; Pearcy, M J

    2007-01-01

    Degenerate intervertebral discs exhibit both material and structural changes. Structural defects (lesions) develop in the anulus fibrosus with age. While degeneration has been simulated in numerous previous studies, the effects of structural lesions on disc mechanics are not well known. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) of the L4/5 intervertebral disc was developed in order to study the effects of anular lesions and loss of hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus pulposus on the disc mechanics. Models were developed to simulate both healthy and degenerate discs. Degeneration was simulated with either rim, radial or circumferential anular lesions and by equating nucleus pressure to zero. The anulus fibrosus ground substance was represented as a nonlinear incompressible material using a second-order polynomial, hyperelastic strain energy equation. Hyperelastic material parameters were derived from experimentation on sheep discs. Endplates were assumed to be rigid, and annulus lamellae were assumed to be vertical in the unloaded state. Loading conditions corresponding to physiological ranges of rotational motion were applied to the models and peak rotation moments compared between models. Loss of nucleus pulposus pressure had a much greater effect on the disc mechanics than the presence of anular lesions. This indicated that the development of anular lesions alone (prior to degeneration of the nucleus) has minimal effect on disc mechanics, but that disc stiffness is significantly reduced by the loss of hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus. With the degeneration of the nucleus, the outer innervated anulus or surrounding osteo-ligamentous anatomy may therefore experience increased strains. PMID:17383659

  2. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  3. RP cone-rod degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Heckenlively, J R

    1987-01-01

    A group of patients with progressive retinal degeneration and visual field loss, who meet the basic definition of RP were investigated to better define the relationship of the findings on the ERG with clinical characteristics such as visual field size, presence or absence of scotomata or pseudo-altitudinal defects on visual field, amount of night blindness; and presence or absence of macular or optic nerve changes. These studies suggest that cone-rod degeneration patients of the RP type go through the following stages; early, the ERG has a definite cone-rod pattern where the rod ERG is larger than the cone ERG while both are abnormal. As the disease advances, there is more of a reduction in the scotopic ERG such that both the rod and cone ERGs become nearly equal. As the disease further progresses the ERG becomes non-recordable on single-flash technique, but there is good residual rod function and the final rod threshold remains good until the visual field is reduced, typically less than 10 degrees with the IV-4 isopter. Finally with advanced disease the patient becomes night blind and generally becomes very difficult to distinguished from patients who have advanced rod-cone degeneration. While it may seem logical to find that visual field size correlates with various ERG parameters; this has not been as consistent a finding in patients with rod-cone degeneration in the author's experience. The analysis shows several new pieces of information about visual field changes in cone-rod degeneration; enlarged blind spots are seen earlier in cases which have recordable cone-rod patterns (group I), and pseudo-altitudinal changes are more likely to occur in autosomal recessive patients. Patients with macular lesions and central scotomata had larger amplitudes than patients with normal appearing maculae and no central scotomata. Patients with temporal optic atrophy had an earlier onset of symptoms and significant correlation with both photopic a- and b-waves and bright flash

  4. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  5. Simulating the sensitivity of cell nutritive environment to composition changes within the intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, C. Ruiz; Malandrino, A.; van Rijsbergen, MM.; Lacroix, D.; Ito, K.; Noailly, J.

    2016-05-01

    Altered nutrition in the intervertebral disc affects cell viability and can generate catabolic cascades contributing to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Such degradation is expected to affect couplings between disc mechanics and nutrition, contributing to accelerate degenerative processes. However, the relation of ECM changes to major biophysical events within the loaded disc remains unclear. A L4-L5 disc finite element model including the nucleus (NP), annulus (AF) and endplates was used and coupled to a transport-cell viability model. Solute concentrations and cell viability were evaluated along the mid-sagittal plane path. A design of experiment (DOE) was performed. DOE parameters corresponded to AF and NP biochemical tissue measurements in discs with different degeneration grades. Cell viability was not affected by any parameter combinations defined. Nonetheless, the initial water content was the parameter that affected the most the solute contents, especially glucose. Calculations showed that altered NP composition could negatively affect AF cell nutrition. Results suggested that AF and NP tissue degeneration are not critical to nutrition-related cell viability at early-stage of disc degeneration. However, small ECM degenerative changes may alter significantly disc nutrition under mechanical loads. Coupling disc mechano-transport simulations and enzyme expression studies could allow identifying spatiotemporal sequences related to tissue catabolism.

  6. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  7. Particle rings and astrophysical accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Norman Rostoker had a wide range of interests and significant impact on the plasma physics research at Cornell during the time he was a Cornell professor. His interests ranged from the theory of energetic electron and ion beams and strong particle rings to the related topics of astrophysical accretion discs. We outline some of the topics related to rings and discs including the Rossby wave instability which leads to formation of anticyclonic vortices in astrophysical discs. These vorticies are regions of high pressure and act to trap dust particles which in turn may facilitate planetesimals growth in proto-planetary disks and could be important for planet formation. Analytical methods and global 3D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations have led to rapid advances in our understanding of discs in recent years.

  8. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition in the intervertebral discs in a case of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    McClure, J; Smith, P S

    1983-07-01

    The vertebral column from a known case of Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration) was examined by radiological, histological, histochemical and x-ray microanalytical techniques which demonstrated the presence of focal depositions of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) in the intervertebral discs. These deposits were present in both the annulus fibrosus and the nucleus pulposus but in certain discs the deposits were concentrated near the interface between disc and vertebral body bone endplates. At these sites there was new bone formation with narrowing of the discs, irregularity and sclerosis of the bone endplates and exostosis.

  9. Computer disc revolution.

    PubMed

    Nunnally, R H

    1994-05-01

    CD-ROM Computer Discs with read only memory are etched in polycarbonate discs that permit storage of up to 400,000 pages on a single disc. Use of this technology supplemented by access to the National Library of Medicine or a large information service brings the medical library to the rural physician's office. This allows pertinent journal information to be applied to day-to-day office practice. PMID:8034564

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells regulate mechanical properties of human degenerated nucleus pulposus cells through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT axis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Han; Bian, Bai-Shi-Jiao; Cui, Xiang; Liu, Lan-Tao; Liu, Huan; Huang, Bo; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Zhou, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) has shown promise for decelerating or arresting IVD degeneration. Cellular mechanical properties play crucial roles in regulating cell-matrix interactions, potentially reflecting specific changes that occur based on cellular phenotype and behavior. However, the effect of co-culturing of MSCs with nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) on the mechanical properties of NPCs remains unknown. In our study, we demonstrated that co-culture of degenerated NPCs with MSCs resulted in significantly decreased mechanical moduli (elastic modulus, relaxed modulus, and instantaneous modulus) and increased biological activity (proliferation and expression of matrix genes) in degenerated NPCs, but not normal NPCs. SDF-1, CXCR4 ligand, was highly expressed in MSCs when co-cultured with degenerated NPCs. Inhibition of SDF-1 using CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or knocking-down CXCR4 in degenerated NPCs abolished the MSCs-induced decrease in the mechanical moduli and increased biological activity of degenerated NPCs, suggesting a crucial role for SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling. AKT and FAK inhibition attenuated the MSCs- or SDF-1-induced decrease in the mechanical moduli of degenerated NPCs. In conclusion, it was demonstrated in vitro that MSCs regulate the mechanical properties of degenerated NPCs through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling. These findings highlight a possible mechanical mechanism for MSCs-induced modulation with degenerated NPCs, which may be applicable to MSCs-based therapy for disc degeneration.

  11. Nucleotomy reduces the effects of cyclic compressive loading with unloaded recovery on human intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Brent L; Malhotra, Neil R; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    The first objective of this study was to determine the effects of physiological cyclic loading followed by unloaded recovery on the mechanical response of human intervertebral discs. The second objective was to examine how nucleotomy alters the disc's mechanical response to cyclic loading. To complete these objectives, 15 human L5-S1 discs were tested while intact and subsequent to nucleotomy. The testing consisted of 10,000 cycles of physiological compressive loads followed by unloaded hydrated recovery. Cyclic loading increased compression modulus (3%) and strain (33%), decreased neutral zone modulus (52%), and increased neutral zone strain (31%). Degeneration was not correlated with the effect of cyclic loading in intact discs, but was correlated with cyclic loading effects after nucleotomy, with more degenerate samples experiencing greater increases in both compressive and neutral zone strain following cyclic loading. Partial removal of the nucleus pulposus decreased the compression and neutral zone modulus while increasing strain. These changes correspond to hypermobility, which will alter overall spinal mechanics and may impact low back pain via altered motion throughout the spinal column. Nucleotomy also reduced the effects of cyclic loading on mechanical properties, likely due to altered fluid flow, which may impact cellular mechanotransduction and transport of disc nutrients and waste. Degeneration was not correlated with the acute changes of nucleotomy. Results of this study provide an ideal protocol and control data for evaluating the effectiveness of a mechanically-based disc degeneration treatment, such as a nucleus replacement.

  12. Degenerate density perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2016-09-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of Nd degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X α exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first- through third-order energies as a function of α , with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  13. Intervertebral disc magnetic resonance image: correlation with gross morphology and biochemical composition

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Paul B

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic resonance image, gross morphology, and biochemical composition of the intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP), anulus fibrosus (AF) and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) from two groups of three human lumbar spines were compared. Group I consisted of all healthy discs from young donors (Grade I) and group II was comprised of discs that had undergone degeneration and age-related changes (average Grade 4). The gross morphological changes in the individual disc tissues associated with ageing/degeneration were consistent with specific changes in the characteristics of the magnetic resonance image. In particular, the mid-nuclear band of decreased magnetic resonance signal intensity seen in Grade 4 discs was associated with the appearance of clefts and fissures as well as a region of mucinous infiltration. The results of the biochemical analysis suggest that the changes in signal intensity are not due merely to changes in water content, but are also associated with changes in proteoglycan content. The changes associated with ageing/degeneration in the magnetic resonance image of the disc were related to a decrease in the proteoglycan content of the AF and NP. The water content of the NP also decreased. There was no clear association between the biochemical composition of the CEP and the magnetic resonance image. These results demonstrate that magnetic resonance imaging is an effective technique for evaluating subtle morphological changes in the intervertebral disc tissues and may be a sensitive indicator of the proteoglycan content of the AF and NP. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  14. Translation of an Engineered Nanofibrous Disc-like Angle Ply Structure for Intervertebral Disc Replacement in a Small Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John T.; Milby, Andrew H.; Chiaro, Joseph A.; Kim, Dong Hwa; Hebela, Nader M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration has been implicated in the etiology of low back pain; however the current surgical strategies for treating symptomatic disc disease are limited. A variety of materials have been developed to replace disc components, including the nucleus pulposus (NP), the annulus fibrosus (AF), and their combination into disc-like engineered constructs. We have previously shown that layers of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold, mimicking the hierarchical organization of the native AF, have functional parity with native tissue. Likewise, we have combined these structures with cell-seeded hydrogels (as an NP replacement) to form disc-like angle ply structures (DAPS). The objective of this study was to develop a model for the evaluation of DAPS in vivo. Through a series of studies, we developed a surgical approach to replace the rat caudal disc with an acellular DAPS and then stabilize the motion segment by external fixation. We then optimized cell infiltration into DAPS by including sacrificial poly(ethylene oxide) layers interspersed throughout the angle-ply structure. Our findings illustrate that DAPS are stable in the caudal spine, are infiltrated by cells from the peri-implant space, and that infiltration is expedited by providing additional routes for cell migration. These findings establish a new in vivo platform in which to evaluate and optimize the design of functional disc replacements. PMID:24560621

  15. Propionibacterium acnes infected intervertebral discs cause vertebral bone marrow lesions consistent with Modic changes.

    PubMed

    Dudli, Stefan; Liebenberg, Ellen; Magnitsky, Sergey; Miller, Steve; Demir-Deviren, Sibel; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Modic type I change (MC1) are vertebral bone marrow lesions adjacent to degenerated discs that are specific for discogenic low back pain. The etiopathogenesis is unknown, but occult discitis, in particular with Propionibacteria acnes (P. acnes), has been suggested as a possible etiology. If true, antibiotic therapy should be considered for patients with MC1. However, this hypothesis is controversial. While some studies report up to 40% infection rate in herniated discs, others fail to detect infected discs and attribute reports of positive cultures to contamination during sampling procedure. Irrespective of the clinical controversy, whether it is biologically plausible for P. acnes to cause MC1 has never been investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test if P. acnes can proliferate within discs and cause reactive changes in the adjacent bone marrow. P. acnes was aseptically isolated from a symptomatic human L4/5 disc with MC1 and injected into rat tail discs. We demonstrate proliferation of P. acnes and up-regulation of IL-1 and IL-6 within three days of inoculation. At day-7, disc degeneration was apparent along with fibrotic endplate erosion. TNF-α immunoreactivity was enhanced within the effected endplates along with cellular infiltrates. The bone marrow appeared normal. At day-14, endplates and trabecular bone close to the disc were almost completely resorbed and fibrotic tissue extended into the bone marrow. T-cells and TNF-α immunoreactivity were identified at the disc/marrow junction. On MRI, bone marrow showed MC1-like changes. In conclusion, P. acnes proliferate within the disc, induce degeneration, and cause MC1-like changes in the adjacent bone marrow. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1447-1455, 2016. PMID:27101067

  16. The Effect of Sustained Compression on Oxygen Metabolic Transport in the Intervertebral Disc Decreases with Degenerative Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  17. The effect of sustained compression on oxygen metabolic transport in the intervertebral disc decreases with degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-08-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  18. Discal cyst associated with myxoid change and apoptosis of herniated disc materials: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kyoji; Saito, Hajime; Nishida, Jun; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Takahashi, Shu; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Norio; Chida, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Discal cyst is a lumbar intraspinal cyst communicating with intervertebral disc, and previously reported series described the wall of these cysts as consisting of dense fibrous connective tissue. We report a 29-year-old Japanese male with discal cyst showing unusual histological features. Clinical symptoms in the current case as well as imaging features including discography were similar to those previously reported.However, the wall of the cyst consisted of disc material with myxoid degeneration. In addition, apoptosis of chondrocytes was diffusely observed in the herniated disc material. The current case was considered a histological variant of discal cyst. Myxoid degeneration of herniated disc material with diffuse apoptotic change of chondrocytes was probably associated with the formation of discal cyst. PMID:17578806

  19. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  20. Disc replacement using Pro-Disc C versus fusion: a prospective randomised and controlled radiographic and clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ahlhelm, F.; Pitzen, T.; Steudel, W. I.; Jung, J.; Shariat, K.; Steimer, O.; Bachelier, F.; Pape, D.

    2006-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) may be considered to be the gold standard for treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease within the cervical spine. However, fusion of the segment may result in progressive degeneration of the adjacent segments. Therefore, dynamic stabilization procedures have been introduced. Among these, artificial disc replacement by disc prosthesis seems to be promising. However, to be so, segmental motion must be preserved. This, again, is very difficult to judge and has not yet been proven. The aim of the current study was to first analyse the segmental motion following artificial disc replacement using a disc prosthesis. A second aim was to compare both segmental motion as well as clinical result to the current gold standard (ACDF). This is a prospective controlled study. Twenty-five patients with cervical disc herniation were enrolled and assigned to either study group (receiving a disc prosthesis) or control group (receiving ACDF, using a cage with bone graft and an anterior plate.) Radiostereometric analysis was used to quantify intervertebral motion immediately as well as 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively. Further, clinical results were judged using visual analogue scale and neuro-examination. Cervical spine segmental motion decreased over time in the presence of disc prosthesis or ACDF. However, the loss of segmental motion is significantly higher in the ACDF group, when looked at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery. We observed significant pain reduction in neck and arm postoperatively, without significant difference between both groups (P > 0.05). Cervical spine disc prosthesis preserves cervical spine segmental motion within the first 6 months after surgery. The clinical results are the same when compared to the early results following ACDF. PMID:17106665

  1. Alterations in Magnetic Resonance Imaging T2 Relaxation Times of the Ovine Intervertebral Disc Due to Non-enzymatic Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Jazini, Ehsan; Sharan, Alok D; Morse, Lee Jae; Dyke, Jonathon P; Aronowitz, Eric A; Chen, Louis KH; Tang, Simon Y

    2011-01-01

    Study Design An in vitro study using ovine intervertebral discs to correlate the effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) with disc hydration evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objective To determine the relationship between the level of AGEs and tissue water content in intervertebral discs using T2 relaxation MRI. Summary of Background Data AGEs result from nonenzymatic glycation, and AGEs have been shown to accumulate in the IVD tissue with aging and degeneration. AGEs can alter biochemical properties, including the hydrophobicity of the extracellular matrix. Since one of the degenerative signs of the IVD is the reduced hydration, it was hypothesized that increased levels of tissue AGEs may contribute to disc hydration. T2 relaxation MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the hydration status of the disc, and may be valuable in detecting the changes in the IVD mediated by the increase of AGEs. Methods Thirty-eight IVDs were obtained from 4 ovine spines, and the annulus fibrosis (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from these discs. The tissues were incubated in either a ribosylation or control solution for up to 8 days to induce the formation of AGEs. These tissues were subsequently analyzed for tissue water content and concentration of AGEs. T2 relaxation times were obtained from these tissues after ribosylation. Results Ribosylation led to the increased accumulation of AGEs and reduced water content in both the AF and NP in a dose-dependent manner. When analyzed by MRI, ribosylation significantly altered the mean T2 relaxation times in the NP (p=0.001), but not in the AF (p=0.912). Furthermore, the mean T2 values in the NP significantly decreased with increasing periods of incubation time (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrates that levels of AGEs in the IVD may affect the tissue water content. Moreover, these ribosylation-mediated changes in tissue hydration were detectable using T2 relaxation MRI. T2 relaxation MRI

  2. An In Vivo Model of Reduced Nucleus Pulposus Glycosaminoglycan Content in the Rat Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, John I.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Sen, Sounok; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design An in vivo model resembling early stage disc degeneration in the rat lumbar spine. Objective Simulate the reduced glycosaminoglycan content and altered mechanics observed in intervertebral disc degeneration using a controlled injection of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). Summary of Background Data Nucleus glycosaminoglycan reduction occurs early during disc degeneration; however, mechanisms through which degeneration progresses from this state are unknown. Animal models simulating this condition are essential for understanding disease progression and for development of therapies aimed at early intervention. Methods ChABC was injected into the nucleus pulposus, and discs were evaluated via micro-CT, mechanical testing, biochemical assays, and histology 4 and 12 weeks after injection. Results At 4 weeks, reductions in nucleus glycosaminoglycan level by 43%, average height by 12%, neutral zone modulus by 40%, and increases in range of motion by 40%, and creep strain by 25% were found. Neutral zone modulus and range of motion were correlated with nucleus glycosaminoglycan. At 12 weeks, recovery of some mechanical function was detected as range of motion and creep returned to control levels; however, this was not attributed to glycosaminoglycan restoration, because mechanics were no longer correlated with glycosaminoglycan. Conclusion An in vivo model simulating physiologic levels of glycosaminoglycan loss was created to aid in understanding the relationships between altered biochemistry, altered mechanics, and altered cellular function in degeneration. PMID:18197098

  3. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  4. Lubricin immunohistochemical expression in human temporomandibular joint disc with internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Loreto, Carla

    2011-08-01

    Lubricin is a chondroprotective, mucinous glycoprotein which contribute to joint lubrication, especially to boundary lubrication and maintains joint integrity. The present investigation aimed to study the immunolocalization of lubricin in TMJ discs from patients affected by anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) ADDwoR. Eighteen TMJ displaced disc affected by ADDwoR were processed immunohistochemically, with a polyclonal anti-lubricin antibody, used at 1:50 working dilution. The percentage of lubricin immunopositive cells (extent score = ES) and the extent of lubricin staining of the disc extracellular matrix (ECM), were evaluated. Each sample was scored for histopathological changes. Percentage of immunostained surface disc cells was the same (ES = 4) in both control and ADDwOR cells, being this data not statistically significant (P < 0.05). In pathological specimens the percentages of lubricin-stained cells was very high with an ES of 4 respect to control specimen, and this difference was statistically significant different (P > 0.05). The extracellular matrix (ECM) of discs at the disc surfaces of both pathological and normal specimens was very heavily stained (++++). Both the ES and ECM staining were not statistically correlated to the TMJ degeneration score according to the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. According to our findings, a longstanding TMJ disc injury, affects lubricin expression in the TMJ disc tissue and not its surfaces, moreover, lubricin immunostaining is not correlated to TMJ disc histopathological changes.

  5. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  6. Low back pain, intervertebral disc and occupational diseases.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Nonspecific low back pain and sciatica are prevalent diseases among working adults and have become a worrying occupational health issue because they sometimes affect continuation or resumption of employment. Epidemiological studies that based questionnaires on workers' healthcare consumption have shown a higher prevalence of these disorders in certain industrial sectors. Thus, low back disorders are usually more prevalent among workers exposed to cumulative lumbar load such as manual handling, awkward postures of the trunk and whole-body vibrations. In addition, morphological and biomechanical studies have compared disc space narrowing and the intensity of lumbar workload. Although debated, the relationship between disc degeneration and biomechanical work exposures seems to be usually accepted by most authors. In response to a considerable need of prevention and compensation for workers, low back pain and/or disc disease can be recognized as an occupational diseases in several countries but the criteria of recognition remains heterogeneous from one country to another. PMID:26327258

  7. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  8. Two Ultracool Degenerate Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farihi, J.

    2005-07-01

    In the course of an extensive survey for low mass stellar and substellar companions to nearby white dwarfs, two extrememly cool degenerate objects have been discovered. GD 392B is one of only a few known white dwarfs with Teff⪉4000 K and exhibits collision induced absorption in the near infrared tep{far04}. GD 1400B is the second known L dwarf companion to a white dwarf and a possible brown dwarf (Farihi & Christopher 2004). Interested readers should consult the references for a complete description of these two cool objects.

  9. Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Chin, Steven S.; Marder, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  10. Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs: Report of one illustrative case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qin; Hao, Xiaoning; Guo, Xinghua; Wang, Liping

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common disease that induces back pain and radicular pain. The most efficient method for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation is still controversial. Spontaneous regression of LDH has been recognized with the advancement of radiological diagnostic tools and can explain the reason of spontaneous relief of symptoms without treatment. The proposed hypotheses are; dehydration, retraction of the disc to the hernia in the annulus fibrosis, enzymatic catabolism and phagocytosis. In this study, the case of a patient with huge lumbar disc hernia regressing by itself has been presented and the potential mechanisms of disc regression have been discussed. PMID:26907997

  11. Stress Reduction in Adjacent Level Discs via Dynamic Instrumentation: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Castellvi, Antonio E.; Huang, Hao; Vestgaarden, Tov; Saigal, Sunil; Pienkowski, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional (rigid) fusion instrumentation is believed to accelerate the degeneration of adjacent discs by increasing stresses caused by motion discontinuity. Fusion instrumentation that employs reduced rod stiffness and increased axial motion, or dynamic instrumentation, may partially alleviate this problem, but the effects of this instrumentation on the stresses in the adjacent disc are unknown. We used a finiteelement model to calculate and compare the stresses in the adjacent-level disc that are induced by rigid and dynamic posterior lumbar fusion instrumentation. Methods A 3-dimensional finite-element model of the lumbar spine was obtained that simulated flexion and extension. The L5–S1 segment of this model was fused, and the L4–L5 segment was fixed with rigid or dynamic instrumentation. The mechanical properties of the dynamic instrumentation were determined by laboratory testing and then used in the finite-element model. Peak stresses in the lumbar discs were calculated and compared. Results The reduced-stiffness component of the dynamic instrumentation was associated with a 1% to 2% reduction in peak compressive stresses in the adjacent-level disc (at 45° flexion), and the increased axial motion component of this instrumentation reduced peak disc stress by 8% to 9%. Areas of disc tissue exposed to 80% of peak stresses of 6.17 MPa were 47% less for discs adjacent to dynamic instrumentation than for those adjacent to rigid instrumentation. Conclusions Reduced stiffness and increased axial motion of dynamic posterior lumbar fusion instrumentation designs result in an approximately 10% cumulative stress reduction for each flexion cycle. The effect of this stress reduction over many cycles may be substantial. Clinical Relevance The cumulative effect of this reduced amplitude and distribution of peak stresses in the adjacent disc may partially alleviate the problem of adjacent-level disc degeneration. PMID:25802582

  12. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  13. Changes in disc status in the reducing and nonreducing anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint: a longitudinal retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying Kai; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qian Yang

    2016-01-01

    Treatment procedures for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are far from reaching a consensus. The aim of the study was to evaluate disc status changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDWR) and without reduction (ADDWoR) comparatively, to get a better understanding of the disease progress without intervention. This longitudinal retrospective study included 217 joints in 165 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDWoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for disc length and displacement distance at initial and follow-up visits. Disc morphology, which was classified in 5 types, was also evaluated. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to assess intra-group differences and independent t-test for inter-group differences. Moreover, analysis of covariance was applied to analyze influential factors for changes in disc length and displacement distance. According to our results, discs tended to become shorter, move further forward and distort more seriously in ADDWoR group than in ADDWR group after follow-up. Moreover, discs were prone to become shorter and more anteriorly displaced in teenagers, type I and III morphologies, advanced Wilkes stages, or those with joint effusion. Follow-up period seemed to be not critical. PMID:27671371

  14. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  15. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  16. The Chemistry of Optical Discs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains the chemistry used in compact discs (CD), digital versatile discs (DVD), and magneto-optical (MO) discs focusing on the steps of initial creation of the mold, the molding of the polycarbonate, the deposition of the reflective layers, the lacquering of the CDs, and the bonding of DVDs. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  17. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  18. Acceleration of cutaneous healing by electrical stimulation: degenerate electrical waveform down-regulates inflammation, up-regulates angiogenesis and advances remodeling in temporal punch biopsies in a human volunteer study.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Anil; Syed, Farhatullah; Perry, Donna; Balamurugan, Vinayagapriya; Colthurst, James; Chaudhry, Iskander H; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2011-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the beneficial effect of a novel electrical stimulation (ES) waveform, degenerate wave (DW) on skin fibroblasts, and now hypothesize that DW can enhance cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Therefore, a punch biopsy was taken from the upper arm of 20 volunteers on day 0 and repeated on day 14 (NSD14). A contralateral upper arm biopsy was taken on day 0 and treated with DW for 14 days prior to a repeat biopsy on day 14 (ESD14). A near-completed inflammatory stage of wound healing in ESD14, compared to NSD14 was demonstrated by up-regulation of interleukin-10 and vasoactive intestinal peptide using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and down-regulation of CD3 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) (p < 0.05). In addition to up-regulation (p < 0.05) of mRNA transcripts for re-epithelialization and angiogenesis, IHC showed significant overexpression (p < 0.05) of CD31 (15.5%), vascular endothelial growth factor (66%), and Melan A (8.6 cells/0.95 mm²) in ESD14 compared to NSD14 (9.5%, 38% and 4.3 cells/0.95 mm², respectively). Furthermore, granulation tissue formation (by hematoxylin and eosin staining), and myofibroblastic proliferation demonstrated by alpha-smooth muscle actin (62.7%) plus CD3+ T lymphocytes (8.1%) showed significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) in NSD14. In the remodeling stage, mRNA transcripts for fibronectin, collagen IV (by IHC, 14.1%) and mature collagen synthesis (by Herovici staining, 71.44%) were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) in ESD14. Apoptotic (TUNEL assay) and proliferative cells (Ki67) were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) in NSD14 (5.34 and 11.9 cells/0.95 mm²) while the proliferation index of ESD14 was similar to normal skin. In summary, cutaneous wounds receiving DW electrical stimulation display accelerated healing seen by reduced inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis and advanced remodeling phase.

  19. Key emerging issues in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    It has been approximately 50 years since neurologists were introduced to the entities progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Since the two seminal publications, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of these two neurodegenerative diseases, particularly the fact that both are associated with tau. Recent advances over the past 3 years that are notable to the field are discussed in this review that covers clinical diagnosis, pathological features, neuroimaging and CSF biomarkers, genetic associations and clinical trials related to progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. PMID:25701010

  20. Multi-center, Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Trial Comparing Mobi-C Cervical Artificial Disc to Anterior Discectomy and Fusion in the Treatment of Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Davis, Reginald; Gaede, Steven; Hoffman, Greg; Kim, Kee; Nunley, Pierce D.; Peterson, Daniel; Rashbaum, Ralph; Stokes, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard for treating symptomatic cervical disc degeneration. Cervical total disc replacements (TDRs) have emerged as an alternative for some patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new TDR device compared with ACDF for treating single-level cervical disc degeneration. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. A total of 245 patients were treated (164 TDR: 81 ACDF). The primary outcome measure was overall success based on improvement in Neck Disability Index (NDI), no subsequent surgical interventions, and no adverse events (AEs) classified as major complications. Secondary outcome measures included SF-12, visual analog scale (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, patient satisfaction, radiographic range of motion, and adjacent level degeneration. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The hypothesis was that the TDR success rate was non-inferior to ACDF at 24 months. Results Overall success rates were 73.6% for TDR and 65.3% for ACDF, confirming non-inferiority (p < 0.0025). TDR demonstrated earlier improvements with significant differences in NDI scores at 6 weeks and 3 months, and VAS neck pain and SF-12 PCS scores at 6 weeks (p<0.05). Operative level range of motion in the TDR group was maintained throughout follow-up. Radiographic evidence of inferior adjacent segment degeneration was significantly greater with ACDF at 12 and 24 months (p < 0.05). AE rates were similar. Conclusions Mobi-C TDR is a safe and effective treatment for single-level disc degeneration, producing outcomes similar to ACDF with less adjacent segment degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level I. Clinical relevance: This study adds to the literature supporting cervical TDR as a viable option to ACDF in

  1. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration Diagnosis: How is AMD diagnosed? Macular Degeneration Treatment: How is AMD Treated? Macular ... macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the ...

  2. Molecular regulation of CCN2 in the intervertebral disc: lessons learned from other connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cassie M; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2013-08-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) plays an important role in extracellular matrix synthesis, especially in skeletal tissues such as cartilage, bone, and the intervertebral disc. As a result there is a growing interest in examining the function and regulation of this important molecule in the disc. This review discusses the regulation of CCN2 by TGF-β and hypoxia, two critical determinants that characterize the disc microenvironment, and discusses known functions of CCN2 in the disc. The almost ubiquitous regulation of CCN2 by TGF-β, including that seen in the disc, emphasizes the importance of the TGF-β-CCN2 relationship, especially in terms of extracellular matrix synthesis. Likewise, the unique cross-talk between CCN2 and HIF-1 in the disc highlights the tissue and niche specific mode of regulation. Taken together the current literature supports an anabolic role for CCN2 in the disc and its involvement in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis during both health and disease. Further studies of CCN2 in this tissue may reveal valuable targets for the biological therapy of disc degeneration.

  3. [Twelve cases of total arthroplasty of lumbar disc. Preliminary results at 6 months].

    PubMed

    Morales, José Fernando Ramos; Palacios, Jesús López; Soriano, Juan Carlos Alvarado

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar pathology is a problem with growing incidence in developed countries. Lumbar pain caused by disc degeneration is the most frequently cause of functional restriction in patients under 45 years old. Discectomy, laminectomy and posterior spinal fusion have been the traditional surgery treatment. Many patients continue with pain as a consequence of mechanical damage at the functional unit, with different degrees of instability and adjacent disc damage. There are two types of strategies for disc replacement: disc nucleus arthroplasty and total disc arthroplasty. A clinical essay was made in Angeles Mocel Hospital during the period between October 2003 to March 2005. Eight patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease or contained disc herniation, were treated with 12 disc prosthesis, previously they showed no improvement with conservative treatment at minimum 4 months. Preoperative and postoperative pain was reported with the analogue visual score and the Oswestry score. Eighty percent presented immediate postoperative improvement and 100% after 6 months using Oswestry score. This procedure offers good outcome at short term, when its well indicated. This treatment requires a multidisciplinary team and elevates the costs. We need long term follow up results.

  4. Mechanotransduction in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lai, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a critical role in intracellular functioning—it allows cells to translate external physical forces into internal biochemical activities, thereby affecting processes ranging from proliferation and apoptosis to gene expression and protein synthesis in a complex web of interactions and reactions. Accordingly, aberrant mechanotransduction can either lead to, or be a result of, a variety of diseases or degenerative states. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanotransduction in the context of intervertebral discs, with a focus on the latest methods of investigating mechanotransduction and the most recent findings regarding the means and effects of mechanotransduction in healthy and degenerative discs. We also provide some discussion of potential directions for future research and treatments. PMID:25267492

  5. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  6. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  7. MicroRNA-146a reduces IL-1 dependent inflammatory responses in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Su-Xi; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L.; Chee, Ana; Kc, Ranjan; Chen, Di; An, Howard S.; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Chun-do; Ma, Yuan-Zheng; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Because miR-146a expression in articular chondrocytes is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed whether miR-146a is linked to cartilage degeneration in the spine. Monolayer cultures of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from the intervertebral discs (IVD) of bovine tails were transfected with a miR-146a mimic. To provoke inflammatory responses and catabolic extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, cells were co-treated with interleukin-1 (IL-1). Transfection of miR-146a decreases IL-1 induced mRNA levels of inflammatory genes and catabolic proteases in NP cells based on quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Similarly, miR146a suppresses IL-1 induced protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and aggrecanases as revealed by immunoblotting. Disc segments from wild type (WT) and miR-146a knockout (KO) mice were cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of IL-1 for 3 days. Histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of disc organ cultures revealed that IL-1 mediates changes in proteoglycan (PG) content and in-situ levels of catabolic proteins (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) in the nucleus pulposus of the disc. However, these IL-1 effects are more pronounced in miR-146a KO discs compared to WT discs. For example, absence of miR-146a increases the percentage of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive cells after treatment with IL-1. Thus, miR-146a appears to protect against IL-1 induced IVD degeneration and inflammation. Stimulation of endogenous miR-146a expression or exogenous delivery of miRNA-146a are viable therapeutic strategies that may decelerate disc degeneration and regain a normal homeostatic balance in extracellular matrix production and turn-over. PMID:25311550

  8. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration − the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR received Food and Drug Administration approval − the activL® Artificial Disc (Aesculap Implant Systems). Compared to previous-generation lumbar TDRs, the activL® Artificial Disc incorporates specific design enhancements that result in a more precise anatomical match and allow a range of motion that better mimics the healthy spine. The results of mechanical and clinical studies demonstrate that the activL® Artificial Disc results in improved mechanical and clinical outcomes versus earlier-generation artificial discs and compares favorably to lumbar fusion. The purpose of this report is to describe the activL® Artificial Disc including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, postoperative care, mechanical testing, and clinical experience to date. PMID:27274317

  9. The activL(®) Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration - the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR received Food and Drug Administration approval - the activL(®) Artificial Disc (Aesculap Implant Systems). Compared to previous-generation lumbar TDRs, the activL(®) Artificial Disc incorporates specific design enhancements that result in a more precise anatomical match and allow a range of motion that better mimics the healthy spine. The results of mechanical and clinical studies demonstrate that the activL(®) Artificial Disc results in improved mechanical and clinical outcomes versus earlier-generation artificial discs and compares favorably to lumbar fusion. The purpose of this report is to describe the activL(®) Artificial Disc including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, postoperative care, mechanical testing, and clinical experience to date.

  10. The activL(®) Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration - the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR received Food and Drug Administration approval - the activL(®) Artificial Disc (Aesculap Implant Systems). Compared to previous-generation lumbar TDRs, the activL(®) Artificial Disc incorporates specific design enhancements that result in a more precise anatomical match and allow a range of motion that better mimics the healthy spine. The results of mechanical and clinical studies demonstrate that the activL(®) Artificial Disc results in improved mechanical and clinical outcomes versus earlier-generation artificial discs and compares favorably to lumbar fusion. The purpose of this report is to describe the activL(®) Artificial Disc including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, postoperative care, mechanical testing, and clinical experience to date. PMID:27274317

  11. High-density optical discs for audio, video, and image applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Fuxi; Hou, Lisong

    2003-04-01

    Great progress in optical storage has taken place in the last decade. The development of optical discs is always towards higher and higher storage density and data transfer rate in order to meet the ever-increasing requirements of applications in audio, video and image areas. It has been proved a logical and effective approach to employ laser light of shorter wavelength and lenses of higher numerical aperture for increasing storage density, as is shown by the evolution of optical disc from CD family to DVD family. At present, research and development of high density DVD (HD-DVD), blu-ray disc and advanced storage magneto-optical (AS-MO) disc are carried out very extensively. Meanwhile, miniaturization of disc size and use of multiplication techniques to increase the storage density and capacity have already given rise to new formats such as iD Photo disc and Data Play disc as well as multi-layer discs. Digital holographic storage (DHS) disc is also one of the research and development subjects of many companies and research institutions. Some new concept optical storage such as fluorescent multiplayer disc (FMD) is also under intensive development. All these have greatly promoted applications of optical discs in audio, video and image devices.

  12. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc.

  13. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc. PMID:26736977

  14. Disc edge veins of Kraupa associated with optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Andrea; Almela, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Disc edge veins of Kraupa are a rare anomaly of the retinal venous system in which the main trunk of the retinal vein disappeared into the margin of the optic disc instead of its centre. Methods: A 40-year-old woman was detected to have an anomaly in her left optic disc in a routine eye examination. The eyes had an anomaly of the retinal venous system in which all branches of the retinal vein joined in a common trunk that entered the disc margin inferonasally. The central retinal artery issued from the centre of the disc separately of the venous system. B-scan ultrasonografhy revealed the presence of hyperechoic imaging at the optic nerve head in both eyes. Results: We describe the association of disc edge veins of Kraupa with optic disc drusen. Conclusion: Vascular complications of optic disc drusen hav been described. We don’t know the implication of disc edge veins in the pathogenesis of these complications.

  15. New Experiments with Spinning Metallic Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    A number of recent advanced theories related to torsion properties of the space-time matrix predict the existence of an interaction between classically spinning objects. Indeed, some experimental data suggest that spinning magnetic bodies discernibly interact with Earth's natural fields. If there are interactions between rotating bodies then nuclear spins could be used for detection. Thus, assuming a spinning body induces a hypothetical torsion field, a sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect would detect local changes. Experimentally, spinning a brass wheel shielded from Earth's magnetic field showed no measurable change in signals; with no shielding a Faraday disc phenomenon was observed. Unexpected experimental measurements from the non-axial Faraday disc configuration were recorded and a theoretical model was derived to explain them.

  16. X-linked recessive atrophic macular degeneration from RPGR mutation.

    PubMed

    Ayyagari, Radha; Demirci, F Yesim; Liu, Jiafan; Bingham, Eve L; Stringham, Heather; Kakuk, Laura E; Boehnke, Michael; Gorin, Michael B; Richards, Julia E; Sieving, Paul A

    2002-08-01

    We mapped a new X-linked recessive atrophic macular degeneration locus to Xp21.1-p11.4 and show allelic involvement of the gene RPGR, which normally causes severe peripheral retinal degeneration leading to global blindness. Ten affected males whom we examined had primarily macular atrophy causing progressive loss of visual acuity with minimal peripheral visual impairment. One additional male showed extensive macular degeneration plus peripheral loss of retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaries. Full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) showed normal cone and rod responses in some affected males despite advanced macular degeneration, emphasizing the dissociation of atrophic macular degeneration from generalized cone degenerations, including X-linked cone dystrophy (COD1). The RPGR gene nonsense mutation G-->T at open reading frame (ORF)15+1164 cosegregated with the disease and may create a donor splice site. Identification of an RPGR mutation in atrophic maculardegeneration expands the phenotypic range associated with this gene and provides a new tool for the dissection of the relationship between clinically different retinal pathologies.

  17. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Lina; Mackenzie, Ian R; Förstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Diehl-Schmid, Janine

    2014-01-01

    The term frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) refers to a group of progressive brain diseases, which preferentially involve the frontal and temporal lobes. Depending on the primary site of atrophy, the clinical manifestation is dominated by behavior alterations or impairment of language. The onset of symptoms usually occurs before the age of 60 years, and the mean survival from diagnosis varies between 3 and 10 years. The prevalence is estimated at 15 per 100,000 in the population aged between 45 and 65 years, which is similar to the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in this age group. There are two major clinical subtypes, behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia. The neuropathology underlying the clinical syndromes is also heterogeneous. A common feature is the accumulation of certain neuronal proteins. Of these, the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), the transactive response DNA-binding protein, and the fused in sarcoma protein are most important. Approximately 10% to 30% of FTLD shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, with mutations in the genes for MAPT, progranulin (GRN), and in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) accounting for more than 80% of familial cases. Although significant advances have been made in recent years regarding diagnostic criteria, clinical assessment instruments, neuropsychological tests, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and brain imaging techniques, the clinical diagnosis remains a challenge. To date, there is no specific pharmacological treatment for FTLD. Some evidence has been provided for serotonin reuptake inhibitors to reduce behavioral disturbances. No large-scale or high-quality studies have been conducted to determine the efficacy of non-pharmacological treatment approaches in FTLD. In view of the limited treatment options, caregiver education and support is currently the most important component of the clinical management. PMID:24600223

  18. Heat distribution in disc brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  19. Edge-on thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, A.; Katkov, I.; Chilingarian, I.; Silchenko, O.; Moiseev, A.; Borisov, S.

    2016-06-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on early-type disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4 ‑ 5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ ‑0.2 ‑ 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its only disc is thick and old (10 Gyr) and its α-element abundance suggests a long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results prove the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  20. Enclosed rotary disc air pulser

    DOEpatents

    Olson, A. L.; Batcheller, Tom A.; Rindfleisch, J. A.; Morgan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    An enclosed rotary disc air pulser for use with a solvent extraction pulse olumn includes a housing having inlet, exhaust and pulse leg ports, a shaft mounted in the housing and adapted for axial rotation therein, first and second disc members secured to the shaft within the housing in spaced relation to each other to define a chamber therebetween, the chamber being in communication with the pulse leg port, the first disc member located adjacent the inlet port, the second disc member being located adjacent the exhaust port, each disc member having a milled out portion, the disc members positioned on the shaft so that as the shaft rotates, the milled out portions permit alternative cyclical communication between the inlet port and the chamber and the exhaust port and the chamber.

  1. Acute trauma induced disc displacement without reduction and its sequelae

    PubMed Central

    He, DongMei; Yang, XiuJuan; Wang, FeiYu; Yang, Chi; Dong, MinJun

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic temporomandibular joint disc displacement (ATDD) and its sequelae are not familiar for most surgeons. This study is to discuss its sequelae in cases without disc reduction after failed conservative treatment. From 2010 to 2015, 26 patients with 34 joints were included in the study. All patients had at least 3 months conservative treatment. Their maximal incisor opening (MIO) was measured during follow-ups and MRI examination was used to check the condylar bone degeneration. The mean follow-up for conservative treatment after admission was 8.69 months, the patients reached an average of 25.7 mm MIO. MRI showed condylar bone intact in 8 joints (23.5%), condylar surface bone destruction (Wilks IV, V stages) in 14 joints (41.2%), and severe bone resorption in 12 joints (35.3%). 15 patients with 23 joints were asked for surgical treatment after a mean conservative treatment of 5.4 months (3–12 months) to improve mouth opening and relieve chronic pain. 12 joints had total joint replacement (TJR). 11 joints had disc repositioning. Their mean MIO before operation was 19.8 mm and significantly improved to 33.9 mm after operation (p = 0.0000). ATDD may cause severe osteoarthritis or ankylosis. Disc repositioning and TJR could significantly improve MIO. PMID:27582054

  2. Acute trauma induced disc displacement without reduction and its sequelae.

    PubMed

    He, DongMei; Yang, XiuJuan; Wang, FeiYu; Yang, Chi; Dong, MinJun

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic temporomandibular joint disc displacement (ATDD) and its sequelae are not familiar for most surgeons. This study is to discuss its sequelae in cases without disc reduction after failed conservative treatment. From 2010 to 2015, 26 patients with 34 joints were included in the study. All patients had at least 3 months conservative treatment. Their maximal incisor opening (MIO) was measured during follow-ups and MRI examination was used to check the condylar bone degeneration. The mean follow-up for conservative treatment after admission was 8.69 months, the patients reached an average of 25.7 mm MIO. MRI showed condylar bone intact in 8 joints (23.5%), condylar surface bone destruction (Wilks IV, V stages) in 14 joints (41.2%), and severe bone resorption in 12 joints (35.3%). 15 patients with 23 joints were asked for surgical treatment after a mean conservative treatment of 5.4 months (3-12 months) to improve mouth opening and relieve chronic pain. 12 joints had total joint replacement (TJR). 11 joints had disc repositioning. Their mean MIO before operation was 19.8 mm and significantly improved to 33.9 mm after operation (p = 0.0000). ATDD may cause severe osteoarthritis or ankylosis. Disc repositioning and TJR could significantly improve MIO. PMID:27582054

  3. Vertebral degenerative disc disease severity evaluation using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Hector E.; Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Pham, Yasuyuki; Stieger, James; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) develops in the spine as vertebral discs degenerate and osseous excrescences or outgrowths naturally form to restabilize unstable segments of the spine. These osseous excrescences, or osteophytes, may progress or stabilize in size as the spine reaches a new equilibrium point. We have previously created a CAD system that detects DDD. This paper presents a new system to determine the severity of DDD of individual vertebral levels. This will be useful to monitor the progress of developing DDD, as rapid growth may indicate that there is a greater stabilization problem that should be addressed. The existing DDD CAD system extracts the spine from CT images and segments the cortical shell of individual levels with a dual-surface model. The cortical shell is unwrapped, and is analyzed to detect the hyperdense regions of DDD. Three radiologists scored the severity of DDD of each disc space of 46 CT scans. Radiologists' scores and features generated from CAD detections were used to train a random forest classifier. The classifier then assessed the severity of DDD at each vertebral disc level. The agreement between the computer severity score and the average radiologist's score had a quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa of 0.64.

  4. Cell Therapy Using Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Overexpressing BMP-7 for Degenerative Discs in a Rat Tail Disc Model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative discs can cause low back pain. Cell-based transplantation or growth factors therapy have been suggested as a strategy to stimulate disc regeneration. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSC) containing bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) gene were constructed. We evaluated the effectiveness of these BMP-7 overexpressing cells on degenerative discs in rat tails. In vitro and in vivo studies were designed. In the first stage, the rats were divided into two group according to discs punctured by different needle gauges (18 gauge and 22 gauge). In the second stage, the ideal size of needle was used to induce rat tail disc degeneration. These animals are divided into three groups according to timing of treatment (zero-week, two-week, four-week). Each group was divided into three treating subgroups: control group, BMDMSC group, and Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC group. Each rat undergoes radiography examination every two weeks. After eight weeks, the discs were histologically examined with hematoxylin and eosin stain and Alcian blue stain. The 18-gauge group exhibited significant decrease in disc height index (%) than 22-gauge group at eight weeks at both Co6-7 (58.1% ± 2.8% vs. 63.7% ± 1.0%, p = 0.020) and Co8-9 discs (62.7% ± 2.8% vs. 62.8% ± 1.5%, p = 0.010). Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group showed significant difference in disc height index compared to the BMDMSCs group at both Co6-7 (93.7% ± 1.5% vs. 84.8% ± 1.0%, p = 0.011) and Co8-9 (86.0% ± 2.1% vs. 81.8% ± 1.7%, p = 0.012). In Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group, the zero-week treatment subgroup showed significant better in disc height index compared to two-week treatment group (p = 0.044), and four-week treatment group (p = 0.011). The zero-week treatment subgroup in Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group also had significant lower histology score than two-week treatment (4.3 vs. 5.7, p = 0.045) and four-week treatment (4.3 vs. 6.0, p = 0.031). In conclusion, Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC can slow down the progression of disc

  5. Cell Therapy Using Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Overexpressing BMP-7 for Degenerative Discs in a Rat Tail Disc Model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative discs can cause low back pain. Cell-based transplantation or growth factors therapy have been suggested as a strategy to stimulate disc regeneration. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSC) containing bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) gene were constructed. We evaluated the effectiveness of these BMP-7 overexpressing cells on degenerative discs in rat tails. In vitro and in vivo studies were designed. In the first stage, the rats were divided into two group according to discs punctured by different needle gauges (18 gauge and 22 gauge). In the second stage, the ideal size of needle was used to induce rat tail disc degeneration. These animals are divided into three groups according to timing of treatment (zero-week, two-week, four-week). Each group was divided into three treating subgroups: control group, BMDMSC group, and Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC group. Each rat undergoes radiography examination every two weeks. After eight weeks, the discs were histologically examined with hematoxylin and eosin stain and Alcian blue stain. The 18-gauge group exhibited significant decrease in disc height index (%) than 22-gauge group at eight weeks at both Co6-7 (58.1% ± 2.8% vs. 63.7% ± 1.0%, p = 0.020) and Co8-9 discs (62.7% ± 2.8% vs. 62.8% ± 1.5%, p = 0.010). Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group showed significant difference in disc height index compared to the BMDMSCs group at both Co6-7 (93.7% ± 1.5% vs. 84.8% ± 1.0%, p = 0.011) and Co8-9 (86.0% ± 2.1% vs. 81.8% ± 1.7%, p = 0.012). In Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group, the zero-week treatment subgroup showed significant better in disc height index compared to two-week treatment group (p = 0.044), and four-week treatment group (p = 0.011). The zero-week treatment subgroup in Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSCs group also had significant lower histology score than two-week treatment (4.3 vs. 5.7, p = 0.045) and four-week treatment (4.3 vs. 6.0, p = 0.031). In conclusion, Baculo-BMP-7-BMDMSC can slow down the progression of disc

  6. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial

  7. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  8. 26 CFR 1.6011-2 - Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's. 1.6011-2 Section 1.6011-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...., of DISC's and former DISC's. (a) Records and information. Every DISC and former DISC (as defined...

  9. Development of a Large Animal Long-Term Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture Model That Includes the Bony Vertebrae for Ex Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael; Epure, Laura M; Salem, Omar; AlGarni, Nizar; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Alaqeel, Motaz; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2016-07-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common cause of low back pain. Testing potential therapeutics in the regeneration of the disc requires the use of model systems. Although several animal models have been developed to investigate IVD degeneration, they are technically challenging to prepare, expensive, present with limitations when performing biomechanical studies on the disc, and are impractical in large-scale screening of novel anabolic and scaffolding agents. An IVD organ culture system offers an inexpensive alternative. In the current paradigm, the bony endplates are removed to allow for nutrient diffusion and maintenance of disc cell viability. Although this is an excellent system for testing biologics, it results in concave cartilage endplates and, as such, requires special platens for loading purposes in a bioreactor as flat ones can overload the annular disc region leading to improper loading. Furthermore, the absence of bone makes it unsuitable for applying complex cyclic loading, a topic of interest in the study of chronic progressive degeneration, as multiaxial loading is more representative of daily forces encountered by the IVD. We have developed and validated a novel long-term IVD organ culture model that retains vertebral bone and is easy to prepare. Our model is ideal for testing potential drugs and alternate-based therapies, in addition to investigating the long-term effects of loading paradigms on disc degeneration and repair. PMID:27216856

  10. An injectable hydrogel incorporating mesenchymal precursor cells and pentosan polysulphate for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frith, Jessica E; Cameron, Andrew R; Menzies, Donna J; Ghosh, Peter; Whitehead, Darryl L; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2013-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the leading causes of lower back pain and a major health problem worldwide. Current surgical treatments include excision or immobilisation, with neither approach resulting in the repair of the degenerative disc. As such, a tissue engineering-based approach in which stem cells, coupled with an advanced delivery system, could overcome this deficiency and lead to a therapy that encourages functional fibrocartilage generation in the IVD. In this study, we have developed an injectable hydrogel system based on enzymatically-crosslinked polyethylene glycol and hyaluronic acid. We examined the effects of adding pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a synthetic glycosaminoglycan-like factor that has previously been shown (in vitro and in vivo) to this gel system in order to induce chondrogenesis in mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) when added as a soluble factor, even in the absence of additional growth factors such as TGF-β. We show that both the gelation rate and mechanical strength of the resulting hydrogels can be tuned in order to optimise the conditions required to produce gels with the desired combination of properties for an IVD scaffold. Human immunoselected STRO-1+ MPCs were then incorporated into the hydrogels. They were shown to retain good viability after both the initial formation of the gel and for longer-term culture periods in vitro. Furthermore, MPC/hydrogel composites formed cartilage-like tissue which was significantly enhanced by the incorporation of PPS into the hydrogels, particularly with respect to the deposition of type-II-collagen. Finally, using a wild-type rat subcutaneous implantation model, we examined the extent of any immune reaction and confirmed that this matrix is well tolerated by the host. Together these data provide evidence that such a system has significant potential as both a delivery vehicle for MPCs and as a matrix for fibrocartilage tissue engineering applications.

  11. Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration).

    PubMed

    Herron, B E

    1976-01-01

    Wilson's disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism which usually affects young people. Excess copper accumulates in the tissues, primarily in the liver, brain, and cornea. This copper deposition results in a wide range of hepatic and neurological symptoms, and may produce psychiatric illness. Hepatic involvement often occurs in childhood, while neurological deficits generally are detected at a later age. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. Ocular findings are of particular importance because the corneal copper deposition, forming the Kayser-Fleischer ring,is the only pathognomonic sign of the disease. The structure of the ring and the presence of copper have been well established. An anterior capsular deposition of copper in the lens results in a characteristic sunflower cataract in some of these patients. Other ocular abnormalities have been described but are much less common. The pathogenesis of the disease and the basic genetic defect remain obscure. It is clear that there is excess copper in the tissues, but the mechanism of its deposition is unknown. It is in some way associated with a failure to synthesize the serum copper protein ceruloplasmin normally. Another theory suggests that an abnormal protein with a high affinity for copper may bind the metal in the tissues. The diagnosis may be suggested by the clinical manifestations and confirmed by the presence of a Kayser-Fleischer ring. In the absence of these findings biochemical determinations are necessary. The most important of these are the serum ceruloplasmin, the urinary copper, and the hepatic copper concentration on biopsy. Treatment consists in the administration of the copper chelating agent, penicillamine, and the avoidance of a high copper intake. This usually results in marked clinical improvement if irreversible tissue damage has not occurred. Maintenance therapy for life is necessary in order to continue the negative

  12. TRAIL, DR5 and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in vessels of diseased human temporomandibular joint disc. An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Almeida, L.E.; Migliore, M.R.; Caltabiano, M.; Leonardi, R.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the apoptosis involvement in the angiogenesis as a self-limiting process in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) degenerated disc vessels, we assessed, by immunohistochemistry, the detection of TRAIL, its death receptor DR5 and caspase 3. TRAIL, its death receptor DR5 and caspase 3 expression were studied by immunohistochemistry in 15 TMJ discs displaced without reduction and in 4 unaffected discs. These apoptosis molecules were detected in the intima and media layers of newly formed vessels affected discs. In conclusion, vessels apoptosis activation in TMJ disc with ID could be regarded as a self-limiting process that try to leads to vessel regression; in this way an inhibition of angiogenic vessels may prove a key strategy in limiting pathological angiogenesis, by cutting off blood supply to tumors, or by reducing harmful inflammation. PMID:20839416

  13. Calcification in the ovine intervertebral disc: a model of hydroxyapatite deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, D.; Taylor, T. K. F.; Dillon, C. T.; Read, R.; Cake, M.; Little, C. B.

    2009-01-01

    The study design included a multidisciplinary examination of the mineral phase of ovine intervertebral disc calcifications. The objective of the study was to investigate the mineral phase and its mechanisms of formation/association with degeneration in a naturally occurring animal model of disc calcification. The aetiology of dystrophic disc calcification in adult humans is unknown, but occurs as a well-described clinical disorder with hydroxyapatite as the single mineral phase. Comparable but age-related pathology in the sheep could serve as a model for the human disorder. Lumbar intervertebral discs (n = 134) of adult sheep of age 6 years (n = 4), 8 years (n = 12) and 11 years (n = 2) were evaluated using radiography, morphology, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, histology, immunohistology and proteoglycan analysis. Half of the 6-year, 84% of the 8-year and 86% of the 11-year-old discs had calcific deposits. These were not well delineated by plain radiography. They were either: (a) punctate deposits in the outer annulus, (b) diffuse deposits in the transitional zone or inner annulus fibrosus with occasional deposits in the nucleus, or (c) large deposits in the transitional zone extending variably into the nucleus. Their maximal incidence was in the lower lumbar discs (L4/5–L6/7) with no calcification seen in the lumbosacral or lower thoracic discs. All deposits were hydroxyapatite with large crystallite sizes (800–1,300 Å) compared to cortical bone (300–600 Å). No type X-collagen, osteopontin or osteonectin were detected in calcific deposits, although positive staining for bone sialoprotein was evident. Calcified discs had less proteoglycan of smaller hydrodynamic size than non-calcified discs. Disc calcification in ageing sheep is due to hydroxyapatite deposition. The variable, but large, crystal size and lack of protein markers indicate that this does not occur by

  14. Linking neurodevelopmental and synaptic theories of mental illness via DISC1

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Nicholas J.; Sawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the underlying genetic architecture of psychiatric disorders, has blown away “old” diagnostic boundaries defined by currently used diagnostic manuals. The DISC1 gene was originally discovered at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, which segregates with major mental illnesses. Many biological studies have indicated the role of DISC1 in early neurodevelopment and synaptic regulation. Given the additional insight that DISC1 is thought to drive a range of endophenotypes, which underlie major mental conditions, the biology of DISC1 may provide a hint on constructing new diagnostic categories for mental illnesses with more meaningful biological foundation. PMID:22095064

  15. Feasibility of minimally-invasive fiber-based evaluation of chondrodystrophoid canine intervertebral discs by light absorption and scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; McKeirnan, Kelci; Piao, Daqing; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    2011-03-01

    Extrusion or protrusion of an intervertebral disc is a common, frequently debilitating, painful, and sometimes fatal neurologic disease in the chondrodystrophic dog (dachshund, Pekingese, etc.). A similar condition of intervertebral disc degeneration with extrusion/protrusion is also a relatively common neurologic condition in human patients. Degeneration of the relatively avascular chondrodystrophoid intervertebral disc is associated with loss of water content, increased collagen, and deposits of calcified mineral in the nucleus pulposus. Current diagnostic methods have many limitations for providing accurate information regarding disc composition in situ prior to surgical intervention. Disc composition (i.e., mineralization), can influence the type of treatment regime and potentially prognosis and recurrence rates. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a fiber-needle spectroscopy sensor to analyze the changes of tissue compositions involved in the chondrodystrophoid condition of the canine intervertebral disc. The nucleous pulposus, in which the metaplastic process / degeneration develops, is approximately 2mm thick and 5mm in diameter in the dachshund-sized dog. It lies in the center of the disc, surrounded by the annulus fibrosis and is enclosed by cartilaginous vertebral endplates cranially and caudally. This "shallow-and-small-slab" geometry limits the configuration of a fiber probe to sense the disc tissue volume without interference from the vertebrae. A single-fiber sensor is inserted into a 20 gauge myelographic spinal needle for insertion into the disc in situ and connected via a bifurcated fiber to the light source and a spectrometer. A tungsten light source and a 940nm light-emitting-diode are combined for spectral illumination covering VIS/NIR with expected improved sensitivity to water. Analysis of the reflectance spectra is expected to provide information of scattering and absorption compositions of tissue in

  16. Wnt Signaling Activates Shh Signaling in Early Postnatal Intervertebral Discs, and Re-Activates Shh Signaling in Old Discs in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Debora; Wylie, Christopher C.; Dahia, Chitra Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are strong fibrocartilaginous joints that connect adjacent vertebrae of the spine. As discs age they become prone to failure, with neurological consequences that are often severe. Surgical repair of discs treats the result of the disease, which affects as many as one in seven people, rather than its cause. An ideal solution would be to repair degenerating discs using the mechanisms of their normal differentiation. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the mouse as a model, we previously showed that Shh signaling produced by nucleus pulposus cells activates the expression of differentiation markers, and cell proliferation, in the postnatal IVD. In the present study, we show that canonical Wnt signaling is required for the expression of Shh signaling targets in the IVD. We also show that Shh and canonical Wnt signaling pathways are down-regulated in adult IVDs. Furthermore, this down-regulation is reversible, since re-activation of the Wnt or Shh pathways in older discs can re-activate molecular markers of the IVD that are lost with age. These data suggest that biological treatments targeting Wnt and Shh signaling pathways may be feasible as a therapeutic for degenerative disc disease. PMID:24892825

  17. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2010-07-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5-S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively.

  18. Region Specific Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells to Complex Dynamic Loading: An Organ Culture Study Using a Dynamic Torsion-Compression Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Samantha C. W.; Walser, Jochen; Käppeli, Patrick; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Javad; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gantenbein-Ritter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The spine is routinely subjected to repetitive complex loading consisting of axial compression, torsion, flexion and extension. Mechanical loading is one of the important causes of spinal diseases, including disc herniation and disc degeneration. It is known that static and dynamic compression can lead to progressive disc degeneration, but little is known about the mechanobiology of the disc subjected to combined dynamic compression and torsion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanobiology of the intervertebral disc when subjected to combined dynamic compression and axial torsion or pure dynamic compression or axial torsion using organ culture. We applied four different loading modalities [1. control: no loading (NL), 2. cyclic compression (CC), 3. cyclic torsion (CT), and 4. combined cyclic compression and torsion (CCT)] on bovine caudal disc explants using our custom made dynamic loading bioreactor for disc organ culture. Loads were applied for 8 h/day and continued for 14 days, all at a physiological magnitude and frequency. Our results provided strong evidence that complex loading induced a stronger degree of disc degeneration compared to one degree of freedom loading. In the CCT group, less than 10% nucleus pulposus (NP) cells survived the 14 days of loading, while cell viabilities were maintained above 70% in the NP of all the other three groups and in the annulus fibrosus (AF) of all the groups. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong up-regulation in matrix genes and matrix remodeling genes in the AF of the CCT group. Cell apoptotic activity and glycosaminoglycan content were also quantified but there were no statistically significant differences found. Cell morphology in the NP of the CCT was changed, as shown by histological evaluation. Our results stress the importance of complex loading on the initiation and progression of disc degeneration. PMID:24013824

  19. Testicular degeneration in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M; Murphy, Zoe; Selva, David M; Hamidizadeh, Reza; Pearson, Jacqueline; Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria; Muir, Cameron; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hammond, Geoffrey L; Vogl, A Wayne; Hayden, Michael R; Leavitt, Blair R

    2007-06-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an adult onset, neurodegenerative disorder that results from CAG expansion in the HD gene. Recent work has demonstrated testicular degeneration in mouse models of HD and alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in HD patients. Here, we show that HD patients have specific testicular pathology with reduced numbers of germ cells and abnormal seminiferous tubule morphology. In the YAC128 mouse model, testicular degeneration develops prior to 12 months of age, but at 12 months, there is no evidence for decreased testosterone levels or loss of GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus. This suggests that testicular pathology results from a direct toxic effect of mutant huntingtin in the testis and is supported by the fact that huntingtin is highly expressed in the affected cell populations in the testis. Understanding the pathogenesis of HD in the testis may reveal common critical pathways which lead to degeneration in both the brain and testis.

  20. Comparison between cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, Luis; Nykamp, Stephanie; Daniel, Rob; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    Cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations have been reported to be rare in dogs due to the presence of the intercapital ligament, however some studies have proposed they may not be uncommon in German Shepherd dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs (control group). Medical records at the Ontario Veterinary College were searched for German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs that had magnetic resonance imaging studies including the T1-T9 region. For each dog and each disc space from T1-T9, three variables (compression, disc degeneration, and herniation) were recorded and graded based on review of sagittal T2-weighted images. Twenty-three German Shepherd dogs and 47 other large breed dogs met inclusion criteria. The German Shepherd dog group had higher scores than the control group for compression (P = 0.0099) and herniation (P < 0.001), but not disc degeneration (P = 0.97). In the German Shepherd dog group, intervertebral discs T2-T3 and T4-T5 had an increased risk for compression and T3-T4 had an increased risk for compression and herniation. Findings from this study indicated that German Shepherd dogs may be more likely than other large breed dogs to have spinal cord compression due to cranial thoracic disc herniations. Imaging of the cranial thoracic spine, including T2-T3, is recommended for German Shepherd dogs with T3-L3 neurological signs.

  1. The Effect of Gamma Irradiation on the Biological Properties of Intervertebral Disc Allografts: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies in a Beagle Model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu; Ruan, Dike; Luk, Keith D. K.; He, Qing; Wang, Chaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Study Design An animal experiment about intervertebral disc allograft. Objective To explore the feasibility to decellularize disc allografts treated by 6°Co Gamma Irradiation, and simultaneously, to assess the possibility to make use of the decellularized natural disc scaffold for disc degeneration biotherapy. Summary of Background Data Studies of both animal and human disc allograft transplantation indicated that the disc allograft may serve as a scaffold to undertake the physiological responsibility of the segment. Methods Experiment in vitro: 48 discs of beagles were harvested and divided randomly into four groups including a control group and three irradiated groups. Immediate cell viability and biomechanical properties of the discs were checked and comparisons were made among these groups. Experiment in vivo: 24 beagles accepted single-level allografted disc treated with different doses of gamma irradiation. Plain X-rays and MRIs were taken before and after surgery. Then, the spinal columns were harvested en bloc from the sacrificed beagles and were examined morphologically. Results There were significant differences of both the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus immediate cell viabilities among the various groups. There were no obvious differences of the biomechanical properties among the four groups. The disc height and range of motion decreased significantly in all groups as time went on. The observed indexes in irradiated groups were much smaller than those in the control group, but the indexes in 18-kGy group were larger than those in 25-kGy and 50-kGy groups. Both MRI and macroscopic findings showed that the segmental degeneration in the control and 18-kGy group was less severe than that in 25-kGy and 50-kGy groups. Conclusion Gamma Irradiation can decellularize disc allograft successfully to provide natural scaffold for the study of degenerative disc disease therapy, and also can be used as an effective method to produce adjustable animal models

  2. [Acquired polycystic degeneration of the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Kreisel-Büstgens, C; Büstgens, L; Graben, N

    1990-12-15

    Kidneys of patients with advanced renal insufficiency undergo polycystic transformation, described as acquired cystic degeneration (ACD). In 118 chronic dialysis patients clinical data were compared with sonographic findings of their 221 cirrhotic kidneys: 74 (63%) patients showed distinctly discernible renal cysts: 19 patients hat one single cyst, nine patients had two to eight cysts, 46 patients had more than eight cysts. Accordingly 39% of patients had ACD. Cystic transformation was of the same degree on both sides and in a few cases so marked that a formal discrimination to congenital cystic disease seemed impossible. Cystic degeneration was not influenced by patient's age, sex or underlying renal disease, but was dependent on the duration of both, renal disease and dialysis treatment. After eight years 71% of dialysis patients had ACD. In coincidence with cystic transformation the size of the kidneys apparently normalized and Hb-concentration rose from 8 to 10 g/dl. Complications were seen in six patients: two severe retroperitoneal bleedings and four hypernephroma were observed. The etiology of cystic transformation and its possible role as precancerosis are discussed.

  3. Double-disc gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, Seth J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewtih, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separtion of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve.

  4. Discs in misaligned binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawiraswattana, Krisada; Hubber, David A.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2016-08-01

    We perform SPH simulations to study precession and changes in alignment between the circumprimary disc and the binary orbit in misaligned binary systems. We find that the precession process can be described by the rigid-disc approximation, where the disc is considered as a rigid body interacting with the binary companion only gravitationally. Precession also causes change in alignment between the rotational axis of the disc and the spin axis of the primary star. This type of alignment is of great important for explaining the origin of spin-orbit misaligned planetary systems. However, we find that the rigid-disc approximation fails to describe changes in alignment between the disc and the binary orbit. This is because the alignment process is a consequence of interactions that involve the fluidity of the disc, such as the tidal interaction and the encounter interaction. Furthermore, simulation results show that there are not only alignment processes, which bring the components towards alignment, but also anti-alignment processes, which tend to misalign the components. The alignment process dominates in systems with misalignment angle near 90°, while the anti-alignment process dominates in systems with the misalignment angle near 0° or 180°. This means that highly misaligned systems will become more aligned but slightly misaligned systems will become more misaligned.

  5. Finite element analysis of weightbath hydrotraction treatment of degenerated lumbar spine segments in elastic phase.

    PubMed

    Kurutz, M; Oroszváry, L

    2010-02-10

    3D finite element models of human lumbar functional spinal units (FSU) were used for numerical analysis of weightbath hydrotraction therapy (WHT) applied for treating degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Five grades of age-related degeneration were modeled by material properties. Tensile material parameters of discs were obtained by parameter identification based on in vivo measured elongations of lumbar segments during regular WHT, compressive material constants were obtained from the literature. It has been proved numerically that young adults of 40-45 years have the most deformable and vulnerable discs, while the stability of segments increases with further aging. The reasons were found by analyzing the separated contrasting effects of decreasing incompressibility and increasing hardening of nucleus, yielding non-monotonous functions of stresses and deformations in terms of aging and degeneration. WHT consists of indirect and direct traction phases. Discs show a bilinear material behaviour with higher resistance in indirect and smaller in direct traction phase. Consequently, although the direct traction load is only 6% of the indirect one, direct traction deformations are 15-90% of the indirect ones, depending on the grade of degeneration. Moreover, the ratio of direct stress relaxation remains equally about 6-8% only. Consequently, direct traction controlled by extra lead weights influences mostly the deformations being responsible for the nerve release; while the stress relaxation is influenced mainly by the indirect traction load coming from the removal of the compressive body weight and muscle forces in the water. A mildly degenerated disc in WHT shows 0.15mm direct, 0.45mm indirect and 0.6mm total extension; 0.2mm direct, 0.6mm indirect and 0.8mm total posterior contraction. A severely degenerated disc exhibits 0.05mm direct, 0.05mm indirect and 0.1mm total extension; 0.05mm direct, 0.25mm indirect and 0.3mm total posterior contraction. These

  6. T1ρ and T2 -based characterization of regional variations in intervertebral discs to detect early degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Prachi; Talbott, Jason F; Pedoia, Valentina; Dillon, William; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-08-01

    Lower back pain is one of the main contributors to morbidity and chronic disability in the United States. Despite the significance of the problem, it is still not well understood. There is a clear need for objective, non-invasive biomarkers to localize specific pain generators and identify early stage changes to enable reliable diagnosis and treatment. In this study we focus on intervertebral disc degeneration as a source of lower back pain. Quantitative imaging markers T1ρ and T2 have been shown to be promising techniques for in vivo diagnosis of biochemical degeneration in discs due to their sensitivity to macromolecular changes in proteoglycan content and collagen integrity. We describe a semi-automated technique for quantifying T1ρ and T2 relaxation time maps in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the annulus fibrosus (AF) of the lumbar intervertebral discs. Compositional changes within the NP and AF associated with degeneration occur much earlier than the visually observable structural changes. The proposed technique rigorously quantifies these biochemical changes taking into account subtle regional variations to allow interpretation of early degenerative changes that are difficult to interpret with traditional MRI techniques and clinical subjective grading scores. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times in the NP decrease with degenerative severity in the disc. Moreover, standard deviation and texture measurements of these values show sharper and more significant changes during early degeneration compared to later degenerative stages. Our results suggest that future prospective studies should include automated T1ρ and T2 metrics as early biomarkers for disc degeneration-induced lower back pain. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1373-1381, 2016.

  7. T1ρ and T2 -based characterization of regional variations in intervertebral discs to detect early degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Prachi; Talbott, Jason F; Pedoia, Valentina; Dillon, William; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-08-01

    Lower back pain is one of the main contributors to morbidity and chronic disability in the United States. Despite the significance of the problem, it is still not well understood. There is a clear need for objective, non-invasive biomarkers to localize specific pain generators and identify early stage changes to enable reliable diagnosis and treatment. In this study we focus on intervertebral disc degeneration as a source of lower back pain. Quantitative imaging markers T1ρ and T2 have been shown to be promising techniques for in vivo diagnosis of biochemical degeneration in discs due to their sensitivity to macromolecular changes in proteoglycan content and collagen integrity. We describe a semi-automated technique for quantifying T1ρ and T2 relaxation time maps in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the annulus fibrosus (AF) of the lumbar intervertebral discs. Compositional changes within the NP and AF associated with degeneration occur much earlier than the visually observable structural changes. The proposed technique rigorously quantifies these biochemical changes taking into account subtle regional variations to allow interpretation of early degenerative changes that are difficult to interpret with traditional MRI techniques and clinical subjective grading scores. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times in the NP decrease with degenerative severity in the disc. Moreover, standard deviation and texture measurements of these values show sharper and more significant changes during early degeneration compared to later degenerative stages. Our results suggest that future prospective studies should include automated T1ρ and T2 metrics as early biomarkers for disc degeneration-induced lower back pain. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1373-1381, 2016. PMID:27227485

  8. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  9. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision.

  10. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  11. Enlivening Physics, a Local Video Disc Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how to make and use an inexpensive video disc of physics demonstrations. Discusses the background, production of the disc, subject of the disc including angular momentum, "monkey and the hunter" experiment, Doppler shift, pressure of a constant volume of gas thermometer, and wave effects, and using the disc in classroom. (YP)

  12. Disc pack cleaning table saves computer time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, J. T., Sr.

    1970-01-01

    Disc pack holding table is support frame upon which computer disc pack is loaded and protective cover released. This combination permits manual off-line cleaning of disc pack storage units at any time without shutting down the computer, and eliminates on-line disc drive unit to hold pack during cleaning.

  13. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Synonym(s): ... Publications and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration? Ataxia often occurs ...

  14. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular

  15. Imaginal Disc Transplantation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Tomonori; Paro, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Since Ephrussi and Beadle introduced imaginal disc transplantation to Drosophila research in 1936, the method played an important part towards a better understanding of disc patterning, tissue regeneration, and reprogramming phenomena like transdetermination. Despite increasing usage of high-throughput approaches towards solving biological problems this classical manual method is still in use for studying disc development in a semi-physiological context. Here we describe in detail a protocol and provide recommendations on the procedure in particular for analyzing the regenerative potential of imaginal disks. The steps consist of disc dissection and fragmentation, transplantation into the larval or adult abdomen, and the recovery of implants from the host abdomen. Additionally, we also describe how to make the special transplantation needle from a glass capillary. PMID:27659995

  16. Cells from Degenerative Intervertebral Discs Demonstrate Unfavorable Responses to Mechanical and Inflammatory Stimuli: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Coelho, J. Paulo; Vo, Nam V.; Pacek, Corey; Westrick, Edward; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical forces and inflammatory signaling influence intervertebral disc matrix homeostasis. We hypothesized that annulus fibrosus cells from degenerative discs would have altered responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli compared with cells isolated from normal discs. Design Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits with normal and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed degenerative discs created by annular stab. Cells were cultured with and without inflammatory and mechanical stimuli (tensile strain). After 4 or 24 hrs, the mRNA expression of inflammatory, catabolic, and anabolic genes was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Baseline gene expression differences were noted between cells from normal and degenerative discs. Degenerative cells demonstrated a more proinflammatory response profile to inflammatory and mechanical stimuli and loss of the beneficial effects of mechanical signaling. Decreased expression of catabolic and anabolic genes was observed in degenerative cells under conditions of inflammatory and mechanical stimuli. Conclusions These data demonstrate that degenerative cells have a decreased capacity to respond positively to beneficial levels of mechanical strain and demonstrate an exaggerated response to an inflammatory stimulus. This may, in part, help to explain differential responses to motion-based therapies in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:22760106

  17. Physicochemical properties of the aging and diabetic sand rat intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Ziv, I; Moskowitz, R W; Kraise, I; Adler, J H; Maroudas, A

    1992-03-01

    Hydration, fixed charge density, (FCD) and hydration under various osmotic pressures were compared in young, old, and young diabetic sand rats. This rat is a desert animal that may develop diabetes when fed a regular diet; it is also known to have radiographic and histologic evidence of intervertebral disc (IVD) disease. Forty-five rats and 180 IVD were used in this study; they were divided into three equal groups: young healthy, old healthy, and young diabetics. IVD, cancellous bone, and muscle were sampled from distal lumbar spines. The young diabetic rats (YD) were considerably heavier than the age-matched controls, had higher insulin and glucose levels, and all YD had cataracts. The discs of the young diabetic animals demonstrated decreased hydration, FCD and ability to resist compression under osmotic pressures as compared with the young and healthy discs and were more similar to the discs from old rats. The IVD is the most affected musculoskeletal connective tissue in sand rats with aging and diabetes. The aged and diabetic discs in the sand rat demonstrated changes similar to human changes with regard to lower hydration, FCD, and ability to resist osmotic pressure. Therefore, the sand rat may be a suitable animal model for studying the pathogenesis of disc degeneration.

  18. Delivering Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Collagen Microsphere Carriers to Rabbit Degenerative Disc: Reduced Risk of Osteophyte Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuk Yin; Diao, Hua Jia; Chik, Tze Kit; Chow, Cin Ting; An, Xiao Meng; Leung, Victor; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chi

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to treat early intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. However, during intradiscal injection, the vast majority of cells leaked out even in the presence of hydrogel carrier. Recent evidence suggests that annulus puncture is associated with cell leakage and contributes to osteophyte formation, an undesirable side effect. This suggests the significance of developing appropriate carriers for intradiscal delivery of MSCs. We previously developed a collagen microencapsulation platform, which entraps MSCs in a solid microsphere consisting of collagen nanofiber meshwork. These solid yet porous microspheres support MSC attachment, survival, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and matrix remodeling. Here we hypothesize that intradiscal injection of MSCs in collagen microspheres will outperform that of MSCs in saline in terms of better functional outcomes and reduced side effects. Specifically, we induced disc degeneration in rabbits and then intradiscally injected autologous MSCs, either packaged within collagen microspheres or directly suspended in saline, into different disc levels. Functional outcomes including hydration index and disc height were monitored regularly until 6 months. Upon sacrifice, the involved discs were harvested for histological, biochemical, and biomechanical evaluations. MSCs in collagen microspheres showed advantage over MSCs in saline in better maintaining the dynamic mechanical behavior but similar performance in hydration and disc height maintenance and matrix composition. More importantly, upon examination of gross appearance, radiograph, and histology of IVD, delivering MSCs in collagen microspheres significantly reduced the risk of osteophyte formation as compared to that in saline. This work demonstrates the significance of using cell carriers during intradiscal injection of MSCs in treating disc degeneration. PMID:24372278

  19. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  20. A self-similar solution for thermal disc winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Alexander, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    We derive a self-similar description for the 2D streamline topology and flow structure of an axisymmetric, thermally driven wind originating from a disc in which the density is a power-law function of radius. Our scale-free solution is strictly only valid in the absence of gravity or centrifugal support; comparison with 2D hydrodynamic simulations of winds from Keplerian discs however demonstrates that the scale-free solution is a good approximation also in the outer regions of such discs, and can provide a reasonable description even for launch radii well within the gravitational radius of the flow. Although other authors have considered the flow properties along streamlines whose geometry has been specified in advance, this is the first isothermal calculation in which the flow geometry and variation of flow variables along streamlines is determined self-consistently. It is found that the flow trajectory is very sensitive to the power-law index of radial density variation in the disc: the steeper the density gradient, the stronger is the curvature of streamlines close to the flow base that is required in order to maintain momentum balance perpendicular to the flow. Steeper disc density profiles are also associated with more rapid acceleration, and a faster fall-off of density, with height above the disc plane. The derivation of a set of simple governing equations for the flow structure of thermal winds from the outer regions of power-law discs offers the possibility of deriving flow observables without having to resort to hydrodynamical simulation.

  1. Lubricin Protects the Temporomandibular Joint Surfaces from Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4−/− mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4−/− mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:25188282

  2. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  3. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power. PMID:25004532

  4. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  5. The use of a novel injectable hydrogel nucleus pulposus replacement in restoring the mechanical properties of cyclically fatigued porcine intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Balkovec, Christian; Vernengo, Jennifer; McGill, Stuart M

    2013-06-01

    Repeated flexion and extension of an intervertebral disc has been shown to affect the angular stiffness of spinal motion segments and is a barometer of the mechanical integrity of the disc. A degenerated disc that loses height causes higher levels of stress on the annulus and facet joints which may increase its level of degeneration; restoring disc height may therefore help to slow this degenerative cascade. Previous research has indicated that nucleus implants have the potential to improve the mechanical characteristics of a disc and an implant that is custom-fit to the intervertebral disc yields the best results with respect to decreasing annular degeneration. Two groups of porcine spinal motion segments were exposed to repeated flexion and extension. One group was then injected with a novel hydrogel while the other group was used as a control. Both groups were then exposed to another round of cyclic flexion and extension to examine the effect that the hydrogel had on restoring the original mechanics to the motion segments. Angular stiffness was restored to the group which received the hydrogel injection in addition to a significant improvement in specimen height. No significant changes were seen in the group which did not receive an injection. It would appear that use of the novel injectable hydrogel is able to restore angular stiffness to cyclically fatigued spinal motion segments. It is also important to note that continued repetition of the event causing specimen fatigue after performing hydrogel injection will result in an eventual return to the same fatigued state.

  6. Bladed disc crack diagnostics using blade passage signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanachi, Houman; Liu, Jie; Banerjee, Avisekh; Koul, Ashok; Liang, Ming; Alavi, Elham

    2012-12-01

    One of the major potential faults in a turbo fan engine is the crack initiation and propagation in bladed discs under cyclic loads that could result in the breakdown of the engines if not detected at an early stage. Reliable fault detection techniques are therefore in demand to reduce maintenance cost and prevent catastrophic failures. Although a number of approaches have been reported in the literature, it remains very challenging to develop a reliable technique to accurately estimate the health condition of a rotating bladed disc. Correspondingly, this paper presents a novel technique for bladed disc crack detection through two sequential signal processing stages: (1) signal preprocessing that aims to eliminate the noises in the blade passage signals; (2) signal postprocessing that intends to identify the crack location. In the first stage, physics-based modeling and interpretation are established to help characterize the noises. The crack initiation can be determined based on the calculated health monitoring index derived from the sinusoidal effects. In the second stage, the crack is located through advanced detrended fluctuation analysis of the preprocessed data. The proposed technique is validated using a set of spin rig test data (i.e. tip clearance and time of arrival) that was acquired during a test conducted on a bladed military engine fan disc. The test results have demonstrated that the developed technique is an effective approach for identifying and locating the incipient crack that occurs at the root of a bladed disc.

  7. Degenerating the elliptic Schlesinger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, G. A.; Artamonov, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    We study various ways of degenerating the Schlesinger system on the elliptic curve with R marked points. We construct a limit procedure based on an infinite shift of the elliptic curve parameter and on shifts of the marked points. We show that using this procedure allows obtaining a nonautonomous Hamiltonian system describing the Toda chain with additional spin sl(N, ℂ) degrees of freedom.

  8. Apoptotic wing degeneration and formation of an altruism-regulating glandular appendage (gemma) in the ponerine ant Diacamma sp. from Japan (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae).

    PubMed

    Gotoh, A; Sameshima, S; Tsuji, K; Matsumoto, T; Miura, T

    2005-02-01

    We here show an example of morphological novelties, which have evolved from insect wings into the specific structures controlling social behaviour in an ant species. Most ant colonies consist of winged queen(s) and wingless workers. In the queenless ponerine ant Diacamma sp. from Japan, however, all female workers have a pair of small thoracic appendages, called "gemmae", which are homologous to the forewings and acts as an organ regulating altruism expression. Most workers, whose gemmae are clipped off by other colony members, become nonreproductive helpers, while only a single individual with complete gemmae becomes functionally reproductive. We examined histologically the development of gemmae, and compared it with that of functional wings in males. Female larvae had well-developed wing discs for both fore- and hindwings. At pupation, however, the wing discs started to evaginate and later degenerate. The hindwing discs completely degenerated, while the degeneration of forewing discs was incomplete, leading to the formation of gemmae. The degeneration process involved apoptotic cell death as confirmed by TUNEL assay. In addition, glandular cells differentiated from the epithelial cells of the forewing buds after completion of pupation. The mechanism of developmental transition from wing to gemma can be regarded as an evolutionary gain of new function, which can be seen in insect appendages and vertebrate limbs. PMID:15647944

  9. Light scattering of degenerate fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, S.; Leblanc, L. J.; Myrskog, S.; Extavour, M. H. T.; McKay, D.; Stummer, A.; Thywissen, J. H.

    2006-05-01

    We report on progress in measuring the suppression of resonant light scattering in a gas of degenerate fermions. A gas of trapped degenerate fermions is expected to exhibit narrower optical linewidths and longer excited state lifetimes than single atoms when the Fermi energy is larger than the photon recoil energy [1-3]. In this case, the number of available states into which a scattered atom can recoil is significantly reduced due to the filling of the Fermi sea. We produce a degenerate gas of 4x10^4 ultra-cold fermionic ^40K atoms by sympathetic cooling with bosonic ^87Rb in a micro-magnetic chip trap. The atoms can then be loaded into a tight dipole trap just above the surface of the chip and probed with a near resonance laser pulse. [1] Th. Busch, J. R. Anglin, J. I. Cirac, and P. Zoller, Europhys. Lett. 44, 1 (1998). [2] B. DeMarco and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 58, R4267 (1998). [3] J. Javanainen and J. Ruostekosky, Phys. Rev. A 52, 3033 (1995). Work supported by NSERC, CFI, OIT, Research Corporation, and PRO.

  10. Determination of the intervertebral disc space from CT images of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Å tern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc are among the most common causes of low back pain, where for individuals with significant symptoms surgery may be needed. One of the interventions is the total disc replacement surgery, where the degenerated disc is replaced by an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study we propose a method for the determination of the intervertebral disc space from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The first step of the proposed method is the construction of a model of vertebral bodies in the lumbar spine. For this purpose, a chain of five elliptical cylinders is initialized in the 3D image and then deformed to resemble vertebral bodies by introducing 25 shape parameters. The parameters are obtained by aligning the chain to the vertebral bodies in the CT image according to image intensity and appearance information. The determination of the intervertebral disc space is finally achieved by finding the planes that fit the endplates of the obtained parametric 3D models, and placing points in the space between the planes of adjacent vertebrae that enable surface reconstruction of the intervertebral disc space. The morphometric analysis of images from 20 subjects yielded 11:3 +/- 2:6, 12:1 +/- 2:4, 12:8 +/- 2:0 and 12:9 +/- 2:7 cm3 in terms of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 intervertebral disc space volume, respectively.

  11. Indications for full prosthetic disc arthroplasty: a correlation of clinical outcome against a variety of indications.

    PubMed

    Bertagnoli, Rudolf; Kumar, Selva

    2002-10-01

    In this prospective study, a total of 134 prosthetic discs were replaced in 108 patients undergoing total disc replacement surgeries for degenerative disc disease. It was the aim of this study to correlate the clinical findings and the outcome of our patients treated with Prodisc II prostheses for various indications and to formulate indication criteria for disc replacement surgeries. The discs were implanted at L5/S1 in 61 patients, L5/L6 in 3 patients, L4/L5 in 31 patients, L3/L4 in 7 patients, and L2/L3 in 3 patients. There were 12 patients with two-level implants: from L4 to S1 in 11 of them and from L2 to L5 in the remaining one. Two patients also had three-level implants, from L3 to S1. Follow-up evaluation included plain radiographs, physical evaluation, and subjective evaluation by the patient using the Oswestry scale, the visual analog pain scale, and the SF-36V2 well-being questionnaire. The evaluation exercise showed that 90.8% of patients had excellent results, 7.4% had good results and 1.8% had fair results, with no poor results seen. Postoperatively, the average vertebral motion was increased in all patients at the operated level. Progression of disc degeneration at the adjacent levels was noted in ten patients. The average time to resuming activities of daily living unaided was 2.3 weeks. No implant failures or complications due to surgery were encountered in this study. Total prosthesis disc replacement for degenerative disc disease was found to be a good treatment modality, provided proper patient selection and criteria are adhered to. We were able to formulate indication criteria based on this. PMID:12384734

  12. Effect of degeneration on the six degree of freedom mechanical properties of human lumbar spine segments.

    PubMed

    Amin, Dhara B; Sommerfeld, Dana; Lawless, Isaac M; Stanley, Richard M; Ding, Boyin; Costi, John J

    2016-08-01

    While the effects of disc degeneration on compression and rotation motions have been studied, there is no data for shear loading. Clinical research has shown that those with low back pain (a potential consequence of degeneration) experience a 75% greater lateral shear force than those without it. Therefore, the aim was to compare the effect of degeneration on spine segment stiffness and phase angle in each of six degree of freedom (6DOF) loading directions. Fourteen intact functional spinal units (FSU) were dissected from human lumbar spines (mean (SD) age 76.2 (11) years, Thompson grades 3 (N = 5, mild), 4 (N = 6, moderate), 5 (N = 3, severe)). Each FSU was tested in ±6DOFs while subjected to a physiological preload, hydration, and temperature (37°C) conditions in a hexapod robot. A one-way ANOVA between degenerated groups was performed on stiffness and phase angle for each DOF. Significant differences in stiffness were found between mild and moderate degenerative groups in lateral shear (p = 0.001), and axial rotation (p = 0.001), where moderate degeneration had decreased stiffness. For phase angle, significant differences were seen in anterior shear (p = 0.017), and axial rotation (p = 0.026), where phase angle for mild degeneration was less than moderate. Trends of stiffness and phase angle changes between degenerative groups were similar within each DOF. Clinically, the identification of the DOFs that are most affected by degeneration could be used in rehabilitation to improve supplemental stabilization of core muscle groups. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1399-1409, 2016.

  13. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar-Siguán, G.; García-Berro, E.; Lorén-Aguilar, P.; Soker, N.; Kashi, A.

    2015-07-01

    The core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae involves the merger of the hot core of an asymptotic giant branch star and a white dwarf, and might contribute a non-negligible fraction of all thermonuclear supernovae. Despite its potential interest, very few studies, and based on only crude simplifications, have been devoted to investigate this possible scenario, compared with the large efforts invested to study some other scenarios. Here we perform the first three-dimensional simulations of the merger phase, and find that this process can lead to the formation of a massive white dwarf, as required by this scenario. We consider two situations, according to the mass of the circumbinary disc formed around the system during the final stages of the common envelope phase. If the disc is massive enough, the stars merge on a highly eccentric orbit. Otherwise, the merger occurs after the circumbinary disc has been ejected and gravitational wave radiation has brought the stars close enough for the secondary to overflow its Roche lobe radius. Not surprisingly, the overall characteristics of the merger remnants are similar to those found for the double-degenerate scenario, independently of the very different core temperature and of the orbits of the merging stars. They consist of a central massive white dwarf, surrounded by a hot, rapidly rotating corona and a thick debris region.

  15. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Berner, Andre K; Kleinman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina. PMID:26427391

  16. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration.

  17. IL-1β/HMGB1 signalling promotes the inflammatory cytokines release via TLR signalling in human intervertebral disc cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and cytokines have been recognized to correlate with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration (IDD), via mediating the development of clinical signs and symptoms. However, the regulation mechanism remains unclear. We aimed at investigating the regulatory role of interleukin (IL)β and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in the inflammatory response in human IVD cells, and then explored the signalling pathways mediating such regulatory effect. Firstly, the promotion to inflammatory cytokines in IVD cells was examined with ELISA method. And then western blot and real time quantitative PCR were performed to analyse the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), receptors for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and NF-κB signalling markers in the IL-1β- or (and) HMGB1-treated IVD cells. Results demonstrated that either IL-1β or HMGB1 promoted the release of the inflammatory cytokines such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in human IVD cells. And the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-1, -3 and -9 was also additively up-regulated by IL-1β and HMGB1. We also found such additive promotion to the expression of TLR-2, TLR-4 and RAGE, and the NF-κB signalling in intervertebral disc cells. In summary, our study demonstrated that IL-1β and HMGB1 additively promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and the expression of MMPs in human IVD cells. The TLRs and RAGE and the NF-κB signalling were also additively promoted by IL-1β and HMGB1. Our study implied that the additive promotion by IL-1β and HMGB1 to inflammatory cytokines and MMPs might aggravate the progression of IDD. PMID:27512095

  18. The cellular memory disc of reprogrammed cells.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2013-04-01

    The crucial facts underlying the low efficiency of cellular reprogramming are poorly understood. Cellular reprogramming occurs in nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation, cell fusion, and lineage-switching experiments. Despite these advances, there are three fundamental problems to be addressed: (1) the majority of cells cannot be reprogrammed, (2) the efficiency of reprogramming cells is usually low, and (3) the reprogrammed cells developed from a patient's own cells activate immune responses. These shortcomings present major obstacles for using reprogramming approaches in customised cell therapy. In this Perspective, the author synthesises past and present observations in the field of cellular reprogramming to propose a theoretical picture of the cellular memory disc. The current hypothesis is that all cells undergo an endogenous and exogenous holographic memorisation such that parts of the cellular memory dramatically decrease the efficiency of reprogramming cells, act like a barrier against reprogramming in the majority of cells, and activate immune responses. Accordingly, the focus of this review is mainly to describe the cellular memory disc (CMD). Based on the present theory, cellular memory includes three parts: a reprogramming-resistance memory (RRM), a switch-promoting memory (SPM) and a culture-induced memory (CIM). The cellular memory arises genetically, epigenetically and non-genetically and affects cellular behaviours. [corrected].

  19. Towards Long Term Cultivation of Drosophila Wing Imaginal Discs In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Handke, Björn; Szabad, János; Lidsky, Peter V.; Hafen, Ernst; Lehner, Christian F.

    2014-01-01

    The wing imaginal disc of Drosophila melanogaster is a prominent experimental system for research on control of cell growth, proliferation and death, as well as on pattern formation and morphogenesis during organogenesis. The precise genetic methodology applicable in this system has facilitated conceptual advances of fundamental importance for developmental biology. Experimental accessibility and versatility would gain further if long term development of wing imaginal discs could be studied also in vitro. For example, culture systems would allow live imaging with maximal temporal and spatial resolution. However, as clearly demonstrated here, standard culture methods result in a rapid cell proliferation arrest within hours of cultivation of dissected wing imaginal discs. Analysis with established markers for cells in S- and M phase, as well as with RGB cell cycle tracker, a novel reporter transgene, revealed that in vitro cultivation interferes with cell cycle progression throughout interphase and not just exclusively during G1. Moreover, quantification of EGFP expression from an inducible transgene revealed rapid adverse effects of disc culture on basic cellular functions beyond cell cycle progression. Disc transplantation experiments confirmed that these detrimental consequences do not reflect fatal damage of imaginal discs during isolation, arguing clearly for a medium insufficiency. Alternative culture media were evaluated, including hemolymph, which surrounds imaginal discs during growth in situ. But isolated larval hemolymph was found to be even less adequate than current culture media, presumably as a result of conversion processes during hemolymph isolation or disc culture. The significance of prominent growth-regulating pathways during disc culture was analyzed, as well as effects of insulin and disc co-culture with larval tissues as potential sources of endocrine factors. Based on our analyses, we developed a culture protocol that prolongs cell

  20. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  1. Riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in intervertebral discs: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Peter; Borde, Brandon H; Towne, Sara B; Moriguchi, Yu; Hudson, Katherine D; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Härtl, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Open annular defects compromise the ability of the annulus fibrosus to contain nuclear tissue in the disc space, and therefore lead to disc herniation with subsequent degenerative changes to the entire intervertebral disc. This study reports the use of riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in a needle-punctured rat-tail model. High-density collagen has increased stiffness and greater hydraulic permeability than conventional low-density gels; riboflavin crosslinking further increases these properties. This study found that treating annular defects with crosslinked high-density collagen inhibited the progression of disc degeneration over 18 weeks compared to untreated control discs. Histological sections of FITC-labeled collagen gel revealed an early tight attachment to host annular tissue. The gel was subsequently infiltrated by host fibroblasts which remodeled it into a fibrous cap that bridged the outer disrupted annular fibers and partially repaired the defect. This repair tissue enhanced retention of nucleus pulposus tissue, maintained physiological disc hydration, and preserved hydraulic permeability, according to MRI, histological, and mechanical assessments. Degenerative changes were partially reversed in treated discs, as indicated by an increase in nucleus pulposus size and hydration between weeks 5 and 18. The collagen gel appeared to work as an instant sealant and by enhancing the intrinsic healing capabilities of the host tissue.

  2. Genetics, Pregnancy, and Aortic Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Hsieh, Cindy M; Schenning, Ryan C; Slater, Matthew S; Landry, Gregory J; Moneta, Gregory L; Mitchell, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (FTAAD) in a pregnant female. FTAAD is an inherited, nonsyndromic aortopathy resulting from several genetic mutations critical to aortic wall integrity have been identified. One such mutation is the myosin heavy chain gene (MYH11) which is responsible for 1-2% of all FTAAD cases. This mutation results in aortic medial degeneration, loss of elastin, and reticulin fiber fragmentation predisposing to TAAD. Aortic disease is more aggressive during pregnancy as a result of increased wall stress from hyperdynamic cardiovascular changes and estrogen-induced aortic media degeneration. Our patient was a 29-year-old G2P1 woman at 26 weeks gestation presenting with abdominal and back pain. Work-up revealed a 6.4-cm ascending aortic aneurysm with a type A dissection extending into all arch vessels, aortic coarctation at the isthmus, and a separate focal type B aortic dissection with visceral involvement. Surgical management included concomitant cesarean section with delivery of a live premature infant, tubal ligation, ascending aortic replacement with reconstruction of the arch vessels, and aortic valve resuspension. The type B dissection was managed medically without complication. This is the first reported case of aortic dissection in a patient with FTAAD/MYH11 mutation and pregnancy. This case highlights that FTAAD and pregnancy cause aortic degeneration via distinct mechanisms and that hyperdynamics of pregnancy increase aortic wall stress. Management of pregnancy associated with aortopathy requires early transfer to a tertiary center, careful investigation to identify familial aortopathy, fetal monitoring, and a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:26381327

  3. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  4. Degeneration of a Nonrecombining Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies suggest that sex chromosomes begin as ordinary autosomes that happen to carry a major sex determining locus. Over evolutionary time the Y chromosome is selected to stop recombining with the X chromosome, perhaps in response to accumulation of alleles beneficial to the heterogametic but harmful to the homogametic sex. Population genetic theory predicts that a nonrecombining Y chromosome should degenerate. Here this prediction is tested by application of specific selection pressures to Drosophila melanogaster populations. Results demonstrate the decay of a nonrecombining, nascent Y chromosome and the capacity for recombination to ameliorate such decay.

  5. Error Rate Reduction of Super-Resolution Near-Field Structure Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooho; Bae, Jaecheol; Hwang, Inoh; Lee, Jinkyung; Park, Hyunsoo; Chung, Chongsam; Kim, Hyunki; Park, Insik; Tominaga, Junji

    2007-06-01

    We report the error rate improvement of super-resolution near-field structure (super-RENS) write-once read-many (WORM) and read-only-memory (ROM) discs in a blue laser optical system [laser wavelength (λ), 405 nm; numerical aperture (NA), 0.85]. We prepared samples of higher carrier level WORM discs and wider pit width ROM discs. Using controlled equalization (EQ) characteristics and an adaptive write strategy and an advanced adaptive partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) technique, we obtained a bit error rate (bER) of 10-4 level. This result shows the high feasibility of super-RENS technology for practical use.

  6. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  7. Mechanical Vibrations Reduce the Intervertebral Disc Swelling and Muscle Atrophy from Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holguin, Nilsson; Muir, Jesse; Evans, Harlan J.; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Clinton; Wagshul, Mark; Judex, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Loss of functional weight bearing, such as experienced during space flight or bed rest (BR), distorts intervertebral disc (IVD) and muscle morphology. IVDs are avascular structures consisting of cells that may derive their nutrition and waste removal from the load induced fluid flow into and out of the disc. A diurnal cycle is produced by forces related to weight bearing and muscular activity, and comprised of a supine and erect posture over a 24 hr period. A diurnal cycle will include a disc volume change of approx. 10-13%. However, in space there are little or no diurnal changes because of the microgravity, which removes the gravitational load and compressive forces to the back muscles. The BR model and the etiology of the disc swelling and muscle atrophy could provide insight into those subjects confined to bed for chronic disease/injury and aging. We hypothesize that extremely low-magnitude, high frequency mechanical vibrations will abate the disc degeneration and muscle loss associated with long-term BR.

  8. The articular disc surface in different functional conditions of the human temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, C; Bernasconi, G; Reguzzoni, M; Farina, A

    1997-07-01

    The peripheral discal tissue and the surface covering layer have been studied in normal and in variously damaged human temporo-mandibular joint discs. In the normal disc the tissue consisted of dense bundles of fibers and rare fibrocytes. The surface of the disc was covered by a regular basophilic and electron-dense layer. These morphological characteristics persisted also in some pathological discs in which fibrous derangements had already occurred in the deep parts. In very deformed and damaged discs associated with serious functional anomalies, the superficial discal tissue consisted of rare fibers dispersed in a loose ground substance and of an increased number of cells. The superficial coating was formed by an irregular dense lamina and aggregates of various materials containing cellular debris, vesicles, filaments and amorphous components. These deposits are probably due to degeneration processes of discal tissue. This investigation suggests that the superficial discal tissue and the covering layer are together involved in maintaining the functional properties of the articular surfaces. Their structural modification in severe functional anomalies leads to failure in the maintenance of nonadherence conditions and to deterioration of the functional defect.

  9. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients.

  10. Signaling mechanisms regulating Wallerian degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Wallerian degeneration (WD) occurs after an axon is cut or crushed and entails the disintegration and clearance of the severed axon distal to the injury site. WD was initially thought to result from the passive wasting away of the distal axonal fragment, presumably because it lacked a nutrient supply from the cell body. The discovery of the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) mutant mouse, in which distal severed axons survive intact for weeks rather than only 1–2 days, radically changed our thoughts on the autonomy of axon survival. Wlds taught us that under some conditions the axonal compartment can survive for weeks after axotomy without a cell body. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of Wlds and current models for Wlds molecular function are reviewed herein—the mechanism(s) by which WldS spares severed axons remains unresolved. However, recent studies inspired by Wlds have led to the identification of the first “axon death” signaling molecules whose endogenous activities promote axon destruction during WD. PMID:24907513

  11. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  12. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  13. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  14. Notochordal Cells in the Adult Intervertebral Disc: New Perspective on an Old Question

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving M.

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a soft tissue, positioned between each of the vertebrae, that accommodates applied biomechanical forces to the spine. The central compartment of the disc contains the nucleus pulposus (NP), which is enclosed by the annulus fibrosus and the endplate cartilage. The NP is derived from the notochord, a rodlike structure of mesodermal origin. Development of the notochord is tightly regulated by interactive transcription factors and target genes. Since a number of these molecules are unique, they have been used for cell lineage and fate mapping studies of tissues of the intervertebral disc. These studies have shown that in a number of species including human, NP tissue retains notochordal cells throughout life. In the adult NP, there are present both large and small notochordal cells, as well as a progenitor cell population which can differentiate along the mesengenic pathway. Since tissue renewal in the intervertebral disc is dependent on the ability of these cells to commit to the NP lineage and undergo terminal differentiation, studies have been performed to assess which signaling pathways may regulate these activities. The notch signaling pathway is active in the intervertebral disc and is responsive to hypoxia, probably through HIF-1α. From a disease viewpoint, it is hypothesized that an oxemic shift, possibly mediated by alterations in the vascular supply to the tissues of the disc, would be expected to lead to a failure in notochordal progenitor cell activation and a decrease in the number of differentiated cells. In turn, this would lead to decrements in function and enhancement of the effect of agents that are known to promote disc degeneration. PMID:21967331

  15. Notochordal cells in the adult intervertebral disc: new perspective on an old question.

    PubMed

    Risbud, Makarand V; Shapiro, Irving M

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a tissue positioned between each of the vertebrae that accommodates applied biomechanical forces to the spine. The central compartment of the disc contains the nucleus pulposus (NP) which is enclosed by the annulus fibrosus and the endplate cartilage.The NP is derived from the notochord, a rod-like structure of mesodermal origin. Development of the notochord is tightly regulated by interactive transcription factors and target genes. Since a number of these molecules are unique they have be used for cell lineage and fate mapping studies of tissues of the intervertebral disc. These studies have shown that in a number of species including human, NP tissue retains notochordal cells throughout life. In the adult NP, there are present both large and small notochordal cells, as well as a progenitor cell population which can differentiate along the mesengenic pathway. Since tissue renewal in the intervertebral disc is dependent on the ability of these cells to commit to the NP lineage and undergo terminal differentiation, studies have been performed to assess which signaling pathways may regulate these activities. The notch signaling pathway is active in the intervertebral disc and is responsive to hypoxia, probably through HIF-1a. From a disease viewpoint, it is hypothesized that an oxemic shift, possibly mediated by alterations in the vascular supply to the tissues of the disc would be expected to lead to a failure in notochordal progenitor cell activation and a decrease in the number of differentiated cells. In turn, this would lead to decrements in function and enhancement of the effect of agents that are known to promote disc degeneration.

  16. Survivin is expressed in degenerated nucleus pulposus cells and is involved in proliferation and the prevention of apoptosis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    LIN, YAZHOU; YUE, BIN; XIANG, HONGFEI; LIU, YONG; MA, XUEXIAO; CHEN, BOHUA

    2016-01-01

    Survivin is a unique inhibitor of apoptosis, which is frequently present within degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Survivin has been extensively investigated using proliferation and apoptosis assays in tumor cells; however, studies conducted on survivin in degenerative NP cells remain limited to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate survivin expression and its effects on the proliferation and apoptosis of degenerated NP cells in vitro. The expression levels of survivin in the NP cells of patients (>45 years) with lumbar disc degenerative disease and the NP cells of patients (<25 years) with lumbar vertebra fracture were assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The effects on in vitro proliferation and apoptosis were investigated through transfection with a specific small interfering (si)RNA. The results of the present study demonstrated that survivin was expressed in the degenerated NP cells, but was undetectable in normal NP cells at the mRNA level. Survivin suppression following transfection with a specific survivin-siRNA reduced the proliferation rate of NP cells and enhanced sensitization to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Therefore, survivin was shown to be expressed and exhibit an important role in the proliferation and prevention of apoptosis of degenerated NP cells. Studies on survivin in NP cells may aid in increasing the understanding of the complex processes underlying NP cell degeneration, and could provide fundamental information for gene therapy to inhibit this degeneration in vitro. PMID:26648308

  17. Nerve Growth Factor Is Regulated by Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Human Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Currie, J Brooke; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Haglund, Lisbet

    2016-02-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes to the development of chronic pain associated with degenerative connective tissue pathologies, such as intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, surprisingly little is known about the regulation of NGF in these conditions. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors classically associated with innate immunity but more recently were found to be activated by endogenous alarmins such as fragmented extracellular matrix proteins found in degenerating discs or cartilage. In this study we investigated if TLR activation regulates NGF and which signaling mechanisms control this response in intervertebral discs. TLR2 agonists, TLR4 agonists, or IL-1β (control) treatment increased NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and IL-1β gene expression in human disc cells isolated from healthy, pain-free organ donors. However, only TLR2 activation or IL-1β treatment increased NGF protein secretion. TLR2 activation increased p38, ERK1/2, and p65 activity and increased p65 translocation to the cell nucleus. JNK activity was not affected by TLR2 activation. Inhibition of NF-κB, and to a lesser extent p38, but not ERK1/2 activity, blocked TLR2-driven NGF up-regulation at both the transcript and protein levels. These results provide a novel mechanism of NGF regulation in the intervertebral disc and potentially other pathogenic connective tissues. TLR2 and NF-κB signaling are known to increase cytokines and proteases, which accelerate matrix degradation. Therefore, TLR2 or NF-κB inhibition may both attenuate chronic pain and slow the degenerative progress in vivo. PMID:26668319

  18. Intervertebral disc cell response to dynamic compression is age and frequency dependent.

    PubMed

    Korecki, Casey L; Kuo, Catherine K; Tuan, Rocky S; Iatridis, James C

    2009-06-01

    The maintenance of the intervertebral disc extracellular matrix is regulated by mechanical loading, nutrition, and the accumulation of matrix proteins and cytokines that are affected by both aging and degeneration. Evidence suggests that cellular aging may lead to alterations in the quantity and quality of extracellular matrix produced. The aims of this study were to examine the role of loading and maturation (a subset of aging), and the interaction between these two factors in intervertebral disc cell gene expression and biosynthesis in a controlled 3D culture environment. Cells were isolated from young (4-6 months) and mature (18-24 months) bovine caudal annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus tissue. Isolated cells were seeded into alginate and dynamically compressed for 7 days at either 0.1, 1, or 3 Hz or maintained as a free-swelling control. After 7 days, DNA and sulfated glycosaminoglycan contents were analyzed along with real time, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis for collagen types I and II, aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene expression. Results suggest that maturation plays an important role in intervertebral disc homeostasis and influences the cell response to mechanical loading. While isolated intervertebral disc cells responded to mechanical compression in 3D culture, the effect of loading frequency was minimal. Altered cellular phenotype and biosynthesis rates appear to be an attribute of the cell maturation process, potentially independent of changes in cellular microenvironment associated with lost nutrition and disc degeneration. Mature cells may have a decreased capacity to create or retain extracellular matrix components in response to mechanical loading compared to young cells.

  19. Disruption of muscle architecture and myocardial degeneration in mice lacking desmin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Desmin, the muscle specific intermediate filament (IF) protein encoded by a single gene, is expressed in all muscle tissues. In mature striated muscle, desmin IFs surround the Z-discs, interlink them together and integrate the contractile apparatus with the sarcolemma and the nucleus. To investigate the function of desmin in all three muscle types in vivo, we generated desmin null mice through homologous recombination. Surprisingly, desmin null mice are viable and fertile. However, these mice demonstrated a multisystem disorder involving cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. Histological and electron microscopic analysis in both heart and skeletal muscle tissues revealed severe disruption of muscle architecture and degeneration. Structural abnormalities included loss of lateral alignment of myofibrils and abnormal mitochondrial organization. The consequences of these abnormalities were most severe in the heart, which exhibited progressive degeneration and necrosis of the myocardium accompanied by extensive calcification. Abnormalities of smooth muscle included hypoplasia and degeneration. The present data demonstrate the essential role of desmin in the maintenance of myofibril, myofiber, and whole muscle tissue structural and functional integrity, and show that the absence of desmin leads to muscle degeneration. PMID:8794866

  20. Gene therapy for retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Reichel, M B; Ali, R R; Hunt, D M; Bhattacharya, S S

    1997-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations are a group of diseases leading to blindness through progressive loss of vision in many patients. Although with the cloning of more and more disease genes the knowledge on the molecular genetics of these conditions and on the apoptotic pathway as the common disease mechanism is steadily increasing, there is still no cure for those affected. In recent years, new experimental treatments have evolved through the efforts of many investigators and have been explored in animal models. The rationale of the different strategies for developing a treatment based on gene replacement or rescue of the diseased neuronal tissue with growth factors will be outlined and discussed in this paper. PMID:9323717

  1. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex PT-symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  2. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex {P}{T} -symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  3. Degenerate doping of metallic anodes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A; Zeller, Robert A; Johnson, Paul B; Switzer, Elise E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the invention relate to an electrochemical cell comprising: (i) a fuel electrode comprising a metal fuel, (ii) a positive electrode, (iii) an ionically conductive medium, and (iv) a dopant; the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the metal fuel is oxidized at the fuel electrode and the dopant increases the conductivity of the metal fuel oxidation product. In an embodiment, the oxidation product comprises an oxide of the metal fuel which is doped degenerately. In an embodiment, the positive electrode is an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, wherein during discharge mode, oxygen is reduced at the air electrode. Embodiments of the invention also relate to methods of producing an electrode comprising a metal and a doped metal oxidation product.

  4. Mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Fowler, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a progressive condition that is untreatable in up to 90% of patients, is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. The two forms of AMD, wet and dry, are classified based on the presence or absence of blood vessels that have disruptively invaded the retina, respectively. A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying wet AMD has led to several robust FDA-approved therapies. In contrast, there are not any approved treatments for dry AMD. In this review, we provide insight into the critical effector pathways that mediate each form of disease. The interplay of immune and vascular systems for wet AMD, and the proliferating interest in hunting for gene variants to explain AMD pathogenesis, are placed in the context of the latest clinical and experimental data. Emerging models of dry AMD pathogenesis are presented, with a focus on DICER1 deficit and the toxic accumulation of retinal debris. A recurring theme that spans most aspects of AMD pathogenesis is defective immune modulation in the classically immune-privileged ocular haven. Interestingly, the latest advances in AMD research highlight common molecular disease pathways with other common neurodegenerations. Finally, the therapeutic potential of intervening at known mechanisms of AMD pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:22794258

  5. Photoreceptor Cells Influence Retinal Vascular Degeneration in Mouse Models of Retinal Degeneration and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Saadane, Aicha; Tonade, Deoye; Samuels, Ivy; Veenstra, Alex; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Loss of photoreceptor cells is associated with retinal vascular degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the presence of photoreceptor cells is implicated in vascular degeneration in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate how both the absence and presence of photoreceptors could damage the retinal vasculature, we compared two mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration (opsin−/− and RhoP23H/P23H ) and control C57Bl/5J mice, each with and without diabetes. Methods Retinal thickness, superoxide, expression of inflammatory proteins, ERG and optokinetic responses, leukocyte cytotoxicity, and capillary degeneration were evaluated at 1 to 10 months of age using published methods. Results Retinal photoreceptor cells degenerated completely in the opsin mutants by 2 to 4 months of age, and visual function subsided correspondingly. Retinal capillary degeneration was substantial while photoreceptors were still present, but slowed after the photoreceptors degenerated. Diabetes did not further exacerbate capillary degeneration in these models of photoreceptor degeneration, but did cause capillary degeneration in wild-type animals. Photoreceptor cells, however, did not degenerate in wild-type diabetic mice, presumably because the stress responses in these cells were less than in the opsin mutants. Retinal superoxide and leukocyte damage to retinal endothelium contributed to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes, and leukocyte-mediated damage was increased in both opsin mutants during photoreceptor cell degeneration. Conclusions Photoreceptor cells affect the integrity of the retinal microvasculature. Deterioration of retinal capillaries in opsin mutants was appreciable while photoreceptor cells were present and stressed, but was less after photoreceptors degenerated. This finding proves relevant to diabetes, where persistent stress in photoreceptors likewise contributes to capillary degeneration. PMID:27548901

  6. Degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigolin, Gustavo; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    We present details and expand on the framework leading to the recently introduced degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 170406 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.170406], and on the formulation of the degenerate adiabatic theorem, along with its necessary and sufficient conditions [given in Phys. Rev. A 85, 062111 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.062111]. We start with the adiabatic approximation for degenerate Hamiltonians that paves the way to a clear and rigorous statement of the associated degenerate adiabatic theorem, where the non-Abelian geometric phase (Wilczek-Zee phase) plays a central role to its quantitative formulation. We then describe the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory, whose zeroth-order term is the degenerate adiabatic approximation, in its full generality. The parameter in the perturbative power-series expansion of the time-dependent wave function is directly associated to the inverse of the time it takes to drive the system from its initial to its final state. With the aid of the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory we obtain rigorous necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. Finally, to illustrate the power and wide scope of the methodology, we apply the framework to a degenerate Hamiltonian, whose closed-form time-dependent wave function is derived exactly, and also to other nonexactly solvable Hamiltonians whose solutions are numerically computed.

  7. Temporal Analyses of the Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Nutrient Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Sarah A.; Wright, Karina T.; Jones, Philip N.; Balain, Birender; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed recently on the repair of degenerate discs using implanted cells, such as disc cells or bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This study examines the temporal response of bovine and human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and MSCs cultured in monolayer following exposure to altered levels of glucose (0, 3.15, and 4.5 g/L) and foetal bovine serum (0, 10, and 20%) using an automated time-lapse imaging system. NP cells were also exposed to the cell death inducers, hydrogen peroxide and staurosporine, in comparison to serum starvation. We have demonstrated that human NP cells show an initial “shock” response to reduced nutrition (glucose). However, as time progresses, NP cells supplemented with serum recover with minimal evidence of cell death. Human NP cells show no evidence of proliferation in response to nutrient supplementation, whereas MSCs showed greater response to increased nutrition. When specifically inducing NP cell death with hydrogen peroxide and staurosporine, as expected, the cell number declined. These results support the concept that implanted NP cells or MSCs may be capable of survival in the nutrient-poor environment of the degenerate human disc, which has important clinical implications for the development of IVD cell therapies. PMID:26977156

  8. Altered Knee Joint Mechanics in Simple Compression Associated with Early Cartilage Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    The progression of osteoarthritis can be accompanied by depth-dependent changes in the properties of articular cartilage. The objective of the present study was to determine the subsequent alteration in the fluid pressurization in the human knee using a three-dimensional computer model. Only a small compression in the femur-tibia direction was applied to avoid numerical difficulties. The material model for articular cartilages and menisci included fluid, fibrillar and nonfibrillar matrices as distinct constituents. The knee model consisted of distal femur, femoral cartilage, menisci, tibial cartilage, and proximal tibia. Cartilage degeneration was modeled in the high load-bearing region of the medial condyle of the femur with reduced fibrillar and nonfibrillar elastic properties and increased hydraulic permeability. Three case studies were implemented to simulate (1) the onset of cartilage degeneration from the superficial zone, (2) the progression of cartilage degeneration to the middle zone, and (3) the progression of cartilage degeneration to the deep zone. As compared with a normal knee of the same compression, reduced fluid pressurization was observed in the degenerated knee. Furthermore, faster reduction in fluid pressure was observed with the onset of cartilage degeneration in the superficial zone and progression to the middle zone, as compared to progression to the deep zone. On the other hand, cartilage degeneration in any zone would reduce the fluid pressure in all three zones. The shear strains at the cartilage-bone interface were increased when cartilage degeneration was eventually advanced to the deep zone. The present study revealed, at the joint level, altered fluid pressurization and strains with the depth-wise cartilage degeneration. The results also indicated redistribution of stresses within the tissue and relocation of the loading between the tissue matrix and fluid pressure. These results may only be qualitatively interesting due to the small

  9. The chemodynamical evolution of the Milky Way disc - A new modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Ivan; Chiappini, Cristina; Martig, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent advancements in the field of galaxy formation and evolution, fully self-consistent simulations are still unable to make the detailed predictions necessary for the planned and ongoing large spectroscopic and photometric surveys of the Milky Way disc. These difficulties arise from the very uncertain nature of sub-grid physical energy feedback within models, affecting both star formation rates and chemical enrichment. To avoid these problems, we have introduced a new approach which consists of fusing disc chemical evolution models with compatible numerical simulations. We demonstrate the power of this method by showing that a range of observational results can be explained by our new model. We show that due to radial migration from mergers at high redshift and the central bar at later times, a sizable fraction of old metal-poor, high-[α/Fe] stars can reach the solar vicinity. This naturally accounts for a number of recent observations related to both the thin and thick discs, despite the fact that we use thin-disc chemistry only. Within the framework of our model, the MW thick disc has emerged naturally from (i) stars born with high velocity dispersions at high redshift, (ii) stars migrating from the inner disc very early on due to strong merger activity, and (iii) further radial migration driven by the bar and spirals at later times. A significant fraction of old stars with thick-disc characteristics could have been born near the solar radius.

  10. [Innervation of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    García-Cosamalón, José; Fernández-Fernández, Javier; González-Martínez, Emilio; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Javier; Robla Costales, Javier; Martínez-Madrigal, Milton; López Muñíz, Alfonso; del Valle, Miguel Enrique; Vega, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently, intervertebral disc innervation was a subject of considerable debate. Nowadays, the introduction of inmunohistochemical techniques associated to specific antibodies and studies with retrograde tracers in nerves have allowed greater understanding of disc innervation in physiological and pathological conditions and also endings characteristics and their patterns of distribution in both situations. The existing controversies regarding structural basis of discogenic pain, have raised the interest of knowing the influence of innervation in back pain from discal origin and its characteristics. Today, we know that pathologic neoinnervation accompanying radial fissures is an important factor in the genesis of discogenic pain; within a complex mechanism in which other neurobiomechemical, inflammatory and biomechanical factors are involved. PMID:23582224

  11. Indications for Lumbar Total Disc Replacement: Selecting the Right Patient with the Right Indication for the Right Total Disc

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary of Background Data As with any surgery, care should be taken to determine patient selection criteria for lumbar TDR based on safety and optimizing outcome. These goals may initially be addressed by analyzing biomechanical implant function and early clinical experience, ongoing evaluation is needed to refine indications. Objective The purpose of this work was to synthesize information published on general indications for lumbar TDR. A secondary objective was to determine if indications vary for different TDR designs. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify lumbar TDR articles. Articles were reviewed and patient selection criteria and indications were synthesized. Results With respect to safety, there was good agreement in the literature to exclude patients with osteopenia/osteoporosis or fracture. Risk of injury to vascular structures due to the anterior approach was often addressed by excluding patients with previous abdominal surgery in the area of disc pathology or increased age. The literature was very consistent on the primary indication for TDR being painful disc degeneration unresponsive to at least 6 months of nonoperative care. Literature investigating the impact of previous spine surgery was mixed; however, prior surgery was not necessarily a contra-indication, provided the patient otherwise met selection criteria. The literature was mixed on setting a minimum preoperative disc height as a selection criterion. There were no publications investigating whether some patients are better/worse candidates for specific TDR designs. Based on the literature a proposal for patient selection criteria is offered. Conclusions Several TDR indications and contra-indications are widely accepted. No literature addresses particular TDR design being preferable for some patients. As with any spine surgery, ongoing evaluation of TDR outcomes will likely lead to more detailed general and device design specific indications. PMID:25694946

  12. Prevalence of Age-Related Changes in Ovine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, Jean-François; Bihin, Benoît; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Neveu, Fabienne; Clegg, Peter; Dugdale, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaoqing; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ovine models are used to study intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The objective of the current study was to assess the naturally occurring age-related changes of the IVD that can be diagnosed by CT and MRI in the lumbar spine of sheep. We used CT and T2-weighted MR images to score the IVD (L6S1 to L1L2) in 41 sheep (age, 6 mo to 11 y) that were euthanized for reasons not related to musculoskeletal disease. T2 mapping and measurement of T2 time of L6S1 to L2L3 were performed in 22 of the sheep. Degenerative changes manifested as early as 2 y of age and occurred at every IVD level. Discs were more severely damaged in older sheep. The age effect of the L6S1 IVD was larger than the average age effect for the other IVD. The current study provides evidence that lesions similar to those encountered in humans can be identified by CT and MRI in lumbar spine of sheep. Ideally, research animals should be assessed at the initiation of preclinical trials to determine the extent of prevalent degenerative changes. The ovine lumbosacral disc seems particularly prone to degeneration and might be a favorable anatomic site for studying IVD degeneration.

  13. Prevalence of Age-Related Changes in Ovine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, Jean-François; Bihin, Benoît; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Neveu, Fabienne; Clegg, Peter; Dugdale, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaoqing; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ovine models are used to study intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The objective of the current study was to assess the naturally occurring age-related changes of the IVD that can be diagnosed by CT and MRI in the lumbar spine of sheep. We used CT and T2-weighted MR images to score the IVD (L6S1 to L1L2) in 41 sheep (age, 6 mo to 11 y) that were euthanized for reasons not related to musculoskeletal disease. T2 mapping and measurement of T2 time of L6S1 to L2L3 were performed in 22 of the sheep. Degenerative changes manifested as early as 2 y of age and occurred at every IVD level. Discs were more severely damaged in older sheep. The age effect of the L6S1 IVD was larger than the average age effect for the other IVD. The current study provides evidence that lesions similar to those encountered in humans can be identified by CT and MRI in lumbar spine of sheep. Ideally, research animals should be assessed at the initiation of preclinical trials to determine the extent of prevalent degenerative changes. The ovine lumbosacral disc seems particularly prone to degeneration and might be a favorable anatomic site for studying IVD degeneration. PMID:27538861

  14. The Aerodynamics of a Flying Sports Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Jonathan R.; Crowther, William J.

    2001-11-01

    The flying sports disc is a spin-stabilised axi-symmetric wing of quite remarkable design. A typical disc has an approximate elliptical cross-section and hollowed out under-side cavity, such as the Frisbee(TM) disc. An experimental study of flying disc aerodynamics, including both spinning and non-spinning tests, has been carried out in the wind tunnel. Load measurements, pressure data and flow visualisation techniques have enabled an explanation of the flow physics and provided data for free-flight simulations. A computer simulation that predicts free-flight trajectories from a given set of initial conditions was used to investigate the dynamics of a flying disc. This includes a six-degree of freedom mathematical model of disc flight mechanics, with aerodynamic coefficients derived from experimental data. A flying sports disc generates lift through forward velocity just like a conventional wing. The lift contributed by spin is insignificant and does not provide nearly enough down force to support hover. Without spin, the disc tumbles ground-ward under the influence of an unstable aerodynamic pitching moment. From a backhand throw however, spin is naturally given to the disc. The unchanged pitching moment now results in roll, due to gyroscopic precession, stabilising the disc in free-flight.

  15. Proto-planetary disc evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Planets form from gas and dust discs in orbit around young stars. The timescale for planet formation is constrained by the lifetime of these discs. The properties of the formed planetary systems depend thus on the evolution and final dispersal of the discs, which is the main topic of this thesis. Observations reveal the existence of a class of discs called "transitional", which lack dust in their inner regions. They are thought to be the last stage before the complete disc dispersal, and hence they may provide the key to understanding the mechanisms behind disc evolution. X-ray photoevaporation and planet formation have been studied as possible physical mechanisms responsible for the final dispersal of discs. However up to now, these two phenomena have been studied separately, neglecting any possible feedback or interaction. In this thesis we have investigated what is the interplay between these two processes. We show that the presence of a giant planet in a photo-evaporating disc can significantly shorten its lifetime, by cutting the inner regions from the mass reservoir in the exterior of the disc. This mechanism produces transition discs that for a given mass accretion rate have larger holes than in models considering only X-ray photo-evaporation, constituting a possible route to the formation of accreting transition discs with large holes. These discs are found in observations and still constitute a puzzle for the theory. Inclusion of the phenomenon called "thermal sweeping", a violent instability that can destroy a whole disc in as little as 10 4 years, shows that the outer disc left can be very short-lived (depending on the X-ray luminosity of the star), possibly explaining why very few non accreting transition discs are observed. However the mechanism does not seem to be efficient enough to reconcile with observations. In this thesis we also show that X-ray photo-evaporation naturally explains the observed correlation between stellar masses and accretion

  16. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  17. Systematic review of tests to identify the disc, SIJ or facet joint as the source of low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Maher, C. G.; Latimer, J.; Spindler, M. F.; McAuley, J. H.; Laslett, M.; Bogduk, N.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines state that the tissue source of low back pain cannot be specified in the majority of patients. However, there has been no systematic review of the accuracy of diagnostic tests used to identify the source of low back pain. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to determine the diagnostic accuracy of tests available to clinicians to identify the disc, facet joint or sacroiliac joint (SIJ) as the source of low back pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched up to February 2006 with citation tracking of eligible studies. Eligible studies compared index tests with an appropriate reference test (discography, facet joint or SIJ blocks or medial branch blocks) in patients with low back pain. Positive likelihood ratios (+LR) > 2 or negative likelihood ratios (-LR) < 0.5 were considered informative. Forty-one studies of moderate quality were included; 28 investigated the disc, 8 the facet joint and 7 the SIJ. Various features observed on MRI (high intensity zone, endplate changes and disc degeneration) produced informative +LR (> 2) in the majority of studies increasing the probability of the disc being the low back pain source. However, heterogeneity of the data prevented pooling. +LR ranged from 1.5 to 5.9, 1.6 to 4.0, and 0.6 to 5.9 for high intensity zone, disc degeneration and endplate changes, respectively. Centralisation was the only clinical feature found to increase the likelihood of the disc as the source of pain: +LR = 2.8 (95%CI 1.4–5.3). Absence of degeneration on MRI was the only test found to reduce the likelihood of the disc as the source of pain: −LR = 0.21 (95%CI 0.12–0.35). While single manual tests of the SIJ were uninformative, their use in combination was informative with +LR of 3.2 (95%CI 2.3–4.4) and −LR of 0.29 (95%CI 0.12–0.35). None of the tests for facet joint pain were found to be informative. The results of this review demonstrate that tests do exist that change the probability of the

  18. Cervical and lumbar pain and radiological degeneration among fighter pilots: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman; Frilander, Heikki; Sainio, Markku; Karvala, Kirsi; Sovelius, Roope; Vehmas, Tapio; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2015-02-01

    To assess the associations of acceleration force indicators (aircraft type and flight hours) with cervical and lumbar pain and radiological degeneration among fighter pilots. The PubMed, Embase, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched until October 2013. Twenty-seven studies were included in the review and 20 in the meta-analysis. There were no differences in the prevalence of neck pain (pooled OR=1.07, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.33), cervical disc degeneration (OR=1.26, CI 0.81 to 1.96), low back pain (OR=0.80, CI 0.47 to 1.38) or lumbar disc degeneration (OR=0.87, CI 0.67 to 1.13) between fighter pilots and helicopter or transport/cargo pilots. Moreover, the prevalence of cervical (OR=1.14, CI 0.61 to 2.16) or lumbar (OR=1.05, CI 0.49 to 2.26) disc degeneration did not differ between fighter pilots and non-flying personnel. Most studies did not control their estimates for age and other potential confounders. Among high-performance aircraft pilots, exposure to the highest G-forces was associated with a higher prevalence of neck pain compared with exposure to lower G-forces (pooled OR=3.12, CI 2.08 to 4.67). The studies on the association between flight hours and neck pain reported inconsistent findings. Moreover, looking back over the shoulder (check six) was the most common posture associated with neck pain. Fighter pilots exposed to high G-forces may be at a greater risk for neck pain than those exposed to low G-forces. This finding should be confirmed with better control for confounding. Awkward neck posture may be an important factor in neck pain among fighter pilots.

  19. Degeneration of biogenic superparamagnetic magnetite.

    PubMed

    Li, Y-L; Pfiffner, S M; Dyar, M D; Vali, H; Konhauser, K; Cole, D R; Rondinone, A J; Phelps, T J

    2009-01-01

    Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 h incubation and 5-year anaerobic storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 h and 5-year crystals are 8.4164A and 8.3774A, respectively. The Mössbauer spectra indicated that the 265 h magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe(3+) (1.990)Fe(2+) (1.015)O(4)) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe(3+) (2.388)Fe(2+) (0.419)O(4)). Such crystal-chemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases (fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  20. Modified gravitational instability of degenerate and non-degenerate dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shweta; Sharma, Prerana

    2016-09-01

    The gravitational instability of strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) is studied considering degenerate and non-degenerate dusty plasma situations. The SCDP system is assumed to be composed of the electrons, ions, neutrals, and strongly coupled dust grains. First, in the high density regime, due to small interparticle distance, the electrons are considered degenerate, whereas the neutrals, dust grains, and ions are treated non-degenerate. In this case, the dynamics of inertialess electrons are managed by Fermi pressure and Bohm potential, while the inertialess ions are by only thermal pressure. Second, in the non-degenerate regime, both the electrons and ions are governed by the thermal pressure. The generalized hydrodynamic model and the normal mode analysis technique are employed to examine the low frequency waves and gravitational instability in both degenerate and non-degenerate cases. The general dispersion relation is discussed for a characteristic timescale which provides two regimes of frequency, i.e., hydrodynamic regime and kinetic regime. Analytical solutions reveal that the collisions reduce the growth rate and have a strong impact on structure formation in both degenerate and non-degenerate circumstances. Numerical estimation on the basis of observed parameters for the degenerate and non-degenerate cases is presented to show the effects of dust-neutral collisions and dust effective velocity in the presence of polarization force. The values of Jeans length and Jeans mass have been estimated for degenerate white dwarfs as Jeans length L J = 1.3 × 10 5 cm and Jeans mass M J = 0.75 × 10 - 3 M⊙ and for non-degenerate laboratory plasma Jeans length L J = 6.86 × 10 16 cm and Jeans mass M J = 0.68 × 10 10 M⊙. The stability of the SCDP system is discussed using the Routh-Hurwitz criterion.

  1. Total absorption by degenerate critical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, Jessica R. Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-06-23

    We consider a mirror-symmetric resonator with two ports. We show that, when excited from a single port, complete absorption can be achieved through critical coupling to degenerate resonances with opposite symmetry. Moreover, any time two resonances with opposite symmetry are degenerate in frequency and absorption is always significantly enhanced. In contrast, when two resonances with the same symmetry are nearly degenerate, there is no absorption enhancement. We numerically demonstrate these effects using a graphene monolayer on top of a photonic crystal slab, illuminated from a single side in the near-infrared.

  2. Horizon supertranslation and degenerate black hole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Ruan, Shan-Ming; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2016-09-01

    In this note we first review the degenerate vacua arising from the BMS symmetries. According to the discussion in [1] one can define BMS-analogous supertranslation and superrotation for spacetime with black hole in Gaussian null coordinates. In the leading and subleading orders of near horizon approximation, the infinitely degenerate black hole solutions are derived by considering Einstein equations with or without cosmological constant, and they are related to each other by the diffeomorphism generated by horizon supertranslation. Higher order results and degenerate Rindler horizon solutions also are given in appendices.

  3. Cartilage degeneration at symptomatic persistent olecranon physis in adolescent baseball players.

    PubMed

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elbow overuse injuries are common in adolescent baseball players, but symptomatic persistent olecranon physis is rare, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Purpose. To examine the histopathological and imaging findings of advanced persistent olecranon physis. Methods. The olecranon physes of 2 baseball pitchers, aged 14 and 15 years, were examined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical specimens were examined histologically. Results. T2-weighted MRI revealed alterations in the intrachondral signal intensity possibly related to collagen degeneration and increased free water content. Histological findings of specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin showed complete disorganization of the cartilage structure, hypocellularity, chondrocyte cluster formation, and moderately reduced staining. All these findings are hallmarks of osteoarthritis and are suggestive of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion. Growth plate degeneration was evident in advanced cases of symptomatic persistent olecranon physis. These findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of this disease.

  4. Cartilage Degeneration at Symptomatic Persistent Olecranon Physis in Adolescent Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elbow overuse injuries are common in adolescent baseball players, but symptomatic persistent olecranon physis is rare, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Purpose. To examine the histopathological and imaging findings of advanced persistent olecranon physis. Methods. The olecranon physes of 2 baseball pitchers, aged 14 and 15 years, were examined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical specimens were examined histologically. Results. T2-weighted MRI revealed alterations in the intrachondral signal intensity possibly related to collagen degeneration and increased free water content. Histological findings of specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin showed complete disorganization of the cartilage structure, hypocellularity, chondrocyte cluster formation, and moderately reduced staining. All these findings are hallmarks of osteoarthritis and are suggestive of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion. Growth plate degeneration was evident in advanced cases of symptomatic persistent olecranon physis. These findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25580304

  5. Disc wear and entrapment in a Starr-Edwards mitral caged-disc valve.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Fukunaga, Shuji; Arinaga, Koichi

    2011-07-01

    A case of wear and entrapment of a polyethylene disc observed in a Starr-Edwards (SE) mitral caged-disc valve at 37 years after implantation is reported. A 66-year-old woman who had undergone mitral valve replacement with a SE disc valve 37 years previously was admitted to the authors' hospital. Cinefluoroscopy showed the polyethylene disc of the SE valve to have impinged against a calcified mass on the left ventricular posterior wall, causing a tipping motion of the disc during opening. The valve was successfully replaced at surgery. A macroscopic examination of the excised valve revealed wear of the polyethylene disc at sites where the disc abutted the cage struts, and where it impinged on the calcified mass. The long-term durability of the SE caged-disc valves has been favorable; however, when implanted for over 20 years, they should be carefully followed up.

  6. [Progress and challenges in tissue engineering of intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pinghui; Guo, Qianping; Ling, Feng; Qian, Zhonglai; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a leading cause of low back pain, which severely affects the quality of life and incurs significant medical cost. Annulus fibrosus(AF) injuries can lead to substantial deterioration of intervertebral disc degeneration. However, the AF repair/regeneration remains a challenge due to the intrinsic cellular, biochemical and biomechanical heterogeneity of AF tissue. Tissue engineering would be a promising approach for AF regeneration. This article aims to provide a brief overview of the fundamental aspects of AF, the current achievements and future challenges of AF tissue engineering. A multidisciplinary approach is proposed for future studies to fully mimic the native AF tissue and its microenvironment, including choosing adequate cell source, preparing scaffolds with hierarchical microstructures, supplementing appropriate growth factors, and enforcing suitable mechanical stimulation. Hopefully, the engineered AF tissues would be effectively used to facilitate the treatment of DDD in the future. PMID:27273986

  7. Comparison of two methods for RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Gan, M F; Yang, H L; Qian, J L; Wu, C S; Yuan, C X; Li, X F; Zou, J

    2016-01-01

    RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs has been extensively used in orthopedic studies. We compared two methods for extracting RNA from the nucleus pulposus: liquid nitrogen grinding and enzyme digestion. The RNA was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, and the purity was evaluated by absorbance ratio using a spectrophotometer. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) expression was assayed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Thirty human lumbar intervertebral discs were used in this study. The liquid nitrogen-grinding method was used for RNA extraction from 15 samples, and the mean RNA concentration was 491.04 ± 44.16 ng/mL. The enzyme digestion method was used on 15 samples, and the mean RNA concentration was 898.42 ± 38.64 ng/mL. The statistical analysis revealed that there was a significant difference in concentration between the different methods. Apparent 28S, 18S, and 5S bands were detectable in RNA extracted using the enzyme digestion method, whereas no 28S or 18S bands were detected in RNA extracted using the liquid nitrogen-grinding method. The GAPDH band was visible, and no non-specific band was detected in the RT-PCR assay by the enzyme digestion method. Therefore, the enzyme digestion method is an efficient and easy method for RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs for further intervertebral disc degeneration-related studies. PMID:27323116

  8. Effects of Repeated +Gz Exposure on Cervical Intervertebral Disc in Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-chun; Sun, Xi-qing; Cao, Xin-sheng

    2008-06-01

    Background This study was to explore the cumulative effect of exposure to +Gz on intervertebral disc in rabbits. Method 25 rabbits were randomly divided into 5 groups: control, +6Gz/1d, +6Gz/2wk, +6Gz/4wk and +6Gz/6wk group. Lateral Cervical Radiographies of each rabbit were studied with self-control method. Pathological changes of the cervical vertebrae were observed by light microscope after staining with hematoxylin-eosin. Results The X-ray films revealed that there were no changes of cervical vertebrae in rabbits of control, +6Gz/1d and 2wks group, while significant degenerative changes of intervertebral discs were observed in rabbits suffered to 4wks and 6wks of +6Gz exposure(P<0.01). Fissure and irregular arrangement were found in fibrous ring of intervertebral disc by histological examination in rabbits of 2wks, 4wks and 6wks of +6Gz exposure. Shrinking of nucleus pulposus and proliferation of cartilage cells occurred in rabbits suffered to 6 wks of +6Gz exposure. Conclusion Repeated +6Gz exposure for 4wks and 6wks may induce degeneration of intervertebral disc in rabbits.

  9. On the evolution of the protolunar disc.

    PubMed

    Ward, William R

    2014-09-13

    The structure and viscous evolution of a post-impact, protolunar disc is examined. The equations for a silicate disc in two-phase (vapour-liquid) equilibrium are employed to derive an analytical solution to vertical structure. Both a vertically mixed phase disc and a stratified disc, where a magma layer exists in the mid-plane surrounded by a vapour reservoir, are considered. The former largely reproduces the low gas mass fraction, x≪1, profiles of the disc described in earlier literature that proposed that the disc would hover on the brink of gravitational instability. In the latter, the vapour layer has x∼1 and is generally gravitationally stable, while the magma layer is vigorously unstable. The viscous evolution of the stratified model is then explored. Initially, the disc quickly settles to a quasi-steady state with a vapour reservoir containing the majority of the disc mass. The magma layer viscously spreads on a time scale of approximately 3-4 years, during which vapour continuously condenses into droplets that settle to the mid-plane, maintaining the magma surface density in spite of disc spreading. Material flowing inwards is accreted by the Earth; material flowing outwards past the Roche boundary can become incorporated into accreting moonlets. This evolution persists until the vapour reservoir is depleted in approximately 50-100 years, depending on its initial mass. PMID:25114314

  10. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  11. Accretion Discs Show Their True Colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Quasars are the brilliant cores of remote galaxies, at the hearts of which lie supermassive black holes that can generate enough power to outshine the Sun a trillion times. These mighty power sources are fuelled by interstellar gas, thought to be sucked into the hole from a surrounding 'accretion disc'. A paper in this week's issue of the journal Nature, partly based on observations collected with ESO's Very Large Telescope, verifies a long-standing prediction about the intensely luminous radiation emitted by these accretion discs. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 21/08 Uncovering the inner disc "Astronomers were puzzled by the fact that the best models of these discs couldn't quite be reconciled with some of the observations, in particular, with the fact that these discs did not appear as blue as they should be," explains lead-author Makoto Kishimoto. Such a discrepancy could be the signal that there was something very wrong with the models. With his colleagues, he investigated this discrepancy by studying the polarised light from six quasars. This enabled them to demonstrate that the disc spectrum is as blue as predicted. "The crucial observational difficulty here has been that the disc is surrounded by a much larger torus containing hot dust, whose light partly outshines that of the disc," says Kishimoto. "Because the light coming from the disc is scattered in the disc vicinity and thus polarised, by observing only polarised light from the quasars, one can uncover the buried light from the disc." In a similar way that a fisherman would wear polarised sunglasses to help get rid of the glare from the water surface and allow him to see more clearly under the water, the filter on the telescope allowed the astronomers to see beyond surrounding clouds of dust and gas to the blue colour of the disc in infrared light. The observations were done with the FORS and ISAAC instruments on one of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in the Atacama

  12. [The three-dimensional culture of adult mesenchymal stem cells for intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ganjun; Liu, Hao; Deng, Li; Chen, Xiaohe; Zhao, Xianfeng; Liang, Tao; Li, Xiuqiong

    2009-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain. As current clinical treatments are aimed at restoring biomechanical function and providing symptomatic relief, the methods focused on biological repair have aroused interest and several tissue engineering approaches using different cell types have been proposed. Owing to the unsuitable nature of degenerate cells for tissue engineering, attention has been given to the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this connection, we have made a study on the characteristics of MSCs derived from adult bone marrow and on the feasibility of constructing IVD tissue-engineering cell under a Three-Dimensional Pellet Culture System. The human bone marrow MSCs were isolated and purified with density gradient solution and attachment-independent culture system. MSCs isolated using this method are a homogeneous population as indicated by morphology and other criteria. They have the capacity for self-renewal and proliferation, and the multilineage potential to differentiate.

  13. Optic Disc - Fovea Distance, Axial Length and Parapapillary Zones. The Beijing Eye Study 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Rahul Arvo; Wang, Ya Xing; Yang, Hua; Li, Jian Jun; Xu, Liang; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Jonas, Jost Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To measure the distance between the optic disc center and the fovea (DFD) and to assess its associations. Methods The population-based cross-sectional Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals aged 50+ years. The DFD was measured on fundus photographs. Results Readable fundus photographs were available for 2836 (81.8%) individuals. Mean DFD was 4.76 ± 0.34mm (median: 4.74 mm; range: 3.76–6.53mm). In multivariate analysis, longer DFD was associated with longer axial length (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient beta: 0.62), higher prevalence of axially high myopia (P<0.001; beta:0.06), shallower anterior chamber depth (P<0.001; beta:-0.18), thinner lens thickness (P = 0.004; beta: -0.06), smaller optic disc-fovea angle (P = 0.02; beta: -0.04), larger parapapillary alpha zone (P = 0.008; beta: 0.05), larger parapapillary beta/gamma zone (P<0.001; beta: 0.11), larger optic disc area (P<0.001; beta: 0.08), lower degree of cortical cataract (P = 0.002; beta: -0.08), and lower prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (P = 0.001; beta: -0.06). Bruch´s membrane opening-fovea distance (DFD minus disc radius minus parapapillary beta/gamma zone width) in non-glaucomatous eyes was not significantly (P = 0.60) related with axial length in emmetropic or axially myopic eyes (axial length ≥23.5 mm), while it increased significantly (P<0.001; r: 0.32) with longer axial length in eyes with an axial length of <23.5mm. Ratio of mean DFD to disc diameter was 2.65 ± 0.30. If the ratio of disc-fovea distance to disc diameter was considered constant and if the individual disc diameter was calculated as the individual disc-fovea distance divided by the constant factor of 2.65, the resulting calculated disc diameter differed from the directly measured disc diameter by 0.16 ±0.13 mm (median: 0.13 mm, range: 0.00–0.89 mm) or 8.9 ± 7.3% (median: 7.4%; range: 0.00–70%) of the measured disc diameter. Conclusions DFD (mean: 4.76mm) increases with longer

  14. Effect of cartilage endplate on cell based disc regeneration: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongren; Cisewski, Sarah; Sachs, Barton L; Yao, Hai

    2013-06-01

    This study examines the effects of cartilage endplate (CEP) calcification and the injection of intervertebral disc (IVD) cells on the nutrition distributions inside the human IVD under physiological loading conditions using multiphasic finite element modeling. The human disc was modeled as an inhomogeneous mixture consisting of a charged elastic solid, water, ions (Na+ and Cl-), and nutrient solute (oxygen, glucose and lactate) phases. The effect of the endplate calcification was simulated by a reduction of the tissue porosity (i.e., water volume faction) from 0.60 to 0.48. The effect of cell injection was simulated by increasing the cell density in the nucleus pulposus (NP) region by 50%, 100%, and 150%. Strain-dependent transport properties (e.g., hydraulic permeability and solute diffusivities) were considered to couple the solute transport and the mechanical loading. The simulation results showed that nutrient solute distribution inside the disc is maintained at a stable state during the day and night. The physiological diurnal cyclic loading does not change the nutrient environment in the human IVD. The cartilage endplate plays a significant role in the nutrient supply to human IVD. Calcification of the cartilage endplate significantly reduces the nutrient levels in human IVD. Therefore, in cell based therapy for IVD regeneration, the increased nutrient demand as a result of cell injection needs to be addressed. Excessive numbers of injected cells may cause further deterioration of the nutrient environment in the degenerated disc. This study is important for understanding the pathology of IVD degeneration and providing new insights into cell based therapies for low back pain. PMID:24015481

  15. Neural remodeling in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Strettoi, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Mammalian retinal degenerations initiated by gene defects in rods, cones or the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) often trigger loss of the sensory retina, effectively leaving the neural retina deafferented. The neural retina responds to this challenge by remodeling, first by subtle changes in neuronal structure and later by large-scale reorganization. Retinal degenerations in the mammalian retina generally progress through three phases. Phase 1 initiates with expression of a primary insult, followed by phase 2 photoreceptor death that ablates the sensory retina via initial photoreceptor stress, phenotype deconstruction, irreversible stress and cell death, including bystander effects or loss of trophic support. The loss of cones heralds phase 3: a protracted period of global remodeling of the remnant neural retina. Remodeling resembles the responses of many CNS assemblies to deafferentation or trauma, and includes neuronal cell death, neuronal and glial migration, elaboration of new neurites and synapses, rewiring of retinal circuits, glial hypertrophy and the evolution of a fibrotic glial seal that isolates the remnant neural retina from the surviving RPE and choroid. In early phase 2, stressed photoreceptors sprout anomalous neurites that often reach the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. As death of rods and cones progresses, bipolar and horizontal cells are deafferented and retract most of their dendrites. Horizontal cells develop anomalous axonal processes and dendritic stalks that enter the inner plexiform layer. Dendrite truncation in rod bipolar cells is accompanied by revision of their macromolecular phenotype, including the loss of functioning mGluR6 transduction. After ablation of the sensory retina, Müller cells increase intermediate filament synthesis, forming a dense fibrotic layer in the remnant subretinal space. This layer invests the remnant retina and seals it from access via the choroidal route. Evidence of bipolar cell death begins in

  16. Form and function of the intervertebral disc in health and disease: a morphological and stain comparison study.

    PubMed

    Walter, B A; Torre, O M; Laudier, D; Naidich, T P; Hecht, A C; Iatridis, J C

    2015-12-01

    Multiple histologic measurements are commonly used to assess degenerative changes in intervertebral disc (IVD) structure; however, there is no consensus on which stains offer the clearest visualization of specific areas within the IVD. The objective of this study was to compare multiple tinctorial stains, evaluate their ability to highlight structural features within the IVD, and investigate how they influence the capacity to implement a degeneration scoring system. Lumbar IVDs from seven human autopsy specimens were stained using six commonly used stains (Hematoxylin/Eosin, Toluidine Blue, Safranin-O/Fast Green, Extended FAST, modified Gomori's Trichrome, and Picrosirius Red Alcian Blue). All IVDs were evaluated by three separate graders to independently determine which stains (i) were most effective at discerning different structural features within different regions of the IVDs and (ii) allowed for the most reproducible assessment of degeneration grade, as assessed via the Rutges histological scoring system (Rutges et al. A validated new histological classification for intervertebral disc degeneration. Osteoarthritis Cartilage, 21, 2039-47). Although Trichrome, XFAST and PR/AB stains were all effective at highlighting different regions of whole IVDs, we recommend the use of PR/AB because it had the highest degree of rater agreement on assigned degeneration grade, allowed greater resolution of degeneration grade, has an inferential relationship between color and composition, and allowed clear differentiation of the different regions and structural disruptions within the IVD. The use of a standard set of stains together with a histological grading scheme can aid in the characterization of structural changes in different regions of the IVD and may simplify comparisons across the field. This collection of human IVD histological images highlights how IVD degeneration is not a single disease but a composite of multiple processes such as aging, injury, repair, and

  17. Degenerate Quasicrystal of Hard Triangular Bipyramids Stabilized by Entropic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    The assembly of hard polyhedra into novel ordered structures has recently received much attention. Here we focus on triangular bipyramids (TBPs)- i.e. dimers of hard tetrahedra- which pack densely in a simple triclinic crystal with two particles per unit cell [1]. This packing is referred to as the TBP crystal. We show that hard TBPs do not form this densest packing in simulation. Instead, they assemble into a different, far more complicated structure, a dodecagonal quasicrystal, which, in the level of monomers, is identical to the quasicrystal recently discovered in the hard tetrahedron system [2], but the way that tetrahedra pair into TBPs in the nearest neighbor network is random, making it the first degenerate quasicrystal reported in the literature [3]. This notion of degeneracy is in the level of decorating individual tiles and is different from the degeneracy of a quasiperiodic random tiling arising from phason flips [4]. The (3.4.3^2.4) approximant of the quasicrystal is shown to be more stable than the TBP crystal at densities below 79.7%.[4pt] [1] Chen ER, Engel M, Sharon SC, Disc. Comp. Geom. 44:253 (2010).[0pt] [2] Haji-Akbari A, Engel M, et al. Nature 462:773 (2009).[0pt] [3] Haji-Akbari A, Engel M, Glotzer SC, arXiv:1106.5561 [PRL, in press].[0pt] [4] Elser V, PRL 54: 1730 (1985)

  18. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun Kun

    2015-11-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  19. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  20. [Cystic degeneration of autonomous adenomas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Galvan, G; Pohl, G B

    1976-01-01

    Follow-up examinations in four patients with autonomous adenomas showed cystic degeneration in the autonomous adenomas 20 to 45 months after the first examination, confirmed by fine needle biopsy. Clinical improvement occurred three times with scintigraphic compensation, decompensation occurred once without clinical deterioration. In particular cases a therapeutic policy of wait and see is justified in patients with autonomous adenomas because they may remain clinically inconspicuous for a long time; on the other hand there is a possibility of a cystic degeneration.

  1. Hybrid Strategy of Two-Level Cervical Artificial Disc and Intervertebral Cage

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tzu-Tsao; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This numerical study aimed to evaluate tissue and implant responses to the hybrid surgery (HS) of cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Four hybrid strategies of two-level C-ADR and ACDF were compared in terms of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and implant failure. The rotary C-ADR and semirigid ACDF have been extensively used in the multilevel treatment of cervical instability and degeneration, but the constrained mobility at the ACDF segments can induce postoperative ASD problems. Hybrid surgery of C-ADR and ACDF has been an alternative to provide the optimal tradeoff between surgical cost and ASD problems. The biomechanical effects of hybrid strategies warrant thorough investigation for the two-level instrumentation. Based on computed tomography imaging, a nonlinear C2–C7 model was developed and validated by cadaveric and numerical data. Four strategies of inserting the C-ADR and ACDF into the C4–C6 segments were systematically arranged as PP (2 peek cages), AA (2 artificial discs), PA, and AP. The biomechanical behavior of these 4 strategies was evaluated in terms of motion and stresses of discs, facet forces, stresses of C-ADR and ACDF, and C-ADR motion. The constrained mobility of the ACDF segment worsened the kinematic and mechanical demands of the adjacent segments and artificial discs. The C-ADR articulation provided higher mobility than the replaced disc of the intact construct, making it an effective buffer to accommodate the compensated mobility and load from the ACDF segment. Consequently, the ASD progression of the AA construct was most restricted, followed by the PA, AP, and PP construct. The PA strategy is a tradeoff to preserve mobility and reduce cost. The C-ADR of the PA construct preserves the mobility of the C5/C6 segment and shares the transferred motion and loads of the fused C4/C5 segment. The PA construct shows optimal biomechanical results for minimizing ASD and

  2. Acid-sensing ion channel 2 (asic 2) and trkb interrelationships within the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Antonio; Viña, Eliseo; Cabo, Roberto; Vázquez, Gorka; Cobo, Ramón; García-Suárez, Olivia; García-Cosamalón, José; Vega, José A

    2015-01-01

    The cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD) have an unusual acidic and hyperosmotic microenvironment. They express acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), gated by extracellular protons and mechanical forces, as well as neurotrophins and their signalling receptors. In the nervous tissues some neurotrophins regulate the expression of ASICs. The expression of ASIC2 and TrkB in human normal and degenerated IVD was assessed using quantitative-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we investigated immunohistochemically the expression of ASIC2 in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. ASIC2 and TrkB mRNAs were found in normal human IVD and both increased significantly in degenerated IVD. ASIC2 and TrkB proteins were also found co-localized in a variable percentage of cells, being significantly higher in degenerated IVD than in controls. The murine IVD displayed ASIC2 immunoreactivity which was absent in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. Present results demonstrate the occurrence of ASIC2 and TrkB in the human IVD, and the increased expression of both in pathological IVD suggest their involvement in IVD degeneration. These data also suggest that TrkB-ligands might be involved in the regulation of ASIC2 expression, and therefore in mechanisms by which the IVD cells accommodate to low pH and hypertonicity. PMID:26617738

  3. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Protect Intervertebral Disc Cells in Compression: Implications for Stem Cell Regenerative Disc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen; Luo, Beier; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Liu, Zhongyang; Gao, Bo; Huang, Liangliang; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal biomechanics plays a role in intervertebral disc degeneration. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) have been implicated in disc integrity; however, their role in the setting of mechanical stimuli upon the disc's nucleus pulposus (NP) remains unknown. As such, the present study aimed to evaluate the influence of ADSCs upon NP cells in compressive load culture. Methods: Human NP cells were cultured in compressive load at 3.0MPa for 48 hours with or without ADSCs co-culture (the ratio was 50:50). We used flow cytometry, live/dead staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate cell death, and determined the expression of specific apoptotic pathways by characterizing the expression of activated caspases-3, -8 and -9. We further used real-time (RT-) PCR and immunostaining to determine the expression of the extracellular matrix (ECM), mediators of matrix degradation (e.g. MMPs, TIMPs and ADAMTSs), pro-inflammatory factors and NP cell phenotype markers. Results: ADSCs inhibited human NP cell apoptosis via suppression of activated caspase-9 and caspase-3. Furthermore, ADSCs protected NP cells from the degradative effects of compressive load by significantly up-regulating the expression of ECM genes (SOX9, COL2A1 and ACAN), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) genes (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) protein expression. Alternatively, ADSCs showed protective effect by inhibiting compressive load mediated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; MMP-3 and MMP-13), disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs; ADAMTS-1 and 5), and pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1beta, IL-6, TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha). Conclusions: Our study is the first in vitro study assessing the impact of ADSCs on NP cells in an un-physiological mechanical stimulation culture environment. Our study noted that ADSCs protect compressive load induced NP cell death and degradation by inhibition of activated caspase-9 and -3

  4. Role of RDS and Rhodopsin in Cngb1-Related Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Dibyendu; Conley, Shannon M.; Pittler, Steven J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rod photoreceptor outer segment (OS) morphogenesis, structural integrity, and proper signal transduction rely on critical proteins found in the different OS membrane domains (e.g., plasma, disc, and disc rim membrane). Among these key elements are retinal degeneration slow (RDS, also known as peripherin-2), rhodopsin, and the beta subunit of the cyclic nucleotide gated channel (CNGB1a), which have been found to interact in a complex. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential interplay between these three proteins by examining retinal disease phenotypes in animal models expressing varying amounts of CNGB1a, rhodopsin, and RDS. Methods Outer segment trafficking, retinal function, and photoreceptor structure were evaluated using knockout mouse lines. Results Eliminating Cngb1 and reducing RDS leads to additive defects in RDS expression levels and rod electroretinogram (ERG) function, (e.g., Cngb1−/−/rds+/− versus rds+/− or Cngb1−/−) but not to additive defects in rod ultrastructure. These additive effects also manifested in cone function: Photopic ERG responses were significantly lower in the Cngb1−/−/rds+/− versus rds+/− or Cngb1−/−, suggesting that eliminating Cngb1 can accelerate the cone degeneration that usually presents later in the rds+/−. This was not the case with rhodopsin; reducing rhodopsin levels in concert with eliminating CNGB1a did not lead to phenotypes more severe than those observed in the Cngb1 knockout alone. Conclusions These data support a role for RDS as the core component of a multiprotein plasma membrane-rim-disc complex that has both a structural role in photoreceptor OS formation and maintenance and a functional role in orienting proteins for optimal signal transduction. PMID:26934134

  5. The formation of discs in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul C.

    2010-11-01

    We review the properties of the discs that form around ‘sink particles’ in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of cluster formation, similar to those of Bate et al. (2003) and Bonnell et al. (2004), and compare them to the observed properties of discs in nearby star-forming regions. Contrary to previous suggestions, discs can form and survive in such an environment, despite the chaotic effects of competitive accretion. We find the discs are typically massive, with ratios of disc mass to central object mass of around 0.1, or higher, being typical. Naturally, the evolution of these discs is dominated by gravitational torques, and the more massive examples exhibit strong m=2 spiral modes. We also find that they can continuously grow over a period of 100,000 years, provided the central object is a single sink particle and the local density of sink particles is low. Discs that form around sink particles in the very centres of clusters tend to be shorter lived, but a single star can lose and gain a disc several times during the main accretion phase. However due to the nature of the turbulence in the cluster, the disc orientation can change dramatically over this time period, since disc-sink systems can accrete from counter-rotating envelopes. Since the competitive accretion process brings in material from large distances, the associated angular momentum can be higher than one would expect for an isolated star formation model. As such, we find that the discs are typically several hundred of AUs in extent, with the largest keplerian structures having radii of ~ 2000AU.

  6. Use NASA GES DISC Data in ArcGIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wenli; Pham, Long B.; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes GIS relevant data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), GES DISC Services and Support for GIS Users, and use cases of GES DISC data in ArcGIS.

  7. Foraminal deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in the thoracic spine: possible relationship with disc herniation and implications for surgical planning. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Sergio; Ciappetta, Pasquale; Guiducci, Antonio; Principi, Massimo; Missori, Paolo; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The authors report two cases of nodular calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition close to the thoracic neural foramen, which caused chronic radiculopathy. Preoperatively, the lesions were interpreted as calcified disc herniations. Both patients underwent surgery in which an extended transfacet pedicle-sparing approach was used. Incision of the posterior longitudinal ligament released soft degenerated material. In both cases, histological examination showed abundant degenerative debris along with CPPD crystals. Spinal CPPD deposition is a comparatively rare disease that almost invariably involves the posterior aspect of the spinal canal, typically the ligamentum flavum. The exceptional foraminal location of the lesions reported here, combined with the surgical findings, indicated that the CPPD crystals were deposited on a laterally herniated disc fragment. A distinctive feature in both cases was the soft consistency of the resected tissue. The consistency of the disc material and the location of the lesion in the axial plane (that is, median compared with lateral) are key factors in determining the optimal surgical approach to thoracic disc herniations. In describing consistency, terms such as "calcified" and "hard" have been used interchangeably in the literature. In the cases reported here, what appeared on computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies to be densely calcified lesions were shown intraoperatively to be soft herniations. The authors' experience underscores that not all densely calcified herniated discs are hard. Although detection of this discrepancy would have left surgical planning for the lateral disc herniations unchanged, it could have altered planning for centrally or centrolaterally located disc herniations.

  8. Changes in disc herniation after CT-guided Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD): MR findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brat, Hugues G.; Bouziane, Tarik; Lambert, Jean; Divano, Luisa

    2004-09-01

    The aim of Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus. Clinical efficacy of this technique is largely proven. However, time-evolution of intervertebral disc and its hernia after PLDD is not known. This study analyses changes in disc herniation and its native intervertebral disc at a mean follow-up of 7.5 months after PLDD in asymptomatic patients. Main observations at MRI are appearance of a high signal on T2WI in the hernia in 59%, shrinking of the hernia in 66% and overall stability of disc height.

  9. Mid- to Long-Term Outcomes of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Disc Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Eight Prospective Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Lv, Guohua; Ren, Siying; Johansen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the mid- to long-term outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of 1-level or 2-level symptomatic cervical disc disease. Methods Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched to identify relevant randomized controlled trials that reported mid- to long-term outcomes (at least 48 months) of CDA versus ACDF. All data were analyzed by Review Manager 5.3 software. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for dichotomous variables. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95%CIs were calculated for continuous variables. A random effect model was used for heterogeneous data; otherwise, a fixed effect model was used. Results Eight prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were retrieved in this meta-analysis, including 1317 and 1051 patients in CDA and ACDF groups, respectively. Patients after an ACDF had a significantly lower rate of follow-up than that after CDA. Pooled analysis showed patients in CDA group achieved significantly higher rates of overall success, Neck Disability Index (NDI) success, neurological success and significantly lower rates of implant/surgery-related serious adverse events and secondary procedure compared with that in ACDF group. The long-term functional outcomes (NDI, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) neck and arm pain scores, the Short Form 36 Health Survey physical component score (SF-36 PCS)), patient satisfaction and recommendation, and the incidence of superior adjacent segment degeneration also favored patients in CDA group with statistical difference. Regarding inferior adjacent segment degeneration, patients in CDA group had a lower rate without statistical significance. Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that cervical disc arthroplasty was superior over anterior discectomy and fusion for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease in

  10. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  11. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  12. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  13. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  15. D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental Rupture Disc

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-03

    The common relief and rupture disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel rupture disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum rupture value for the second disc must be less than the minimum rupture value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.

  16. The inner cavity of the circumnuclear disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, M.; Morris, M. R.; Frank, A.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Duschl, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    The circumnuclear disc (CND) orbiting the Galaxy's central black hole is a reservoir of material that can ultimately provide energy through accretion, or form stars in the presence of the black hole, as evidenced by the stellar cluster that is presently located at the CND's centre. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study of the dynamics of the CND. The results lead us to question two paradigms that are prevalent in previous research on the Galactic Centre. The first is that the disc's inner cavity is maintained by the interaction of the central stellar cluster's strong winds with the disc's inner rim, and secondly, that the presence of unstable clumps in the disc implies that the CND is a transient feature. Our simulations show that, in the absence of a magnetic field, the interaction of the wind with the inner disc rim actually leads to a filling of the inner cavity within a few orbital time-scales, contrary to previous expectations. However, including the effects of magnetic fields stabilizes the inner disc rim against rapid inward migration. Furthermore, this interaction causes instabilities that continuously create clumps that are individually unstable against tidal shearing. Thus the occurrence of such unstable clumps does not necessarily mean that the disc is itself a transient phenomenon. The next steps in this investigation are to explore the effect of the magnetorotational instability on the disc evolution and to test whether the results presented here persist for longer time-scales than those considered here.

  17. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Owen, James E.

    2016-04-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ˜50 au implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called `thermal sweeping' mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scalelengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. This less efficient clearing of discs by X-ray driven thermal sweeping leaves open the issue of what mechanism (e.g. far-ultraviolet heating) can clear gas from the outer disc sufficiently quickly to explain the non-detection of cold gas around weak line T Tauri stars.

  18. Dependence of optic disc parameters on disc area according to Heidelberg Retina Tomograph: Part II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhin, V.; Manaenkova, G.; Bondarenko, O.

    2007-05-01

    With the help of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT-II) optic disc parameters in 211 eyes of 115 healthy patients with refraction Em +/- 3,0 D and 96 eyes of 72 patients with myopia 3,5-14,0 D without any signs of glaucoma were studied. Analysis of optic disc parameters were carried out in 5 groups of patients according to disc area: less than 1,5 mm2, 1,5- 2,5 mm2, 2,5-3,0 mm2, 3,0-3,5 mm2 and more than 3,5 mm2. An accurate depending on disc area was revealed for all optic disc parameters in all sectors, which was manifested by increasing cup disc and rim disc (area and volume) and other parameters. We consider it is necessary to use the proper tables for right interpretation of received data for early diagnosis of glaucoma.

  19. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  20. About detection of precessing circumpulsar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, Catia

    2016-08-01

    Detections of circumpulsar discs and planetary systems through electromagnetic observations appear quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24 and B0656+14, the hypothesis of a precessing disc penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio and gamma observations from these stars. Disc self-occultation and precession may affect electromagnetic measurements. We investigate here under which conditions gravitational waves generated by circumpulsar disc precession may be detected by the proposed second-generation space interferometers DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing discs are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar system. Speculations on detection rates are presented.

  1. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  2. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  3. Effect of Long-Term Osmotic Loading Culture on Matrix Synthesis from Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Isabella B.; Carapezza, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a highly hydrated tissue that acts to absorb and distribute large complex loads placed on the spine. Diurnal loading and disc degeneration causes significant changes in water volume and proteoglycan content, which alters the internal osmotic environment. Short-term osmotic loading alters disc cell gene expression; however, the long-term effect of osmotic loading on disc cell matrix synthesis is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-term osmotic loading on matrix turnover and proliferation by juvenile and adult cells from the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the cartilaginous endplate (EP). Matrix synthesis was evaluated using pellets and a 3D agarose system, which has been used for developing engineered tissues. Intervertebral discs were acquired from juvenile and adult cows. Cells were acquired through enzymatic digestion and expanded in culture. Pellets were formed through centrifugation, and constructs were created by encapsulating cells within 2% w/v agarose hydrogel. Pellets and constructs were cultured up to 42 days in chemically defined medium with the osmolality adjusted to 300, 400, or 500 mOsm/kg. EP cells were evaluated as a chondrocyte comparison to chondrocyte-like NP cells. Pellet and agarose cultures of juvenile NP and EP cells demonstrated similarities with respect to cell proliferation and functional mechanical properties. Cell proliferation decreased significantly with increased osmotic loading. The final compressive Young's modulus of juvenile NP cells was 10–40× greater than initial properties (i.e., day 0) and was greater than the final Young's modulus of adult NP and juvenile EP constructs. In juvenile NP constructs, there were no significant differences in GAG content with respect to osmotic loading. However, GAG synthesis and mechanical properties were greatest for the 400 mOsm/kg group in adult NP constructs. Taken together, the results presented here suggest a

  4. Evaluation of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Biochemical and Mechanical Properties of Trypsin-Treated Intervertebral Discs Under Physiological Compression Loading

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Demers, Caroline N.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Beaudoin, Gilles; Goswami, Tapas; Beckman, Lorne; Iatridis, James C.; Antoniou, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of targeted trypsin digestion and 16 hours compression loading on MR parameters and the mechanical and biochemical properties of bovine disc segments. Materials and Methods Twenty-two 3-disc bovine coccygeal segments underwent compression loading for 16 hours after the nucleus pulposus (NP) of each disc was injected with a solution of trypsin or buffer. The properties of the NP and annulus fibrosus (AF) tissues of each disc were analyzed by quantitative MRI, biochemical tests, and confined compression tests. Results Loading had a significant effect on the MR properties (T1, T2, T1ρ, MTR, ADC) of both the NP and AF tissues. Loading had a greater effect on the MR parameters and biochemical composition of the NP than trypsin. In contrast, trypsin had a larger effect on the mechanical properties. Our data also indicated that localized trypsin injection predominantly affected the NP. T1ρ was sensitive to loading and correlated with the water content of the NP and AF but not with their proteoglycan content. Conclusion Our studies indicate that physiological loading is an important parameter to consider and that T1ρ contributes new information in efforts to develop quantitative MRI as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to detect changes in early disc degeneration. PMID:18219615

  5. The role of thermodynamics in disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatellos, Dimitris; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamics play an important role in determining the way a protostellar disc fragments to form planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We explore the effect that different treatments of radiative transfer have in simulations of fragmenting discs. Three prescriptions for the radiative transfer are used: (i) the diffusion approximation of Stamatellos et al.; (ii) the barotropic equation of state (EOS) of Goodwin et al. and (iii) the barotropic EOS of Bate et al. The barotropic approximations capture the general evolution of the density and temperature at the centre of each proto-fragment but (i) they do not make any adjustments for particular circumstances of a proto-fragment forming in the disc and (ii) they do not take into account thermal inertia effects that are important for fast-forming proto-fragments in the outer disc region. As a result, the number of fragments formed in the disc and their properties are different, when a barotropic EOS is used. This is important not only for disc studies but also for simulations of collapsing turbulent clouds, as in many cases in such simulations stars form with discs that subsequently fragment. We also examine the difference in the way proto-fragments condense out in the disc at different distances from the central star using the diffusion approximation and following the collapse of each proto-fragment until the formation of the second core (ρ ~= 10-3gcm-3). We find that proto-fragments forming closer to the central star tend to form earlier and evolve faster from the first to the second core than proto-fragments forming in the outer disc region. The former have a large pool of material in the inner disc region that they can accrete from and grow in mass. The latter accrete more slowly and they are hotter because they generally form in a quick abrupt event.

  6. Prospectives for Gene Therapy of Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  7. Interactive Visualization of a Thin Disc around a Schwarzschild Black Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Thomas; Frauendiener, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    In a first course in general relativity, the Schwarzschild spacetime is the most discussed analytic solution to Einstein's field equations. Unfortunately, there is rarely enough time to study the optical consequences of the bending of light for some advanced examples. In this paper, we present how the visual appearance of a thin disc around a…

  8. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shiori; Funato, Shingo; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy. PMID:25421501

  9. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shiori; Funato, Shingo; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy.

  10. FoxC2 Enhances BMP7-Mediated Anabolism in Nucleus Pulposus Cells of the Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Fu, Changfeng; Chen, Yong; Xu, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Qu, Zhigang; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is a growth factor that plays a major role in mediating anabolism and anti-catabolism of the intervertebral disc matrix and cell homeostasis. In osteoblasts, Forkhead box protein C2 (FoxC2) is a downstream target of BMPs and promotes cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role FoxC2 may play in degenerative human intervertebral disc tissue and the relationship between FoxC2 and BMP-7 in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells remain to be elucidated. This study aims to investigate the presence and signaling mechanisms of FoxC2 in degenerative human intervertebral disc tissue and NP cells. Western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were used to measure FoxC2 expression in the NP tissue and cells. Transfections were carried out to measure the effect of FoxC2 on BMP-7-mediated extracellular matrix upregulation. Adenoviral knock-down of Smad1 was performed to investigate the mechanism of BMP-7-induced FoxC2 expression. In degenerative NP tissue, FoxC2 was markedly upregulated and positively correlated with increased disc degeneration. Induction of NP cell proliferation was confirmed by using cell counting kit-8 assay, immunocytochemistry and real-time qRT-PCR for Ki67. FoxC2 led to decreased noggin expression and increased Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. During combined treatment with BMP-7, FoxC2 greatly potentiated anabolism through synergistic mechanisms on ECM formation. Combination therapy using BMP-7 and FoxC2 may be beneficial to the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:26824865

  11. FoxC2 Enhances BMP7-Mediated Anabolism in Nucleus Pulposus Cells of the Intervertebral Disc.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Fu, Changfeng; Chen, Yong; Xu, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Qu, Zhigang; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is a growth factor that plays a major role in mediating anabolism and anti-catabolism of the intervertebral disc matrix and cell homeostasis. In osteoblasts, Forkhead box protein C2 (FoxC2) is a downstream target of BMPs and promotes cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role FoxC2 may play in degenerative human intervertebral disc tissue and the relationship between FoxC2 and BMP-7 in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells remain to be elucidated. This study aims to investigate the presence and signaling mechanisms of FoxC2 in degenerative human intervertebral disc tissue and NP cells. Western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were used to measure FoxC2 expression in the NP tissue and cells. Transfections were carried out to measure the effect of FoxC2 on BMP-7-mediated extracellular matrix upregulation. Adenoviral knock-down of Smad1 was performed to investigate the mechanism of BMP-7-induced FoxC2 expression. In degenerative NP tissue, FoxC2 was markedly upregulated and positively correlated with increased disc degeneration. Induction of NP cell proliferation was confirmed by using cell counting kit-8 assay, immunocytochemistry and real-time qRT-PCR for Ki67. FoxC2 led to decreased noggin expression and increased Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. During combined treatment with BMP-7, FoxC2 greatly potentiated anabolism through synergistic mechanisms on ECM formation. Combination therapy using BMP-7 and FoxC2 may be beneficial to the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:26824865

  12. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    PubMed Central

    Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  13. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level.

    PubMed

    Hakan, Tayfun; Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  14. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness. PMID:23684651

  15. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging.

    PubMed

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-12-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging's basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs.

  16. Cordycepin inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory and matrix degradation in the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Lu; Han, Xiuguo; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin is a component of the extract obtained from Cordyceps militaris and has many biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-metastatic and anti-inflammatory effects. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a degenerative disease that is closely related to the inflammation of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. The effect of cordycepin on NP cells in relation to inflammation and degeneration has not yet been studied. In our study, we used a rat NP cell culture and an intervertebral disc (IVD) organ culture model to examine the inhibitory effects of cordycepin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression and the production of matrix degradation enzymes (MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5) and oxidative stress-associated factors (nitric oxide and PGE2). We found a protective effect of cordycepin on NP cells and IVDs against LPS-induced matrix degradation and macrophage infiltration. In addition, western blot and luciferase assay results demonstrated that pretreatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, the results of our research suggest that cordycepin could exert anti-inflammatory and anti-degenerative effects on NP cells and IVDs by inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Therefore, cordycepin may be a potential treatment for IDD in the future. PMID:27190710

  17. Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering Using a Novel Hyaluronic Acid–Nanofibrous Scaffold (HANFS) Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Nesti, Leon J.; Li, Wan-Ju; Shanti, Rabie M.; Jiang, Yi Jen; Jackson, Wesley; Freedman, Brett A.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Giuliani, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) represents a significant musculoskeletal disease burden. Although spinal fusion has some efficacy in pain management, spine biomechanics is ultimately compromised. In addition, there is inherent limitation of hardware-based IVD replacement prostheses, which underscores the importance of biological approaches to disc repair. In this study, we have seeded multipotent, adult human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into a novel biomaterial amalgam to develop a biphasic construct that consisted of electrospun, biodegradable nanofibrous scaffold (NFS) enveloping a hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel center. The seeded MSCs were induced to undergo chondrogenesis in vitro in the presence of transforming growth factor-β for up to 28 days. The cartilaginous hyaluronic acid–nanofibrous scaffold (HANFS) construct architecturally resembled a native IVD, with an outer annulus fibrosus–like region and inner nucleus pulposus–like region. Histological and biochemical analyses, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression profiling revealed the time-dependent development of chondrocytic phenotype of the seeded cells. The cells also maintain the microarchitecture of a native IVD. Taken together, these findings suggest the prototypic potential of MSC-seeded HANFS constructs for the tissue engineering of biological replacements of degenerated IVD. PMID:18707229

  18. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging’s basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs. PMID:26807369

  19. Cordycepin inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory and matrix degradation in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Kang; Mao, Lu; Han, Xiuguo; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Changqing; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin is a component of the extract obtained from Cordyceps militaris and has many biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-metastatic and anti-inflammatory effects. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a degenerative disease that is closely related to the inflammation of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. The effect of cordycepin on NP cells in relation to inflammation and degeneration has not yet been studied. In our study, we used a rat NP cell culture and an intervertebral disc (IVD) organ culture model to examine the inhibitory effects of cordycepin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression and the production of matrix degradation enzymes (MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5) and oxidative stress-associated factors (nitric oxide and PGE2). We found a protective effect of cordycepin on NP cells and IVDs against LPS-induced matrix degradation and macrophage infiltration. In addition, western blot and luciferase assay results demonstrated that pretreatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, the results of our research suggest that cordycepin could exert anti-inflammatory and anti-degenerative effects on NP cells and IVDs by inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Therefore, cordycepin may be a potential treatment for IDD in the future. PMID:27190710

  20. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  1. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  2. Potential Outcome Factors in Subacute Combined Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Olavo M; Poehm, Erika H; McCarter, Robert J; Campbell, William W; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Subacute combined degeneration is an acquired myelopathy caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. Therapy with B12 leads to improvement in most but to complete recovery in only a few patients. Prognostic indicators in subacute combined degeneration are unknown; therefore, predicting complete recovery of neurologic deficits is challenging. PURPOSE To identify potential correlates of outcome and to generate hypotheses concerning predictors of complete resolution of neurologic deficits in subacute combined degeneration. DATA SOURCE We searched EMBASE (1974 to October 2005), MEDLINE (1968 to October 2005), and references from identified reports. REPORTS SELECTION Reports of patients with subacute combined degeneration containing results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and description of outcome and 1 patient treated by the authors. DATA EXTRACTION, SYNTHESIS We extracted data from 45 reports and 57 patients (36 males, 21 females; age range: 10 to 81) with a diagnosis of subacute combined degeneration, and estimated the strength of association between clinical, laboratory, and radiological factors and complete resolution of signs and symptoms. RESULTS Eight patients (14%) achieved clinical resolution and 49 (86%) improved with B12 therapy. The absence of sensory dermatomal deficit, Romberg, and Babinski signs were associated with a higher complete resolution rate. Patients with MRI lesions in ≤7 segments and age less than 50 also appear to have higher rates of complete resolution. CONCLUSIONS B12 therapy is reported to stop progression and improve neurologic deficits in most patients with subacute combined degeneration. However, complete resolution only occurs in a small percentage of patients and appears to be associated with factors suggestive of less severe disease at the time of diagnosis. PMID:16970556

  3. Chemical separation of disc components using RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojno, Jennifer; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; McMillan, Paul; Matijevič, Gal; Binney, James; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Boeche, Corrado; Just, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Siebert, Arnaud; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K.; Zwitter, Tomaž; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Navarro, Julio F.; Parker, Quentin A.; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred

    2016-10-01

    We present evidence from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of chemically separated, kinematically distinct disc components in the solar neighbourhood. We apply probabilistic chemical selection criteria to separate our sample into α-low (`thin disc') and α-high (`thick disc') sequences. Using newly derived distances, which will be utilized in the upcoming RAVE DR5, we explore the kinematic trends as a function of metallicity for each of the disc components. For our α-low disc, we find a negative trend in the mean rotational velocity (Vφ) as a function of iron abundance ([Fe/H]). We measure a positive gradient ∂Vφ/∂[Fe/H] for the α-high disc, consistent with results from high-resolution surveys. We also find differences between the α-low and α-high discs in all three components of velocity dispersion. We discuss the implications of an α-low, metal-rich population originating from the inner Galaxy, where the orbits of these stars have been significantly altered by radial mixing mechanisms in order to bring them into the solar neighbourhood. The probabilistic separation we propose can be extended to other data sets for which the accuracy in [α/Fe] is not sufficient to disentangle the chemical disc components a priori. For such data sets which will also have significant overlap with Gaia DR1, we can therefore make full use of the improved parallax and proper motion data as it becomes available to investigate kinematic trends in these chemical disc components.

  4. Phase diagram of degenerate exciton systems.

    PubMed

    Lai, C W; Zoch, J; Gossard, A C; Chemla, D S

    2004-01-23

    Degenerate exciton systems have been produced in quasi-two-dimensional confined areas in semiconductor coupled quantum well structures. We observed contractions of clouds containing tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micron)2 near 10 kelvin. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were determined by measuring photoluminescence as a function of temperature and laser excitation and were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct the phase diagram of the exciton system, which demonstrates the existence of distinct phases. Understanding the formation mechanisms of these degenerate exciton systems can open new opportunities for the realization of Bose-Einstein condensation in the solid state.

  5. Visual system degeneration induced by blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Petras, J M; Bauman, R A; Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    The effect of blast overpressure on visual system pathology was studied in 14 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 360-432 g. Blast overpressure was simulated using a compressed-air driven shock tube, with the aim of studying a range of overpressures causing sublethal injury. Neither control (unexposed) rats nor rats exposed to 83 kiloPascals (kPa) overpressure showed evidence of visual system pathology. Neurological injury to brain visual pathways was observed in male rats surviving blast overpressure exposures of 104-110 kPa and 129-173 kPa. Optic nerve fiber degeneration was ipsilateral to the blast pressure wave. The optic chiasm contained small numbers of degenerated fibers. Optic tract fiber degeneration was present bilaterally, but was predominantly ipsilateral. Optic tract fiber degeneration was followed to nuclear groups at the level of the midbrain, midbrain-diencephalic junction, and the thalamus where degenerated fibers arborized among the neurons of: (i) the superior colliculus, (ii) pretectal region, and (iii) the lateral geniculate body. The superior colliculus contained fiber degeneration localized principally to two superficial layers (i) the stratum opticum (layer III) and (ii) stratum cinereum (layer II). The pretectal area contained degenerated fibers which were widespread in (i) the nucleus of the optic tract, (ii) olivary pretectal nucleus, (iii) anterior pretectal nucleus, and (iv) the posterior pretectal nucleus. Degenerated fibers in the lateral geniculate body were not universally distributed. They appeared to arborize among neurons of the dorsal and ventral nuclei: the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (parvocellular and magnocellular parts); and the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. The axonopathy observed in the central visual pathways and nuclei of the rat brain are consistent with the presence of blast overpressure induced injury to the retina. The orbital cavities of the human skull contain frontally-directed eyeballs for binocular

  6. Pathogenesis of tendinopathies: inflammation or degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Gravare-Silbernagel, Karin; Siljeholm, Carl; Di Iorio, Angelo; De Amicis, Daniele; Salini, Vincenzo; Werner, Suzanne; Paganelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic pathogenetic mechanisms of tendinopathies are largely unknown and whether inflammation or degeneration has the prominent role is still a matter of debate. Assuming that there is a continuum from physiology to pathology, overuse may be considered as the initial disease factor; in this context, microruptures of tendon fibers occur and several molecules are expressed, some of which promote the healing process, while others, including inflammatory cytokines, act as disease mediators. Neural in-growth that accompanies the neovessels explains the occurrence of pain and triggers neurogenic-mediated inflammation. It is conceivable that inflammation and degeneration are not mutually exclusive, but work together in the pathogenesis of tendinopathies. PMID:19591655

  7. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  8. [Degenerated papillomatosis of the bile duct].

    PubMed

    De Castro Gutiérrez, J; Armengol Carrasco, M; Oller Sales, B; Fdez-Llamazares Rodríguez, J; Julián Ibáñez, J F; Broggi Trías, M A; Salvá Lacombe, J A

    1989-07-01

    Papillomatosis of the biliary ducts is exceptional. It is defined by the presence of multiple, benign, papillary type, epithelial tumors on the choledochus and hepatic ducts, and can also effect the gallbladder and intrahepatic bile ducts. It courses with a tendency to recurrence and secondary degeneration, and its prognosis is uncertain and sometimes grave. The treatment is surgical and depends on the extension of the lesions, often being only palliative. The techniques of choice are curettage and biliodigestive derivation. A case is presented of degenerated papillomatosis treated by cephalic duodenopancreatectomy and cholecystectomy.

  9. Up-regulation of niacinamide in intervertebral disc aggrecan in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoqian; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Liu, Xin; Zhan, Zirui; Duan, Deyu

    2006-01-01

    The regulatory effects of niacinamide (Nia) on intervertebral disc (IVD) aggrecan in vitro was investigated. Chiba's 10 ng/mL interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced rabbit IVD degeneration model in vitro was established. 0.5, 0.25 and 0.05 mg/mL Nia was added to normal and degenerated IVDs for intervention. On the first and second week after intervention, safranin O-fast green staining intensity and glycosaminoglycan (GS) content were measured. The expression of aggrecan core protein was detected by RT-PCR. The results showed: (1) After treatment with 0.5 mg/mL Nia for one week, the GS content in nucleus pulposus (NP) was increased by 44.8% as compared with control group (P < 0 01); The GS content in IL-1 induction groups was increased with the increase of Nia concentrations: After treatment with 0.5 mg/mL for one week, the GS content in NP was increased by 68.3% as compared with control group (P < 0.01). After two weeks, GS content in NP and fibrous rings was still higher than in control group at the same period (P < 0.01) and untreated group (P < 0.01). (2) Safranin O-fast green staining revealed that with the increase of Nia concentrations, staining density in NP and fibrous rings was increased and histological structure damage to IVDs by IL-1beta was alleviated. (3) RT-PCR showed that the expression of core protein gene in IL-1beta-induced degenerated IVDS was increased with the increase of Nia concentrations. It was concluded that under conditions in vitro, Nia could up-regulate the expression of aggrecan in IVDs and protect IVDs from IL-1beta-induced degeneration at least partially, which offers a potential choice for IVD degeneration clinical therapy.

  10. A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card.

    PubMed

    Finneson, B E

    1978-06-01

    A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card or questionnaire has been developed to assess potential candidates for excision of a herniated lumbar disc who have not previously undergone lumbar spine surgery. It is not designed to encompass patients who are being considered for other types of lumbar spine surgery, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. In an effort to make the "score card" usable by almost all physicians who are involved in lumbar disc surgery, only studies which have broad acceptance and are generally employed are included. Studies which have less widespread use such as electromyogram, discogram, venogram, special psychologic studies (MMPI, pain drawings) have been purposely excluded.

  11. DISC1 genetics, biology and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    THOMSON, Pippa A.; MALAVASI, Elise L.V.; GRÜNEWALD, Ellen; SOARES, Dinesh C.; BORKOWSKA, Malgorzata; MILLAR, J. Kirsty

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are highly heritable, and in many individuals likely arise from the combined effects of genes and the environment. A substantial body of evidence points towards DISC1 being one of the genes that influence risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and functional studies of DISC1 consequently have the potential to reveal much about the pathways that lead to major mental illness. Here, we review the evidence that DISC1 influences disease risk through effects upon multiple critical pathways in the developing and adult brain. PMID:23550053

  12. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  13. Reliable chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging of human lumbar intervertebral discs using reduced-field-of-view turbo spin echo at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Jin, Ning; Fan, Zhaoyang; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Tawackoli, Wafa; Pelled, Gadi; Bae, Hyun; Gazit, Dan; Li, Debiao

    2013-12-01

    The reduced field-of-view (rFOV) turbo-spin-echo (TSE) technique, which effectively suppresses bowel movement artifacts, is developed for the purpose of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of the intervertebral disc (IVD) in vivo. Attempts to quantify IVD CEST signals in a clinical setting require high reliability and accuracy, which is often compromised in the conventionally used technique. The proposed rFOV TSE CEST method demonstrated significantly superior reproducibility when compared with the conventional technique on healthy volunteers, implying it is a more reliable measurement. Phantom study revealed a linear relation between CEST signal and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration. The feasibility of detecting IVD degeneration was demonstrated on a healthy volunteer, indicating that the proposed method is a promising tool to quantify disc degeneration.

  14. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Rate of Caspase-3 positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 3.4%, 4.2%, 17.6% and 10.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Type II collagen staining demonstrated that lamellar structure and continuity of collagen in treatment group was better reversed than in the degeneration group. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of type II collagen in treatment group was significantly stronger than that in type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). It was concluded that niacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  15. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  16. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  17. When degenerate stars collide: Understanding A New Explosion Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Joshua

    2007-07-01

    Explosive events seen at extragalactic distances mark the end-state of violent and catastrophic physical processes. Most supernovae and gamma-ray bursts {GRBs}, in particular, are thought to herald the death of massive stars and the birth of solar-mass black holes. A minority fraction of GRBs, however, have been circumstantially associated with the merger of degenerate systems {such as black holes and neutron stars}. These short-duration bursts are rare and difficult to localize, with only about 2 dozen studied to any degree of detail to date. We believe that we have finally discovered, in the last few days, one of the tell-tale signatures of degenerate merger products -- a "mini-supernova" from the non-relativistic ejecta left over after merger. If true, this long-theorized phenomenon would be an entirely new sort of explosion in the universe. In several rapidly executed visits, HST, coupled with a recently approved Chandra DD proposal to search for underlying afterglow, could make a substantial contribution to our understanding of this phenomena by honing the physical parameters of the event and helping to rule out alternatives. If we are correct in our hypothesis, we have found the first clear cut observational signature in the electromagnetic spectrum of what are expected to the be the dominant sources of gravitational waves for advanced LIGO.

  18. Proteoglycan components of the intervertebral disc and cartilage endplate: an immunolocalization study of animal and human tissues.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Caterson, B; Evans, H; Eisenstein, S M

    1994-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been used to study the presence and distribution of various components of the proteoglycan molecule in the intervertebral disc and cartilage endplate. Link protein, hyaluronic acid binding region, keratan sulphate and chondroitin 4- and 6-sulphate have been investigated in tissues from humans and other mammals. Exposure of the carbohydrate and protein epitopes was enhanced by chondroitinase and trypsin pretreatment respectively. The degree of immunoreactivity varied with location, being greater in the nucleus pulposus than the annulus fibrosus with least reactivity in the cartilage endplate. In addition, there was increased staining in the pericellular domains, particularly in adult tissues. Areas of ectopic calcification exhibited very different immunoreactivity, depending on the type of calcium salt present. Calcium hydroxyapatite deposits showed greater staining for 8A4 (link protein), while calcium pyrophosphate deposits demonstrated greater staining for 3B3(-), 7D4(-) and 3D5 than the surrounding non-calcified matrix. Staining for chondroitin sulphate isomer epitopes 3B3(-) and 7D4(-), indicative of modified chondroitin sulphate chains, was greater in human tissues of degenerate than non-degenerate appearance. This suggests that expression of these epitopes may be an indicator of disease and subsequent reparative procedures in intervertebral disc and cartilage endplate, similar to that seen in articular cartilage degeneration.

  19. Archival-grade optical disc design and international standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toru; Kojyo, Shinichi; Endo, Akihisa; Kodaira, Takuo; Mori, Fumi; Shimizu, Atsuo

    2015-09-01

    Optical discs currently on the market exhibit large variations in life span among discs, making them unsuitable for certain business applications. To assess and potentially mitigate this problem, we performed accelerated degradation testing under standard ISO conditions, determined the probable disc failure mechanisms, and identified the essential criteria necessary for a stable disc composition. With these criteria as necessary conditions, we analyzed the physical and chemical changes that occur in the disc components, on the basis of which we determined technological measures to reduce these degradation processes. By applying these measures to disc fabrication, we were able to develop highly stable optical discs.

  20. Accelerated and widespread neuronal loss occurs in motor neuron degeneration (mnd) mice expressing a neurofilament-disrupting transgene.

    PubMed

    Plummer, J; Peterson, A; Messer, A

    1995-12-01

    To examine the effects of multiple stressors on the onset and specificity of a neurodegenerative disease, we derived mnd/mnd mice expressing a neurofilament-H/lacZ transgene. The mnd mutation causes adult-onset motor dysfunction, and produces abnormal ubiquitous accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment, with retinal degeneration and late-onset motor neuron degeneration. The neurofilament H-beta-galactosidase fusion protein causes endogenous neurofilament subunits to precipitate in perikarya, but shows neither significant neuronal degeneration nor behavioral changes until advanced age. In mnd/mnd-transgenic animals, neurological symptoms, lipopigment accumulation, and motor neuron loss were substantially accelerated. Newly vulnerable populations of neurons also degenerated, including cerebellar Purkinje cells and dorsal roots. This study exemplifies a synergistic interaction between a neuron-specific and a ubiquitous defect, leading to significant neurological consequences. It further indicates that cytoskeletal abnormalities similar to those observed in late-onset human neurodegenerative disorders can interact with other cellular defects and contribute to pathogenesis.

  1. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompressio