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Sample records for advanced disease patients

  1. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  2. Sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Close, John M; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-06-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis.

  3. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment.

  4. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD.

  5. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences.

  6. Advances in sickle cell disease treatment: from drug discovery until the patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Lanaro, Carolina; Chin, Chung Man

    2011-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most prevalent hematological diseases in the world. Despite the immense progress in molecular knowledge about SCD in last years few therapeutical sources are currently available. Nowadays the treatment is performed mainly with drugs such as hydroxyurea or other fetal hemoglobin inducers and chelating agents. This review summarizes current knowledge about the treatment and the advancements in drug design in order to discover more effective and safe drugs. Patient monitoring methods in SCD are also discussed.

  7. ATYPICAL MACULOPATHY IN A PATIENT WITH LIGHT CHAIN DEPOSITION DISEASE MIMICKING ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Oshry, Lauren J.; Reichel, Elias

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a previously unreported presentation of advanced geographic atrophy of the macula mimicking nonneovascular (dry) age-related macular degeneration in a patient with light chain deposition disease. Methods: Ocular examination included dilated fundus examination, fundus autofluorescence, full-field electroretinography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Patients: Single-patient case report. Results: Dilated fundus examination demonstrated diffuse loss of the retinal pigment epithelium in a geographic atrophy pattern in the macula and drusenlike deposits localized to the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium. There were no signs of choroidal neovascularization or retinal pigment epithelium detachments. Fundus autofluorescence demonstrated wide areas of retinal pigment epithelium loss. Full-field electroretinography was normal. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography displayed atrophy of the outer retinal layers. Discussion: This is the first documented case of drusenlike deposits and maculopathy in a patient with light chain deposition disease that mimics advanced geographic atrophy that is typically observed in nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration. Physicians should be aware of the macular changes that can be associated with light chain deposition disease, and patients with light chain deposition disease should be regularly evaluated for associated macular disease. PMID:26934302

  8. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients.

  9. Low vitamin D status is associated with advanced liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Shi, Chang-E; Hu, Kai-Feng; Zhou, Ju; Xu, De-Xiang; Chen, Xi

    2017-02-01

    Several studies explored the association between vitamin D status and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with contradictory results. We aimed to investigate the association between vitamin D status, inflammatory cytokines and liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Two hundred nineteen nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients and 166 age- and gender- matched healthy controls were recruited for this study. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum interleukin-8 and transforming growth factor-β1 were measured using ELISA. Serum 25(OH)D was only marginally decreased in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Interestingly, serum 25(OH)D was markedly reduced in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced liver fibrosis compared to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with indeterminate liver fibrosis and no advanced fibrosis. Logistic regression analysis showed that there was an inverse association between serum 25(OH)D and severity of liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Further analysis showed that serum interleukin-8 was elevated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients, the highest interleukin-8 in patients with advanced fibrosis. An inverse correlation between serum 25(OH)D and interleukin-8 was observed in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with and without liver fibrosis. Although serum transforming growth factor-β1 was slightly elevated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients, serum transforming growth factor-β1 was reduced in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced fibrosis. Unexpectedly, a positive correlation between serum 25(OH)D and transforming growth factor-β1 was observed in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced fibrosis. In conclusion, low vitamin D status is associated with advanced liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Interleukin-8 may be an important mediator for hepatic fibrosis in nonalcoholic

  10. Recent advances in managing chronic HCV infection: focus on therapy in patients with severe liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Raoel; van der Meer, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection still represents a major public health problem, as it is thought to be responsible for more than 350,000 deaths around the globe on a yearly basis. Fortunately, successful eradication of the virus has been associated with improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality rates. In the past few years, treatment has improved considerably by the implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). From 2014 onwards, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, daclatasvir, ledipasvir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Regimens with various combinations of these new drugs, without the use of interferon (IFN), proved to be very effective and well tolerated, even among patients with advanced liver disease. Moreover, treatment duration could be shortened to 12 weeks in the majority of patients. The high costs of these DAAs, however, limit the availability of IFN-free therapy worldwide. Even in wealthy countries, it is deemed necessary to prioritize DAA treatment in order to limit the immediate impact on the health budget. As patients with advanced liver disease are in most need of HCV clearance, many countries decided to treat those patients first. In the current review, we focus on the currently available IFN-free treatment options for patients with cirrhosis. We discuss the virological efficacy as well as the clinical relevance of these regimens among this specific patient population. PMID:27006761

  11. Immediately loaded fixed maxillary implant treatment for a patient with advanced periodontal disease: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Binon, Paul

    2010-12-01

    Patients with a failing maxillary dentition typically require an extended treatment sequence that involves extractions, interim prosthesis wear, grafting and subsequent implant placement, and restoration with an implant-supported fixed or bar-retained prosthesis. Established maxillary implant protocols can take up to 15 or more months to complete. The purpose of this report is to describe a treatment sequence using zygomatic implants in a patient with advanced periodontal disease. A fixed prosthesis was fabricated without grafting, resulting in a shortened treatment time.

  12. In search of an advance directive that works for end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Bruce

    2006-10-01

    Although loss, disability, and death are constant possibilities for any end-stage renal disease patient, very few have planned for the last of life. Currently available Advance Directives (ADs) are refusal of specific therapies in only specific but nebulous circumstances. They fail to provide positive guidance for a patient's remaining time. Without addressing goals, quality of life, reversibility of medical problems, and desired end-of-life (EOL) care, such ADs are useless. End-stage renal disease providers are generally untrained and unsupported in offering guidance. Financial, emotional, and structural factors collude to justify ignoring EOL planning. Several alternative ADs are offered, along with a goal-directed approach to EOL counseling for patients and staff.

  13. Nitric Oxide Dysregulation in Platelets from Patients with Advanced Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Vittorio; Damato, Antonio; Amico, Enrico; Formisano, Luigi; Vecchione, Carmine; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the modulation of NO signaling in platelets of HD patients. We recruited 55 patients with manifest HD and 28 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Our data demonstrated that NO-mediated vasorelaxation, when evoked by supernatant from insulin-stimulated HD platelets, gradually worsens along disease course. The defective vasorelaxation seems to stem from a faulty release of NO from platelets of HD patients and, it is associated with impairment of eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177) and activity. This study provides important insights about NO metabolism in HD and raises the hypothesis that the decrease of NO in platelets of HD individuals could be a good tool for monitoring advanced stages of the disease. PMID:24587005

  14. Advanced glycation endproducts are increased in rheumatoid arthritis patients with controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced and can accumulate during chronic inflammation, as might be present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AGEs are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether AGEs are increased in patients with long-standing RA and whether AGE accumulation is related to disease activity, disease severity and measures of (premature) atherosclerosis, such as endothelial activation, endothelial dysfunction and intima media thickness (IMT). Methods In a cross-sectional study, 49 consecutive RA patients with longstanding disease (median disease duration of 12.3 years (range 9.3 to 15.1)), receiving standard of care, were included and compared with 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). AGEs were determined by skin autofluorescence. Disease activity was evaluated by the Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS-28) score and joint damage by modified Sharp-v.d. Heijde score. Endothelial activation (soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1) sVCAM-1, von Willebrand factor (vWF), thrombomodulin), endothelial dysfunction (determined by small artery elasticity (SAE)) and IMT were measured and related to AGE accumulation. Results AGEs were increased in RA patients (median 2.4 arbitrary units (a.u.), range 1.6 to 4.2) compared to HC (2.2, 1.3 to 3.8). RA patients had a DAS-28 score of 2.9 (0.8 to 6.9) and a modified Sharp-v.d. Heijde score of 19 (0 to 103). sVCAM-1 and vWF levels were higher in RA patients. SAE was significantly decreased in RA (3.9 ml/mmHg (1.4 to 12.2) vs. 6.1 in HC (1.7 to 12.9). IMT did not differ between the two groups. Combining both groups' AGEs correlated with vWF, sVCAM-1 and IMT, and was inversely related to SAE. In RA, AGEs had an inverse relation with SAE, but did not relate to disease activity or radiological damage. In multivariate analysis for both groups, smoking, glucose levels, vWF, SAE and male gender were significantly

  15. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17(+) and TRAP(+) cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression.

  16. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17+ and TRAP+ cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression. PMID:26063981

  17. A home environment test battery for status assessment in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Westin, Jerker; Dougherty, Mark; Nyholm, Dag; Groth, Torgny

    2010-04-01

    A test battery for assessing patient state in advanced Parkinson's disease, consisting of self-assessments and motor tests, was constructed and implemented on a hand computer with touch screen in a telemedicine setting. The aim of this work was to construct an assessment device, applicable during motor fluctuations in the patient's home environment. Selection of self-assessment questions was based on questions from an e-diary, previously used in a clinical trial. Both un-cued and cued tapping tests and spiral drawing tests were designed for capturing upper limb stiffnes, slowness and involuntary movements. The patient interface gave an audible signal at scheduled response times and was locked otherwise. Data messages in an XML-format were sent from the hand unit to a central server for storage, processing and presentation. In tapping tests, speed and accuracy were calculated and in spiral tests, standard deviation of frequency filtered radial drawing velocity was calculated. An overall test score, combining repeated assessments of the different test items during a test period, was defined based on principal component analysis and linear regression. An evaluation with two pilot patients before and after receiving new types of treatments was performed. Compliance and usability was assessed in a clinical trial (65 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease) and correlations between different test items and internal consistency were investigated. The test battery could detect treatment effect in the two pilot patients, both in self-assessments, tapping tests' results and spiral scores. It had good patient compliance and acceptable usability according to nine nurses. Correlation analysis showed that tapping results provided different information as compared to diary responses. Internal consistency of the test battery was good and learning effects in the tapping tests were small.

  18. Utility of the advanced chronic kidney disease patient management tools: case studies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Meenal B; Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Haley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate management of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) delays or limits its progression. The Advanced CKD Patient Management Toolkit was developed using a process-improvement technique to assist patient management and address CKD-specific management issues. We pilot tested the toolkit in 2 community nephrology practices, assessed the utility of individual tools, and evaluated the impact on conformance to an advanced CKD guideline through patient chart abstraction. Tool use was distinct in the 2 sites and depended on the site champion's involvement, the extent of process reconfiguration demanded by a tool, and its perceived value. Baseline conformance varied across guideline recommendations (averaged 54%). Posttrial conformance increased in all clinical areas (averaged 59%). Valuable features of the toolkit in real-world settings were its ability to: facilitate tool selection, direct implementation efforts in response to a baseline performance audit, and allow selection of tool versions and customizing them. Our results suggest that systematically created, multifaceted, and customizable tools can promote guideline conformance.

  19. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Teruel, José L; Rexach, Lourdes; Burguera, Victor; Gomis, Antonio; Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros; Rivera, Maite; Diaz, Alicia; Collazo, Sergio; Liaño, Fernando

    2015-10-28

    Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m²). The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014) was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital's emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50%) died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams.

  20. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, José L.; Rexach, Lourdes; Burguera, Victor; Gomis, Antonio; Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros; Rivera, Maite; Diaz, Alicia; Collazo, Sergio; Liaño, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m2). The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014) was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital’s emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50%) died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams. PMID:27417813

  1. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  2. Advance care planning uptake among patients with severe lung disease: a randomised patient preference trial of a nurse-led, facilitated advance care planning intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Craig; Auret, Kirsten Anne; Evans, Sharon Frances; Williamson, Fiona; Dormer, Siobhan; Greeve, Kim; Koay, Audrey; Price, Dot; Brims, Fraser

    2017-01-01

    Objective Advance care planning (ACP) clarifies goals for future care if a patient becomes unable to communicate their own preferences. However, ACP uptake is low, with discussions often occurring late. This study assessed whether a systematic nurse-led ACP intervention increases ACP in patients with advanced respiratory disease. Design A multicentre open-label randomised controlled trial with preference arm. Setting Metropolitan teaching hospital and a rural healthcare network. Participants 149 participants with respiratory malignancy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease. Intervention Nurse facilitators offered facilitated ACP discussions, prompted further discussions with doctors and loved ones, and assisted participants to appoint a substitute medical decision-maker (SDM) and complete an advance directive (AD). Outcome measures The primary measure was formal (AD or SDM) or informal (discussion with doctor) ACP uptake assessed by self-report (6 months) and medical notes audit. Secondary measures were the factors predicting baseline readiness to undertake ACP, and factors predicting postintervention ACP uptake in the intervention arm. Results At 6 months, formal ACP uptake was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the intervention arm (54/106, 51%), compared with usual care (6/43, 14%). ACP discussions with doctors were also significantly higher (p<0.005) in the intervention arm (76/106, 72%) compared with usual care (20/43, 47%). Those with a strong preference for the intervention were more likely to complete formal ACP documents than those randomly allocated. Increased symptom burden and preference for the intervention predicted later ACP uptake. Social support was positively associated with ACP discussion with loved ones, but negatively associated with discussion with doctors. Conclusions Nurse-led facilitated ACP is acceptable to patients with advanced respiratory disease and effective in increasing ACP discussions and completion

  3. Genetic Risk Factors for Portopulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kari E.; Fallon, Michael B.; Krowka, Michael J.; Brown, Robert S.; Trotter, James F.; Peter, Inga; Tighiouart, Hocine; Knowles, James A.; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Benza, Raymond L.; Badesch, David B.; Taichman, Darren B.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Zacks, Steven; Kaplowitz, Neil; Kawut, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Portopulmonary hypertension (PPHTN) occurs in 6% of liver transplant candidates. The pathogenesis of this complication of portal hypertension is poorly understood. Objectives: To identify genetic risk factors for PPHTN in patients with advanced liver disease. Methods: We performed a multicenter case-control study of patients with portal hypertension. Cases had a mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mm Hg, pulmonary vascular resistance >240 dynes·s−1·cm−5, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15 mm Hg. Controls had a right ventricular systolic pressure < 40 mm Hg (if estimated) and normal right-sided cardiac morphology by transthoracic echocardiography. We genotyped 1,079 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 93 candidate genes in each patient. Measurements and Main Results: The study sample included 31 cases and 104 controls. Twenty-nine SNPs in 15 candidate genes were associated with the risk of PPHTN (P < 0.05). Multiple SNPs in the genes coding for estrogen receptor 1, aromatase, phosphodiesterase 5, angiopoietin 1, and calcium binding protein A4 were associated with the risk of PPHTN. The biological relevance of one of the aromatase SNPs was supported by an association with plasma estradiol levels. Conclusions: Genetic variation in estrogen signaling and cell growth regulators is associated with the risk of PPHTN. These biologic pathways may elucidate the mechanism for the development of PPHTN in certain patients with severe liver disease. PMID:19218192

  4. Improvement of gait by chronic, high doses of methylphenidate in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Devos, D; Krystkowiak, P; Clement, F; Dujardin, K; Cottencin, O; Waucquier, N; Ajebbar, K; Thielemans, B; Kroumova, M; Duhamel, A; Destée, A; Bordet, R; Defebvre, L

    2007-01-01

    Background Therapeutic management of gait disorders in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) can sometimes be disappointing, since dopaminergic drug treatments and subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation are more effective for limb‐related parkinsonian signs than for gait disorders. Gait disorders could also be partly related to norepinephrine system impairment, and the pharmacological modulation of both dopamine and norepinephrine pathways could potentially improve the symptomatology. Aim To assess the clinical value of chronic, high doses of methylphenidate (MPD) in patients with PD having gait disorders, despite their use of optimal dopaminergic doses and STN stimulation parameters. Methods Efficacy was blindly assessed on video for 17 patients in the absence of l‐dopa and again after acute administration of the drug, both before and after a 3‐month course of MPD, using a Stand–Walk–Sit (SWS) Test, the Tinetti Scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III score and the Dyskinesia Rating Scale. Results An improvement was observed in the number of steps and time in the SWS Test, the number of freezing episodes, the Tinetti Scale score and the UPDRS part III score in the absence of l‐dopa after 3 months of taking MPD. The l‐dopa‐induced improvement in these various scores was also stronger after the 3‐month course of MPD than before. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale score fell dramatically in all patients. No significant induction of adverse effects was found. Interpretation Chronic, high doses of MPD improved gait and motor symptoms in the absence of l‐dopa and increased the intensity of response of these symptoms to l‐dopa in a population with advanced PD. PMID:17098845

  5. Coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes: part I: recent advances in prevention and noninvasive management.

    PubMed

    Berry, Colin; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Bourassa, Martial G

    2007-02-13

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a worldwide epidemic. Its prevalence is rapidly increasing in both developing and developed countries. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent and is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The purpose of this review is to assess the clinical impact of recent advances in the epidemiology, prevention, and management of CHD in diabetic patients. A systematic review of publications in this area, referenced in MEDLINE in the past 5 years (2000 to 2005), was undertaken. Patients with CHD and prediabetic states should undergo lifestyle modifications aimed at preventing DM. Pharmacological prevention of DM is also promising but requires further study. In patients with CHD and DM, routine use of aspirin and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I)--unless contraindicated or not tolerated-and strict glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid control are strongly recommended. The targets for secondary prevention in these patients are relatively well defined, but the strategies to achieve them vary and must be individualized. Intense insulin therapy might be needed for glycemic control, and high-dose statin therapy might be needed for lipid control. For blood pressure control, ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers are considered as first-line therapy. Noncompliance, particularly with lifestyle measures, and underprescription of evidence-based therapies remain important unsolved problems.

  6. Special low-protein foods ameliorate postprandial off in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barichella, Michela; Marczewska, Agnieszka; De Notaris, Roberta; Vairo, Antonella; Baldo, Cinzia; Mauri, Andrea; Savardi, Chiara; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2006-10-01

    Protein intake interferes with levodopa therapy. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) should restrict daily protein intake and shift protein intake to the evening. For further reduction of protein intake in the first part of the day, special low-protein products (LPP) should be used instead of normal food products at breakfast and lunch. We studied the efficacy of LPP on postprandial off periods, in PD patients on levodopa therapy. The methods included a randomized, cross-over, single-blind, pilot clinical trial comparing a 2-month balanced diet with a 2-month LPP diet in 18 PD patients with motor fluctuations. The off phases were significantly shorter after LPP diet than after balanced diet (postprandial off, 49 +/- 73 min vs. 79 +/- 72 min and total off, 164 +/- 148 min vs. 271 +/- 174 min, both P < 0.0001). Moreover, a reduction in total off time during LPP diet (3.3 +/- 2.7 hr vs. 4.7 +/- 3.3 hr, P < 0.0001), occurred also in the 9 patients who did not experience subjective benefit. No significant changes in hematological and biochemical variables or body composition were recorded; a slight reduction in body weight (mean, -1.8%) was observed. Consumption of LPP in the first part of the day ameliorates off periods in PD patients, but additional studies including pharmacokinetics are needed.

  7. Genetic Risk Factors for Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kari E.; Kawut, Steven M.; Krowka, Michael J.; Brown, Robert S.; Trotter, James F.; Shah, Vijay; Peter, Inga; Tighiouart, Hocine; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth; Knowles, James A.; Zacks, Steven; Fallon, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) affects 10%–30% of patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and significantly increases mortality. Studies in experimental models indicate that pulmonary angiogenesis contributes to the development of HPS, but pathogenesis in humans is poorly understood. We investigated genetic risk factors for HPS in patients with advanced liver disease. Methods We performed a multicenter case-control study of patients with cirrhosis being evaluated for liver transplantation. Cases had an alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient ≥15 mm Hg (or ≥20 mm Hg if age > 64 years) and contrast echocardiography with late appearance of microbubbles after venous injection of agitated saline (intrapulmonary vasodilatation); controls did not meet both criteria for case status. The study sample included 59 cases and 126 controls. We genotyped 1086 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 94 candidate genes. Results Forty-two SNPs in 21 genes were significantly associated with HPS after adjustments for race and smoking. Eight genes had at least 2 SNPs associated with disease: CAV3, ENG, NOX4, ESR2, VWF, RUNX1, COL18A1, and TIE1. For example, rs237872 in CAV3 showed an odds ratio of 2.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.65–4.60, P =.0001) and rs4837192 in ENG showed an odds ratio of 0.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.14–0.89, P =.027). Furthermore, variation in CAV3 and RUNX1 was associated with HPS in gene-based analyses. Conclusions Polymorphisms in genes involved in the regulation of angiogenesis are associated with the risk of HPS. Further investigation of these biologic pathways might elucidate the mechanisms that mediate the development of HPS in certain patients with severe liver disease. PMID:20346360

  8. Safety and feasibility of transendocardial autologous bone marrow cell transplantation in patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Shmuel; Kornowski, Ran; Weisz, Giora; Satler, Lowell F; Smits, Peter C; Okubagzi, Petros; Baffour, Richard; Aggarwal, Anita; Weissman, Neil J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Waksman, Ron; Serrruys, Parrick; Battler, Alexander; Moses, Jeffrey W; Leon, Martin B; Epstein, Stephen E

    2006-03-15

    The present report contains the final results of a Phase I study that evaluated the feasibility, safety, and potential efficacy of intramyocardial injection of autologous bone marrow (BM) in "no-option" patients with refractory angina and myocardial ischemia. Twenty-seven patients underwent electromechanic mapping-guided transendomyocardial injections (n = 12, 0.2 ml each) of unfractionated autologous BM cells directed to ischemic, noninfarcted myocardial territory. Patients were injected with 28 +/- 27 x 10(6)/ml nucleated cells containing 2.2 +/- 1.4% CD34+ cells. The autologous BM injection procedure was successful in all patients and was associated with no adverse events. At 3 months, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina score (3.2 +/- 0.5 vs 2.0 +/- 0.91, p = 0.001) and treadmill exercise duration (418 +/- 136 vs 489 +/- 142 seconds, p = 0.017) had improved significantly. The stress-induced ischemia score within the injected territories (118 segments) had also improved (2.2 +/- 0.8 vs 1.7 +/- 1.1, p < 0.001). At 1 year, the clinical improvement was sustained, although 5 patients had undergone revascularization procedures. The number of total injected nucleated cells (CD45+), progenitor cells (CD34+), and the magnitude of secreted vascular endothelial growth factor and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 by cultured BM cells failed to predict the clinical response. In conclusion, the 3- and 12-month study results have indicated the safety of catheter-based transendocardial delivery of autologous BM cells in patients with advanced symptomatic ischemic heart disease and may suggest sustained potential efficacy. The cellular and humeral characteristics of autologous BM cells did not predict the clinical response, underscoring the advisability of additional mechanistic exploration.

  9. Long-Term PEG-J Tube Safety in Patients With Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Michael; Johnson, David A; Hawes, Robert; Schmulewitz, Nathan; Vanagunas, Arvydas D; Gossen, E Roderich; Robieson, Weining Z; Eaton, Susan; Dubow, Jordan; Chatamra, Krai; Benesh, Janet

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to present procedure- and device-associated adverse events (AEs) identified with long-term drug delivery via percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy (PEG-J). Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG, also known in US as carbidopa-levodopa enteral suspension, CLES) is continuously infused directly to the proximal small intestine via PEG-J in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) to overcome slow and erratic gastric emptying and treat motor fluctuations that are not adequately controlled by oral or other pharmacological therapy. METHODS: An independent adjudication committee of three experienced (>25 years each) gastroenterologists reviewed gastrointestinal procedure- and device-associated AEs reported for PD patients (total n=395) enrolled in phase 3 LCIG studies. The rate, clinical significance, and causality of the procedure/device events were determined. RESULTS: The patient median exposure to PEG-J at the data cutoff was 480 days. Procedure- and device-associated serious AEs (SAEs) occurred in 67 (17%) patients. A total of 42% of SAEs occurred during the first 4 weeks following PEG-J placement. SAEs of major clinical significance with the highest procedural incidence were peritonitis (1.5%), pneumonia (1.5%), and abdominal pain (1.3%). The most common non-serious procedure- and device-associated AEs were abdominal pain (31%), post-operative wound infection (20%), and procedural pain (23%). In all, 17 (4.3%) patients discontinued treatment owing to an AE. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, incidences of PEG-J AEs with the LCIG delivery system and PEG-J longevity were compared favorably with ranges described in the PEG/PEG-J literature. A low discontinuation rate in this study suggests acceptable procedural outcomes and AE rates in PD patients treated with this PEG-J drug delivery system. PMID:27030949

  10. Effect of levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel on dyskinesia in advanced Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Victor S. C.; Boyd, James T.; Slevin, John T.; Hall, Coleen; Chatamra, Krai; Eaton, Susan; Benesh, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel (carbidopa‐levodopa enteral suspension) in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with troublesome dyskinesia. Methods Post hoc analyses of patient data from a 12‐week, randomized, double‐blind study and a 54‐week open‐label study were performed. Efficacy was assessed in the subgroup of patients defined by ≥1 hour of “on” time with troublesome dyskinesia at baseline as recorded in Parkinson's disease symptom diaries (double blind: n = 11 levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel, n = 12 oral levodopa‐carbidopa; open label: n = 144 levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel). The changes in “off” time, “on” time with and without troublesome dyskinesia, and the overall safety and tolerability of levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel were analyzed. Results Although not significantly different from oral levodopa treatment (P > .05) in the double‐blind study, levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel treatment resulted in a reduction from baseline in “on” time with troublesome dyskinesia (mean [standard deviation] hours: baseline = 3.1 [1.7], change from baseline to final = −1.8 [1.8], P = .014), increase in “on” time without troublesome dyskinesia (baseline = 7.4 [2.2], change = 4.4 [3.6], P = .004), and decrease in “off” time (baseline = 5.5 [1.3], change = −2.7 [2.8], P = .015). Similar trends were found in the open‐label study. An increase in levodopa‐carbidopa intestinal gel dose was not significantly correlated with increased “on” time with troublesome dyskinesia in either study (double blind: r = −.073, P = .842; open label: r = −0.001, P = .992). Adverse events were usually mild to moderate in severity and related to the gastrointestinal procedure. Conclusion Our exploratory analyses suggest that optimizing levodopa delivery with levodopa

  11. Epidemiology and outcomes of hypoglycemia in patients with advanced diabetic kidney disease on dialysis: A national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Chih-Ching; Chien, Chih-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced diabetic kidney disease (DKD) behave differently to diabetic patients without kidney disease. We aimed to investigate the associations of hypoglycemia and outcomes after initiation of dialysis in patients with advanced DKD on dialysis. Methods Using National Health Insurance Research Database, 20,845 advanced DKD patients beginning long-term dialysis between 2002 and 2006 were enrolled. We investigated the incidence of severe hypoglycemia episodes before initiation of dialysis. Patients were followed from date of first dialysis to death, end of dialysis, or 2008. Main outcomes measured were all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), and subsequent severe hypoglycemic episodes after dialysis. Results 19.18% patients had at least one hypoglycemia episode during 1-year period before initiation of dialysis. Advanced DKD patients with higher adapted Diabetes Complications Severity Index (aDCSI) scores were associated with more frequent hypoglycemia (P for trend < 0.001). Mortality and subsequent severe hypoglycemia after dialysis both increased with number of hypoglycemic episodes. Compared to those who had no hypoglycemic episodes, those who had one had a 15% higher risk of death and a 2.3-fold higher risk of subsequent severe hypoglycemia. Those with two or more episodes had a 19% higher risk of death and a 3.9-fold higher risk of subsequent severe hypoglycemia. However, previous severe hypoglycemia was not correlated with risk of MI after dialysis. Conclusions The rate of severe hypoglycemia was high in advanced DKD patients. Patients with higher aDCSI scores tended to have more hypoglycemic episodes. Hypoglycemic episodes were associated with subsequent hypoglycemia and mortality after initiation of dialysis. We studied the associations and further study is needed to establish cause. In addition, more attention is needed for hypoglycemia prevention in advanced DKD patients, especially for those at risk patients. PMID:28355264

  12. Missed opportunities for earlier diagnosis of HIV in patients who presented with advanced HIV disease: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Itzchak; Maor, Yasmin; Mahroum, Naim; Olmer, Liraz; Wieder, Anat; Litchevski, Vladislav; Mor, Orna; Rahav, Galia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify and characterise missed opportunities for earlier HIV diagnosis in patients diagnosed with advanced HIV. Design A retrospective observational cohort study. Setting A central tertiary medical centre in Israel. Measures The proportion of patients with advanced HIV, the proportion of missed opportunities to diagnose them earlier, and the rate of clinical indicator diseases (CIDs) in those patients. Results Between 2010 and 2015, 356 patients were diagnosed with HIV, 118 (33.4%) were diagnosed late, 57 (16%) with advanced HIV disease. Old age (OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.74)) and being heterosexual (OR=2.65 (95% CI 1.21 to 5.78)) were significant risk factors for being diagnosed late. All patients with advanced disease had at least one CID that did not lead to an HIV test in the 5 years prior to AIDS diagnosis. The median time between CID and AIDS diagnosis was 24 months (IQR 10–30). 60% of CIDs were missed by a general practitioner and 40% by a specialist. Conclusions Missed opportunities to early diagnosis of HIV occur in primary and secondary care. Lack of national guidelines, lack of knowledge regarding CIDs and communication barriers with patients may contribute to a late diagnosis of HIV. PMID:28186940

  13. Alternative treatments in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients with progressive disease after sorafenib treatment: a prospective multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masahito; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kuromatsu, Ryoko; Nagamatsu, Hiroaki; Satani, Manabu; Niizeki, Takashi; Okamura, Shusuke; Iwamoto, Hideki; Shimose, Shigeo; Shirono, Tomotake; Noda, Yu; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has been approved to treat advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), though it is unclear how much benefit advanced HCC patients with progressive disease (PD) derive from sorafenib treatment. This study aimed to assess survival risk factors and evaluate therapeutic strategies for advanced HCC patients with PD after sorafenib treatment. We analyzed the clinical data and treatment outcomes for 315 consecutive advanced HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Univariate analyses of overall survival identified therapeutic effect as an independent risk factor in all patients. Among all patients, 141 developed PD. Of those, 58 (41%) were treated with sorafenib monotherapy, 70 (50%) with agents other than sorafenib, and 13 (9%) were not treated at all. The median survival time was 6.1 months for PD patients with sorafenib monotherapy and 12.2 months for those administered alternative treatments (p < 0.0001). Our results indicated that sorafenib treatment may have negative long-term therapeutic effects in advanced HCC patients with PD, and that alternative treatments should be considered for these patients after sorafenib administration. PMID:27462865

  14. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    PubMed

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process.

  15. The use of enteral access for continuous delivery of levodopa-carbidopa in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Deviere, Jacques; Supiot, Frederic; Ballarin, Asuncion; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Huberty, Vincent; Musala, Carmen; Blero, Daniel; Lemmers, Arnaud; Van Gossum, André; Arvanitakis, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Background Continuous delivery to the jejunum of levodopa-carbidopa is a promising therapy in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, as it reduces motor fluctuation. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and jejunal tube (PEG-J) placement is a suitable option for this. However, studies focused in PEG-J management are lacking. Objectives We report our experience regarding this technique, including technical success, adverse events and outcomes, in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. Methods Twenty-seven advanced Parkinson’s disease patients (17 men, median age: 64 years, median disease duration: 11 years) were included in a retrospective study from June 2007 to April 2015. The median follow-up period was 48 months (1–96). Results No adverse events were noted during and after nasojejunal tube insertion (to assess treatment efficacy). After a good therapeutic response, a PEG-J was placed successfully in all patients. The PEG tube was inserted according to Ponsky’s method. The jejunal extension was inserted during the same procedure in all patients. Twelve patients (44%) experienced severe adverse events related to the PEG-J insertion, which occurred after a median follow-up of 15.5 months. Endoscopy was the main treatment modality. Patients who experienced severe adverse events had a higher comorbidity score (p = 0.011) but were not older (p = 0.941) than patients who did not. Conclusions While all patients responded well to levodopa-carbidopa regarding neurological outcomes, gastro-intestinal severe adverse events were frequent and related to comorbidities. Endoscopic treatment is the cornerstone for management of PEG-J related events. In conclusion, clinicians and endoscopists, as well as patients, should be fully informed of procedure-related adverse events and patients should be followed in centres experienced in their management.

  16. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    further study. Specimens from patients with intraocular hemorrhage should be viewed cautiously, since erythrocytes contain high levels of enolase. Analysis of subretinal aspirates is an extremely accurate method of confirming the diagnosis of Coats' disease. The key diagnostic findings are the presence of cholesterol crystals and pigment-laden macrophages and the absence of tumor cells on fresh preparations. The technique should be reserved for patients where retinoblastoma has been ruled out by all noninvasive means and massive subretinal drainage is anticipated. The natural progression in advanced Coats' disease is toward the development of a blind, painful eye. Spontaneous regression does rarely occur, and some eyes quietly progress to a phthisical state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 A FIGURE 34 B FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 A FIGURE 46 B FIGURE 47 A FIGURE 47 B FIGURE 48 A FIGURE 48 B FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 54 (cont.) FIGURE 55 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 A FIGURE 66 B FIGURE 67 A FIGURE 67 B PMID:1808814

  17. Could metformin be used in patients with diabetes and advanced chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tahseen A; Srirathan, Danushan; Abraham, Georgi; Oei, Elizabeth L; Fan, Stanley L; McCafferty, Kieran; Yaqoob, M Magdi

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is an important cause of end stage renal failure worldwide. As renal impairment progresses, managing hyperglycaemia can prove increasingly challenging, as many medications are contra-indicated in moderate to severe renal impairment. Whilst evidence for tight glycaemic control reducing progression to renal failure in patients with established renal disease is limited, poor glycaemic control is not desirable, and is likely to lead to progressive complications. Metformin is a first-line therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes, as it appears to be effective in reducing diabetes related end points and mortality in overweight patients. Cessation of metformin in patients with progressive renal disease may not only lead to deterioration in glucose control, but also to loss of protection from cardiovascular disease in a cohort of patients at particularly high risk. We advocate the need for further study to determine the role of metformin in patients with severe renal disease (chronic kidney disease stage 4-5), as well as patients on dialysis, or pre-/peri-renal transplantation. We explore possible roles of metformin in these circumstances, and suggest potential key areas for further study.

  18. Current management of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease treated chronically with levodopa.

    PubMed

    Melamed, E; Zoldan, J; Galili-Mosberg, R; Ziv, I; Djaldetti, R

    1999-01-01

    Motor fluctuations after long-term administration of levodopa may be due to central pharmacodynamic mechanisms such as reduced striatal synthesis and storage of dopamine from exogenous levodopa and subsensitization of postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors. Peripheral pharmacokinetic mechanisms may be equally important, particularly in motor fluctuations of the "delayed on" (increased time latencies from dose intake to start-up of clinical benefit) and "no-on" (complete failure of a levodopa dose to exert an "on" response) types. Levodopa itself has a very poor solubility. In addition, there is delayed gastric emptying in many advanced patients. Therefore, an oral dose of levodopa may remain in the stomach for long periods of time before it passes into the duodenum where there is immediate absorption. Consequently, in order to overcome response fluctuations caused by impaired pharmacokinetic mechanisms and to improve its absorption, we recommend that levodopa be taken in multiple small doses, on an empty stomach, preferably crushed and mixed with a lot of liquid. Protein intake should be minimized. Prokinetic drugs such as prepulsid (Cisaprid) could be used to facilitate gastric motility and levodopa transit time. Administration of crushed levodopa through nasoduodenal or gastrojejunostomy tubes may be helpful in certain circumstances. Bypassing the stomach with subcutaneous injections of apomorphine may provide dramatic rescue from difficult "off" situations. Oral and s.c. administration of novel, extremely soluble prodrugs of levodopa, e.g., levodopa ethylester, may offer a new approach to overcome difficulties in levodopa absorption. Addition of dopamine agonists, MAO-B inhibitors, COMT inhibitors and controlled release levodopa preparations may be helpful in prolonging the duration of efficacy of each single levodopa dose. Levodopa, administered orally, usually combined with peripheral dopa decarboxylase inhibitors, continues to be the most widely-used and most

  19. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with advanced periodontal disease: 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Carlos Alberto Estevanell; Allgayer, Susiane; Calvete, Ernani da Silva; Polido, Waldemar Daudt

    2013-09-01

    This case report demonstrates the interdisciplinary treatment of an adult patient with a Class II malocclusion, convex profile, incompetent lips, gummy smile, and advanced periodontal loss. Initial periodontal-endodontic treatment was followed by orthodontic and orthognathic surgical therapies. An esthetic facial profile, a pleasing smile, an appropriate occlusion, and overall good treatment outcomes, including the periodontal condition, remained stable 11 years after active orthodontic treatment.

  20. Glycosuria and Renal Outcomes in Patients with Nondiabetic Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Chih; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Lim, Lee Moay; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chiang, Heng-Pin; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors have shown a potential for renoprotection beyond blood glucose lowering. Glycosuria in nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is sometimes noted. Whether glycosuria in CKD implies a channelopathy or proximal tubulopathy is not known. The consequence of glycosuria in CKD is also not studied. We performed a cross-sectional study for the association between glycosuria and urine electrolyte excretion in 208 nondiabetic patients. Fractional excretion (FE) of glucose >4% was 3.4%, 6.3% and 62.5% in CKD stage 3, 4 and 5, respectively. These patients with glycosuria had higher FE sodium, FE potassium, FE uric acid, UPCR, and urine NGAL-creatinine ratio. We conducted a longitudinal study for the consequence of glycosuria, defined by dipstick, in 769 nondiabetic patients with stage 4–5 CKD. Glycosuria was associated with a decreased risk for end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.77; CI = 0.62–0.97; p = 0.024) and for rapid renal function decline (adjusted odds ratio: 0.63; CI = 0.43–0.95; p = 0.032); but glycosuria was not associated with all-cause mortality or cardiovascular events. The results were consistent in the propensity-score matched cohort. Glycosuria is associated with increased fractional excretion of electrolytes and is related to favorable renal outcomes in nondiabetic patients with stage 5 CKD. PMID:28008953

  1. Impact of COPD in patients with lung cancer and advanced disease treated with chemotherapy and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, José Luis; Resano, Pilar; El Hachem, Abdulkader; Graziani, Desiré; Almonacid, Carlos; Sánchez, Ignacio M

    2014-01-01

    While it is relatively well known that the prognosis of patients with lung cancer (LC) treated with surgery is worse in the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), it is unknown if this assessment can be extrapolated to patients with advanced disease treated with chemotherapy and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The aim of our study is to analyze the clinical characteristics and survival rates in patients with LC and COPD, and to compare these to the patients without airflow obstruction. From 471 evaluable patients, 324 (69%) were not treated with surgery due to disseminated disease (stages 3B and 4). Of them, 47.7% also had COPD. All patients were treated at the moment of diagnosis according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines with platinum-based chemotherapy or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Kaplan-Meier curves showed no significant differences in overall survival between COPD and non-COPD patients (log-rank P=0.65). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for the most relevant variables, the adjusted hazard ratio (HRadj) was statistically significant for performance status (HRadj =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-1.59; P=0.002) and clinical stage (HRadj =0.67, 95% CI: 0.50-0.89; P=0.006), but not for COPD status (HRadj =1.20, 95% CI: 0.83-1.50; P=0.46). Our conclusion is that at present, when using standard care in advanced LC (stages 3B and 4), COPD does not have a significant deleterious impact on overall survival.

  2. Risk of Pathologic Upgrading or Locally Advanced Disease in Early Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Biopsy Gleason Score and PSA: A Population-Based Study of Modern Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Caster, Joseph M.; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists rely on available clinical information (biopsy Gleason score and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]) to determine the optimal treatment regimen for each prostate cancer patient. Existing published nomograms correlating clinical to pathologic extent of disease were based on patients treated in the 1980s and 1990s at select academic institutions. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to examine pathologic outcomes (Gleason score and cancer stage) in early prostate cancer patients based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA concentration. Methods and Materials: This analysis included 25,858 patients whose cancer was diagnosed between 2010 and 2011, with biopsy Gleason scores of 6 to 7 and clinical stage T1 to T2 disease, who underwent radical prostatectomy. In subgroups based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA level, we report the proportion of patients with pathologically advanced disease (positive surgical margin or pT3-T4 disease) or whose Gleason score was upgraded. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with pathologic outcomes. Results: For patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 cancers, 84% of those with PSA <10 ng/mL had surgical T2 disease with negative margins; this decreased to 61% in patients with PSA of 20 to 29.9 ng/mL. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 43% (PSA: <10 ng/mL) to 61% (PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) of biopsy Gleason 6 patients. Patients with biopsy Gleason 7 cancers had a one-third (Gleason 3 + 4; PSA: <10 ng/mL) to two-thirds (Gleason 4 + 3; PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) probability of having pathologically advanced disease. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 11% to 19% of patients with biopsy Gleason 4 + 3 cancers. Multivariable analysis showed that higher PSA and older age were associated with Gleason score upgrading and pathologically advanced disease. Conclusions: This is the first population-based study to examine pathologic extent of disease and pathologic Gleason score

  3. The benefit of consolidation radiotherapy to initial disease bulk in patients with advanced Hodgkin’s disease who achieved complete remission after standard chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bayoumi, Yasser; Al-Homaidi, Abdulaziz; Zaidi, Syed; Tailor, Imran; Motiabi, Ibrahiem; Alshehri, Nawal; Al-Ghazali, Assem; Almudaibigh, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of consolidation radiotherapy (RT) in advanced-stage Hodgkin’s disease (HD) with initial bulky sites after radiological complete remission (CR) or partial response (PR) with positron emission tomography-negative (metabolic CR) following standard chemotherapy (ABVD [Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine]) six to eight cycles. Patients and methods Adult patients with advanced-stage HD treated at our institute during the period 2006 to 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. One hundred and ninety-two patients with initial bulky disease size (>7 cm) who attained radiological CR/PR and metabolic CR were included in the analysis. One hundred and thirteen patients who received radiotherapy (RT) as consolidation postchemotherapy (RT group) were compared to 79 patients who did not receive RT (non-RT group). Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and were compared according to treatment group by the log-rank tests at P ≤0.05 significance level. Results The mean age of the cohort was 33 (range: 14 to 81) years. Eighty-four patients received involved-field radiation and 29 patients received involved-site RT. The RT group had worse prognostic factors compared to the non-RT group. Thirteen (12%) relapses occurred in the RT group, and 19 (24%) relapses occurred in the non-RT group. Nine patients (8%) in the RT group died, compared to eleven patients (14%) in the non-RT group. Second malignancies were seen in only five patients: three patients in the RT group compared to two patients in the non-RT group. At 5 years, overall DFS was 79%±9% and OS was 85%±9%. There was significant statistical difference between the RT group and the non-RT group regarding 5-year DFS: 86%±7% and 74%±9%, respectively (P ≤0.02). However, the 5-year OS was 90%±5% for the RT group and 83%±8% for the non-RT group, with no statistical difference (P ≤0

  4. A phase IIa, nonrandomized study of radium-223 dichloride in advanced breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Naume, Bjørn; Garcia, Camilo; Jerusalem, Guy; Piccart, Martine; Vobecky, Nancy; Thuresson, Marcus; Flamen, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223) mimics calcium and emits high-energy, short-range alpha-particles resulting in an antitumor effect on bone metastases. This open-label, phase IIa nonrandomized study investigated safety and short-term efficacy of radium-223 in breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease. Twenty-three advanced breast cancer patients with progressive bone-dominant disease, and no longer candidates for further endocrine therapy, were to receive radium-223 (50 kBq/kg IV) every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. The coprimary end points were change in urinary N-telopeptide of type 1 (uNTX-1) and serum bone alkaline phosphatase (bALP) after 16 weeks of treatment. Exploratory end points included sequential (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) to assess metabolic changes in osteoblastic bone metastases. Safety data were collected for all patients. Radium-223 significantly reduced uNTX-1 and bALP from baseline to end of treatment. Median uNTX-1 change was -10.1 nmol bone collagen equivalents/mmol creatinine (-32.8 %; P = 0.0124); median bALP change was -16.7 ng/mL (-42.0 %; P = 0.0045). Twenty of twenty-three patients had FDG PET/CT identifying 155 hypermetabolic osteoblastic bone lesions at baseline: 50 lesions showed metabolic decrease (≥25 % reduction of maximum standardized uptake value from baseline) after 2 radium-223 injections [32.3 % metabolic response rate (mRR) at week 9], persisting after the treatment period (41.5 % mRR at week 17). Radium-223 was safe and well tolerated. Radium-223 targets areas of increased bone metabolism and shows biological activity in advanced breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation Significantly Decreases Disability from Low Back Pain in Patients with Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather; Gee, Lucy; Kumar, Vignessh; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Durphy, Jennifer; Hanspal, Era; Barba, Anne; Molho, Eric; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of Parkinson's patients suffer from low back pain (LBP) during the course of their disease. How LBP affects daily functional status and how to manage this aspect of PD has not been adequately explored. Methods We examined sixteen patients undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) who met inclusion criteria for moderate disability from LBP, as classified by the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index (OLBPD). Results Thirteen of 16 patients had attempted additional treatments for LBP including medical management, massage, chiropractic, epidural steroid injections and/or surgery and with minimal relief. Following DBS, there was a significant improvement in OLBPD at both the 6-month and 1-year time points (p < 0.02, p < 0.005 respectively). A mean improvement of 31.7% on OLBPD score was noted. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) similarly decreased significantly at 1 year (p = 0.015). There was no correlation between OLBPD score and other measures including UPDRS, age, and other non-motor symptoms. Conclusion Given the prevalent yet undertreated disability associated with LBP in PD, these results are novel in that they show STN DBS has a significant positive effect on disability associated with LBP. PMID:25895600

  6. Phase I evaluation of recombinant interleukin-2 in patients with advanced malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Atkins, M B; Gould, J A; Allegretta, M; Li, J J; Dempsey, R A; Rudders, R A; Parkinson, D R; Reichlin, S; Mier, J W

    1986-09-01

    Seventeen patients with refractory malignant tumors were treated with recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) administered by weekly bolus intravenous (IV) injection in a phase I dose escalation trial. Patients received 10,000 to 1,000,000 U/m2 per injection over a course of 3 to 33 weeks. Toxicity was dose related and consisted primarily of fever, chills, nausea, and vomiting. Hypotension was observed at doses of 500,000 U/m2 or higher and in one instance was sufficiently severe to require pressors. No tumor regression was seen and all patients eventually developed progressive disease. Blood levels of cortisol, ACTH, prolactin, and growth hormone as well as the acute phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) increased after the administration of IL-2 in most patients. Serum IL-2 levels in excess of 250 U/mL were detected five minutes after an IV injection of 1,000,000 U/m2, after which the levels declined with a half-life of approximately 25 minutes. No alteration in lymphocyte surface phenotype or enhancement in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity against natural killer (NK)-sensitive and resistant tumor cell lines was observed when these parameters were measured weekly just before the IL-2 injections. However, a dramatic but transient decline in circulating lymphocytes and NK activity was noted within hours of receiving IL-2. This effect was independent of fever and was not abrogated by pretreatment with ibuprofen or metyrapone. The majority of patients developed serum IgG antibodies of IL-2 detectable with a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a nitrocellulose dot blot assay. The development of anti-IL-2 antibodies was not associated with symptoms suggestive of serum sickness, reductions in serum complement levels, or deterioration in lymphocyte tumoricidal activity. This investigation provides insight into the in vivo actions of this potent biological response modifier and will assist in the design of future studies with IL-2 administered alone

  7. Endothelin 1 gene is not a major modifier of chronic kidney disease advancement among the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Annapareddy, Shiva Nagendra Reddy; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V K S; Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Periyasamy, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidney and manifest with various renal and extra-renal complications leading to ESRD. Endothelin may contribute to various renal and extra-renal manifestations pointing to genetic and environmental modifying factors that alter the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ADPKD. In the present study we investigated six genes coding for endothelin 1 ( EDN1 ) tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) to unravel the EDN1 gene modifier effect for renal disease progression in ADPKD. Materials and Methods: The tag-SNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method in 108 ADPKD patients and 119 healthy subjects. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the association between ADPKD and EDN1 tag-SNPs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of tag-SNPs on CKD progression. The relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis was performed. Results: All loci are polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of EDN1 genotypes and haplotypes in control and ADPKD is not statistically significant. Five SNPs covering 3.4 kb forming single LD block, but the LD was not strong between SNPs. The EDN1 genotypes are not contributing to the CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that the EDN1 gene is not a major modifier of CKD advancement among ADPKD patients.

  8. Autologous blood stem-cell transplantation in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease and prior radiation to the pelvic site

    SciTech Connect

    Koerbling, M.H.; Holle, R.; Haas, R.; Knauf, W.; Doerken, B.H.; Ho, A.D.; Kuse, R.; Pralle, H.; Fliedner, T.M.; Hunstein, W. )

    1990-06-01

    Patients with relapsed Hodgkin's disease who respond to salvage therapy are successfully treated with cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and etoposide (VP-16) (CBV) followed by autologus bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Because of heavy pretreatment including radiation to the pelvic site, marrow harvest was not feasible in those patients. We therefore used blood-derived hemopoietic precursor cells as an alternative stem-cell source to rescue them after superdose chemotherapy. Hemopoietic precursor cells were mobilized into the peripheral blood either by chemotherapeutic induction of transient myelosuppression followed by an overshooting of blood stem-cell concentration, or by continuous intravenous (IV) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) administration. The median time to reach 1,000 WBC per microliter, 500 polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) per microliter, or 20,000 platelets per microliter was 10, 20.5, and 38 days, respectively, for 50% of all patients. The platelet counts of two patients never dropped below 20,000/microL following autologous blood stem-cell transplantation (ABSCT), whereas two other patients had to be supported with platelets for 75 and 86 days posttransplant until a stable peripheral platelet count of 20,000/microL was attained. Among the 11 assessable patients, seven are in unmaintained complete remission (CR) at a median follow-up of 318 days. This is a first report on a series of ABSCTs in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease proving that, despite prior damage to the marrow site, the circulating stem-cell pool is still a sufficient source of hemopoietic precursor cells for stem-cell rescue.

  9. New Targeted Treatment May Slow Disease in Patients with Advanced GIST

    Cancer.gov

    A new oral drug, regorafenib (Stivarga®), may delay the progression of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) that are resistant to treatment, according to results from an international clinical trial published November 22, 2012, in The Lancet.

  10. Effects of enzyme replacement therapy on five patients with advanced late-onset glycogen storage disease type II: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Yoshihiko; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Chikako; Wakita, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Yoko; Fukumoto, Yutaka; Oya, Yasushi; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Murata, Miho

    2012-03-01

    We examined the efficacy of 2-year enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant human α-glucosidase (GAA; Myozyme®) in five long-term ventilator-dependent adults and aged patients with advanced, late-onset glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII, also known as Pompe disease). Although all patients had advanced respiratory failure and were ventilator-dependent for more than 6 years, four showed obvious improvements in muscle strength, pulmonary function, and activities of daily living after ERT. Improvement in each parameter was more prominent in the first year than in the second year. Values in the second year were still significantly better than those at study entry and indicate stabilization in the clinical status of all patients. These results suggest that ERT continues to be effective in the second year of treatment even in patients suffering from advanced late-onset GSDII disease with severe respiratory failure.

  11. MGMT expression levels predict disease stabilisation, progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanomas treated with DTIC.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Geisler, Jürgen; Lillehaug, Johan R; Lønning, Per Eystein

    2010-07-01

    Metastatic melanoma responds poorly to systemic treatment. We report the results of a prospective single institution study evaluating O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status as a potential predictive and/or prognostic marker among patients treated with dacarbazine (DTIC) 800-1000 mg/m(2) monotherapy administered as a 3-weekly schedule for advanced malignant melanomas. The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Committee. Surgical biopsies from metastatic or loco-regional deposits obtained prior to DTIC treatment were snap-frozen immediately upon removal and stored in liquid nitrogen up to processing. Median time from enrolment to end of follow-up was 67 months. MGMT expression levels evaluated by qRT-PCR correlated significantly to DTIC benefit (CR/PR/SD; p=0.005), time to progression (TTP) (p=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (p=0.003). MGMT expression also correlated to Breslow thickness in the primary tumour (p=0.014). While MGMT promoter hypermethylation correlated to MGMT expression, MGMT promoter hypermethylation did not correlate to treatment benefit, TTP or OS, suggesting that other factors may be critical in determining MGMT expression levels in melanomas. In a Cox proportional regression analysis, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, p<0.001), MGMT expression (p=0.022) and p16(INK4a) expression (p=0.037) independently predicted OS, while TTP correlated to DTIC benefit after 6 weeks only (p=0.001). Our data reveal MGMT expression levels to be associated with disease stabilisation and prognosis in patients receiving DTIC monotherapy for advanced melanoma. The role of MGMT expression as a predictor to DTIC sensitivity versus a general prognostic factor in advanced melanomas warrants further evaluation.

  12. Levels of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid in Patients with Various Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kamo, Tetsuro; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shoji; Asakura, Takanori; Yagi, Kazuma; Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of S100/calgranulins, high-mobility group box 1, and others, and it is associated with the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and circulatory diseases. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is a decoy receptor and competitively inhibits membrane-bound RAGE activation. In this study, we measured sRAGE levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 78 patients, including 41 with interstitial pneumonia, 11 with sarcoidosis, 9 with respiratory infection, 7 with ARDS, 5 with lung cancer, and 5 with vasculitis. Among them, sRAGE was detectable in BALF of 73 patients (94%). In patients with ARDS and vasculitis, the sRAGE levels were significantly higher than in the control subjects and those with interstitial pneumonia. The sRAGE levels were positively correlated with total cell counts in BALF and serum levels of surfactant protein-D, lactate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein. There was an inverse correlation between PaO2/FIO2 ratio and sRAGE levels. These results indicate that sRAGE in BALF might be considered as a biomarker of lung inflammatory disorders, especially ARDS and vasculitis. PMID:27147899

  13. The Efficacy Profile of Rotigotine During the Waking Hours in Patients With Advanced Parkinson's Disease: A Post Hoc Analysis

    PubMed Central

    LeWitt, Peter A.; Poewe, Werner; Elmer, Lawrence W.; Asgharnejad, Mahnaz; Boroojerdi, Babak; Grieger, Frank; Bauer, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Transdermal delivery of rotigotine maintains stable plasma concentrations for 24 hours. Three phase 3 studies of rotigotine as add-on to levodopa in advanced Parkinson's disease showed a significant reduction in “off” time from baseline to end of maintenance (EoM). However, detailed analyses over the range of a day have not yet been performed. The objective was to examine the time course of the efficacy profile of rotigotine throughout the day. Methods Post hoc analysis of diary data from 3 double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of rotigotine in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease inadequately controlled with levodopa, with average “off” time of ≥2.5 h/d (CLEOPATRA-PD [NCT00244387], 16-week maintenance; PREFER, 24-week maintenance; SP921 [NCT00522379], 12-week maintenance). Patients marked 30-minute intervals as “off,” “on without troublesome dyskinesia,” “on with troublesome dyskinesia,” or “sleep.” Diaries completed on the 3 days before EoM were analyzed. A 2-sample t test was performed for comparison of rotigotine + levodopa versus placebo + levodopa for mean percentage of time per status during four 6-hour periods: 12:00am (midnight) to 6:00am, 6:00am to 12:00pm (noon), noon to 6:00pm, and 6:00pm to midnight. Results Data were available for 967 patients (placebo + levodopa, 260; rotigotine + levodopa, 707). During the 24-hour period at EoM, an advantage in mean percentage time spent “off” and “on without troublesome dyskinesia” was observed with rotigotine + levodopa versus placebo + levodopa during the three 6-hour periods from 6:00am to midnight (P < 0.05; exploratory analysis). Conclusions These exploratory analyses of patients with motor fluctuations suggest that the efficacy of rotigotine transdermal patch, as captured by diary data, in reducing “off” time and increasing “on time without troublesome dyskinesia” may cover the full waking day. PMID:26882318

  14. Advances in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Dirk; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), the commonest clinical presentation of which is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is regarded as the most devastating of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. The last decade has seen major improvements in patient care, but also rapid scientific advances, so that rational therapies based on key pathogenic mechanisms now seem plausible. ALS is strikingly heterogeneous in both its presentation, with an average one-year delay from first symptoms to diagnosis, and subsequent rate of clinical progression. Although half of patients succumb within 3-4 years of symptom onset, typically through respiratory failure, a significant minority survives into a second decade. Although an apparently sporadic disorder for most patients, without clear environmental triggers, recent genetic studies have identified disease-causing mutations in genes in several seemingly disparate functional pathways, so that motor neuron degeneration may need to be understood as a common final pathway with a number of upstream causes. This apparent aetiological and clinical heterogeneity suggests that therapeutic studies should include detailed biomarker profiling, and consider genetic as well as clinical stratification. The most common mutation, accounting for 10% of all Western hemisphere ALS, is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. This and several other genes implicate altered RNA processing and protein degradation pathways in the core of ALS pathogenesis. A major gap remains in understanding how such fundamental processes appear to function without obvious deficit in the decades prior to symptom emergence, and the study of pre-symptomatic gene carriers is an important new initiative.

  15. Mitochondrial diseases: advances and issues

    PubMed Central

    Scarpelli, Mauro; Todeschini, Alice; Volonghi, Irene; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases (MDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be related to mutation of genes encoded using either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. The advent of next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in studying the molecular bases of MDs will bring about a revolution in the field of mitochondrial medicine, also opening the possibility of better defining pathogenic mechanisms and developing novel therapeutic approaches for these devastating disorders. The canonical rules of mitochondrial medicine remain milestones, but novel issues have been raised following the use of advanced diagnostic technologies. Rigorous validation of the novel mutations detected using deep sequencing in patients with suspected MD, and a clear definition of the natural history, outcome measures, and biomarkers that could be usefully adopted in clinical trials, are mandatory goals for the scientific community. Today, therapy is often inadequate and mostly palliative. However, important advances have been made in treating some clinical entities, eg, mitochondrial neuro-gastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, for which approaches using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, orthotopic liver transplantation, and carrier erythrocyte entrapped thymidine phosphorylase enzyme therapy have recently been developed. Promising new treatment methods are being identified so that researchers, clinicians, and patients can join forces to change the history of these untreatable disorders. PMID:28243136

  16. Isoprene in the Exhaled Breath is a Novel Biomarker for Advanced Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Alkhouri, Naim; Singh, Tavankit; Alsabbagh, Eyad; Guirguis, John; Chami, Tarek; Hanouneh, Ibrahim; Grove, David; Lopez, Rocio; Dweik, Raed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaled breath can identify markers for alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the utility of breath VOCs measured by mass spectrometry to diagnose advanced fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Methods: Patients undergoing liver biopsy were recruited. Fibrosis was determined by an experienced pathologist (F0–4) and advanced fibrosis was defined as F3–4. Exhaled breath and plasma samples were collected on the same day of the biopsy. Selective ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) was used to analyze breath samples. Bonferroni correction was applied to decrease the false discovery rate. Results: In all, 61 patients were included with a mean age of 50.7±9.9 years and 57% were male. Twenty patients (33%) had advanced fibrosis (F3–4), 44% had chronic hepatitis C, 30% had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and 26% had other CLD. SIFT-MS analysis of exhaled breath revealed that patients with advanced fibrosis had significantly lower values of six compounds compared with those without advanced fibrosis, P value <0.002 for all. Isoprene was found to have the highest accuracy for the prediction of advanced fibrosis with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.855 (95% confidence interval: 0.762, 0.948). The median breath isoprene level in patients with F3–4 was 13.5[8.7, 24.7] p.p.b. compared with 40.4[26.2, 54.1] for those with F0–2, P value <0.001. Isoprene is an endogenous VOC that is a byproduct of cholesterol biosynthesis. Conclusions: Isoprene is a potential biomarker for advanced fibrosis that deserves further validation. PMID:26378385

  17. Geriatric rehabilitation for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a naturalistic prospective cohort study on feasibility and course of health status.

    PubMed

    van Dam van Isselt, Eléonore F; Spruit, Monica; Groenewegen-Sipkema, Karin H; Chavannes, Niels H; Achterberg, Wilco P

    2014-05-01

    In view of the worldwide aging population, disease-specific geriatric rehabilitation (GR) programs are needed. Therefore, we developed and implemented a postacute GR program for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (the GR-COPD program). The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the GR-COPD program and to present clinical data on patient characteristics and course of functional capacity and health status. This is a naturalistic prospective cohort study of patients with advanced COPD. A total of 61 patients entered the GR-COPD program and were eligible to participate in this study. All patients suffered from advanced COPD, and comorbidities were frequent. On admission, functional capacity and health status were severely limited but showed significant and clinically relevant improvement during the GR-COPD program. Patients with advanced COPD admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation suffer from severely impaired functional capacity and poor health status. Development and implementation of a postacute GR program for these patients are feasible and likely to offer substantial improvements. Further research is essential and should focus on designing a controlled intervention trial to investigate the efficacy of the program.

  18. Advances in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains a leading cause of death from liver disease in the United States. In studies from the Veterans Administration, patients with cirrhosis and superimposed alcoholic hepatitis had greater than 60% mortality over a 4-year period, with most of those deaths occurring in the first month. Thus, the prognosis for this disease is more ominous than for many common types of cancer (eg, breast, prostate, and colon). Moreover, ALD imposes a significant economic burden from lost wages, health care costs, and lost productivity. Unfortunately, there is still no Food and Drug Administration–approved or widely accepted drug therapy for any stage of ALD. Thus, a pressing need exists for a more detailed understanding of mechanisms of liver injury. This article reviews recent advances in mechanisms and therapy related to five major areas of direct relevance to ALD: oxidative stress; gut-liver axis and cytokine signaling; malnutrition; fibrin/clotting; and stellate cell activation/fibrosis. We also review why therapies related to these mechanisms have performed well in experimental animals and in vitro systems, but have not necessarily translated into effective therapy for humans with ALD. PMID:21088999

  19. Radiographic Differentiation of Advanced Fibrocystic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Akira, Masanori

    2017-03-01

    The concept of end-stage lung disease suggests a final common pathway for most diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. In accordance with this concept, end-stage disease is characterized radiographically and pathologically by the presence of extensive honeycombing. However, sequential computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained from patients with chronic diffuse lung disease evolve over time to show various advanced lung disease patterns other than honeycombing. In addition, several radiographically distinct honeycomb patterns, including microcystic, macrocystic, mixed, and combined emphysema and honeycombing, differentiate one advanced lung disease from another. For example, usual interstitial pneumonia (IP) usually shows mixed microcystic and macrocystic honeycombing. In contrast, CT images of long-standing fibrotic nonspecific IP typically show only small, scattered foci of honeycombing; instead, most enlarged airspaces observed in the advanced stage of this disease represent dilatation of bronchioles. In desquamative IP and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, focal opacities typically evolve into emphysema-like lesions seen on CT imaging. In combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema and sarcoidosis, the cysts tend to be larger than those observed in usual IP. Sequential CT scans in other chronic, diffuse lung diseases also show various distinctive changes. This article highlights radiographic patterns of lung destruction that belie a single common pathway to end-stage lung disease. Recognition of distinct radiographic patterns of lung destruction can help differentiate diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, even in advanced stages of disease evolution.

  20. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  1. Mutations within enhancer II and BCP regions of hepatitis B virus in relation to advanced liver diseases in patients infected with subgenotype B3 in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Anggorowati, Nungki; Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Ratnasari, Neneng; Maduseno, Sutanto; Purnama, Putut Bayu; Nurdjanah, Siti; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the characteristics of mutations within the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome, their roles in the pathogenesis of advanced liver diseases, and the involvement of host properties of HBV-infected individuals have not been conducted in subgenotype B3-infected populations. For addressing this issue, 40 cases with HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive advanced liver diseases, including advanced liver cancer and cirrhosis (male 31, female 9, age 54.4 ± 11.6-year-old), were collected and compared with 109 cases with chronic hepatitis B (male 71, female 38, age 38.0 ± 13.4-year-old). Mutations in enhancer II (Enh II) and basal core promoter (BCP)/precore regions were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. HBV viral load was examined by real-time PCR. For all examined regions, the prevalence of mutation was significantly higher in cases with advanced liver diseases. Multivariate analysis showed that, in patients older than 45 years, C1638T and T1753V mutations constituted independent risk factors for the advancement of liver diseases. The presence of C1638T and T1753V mutations may serve as predictive markers for the progression of liver diseases in Indonesia and other countries, where subgenotype B3 infection is prevalent.

  2. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  3. Recent Advances in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Murch, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Recent diagnostic advances have demonstrated that celiac disease is relatively common although most patients have less florid symptoms than previously recognised. The mucosal lesion of this autoimmune disorder depends on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The characteristic antibodies to tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG-2) and deamidated gliadin peptides may be produced in persons possessing the relevant HLA-DQ genotypes if intact gliadin peptides can penetrate the epithelial barrier to reach antigen presenting cells. Progression from celiac autoimmunity to overt disease may depend on innate immune mechanisms, not HLA-restricted, where IL-15 is generated within the epithelial compartment. A specific innate immune response previously thought restricted to invertebrates, the encapsulation reaction, may contribute to mucosal volume expansion through recruitment of syndecan-expressing leukocytes and stimulated matrix production. It is notable that tissue transglutaminase is critical in this reaction in insects, and that the very few insects that can predate wheat, possess specific salivary or intestinal enzymes that degrade gluten. Animal models in HLA-DQ transgenic mice suggest that the microbial flora of the intestine may play a role in host responses and modulate the evolution of the disease. This suggests that therapeutic modulation of the microbiome may contribute to management of celiac disease. In developing world countries, there is a potential difficulty in histological diagnosis because of the widespread incidence of environmental enteropathy amongst apparently healthy children. Thus, recognition of local patterns of enteropathy will be important for histopathologists, and high titre tTG-2 autoantibody titres may hold considerable diagnostic significance.

  4. Sorafenib therapy following resection prolongs disease-free survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma at a high risk of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yadi; Zheng, Yun; He, Wei; Li, Qijiong; Shen, Jingxian; Hong, Jian; Zou, Ruhai; Qiu, Jiliang; Li, Binkui; Yuan, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is the standard systemic treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, its therapeutic value in patients with HCC following resection remains controversial. The current retrospective study was undertaken to assess the effects of sorafenib treatment following surgical resection in patients with advanced HCC disease who were at a high risk for recurrence. Between July 2010 and July 2013, a consecutive cohort of 42 patients with advanced HCC and at a high risk of recurrence (i.e., those with portal vein tumor thrombosis, adjacent organ involvement or tumor rupture) who underwent resection were analyzed. The patients were categorized into the sorafenib group (n=14) or the best supportive care (BSC) group (n=28). Although the histological grade, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stage, tumor size, nodule number and proportion of patients with high serum α-fetoprotein levels were comparable between the sorafenib and BSC groups, those receiving sorafenib following resection had significantly longer disease-free survival (DFS) of 5.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2–9.2 months] compared with the BSC group [1.8 months (95% CI, 0.6–3.0 months)]. No differences in overall survival were noted between the groups. Furthermore, no drug-related adverse events resulted in discontinuation of sorafenib therapy. Univariate log-rank analysis revealed that sorafenib treatment (P=0.002) and treatment prior to resection (P=0.012) were significantly associated with longer DFS; however, sorafenib therapy (P=0.027) and tumor size (P=0.028) were associated with longer DFS by multivariate analysis. Furthermore, sorafenib was well-tolerated and improved DFS in patients with advanced HCC who underwent hepatic resection. Thus, tumor resection followed by sorafenib therapy may represent an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with advanced HCC. This possibility should be confirmed in larger, multicenter studies. PMID:28356989

  5. Test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III, dyskinesia scales, and timed motor tests in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: an argument against multiple baseline assessments.

    PubMed

    Metman, Leo Verhagen; Myre, Brian; Verwey, Niek; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Arzbaecher, Jean; Sierens, Diane; Bakay, Roy

    2004-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The secondary objective was to assess the intra-rater reliability of standard timed motor tests and dyskinesia scales to determine the necessity of multiple baseline core evaluations before surgery for PD. We carried out two standardized preoperative core evaluations of patients with advanced PD scheduled to undergo deep brain stimulation. Patients were examined in the defined off and on conditions by the same rater. UPDRS-III, timed tests, and dyskinesia scores from the two evaluations were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Differences in UPDRS-III scores for the two visits were clinically and statistically nonsignificant, and the ICC was 0.9. Similarly, there were no significant differences in timed motor tests or dyskinesia scores, with a median ICC of 0.8. The results indicate that previous findings of high test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III in early untreated PD patients can now be extended to those with advanced disease complicated by motor fluctuations. In addition, test-retest reliability of dyskinesia scales and timed motor tests was high. Taken together, these findings challenge the need for multiple baseline assessments as currently stipulated in core assessment protocols for surgical intervention in PD.

  6. Successful Treatment of Hepatitis C with Simeprevir, Sofosbuvir, and Ribavirin in an HIV Coinfected Liver Transplant Patient with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Anna; Hussaini, Trana; Partovi, Nilufar; Erb, Siegfried R; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Zalunardo, Nadia; Pick, Neora; Hull, Mark; Yoshida, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Although major advances have occurred in treating patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the development of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), treatment of liver transplant recipients with HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection, and renal disease is challenging due to the lack of efficacy and safety data in this population. We report a case of successful HCV therapy in a postliver transplant HIV coinfected patient, with stage 4 chronic kidney disease, using an all-oral regimen of simeprevir, sofosbuvir, and ribavirin. The 51-year-old male achieved SVR24, and no specific HIV-related or transplant-related adverse events were documented during the treatment period. The new DAAs show promise for HIV coinfected patients and those with severe to end-stage renal disease (ESRD); however, robust clinical trials or large cohort studies will need to be conducted to confirm the efficacy and safety of these newer agents in this setting.

  7. Daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, achieved high sustained virological response rates in patients with HCV infection and advanced liver disease in a real-world cohort

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Tania M; Petersen, Jörg; Herzer, Kerstin; Ferenci, Peter; Gschwantler, Michael; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Berg, Thomas; Spengler, Ulrich; Weiland, Ola; van der Valk, Marc; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Zhao, Yue; Jimenez-Exposito, Maria Jesus; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assessed the effectiveness and safety of daclatasvir (DCV) plus sofosbuvir (SOF), with or without ribavirin (RBV), in a large real-world cohort, including patients with advanced liver disease. Design Adults with chronic HCV infection at high risk of decompensation or death within 12 months and with no available treatment options were treated in a European compassionate use programme. The recommended regimen was DCV 60 mg plus SOF 400 mg for 24 weeks; RBV addition or shorter duration was allowed at physicians' discretion. The primary endpoint was sustained virological response at post-treatment week 12 (SVR12). Results Of the 485 evaluable patients, 359 received DCV+SOF and 126 DCV+SOF+RBV. Most patients were men (66%), white (93%) and treatment-experienced (70%). The most frequent HCV genotypes were 1b (36%), 1a (33%) and 3 (21%), and 80% of patients had cirrhosis (42% Child–Pugh B/C; 46% Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score >10). SVR12 (modified intention-to-treat) was achieved by 91% of patients (419/460); 1 patient had virological breakthrough and 13 patients relapsed. Virological failure was not associated with treatment group (adjusted risk difference DCV+SOF minus DCV+SOF+RBV: 1.06%; 95% CI −2.22% to 4.35%). High SVR12 was observed regardless of HCV genotype or cirrhosis, liver transplant or HIV/HCV coinfection status. Twenty eight patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events (n=18) or death (n=10) and 18 died during follow-up. Deaths and most safety events were associated with advanced liver disease and not considered treatment related. Conclusions DCV+SOF with or without RBV achieved high SVR12 and was well tolerated in a diverse cohort of patients with severe liver disease. Trial registration number NCT0209966. PMID:27605539

  8. Older patient considering treatment for advanced renal disease: protocol for a scoping review of the information available for shared decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Mai; Jose, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Older adults constitute the largest group of patients on dialysis in most parts of the world. Management of advanced renal disease in the older adult is complex; treatment outcomes and prognosis can be markedly different from younger patients. Clinical teams caring for such patients are often called on to provide information regarding prognosis and outcomes with treatment—particularly, the comparison between having dialysis treatment versus not having dialysis. These discussions can be difficult for clinicians because they have to contend with incomplete or nascent data regarding prognosis and outcomes in this age group. We aim to summarise the currently available information regarding the prognosis and outcomes of advanced renal disease in the older adult by means of a scoping review of the literature. This article discusses our protocol. Methods This scoping review will be undertaken in accordance with the Joanna Briggs Institute's methodology for scoping reviews. A directed search will look for relevant articles in English (within electronic databases and the grey literature), written between 2000 and 2016, which have studied older patients with advanced renal disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2). After screening by two independent reviewers, selected articles will be analysed using a data charting tool. Reporting will include descriptions, analysis of themes using qualitative software and display of information using charts. Ethics and dissemination This scoping review will analyse previously collected data, and so does not require ethical approval. Results will be disseminated through academic journals, conferences and seminars. We anticipate that our summary of the currently available knowledge regarding the older adult with advanced renal disease will be a repository of information for clinicians in the field. We expect to identify areas of study that are suited to systematic reviews. Our findings can also be

  9. Telemedicine-assisted home support for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: preliminary results after nine-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vontetsianos, Th; Giovas, P; Katsaras, Th; Rigopoulou, A; Mpirmpa, G; Giaboudakis, P; Koyrelea, S; Kontopyrgias, G; Tsoulkas, B

    2005-01-01

    Eighteen well motivated patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who had had at least four hospitalizations during the previous two years, were included in a home-based telemedicine study. A visiting nurse was equipped with a case containing a laptop computer and a number of medical devices, including an electrocardiogram recorder, spirometer, oximeter and blood pressure monitor. It also contained a videoconference camera, for realtime audiovisual connection with the hospital using the patient's TV set. A single ISDN line (128 kbit/s) was installed in each house before the study began. After nine months, there was a decrease in hospitalizations, emergency department visits and use of health services. The patient's disease knowledge and self-management also improved. It seems likely that adopting telemedicine in everyday clinical practice could substantially improve the care of chronically ill patients.

  10. [Benefit of L-DOPA-without-DCI (decarboxylase inhibitor) therapy on wearing-off phenomenon in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Hironishi, Masaya; Miwa, Hideto; Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2002-02-01

    Motor fluctuation is the most annoying complication experienced by patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. A Combination therapy of a dopamine receptor agonist and levodopa/DCI(DOPA-decarboxylase inhibitor) is commonly used to control the complication. Although administration of levodopa/DCI is useful in minimizing peripheral side effects of levodopa, it increases the incidence of motor complications due to the marked fluctuation of plasma levodopa level. The use of levodopa without DCI might be an option for controlling motor fluctuation, because the extent of plasma levodopa level fluctuation is smaller when levodopa is administered without DCI than with DCI. Six patients with Parkinson's disease who had troublesome motor complications under levodopa/DCI and DA agonist combination therapy were compared in terms of the extent of motor complications and their satisfaction after changing their therapy from levodopa/DCI to levodopa without DCI. The change from levodopa/DCI to levodopa(without DCI) was carried out all at once, and the levodopa/DCI to levodopa dose ratio was started at 1:4. The dose of levodopa(without DCI) was then increased gradually until motor complications improved or side effects were observed in patients. Except two patients who voluntarily quitted levodopa and restarted DOPA/DCI before the dose of levodopa fixed, all cases showed improvement of wearing-off phenomenon. No adverse event was observed. Levodopa-without-DCI-therapy was effective for controlling motor fluctuation in patients of Parkinson's disease in advanced stages.

  11. Multiplex Serum Protein Analysis Identifies Novel Biomarkers of Advanced Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease with the Potential to Improve Diagnostic Accuracy of Established Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Wockner, Leesa F.; Hoffmann, Isabell; Horsfall, Leigh U.; Fagan, Kevin J.; Bijin, Veonice; Lee, Bernett; Clouston, Andrew D.; Lampe, Guy; Connolly, John E.; Powell, Elizabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis are urgently required, especially for use in non-specialist settings. The aim of this study was to identify novel serum biomarkers of advanced fibrosis. Methods We performed an unbiased screen of 120 serum analytes including cytokines, chemokines and proteases in 70 patients (35 without fibrosis, 35 with cirrhosis on biopsy), and selected a panel of 44 candidate biomarkers, which were subsequently measured in a mixed-etiology cohort of 432 patients with known serum HA, PIIINP and TIMP1 (which comprise the validated Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) test). Multivariate logistic regression modelling was used to generate models for the prediction of advanced or significant fibrosis (METAVIR ≥F3 and ≥F2, respectively); in addition to identifying biomarkers of disease activity and steatohepatitis. Results Seventeen analytes were significantly differentially expressed between patients with no advanced fibrosis and patients with advanced fibrosis, the most significant being hyaluronic acid (HA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 7 (p = 2.9E-41 and p = 1.0E-26, respectively). The optimal model for the prediction of advanced fibrosis comprised HA, MMP7, MMP1, alphafetoprotein (AFP) and the AST to platelet ratio index (APRI). We demonstrate enhanced diagnostic accuracy (AUROC = 0.938) compared to a model comprising HA, PIIINP and TIMP1 alone (ELF) (AUROC = 0.898, p<0.0001, De Long’s test). Conclusions We have identified novel serum biomarkers of advanced liver fibrosis, which have the potential to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of established biomarkers. Our data suggest MMP7 is a valuable indicator of advanced fibrosis and may play a role in liver fibrogenesis. PMID:27861569

  12. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  13. Phase I clinical trial of cell therapy in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: follow-up of up to 3 years

    PubMed Central

    Stessuk, Talita; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Greco, Oswaldo Tadeu; Bilaqui, Aldemir; Ribeiro-Paes, Maria José de Oliveira; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a major inflammatory disease of the airways and an enormous therapeutic challenge. Within the spectrum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary emphysema is characterized by the destruction of the alveolar walls with an increase in the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles but without significant pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic options are limited and palliative since they are unable to promote morphological and functional regeneration of the alveolar tissue. In this context, new therapeutic approaches, such as cell therapy with adult stem cells, are being evaluated. Objective This article aims to describe the follow-up of up to 3 years after the beginning of a phase I clinical trial and discuss the spirometry parameters achieved by patients with advanced pulmonary emphysema treated with bone marrow mononuclear cells. Methods Four patients with advanced pulmonary emphysema were submitted to autologous infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells. Follow-ups were performed by spirometry up to 3 years after the procedure. Results The results showed that autologous cell therapy in patients having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a safe procedure and free of adverse effects. There was an improvement in laboratory parameters (spirometry) and a slowing down in the process of pathological degeneration. Also, patients reported improvements in the clinical condition and quality of life. Conclusions Despite being in the initial stage and in spite of the small sample, the results of the clinical protocol of cell therapy in advanced pulmonary emphysema as proposed in this study, open new therapeutic perspectives in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is worth emphasizing that this study corresponds to the first study in the literature that reports a change in the natural history of pulmonary emphysema after the use of cell therapy with a pool of bone marrow mononuclear cells. PMID:24255620

  14. Management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease: recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Blok, Ilja M; van Riel, Annelieke C M J; Mulder, Barbara J M; Bouma, Berto J

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a serious complication of adult congenital heart disease associated with systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. Although early shunt closure restricts development of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients remain at risk even after repair. The development of pulmonary arterial hypertension is associated with a markedly increased morbidity and mortality. It is important to identify patients with a poor prognosis using disease specific markers. Echocardiography and biomarkers arise as practical tools to determine the risk of mortality. Although pulmonary arterial hypertension cannot be cured, four classes of disease-targeting therapies are currently available and several promising therapies are being studied. There is a shift in drug studies towards more clinically relevant endpoints such as time to clinical worsening and morbidity and mortality events.

  15. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  16. Tenofovir-based rescue therapy for advanced liver disease in 6 patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B virus and receiving lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sonia; Guillemi, Silvia; Jahnke, Natalie; Montessori, Valentina; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio S G

    2008-02-01

    We summarize the clinical history and laboratory results following the introduction of tenofovir among 6 patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) who presented with severe liver disease while receiving lamivudine-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. In all cases, the introduction of tenofovir led to a sustained undetectable HBV and HIV loads, with marked clinical and laboratory improvement in liver function. We provide supporting evidence for the role of tenofovir in the management of advanced HBV infection in HIV-positive patients after the development of lamivudine resistance.

  17. New advances in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for surgical wounds of patients affected with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Francesco; Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Corte, Angela Della; Candilio, Giuseppe; Campitiello, Ferdinando; Canonico, Silvestro

    2014-03-01

    Surgical site complications (SSC) negatively affect costs of care and prolong length of stay. Crohn's disease (CD) is a risk factor for SSC. CD patients often need surgery, sometimes requiring stoma. Our primary aim was to compare the effects on SSC of a portable device for NPWT (PICO, Smith & Nephew, London, UK) with gauze dressings after elective surgery for CD. Secondary aims were manageability and safety of PICO and its feasibility as home therapy. Between 2010 and 2012, 50 patients were assigned to treatment with either PICO (n = 25) or conventional dressings (n = 25). Each patient completed 12-month follow-up. Parameters of interests for primary aim were SSC, surgical complications, and readmission rates. Data on difficulties in managing PICO and device-related complications were also collected. Patients receiving PICO had less SSC, resulting in shorter hospital stay. At last follow-up, readmission rates were lower with PICO. No differences were observed in surgical complications between groups. No patients reported difficulties in managing the device. Among patients discharged with PICO, none needed to come back to the hospital for device malfunctioning or inability to manage it. PICO reduces SSC and length of stay in selected CD patients compared with conventional dressings. The device is safe and user friendly.

  18. Surgical orthodontic treatment for a patient with advanced periodontal disease: evaluation with electromyography and 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kan; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro

    2009-09-01

    We report here the case of a woman with Class III malocclusion and advanced periodontal disease who was treated with surgical orthodontic correction. Functional recovery after orthodontic treatment is often monitored by serial electromyography of the masticatory muscles, whereas 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography can provide detailed structural information about, for example, periodontal bone defects. However, it is unclear whether the information obtained via these methods is sufficient to determine the treatment goal. It might be useful to address this issue for patients with advanced periodontal disease because of much variability between patients in the determination of treatment goals. We used detailed information obtained by 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography to identify periodontal bone defects and set appropriate treatment goals for inclination of the incisors and mandibular surgery. Results for this patient included stable occlusion and improved facial esthetics. This case report illustrates the benefits of establishing treatment goals acceptable to the patient, based on precise 3-dimensional assessment of dentoalveolar bone, and by using masticatory muscle activity to monitor the stability of occlusion.

  19. Management of thrombocytopenia in advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gangireddy, V G R; Kanneganti, P C; Sridhar, S; Talla, S; Coleman, T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (defined as a platelet count <150×10(9)) is a well-known complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and has been observed in 76% to 85% of patients. Significant thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50×10(9) to 75×10(9)) occurs in approximately 13% of patients with cirrhosis. Thrombocytopenia can negatively impact the care of patients with severe liver disease by potentially interfering with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Multiple factors can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia including splenic platelet sequestration, immunological processes, bone marrow suppression by chronic viral infection, and reduced levels or activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin. The present review focuses on the etiologies and management options for severe thrombocytopenia in the setting of advanced liver disease.

  20. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre

    PubMed Central

    Hing (Wong), Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. Aim: To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. Conclusion: The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients’ preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia. PMID:27803566

  1. Rotigotine transdermal system for long-term treatment of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: results of two open-label extension studies, CLEOPATRA-PD and PREFER.

    PubMed

    LeWitt, Peter A; Boroojerdi, Babak; Surmann, Erwin; Poewe, Werner

    2013-07-01

    Open-label extensions [studies SP516 (NCT00501969) and SP715 (NCT00594386)] of the CLEOPATRA-PD and PREFER studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of the dopaminergic agonist, rotigotine, over several years of follow-up in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Eligible subjects completing the double-blind trials received open-label adjunctive rotigotine (≤16 mg/24 h) for up to 4 and 6 years in Studies SP516 and SP715, respectively. Safety and tolerability were assessed using adverse events, vital signs and laboratory parameters, and efficacy assessed using the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS). Of the 395 and 258 patients enrolled in the SP516 and SP715 studies, 48 and 45 % completed, respectively. Adverse events were typically dopaminergic effects [e.g., somnolence (18-25 %/patient-year), insomnia (5-7 %/patient-year), dyskinesias (4-8 %/patient-year) and hallucinations (4-8 %/patient-year)], or related to the transdermal application of a patch (application site reactions: 14-15 %/patient-year). There were no clinically relevant changes in vital signs or laboratory parameters in either study. Mean UPDRS part II (activities of daily living) and part III (motor function) total scores improved from double-blind baseline during dose titration, then gradually declined over the maintenance period. In study SP516, mean UPDRS part II and III total scores were 0.8 points above and 2.8 points below double-blind baseline, respectively, at end of treatment. In study SP715, mean UPDRS part II and III total scores were 4.1 points above and 0.2 points below baseline, respectively, at end of treatment. In these open-label studies, adjunctive rotigotine was efficacious with an acceptable safety and tolerability profile in patients with advanced PD for up to 6 years.

  2. Relationship between response to induction chemotherapy and disease control in patients with advanced laryngeal carcinoma included in an organ preservation protocol.

    PubMed

    León, Xavier; Valero, Cristina; Rovira, Carlota; Rodriguez, Camilo; López, Montserrat; García-Lorenzo, Jacinto; Quer, Miquel

    2017-03-27

    The aim of the study is to analyze the relationship between the degree of response to induction chemotherapy and the disease control in patients with locally advanced laryngeal carcinomas candidates to total laryngectomy. This retrospective study includes 389 patients with T3-T4 laryngeal tumors candidates to total laryngectomy, diagnosed between 1985 and 2013, treated with induction chemotherapy in an organ preservation protocol. Five-year local recurrence-free survival for patients receiving conservative treatment with radiotherapy after a complete response to induction chemotherapy was 75.4%; for patients with partial response greater than 50%, it was 62.0%; and for patients with the absence of response, it was 32.7%. There were significant differences in local recurrence-free survival and laryngeal dysfunction-free survival according to the response to induction chemotherapy (P = 0.0001) at the expense of patients with absence of response to induction chemotherapy. Patients with partial response greater than 50% treated with radiotherapy had a tendency to have worse local recurrence-free survival and laryngeal dysfunction-free survival than patients with complete response, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Patients with the absence of response after induction chemotherapy had significant differences in disease-specific survival according to the second treatment: for patients treated with surgery it was 70.2%, whereas for patients treated with radiotherapy, it was 28.2% (P = 0.0001). In patients with the absence of response to induction chemotherapy, conservative treatment with radiotherapy implies a significant decrease in survival.

  3. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Lara; Dirven, Linda; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Koekkoek, Johan A. F.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Pasman, H. Roeline W.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL) care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP). Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population. PMID:27834803

  4. Gait analysis in patients with advanced Parkinson disease: different or additive effects on gait induced by levodopa and chronic STN stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lubik, S; Fogel, W; Tronnier, V; Krause, M; König, J; Jost, W H

    2006-02-01

    The aim of our study was to observe the effects on gait parameters induced by STN stimulation and levodopa medication in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in order to determine different or additive effects. Therefore we examined 12 patients with advanced Parkinson disease after bilateral implantation of DBS into the STN. We assessed the motor score of the UPDRS and quantitative gait analysis under 4 treatment conditions: with and without stimulation as well as with and without levodopa. The mean improvement of the UPDRS motor score was almost the same with levodopa and DBS. Combining both therapies we saw a further improvement of the motor score. Gait parameters of patients with PD treated either with levodopa or STN stimulation were greatly improved. A significant difference between levodopa and STN stimulation could only be shown for the parameters velocity and step length. These parameters improved more with levodopa than with stimulation. The combination of both therapeutic methods showed the best results on the UPDRS motor score and gait parameters.

  5. Patient safety: honoring advanced directives.

    PubMed

    Tice, Martha A

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare providers typically think of patient safety in the context of preventing iatrogenic injury. Prevention of falls and medication or treatment errors is the typical focus of adverse event analyses. If healthcare providers are committed to honoring the wishes of patients, then perhaps failures to honor advanced directives should be viewed as reportable medical errors.

  6. The Impact of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade on Renal Outcomes and Mortality in Pre-Dialysis Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yun Jung; Kim, Sun Moon; Shin, Byung Chul; Kim, Hyun Lee; Chung, Jong Hoon; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Chungsik

    2017-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) blockade is thought to slow renal progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it remains uncertain if the habitual use of RAS inhibitors affects renal progression and outcomes in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD. In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we identified 2,076 pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD (stage 4 or 5) from a total of 33,722 CKD patients. RAS blockade users were paired with non-users for analyses using inverse probability of treatment-weighted (IPTW) and propensity score (PS) matching. The outcomes were renal death, all-cause mortality, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, and interactive factors as composite outcomes. RAS blockade users showed an increased risk of renal death in PS-matched analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.381; 95% CI, 1.071–1.781; P = 0.013), which was in agreement with the results of IPTW analysis (HR, 1.298; 95% CI, 1.123–1.500; P < 0.001). The risk of composite outcomes was higher in RAS blockade users in IPTW (HR, 1.154; 95% CI, 1.016–1.310; P = 0.027), but was marginal significance in PS matched analysis (HR, 1.243; 95% CI, 0.996–1.550; P = 0.054). The habitual use of RAS blockades in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD may have a detrimental effect on renal outcome without improving all-cause mortality. Further studies are warranted to determine whether withholding RAS blockade may lead to better outcomes in these patients. PMID:28122064

  7. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.

  8. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  9. Recent advances in heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, J; McCall, J W; Genchi, C; Bazzocchi, C; Kramer, L; Simòn, F; Martarino, M

    2004-10-28

    This compilation of articles consists of four papers presented at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) (held in New Orleans, LA, USA, on 10–14 August 2003) in a symposium session titled “ Recent Advances in Heartworm Disease,” organized and chaired by JohnW. McCall and Jorge Guerrero. The first paper(Guerrero) covered the American Heartworm Society’s most recent revision of their guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of heartworm infection in dogs, based on new research and clinical experience, particularly in the areas of heartworm chemoprophylaxis, adulticide therapy,and serologic testing and retesting. The entire updated 2003 “Guidelines” are presented herein.One paper (McCall) reviewed the “soft-kill” adulticidal and “safety-net” (reach-back, retroactive,clinical prophylactic) activity of prolonged dosing of prophylactic doses of macrocyclic lactones,concluding that ivermectin is the most effective in this way, milbemycin oxime is the least effective,and the activity of injectable moxidectin and selamectin lies between that of ivermectin and milbemycin oxime. The two remaining papers provided an overview of the discovery, rediscovery,phylogeny, and biological association between Wolbachia endosymbionts and filarial nematodes(Genchi and co-authors) and compelling evidence that Wolbachia may play a major role in the immunopathogenesis of filarial diseases of man and animals (Kramer and co-authors).

  10. Multicenter study of autologous adrenal medullary transplantation to the corpus striatum in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, C G; Olanow, C W; Koller, W C; Penn, R D; Cahill, D; Morantz, R; Stebbins, G; Tanner, C M; Klawans, H L; Shannon, K M

    1989-02-09

    In 19 patients with severe Parkinson's disease, we replicated the surgical procedures developed by Madrazo et al. for transplantation of the adrenal medulla to the striatum, and followed them for six months after operation. We monitored their motor function with the use of standardized scales and determined the amount and quality of "on" and "off" time (the hours of the waking day when the antiparkinsonian medications were effective and ineffective, respectively). We found significant improvement in focal areas of motor function. The mean percentage of on time during the day increased from 47.6 percent to 75.0 percent (P = 0.012); the mean percentage of on time without chorea increased from 26.6 percent to 59.2 percent (P = 0.006); the mean severity of off time decreased as assessed by both the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Scale (P = 0.002) and the Schwab and England scale (P = 0.037). In contrast to the finding of Madrazo et al., however, the dosages of antiparkinsonian medications could not be decreased and postoperative morbidity was substantial. Despite cautious optimism, we conclude that the widespread use of this procedure outside of research centers is premature, since the improvement we found was slighter than in the previous cases.

  11. Recent advances in oesophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Al Dulaimi, David

    2014-01-01

    Dong Y, Qi B, Feng XY, Jiang CM. Meta-analysis of Barrett's esophagus in China. World J Gastroenterol 2013;19(46):8770-8779 The disease pattern of Barrett's esophagus (BE) in China is poorly characterised particularly in comparison with other developed countries. This meta-analysis of 3873 cases of BE collated from 69 clinical studies conducted in 25 provinces between 2000 and 2011 investigated the epidemiology and characteristics of BE in China compared to Western countries. The total endoscopic detection rate of BE was 1.0% (95%CI: 0.1%-1.8%) with an average patient age of 49.07 ± 5.09 years, lower than many Western countries.The authors postulate this may be attributed to environmental risk factor variation, distinct genetics and different medical practice including diagnostic criteria for BE and expertise in endoscopy. This study identified a 1.781 male predominancefor BE in China, consistent with Western reports. Short-segment BE accounted for 80.3% of cases with island type and cardiac type the most common endoscopic (44.8%) and histological (40.0%) manifestations respectively. Of the 1283 BE cases followed up for three to 36 months the incidence of esophageal cancer was 1.418 per 1000 person-years, lower than the incidence reported in Western countries. Lee HS, Jeon SW. Barrett esophagus in Asia: same disease with different pattern. ClinEndosc 2014;47(1):15-22 Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common, pre-cancerous condition characterised by intestinal metaplasia of squamous esophageal epithelium usually attributed to chronic gastric acid exposure. This review article explores important differences in the disease pattern of BE between Asian and the Western countries. Overall the prevalence of BE is lower in Asia compared to the West with a greater proportion of short-segment type. The authors identify great variability in the endoscopic and pathologic diagnostic criteria for BE. Many of the studies in Asian countries did not use a standardised four

  12. Advanced therapies in patients with congenital heart disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension: results from a long-term, single center, real-world follow-up.

    PubMed

    Favilli, Silvia; Spaziani, Gaia; Ballo, Piercarlo; Fibbi, Veronica; Santoro, Gennaro; Chiappa, Enrico; Arcangeli, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a common finding in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), and has relevant prognostic implications. The recent introduction of advanced therapies (AT) considerably improved the clinical outcome of these patients, but real-world data are still lacking. We aimed at reporting the results of a long-term follow-up of CHD patients with PAH undergoing AT, followed at a tertiary Center during the two last decades. The study population included a total of 34 patients with an established diagnosis of CHD-related PAH. In addition to conventional treatment, 97% of patients started AT during the follow-up. Over a median follow-up of 9 [3-31] years, 11 (32.4%) patients died: 7 of them were affected by Eisenmenger syndrome and the majority of patients were in NYHA class ≥3 at the time of death. Among the 23 patients who were alive at the last follow-up, the majority were in NYHA class I-II. Oxygen saturation and 6-min walking distance improved in all subjects within the first 6 months after starting of AT. One patient with ventricular septum defect and high pulmonary resistances was successfully treated with AT to lower resistances and underwent defect closure. A good clinical outcome was also observed in the subset (n = 8) with Down syndrome. The results of this real-world experience suggest that, despite a relatively high mortality rate mostly related to late commencement of AT, the clinical outcome of subjects with CHD-related PAH undergoing AT are characterized by a good quality of life and clinical improvement in most patients.

  13. High levels of periostin correlate with increased fracture rate, diffuse MRI pattern, abnormal bone remodeling and advanced disease stage in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Christoulas, D; Kastritis, E; Bagratuni, T; Gavriatopoulou, M; Roussou, M; Papatheodorou, A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Liakou, C; Panagiotidis, I; Migkou, M; Kokkoris, P; Moulopoulos, L A; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is implicated in the biology of normal bone remodeling and in different cancer cell growth and metastasis. However, there is no information on the role of periostin in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, we evaluated periostin in six myeloma cell lines in vitro; in the bone marrow plasma and serum of 105 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM (NDMM) patients and in the serum of 23 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 33 smoldering MM (SMM) patients, 30 patients at the plateau phase post-first-line therapy, 30 patients at first relapse and 30 healthy controls. We found high levels of periostin in the supernatants of myeloma cell lines compared with ovarian cancer cell lines that were not influenced by the incubation with the stromal cell line HS5. In NDMM patients the bone marrow plasma periostin was almost fourfold higher compared with the serum levels of periostin and correlated with the presence of fractures and of diffuse magnetic resonance imaging pattern of marrow infiltration. Serum periostin was elevated in NDMM patients compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients and correlated with advanced disease stage, high lactate dehydrogenase, increased activin-A, increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Patients at first relapse had also elevated periostin compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients, while even patients at the plateau phase had elevated serum periostin compared with healthy controls. These results support an important role of periostin in the biology of myeloma and reveal periostin as a possible target for the development of antimyeloma drugs. PMID:27716740

  14. New Advances in Polycystic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos-Laso, A; Izquierdo-Sánchez, L; Lee-Law, P Y; Perugorria, M J; Marzioni, M; Marin, J J G; Bujanda, L; Banales, J M

    2017-02-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) include a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders inherited as dominant or recessive genetic traits; they are manifested alone or in association with polycystic kidney disease. Ductal plate malformation during embryogenesis and the loss of heterozygosity linked to second-hit mutations may promote the dilatation and/or development of a large number (> 20) of biliary cysts, which are the main cause of morbidity in these patients. Surgical procedures aimed to eliminate symptomatic cysts show short-term beneficial effects, but are not able to block the disease progression. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative option. Intense studies on the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PLDs have resulted in different clinical trials, some of them with promising outcomes. Here the authors summarize the key aspects of PLD etiology, pathogenesis, and therapy, highlighting the most recent advances and future research directions.

  15. A study to describe the health trajectory of patients with advanced renal disease who choose not to receive dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kilshaw, Lindsey; Sammut, Hannah; Asher, Rebecca; Williams, Peter; Saxena, Rema; Howse, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) are unlikely to benefit from dialysis and conservative management (CM) is offered as a positive alternative. Understanding the trajectory of illness by health care professionals may improve end-of-life care. Methods We aimed to describe the trajectory of functional status within our CM population through a prospective, observational study using the objective Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and subjective Barthel Index (BI) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) [EuroQol 5D-5L (EQ-5D-5L)] measurements and correlating them with demographic and laboratory data and with sentinel events. Results There was a significant increase in TUG scores over the 6 months prior to death {2.24 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–4.32], P = 0.017} and a significant decrease in EQ-5D-5L [−0.19 (95% CI −0.33 to −0.06), P = 0.006]. The only significant associations with mortality were serum albumin [hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (95% CI 0.67–0.97), P = 0.024] and male gender [HR 5.94 (95% CI 1.50–23.5), P = 0.011]. Conclusions We have shown there is a significant decline in functional status in the last 6 months before death in the CM population. Of interest, there was a significant relationship of lower serum albumin with functional decline and risk of death. We hope that with improved insight into disease trajectories we can improve our ability to identify and respond to the changes in needs of these patients, facilitate complex and sensitive end-of-life discussions and improve end-of-life care. PMID:27274835

  16. Effects of neurostimulation for advanced Parkinson’s disease patients on motor symptoms: A multiple-treatments meta-analysas of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cheng-Long; Shao, Bei; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Yi; Lin, Shi-Yi; Wang, Wen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure of choice for patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD). We aim to evaluate the efficacy of GPi (globus pallidus internus), STN (subthalamic nucleus)-DBS and medical therapy for PD. We conducted a systematic review and multiple-treatments meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy of neurostimulation and medical therapy for PD patients. Sixteen eligible studies were included in this analysis. We pooled the whole data and found obvious difference between GPi-DBS versus medical therapy and STN-DBS versus medical therapy in terms of UPDRS scores (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale). Meanwhile, we found GPi-DBS had the similar efficacy on the UPDRS scores when compared with STN-DBS. What is more, quality of life, measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson’s disease Questionnaire) showed greater improvement after GPi-DBS than STN-DBS. Five studies showed STN-DBS was more effective for reduction in medication than GPi-DBS. Overall, either GPi-DBS or STN-DBS was an effective technique to control PD patients’ symptoms and improved their functionality and quality of life. Meanwhile, the UPDRS scores measuring parkinsonian symptoms revealed no significant difference between GPi-DBS and STN-DBS. STN-DBS was more effective for reduction in medication than GPi-DBS. Alternatively, GPi-DBS was more effective for improving the PDQ-39 score than STN-DBS. PMID:27142183

  17. [Advances in sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane

    2008-10-01

    Generation of transgenic mice have identified new pathophysiological mechanisms in sickle disease, including a permanent proinflammatory state and dysregulation of vascular tone. Treatment is no longer solely symptomatic. New agents target red cell hydration and the kinetics of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. Hydroxyurea, which reactivates fetal hemoglobin synthesis, is now widely used. Anti-adhesion molecules and agents modulating vascular tone are being tried in sickle mice. Bone marrow transplantation is widely used to cure patients with HLA-identical siblings, and gene therapy looks promising for those without a donor.

  18. The FReedom from Ischemic Events - New Dimensions for Survival (FRIENDS) registry: design of a prospective cohort study of patients with advanced peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD), whether presenting as acute limb ischemia (ALI) or chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI), is associated with high rates of cardiovascular ischemic events, amputation, and death. Past research has focused on strategies of revascularization, but few data are available that prospectively evaluate the impact of key process of care factors (spanning pre-admission, acute hospitalization, and post-discharge) that might contribute to improving short and long-term health outcomes. Methods/Design The FRIENDS registry is designed to prospectively evaluate a range of patient and health system care delivery factors that might serve as future targets for efforts to improve limb and systemic outcomes for patients with ALI or CLI. This hypothesis-driven registry was designed to evaluate the contributions of: (i) pre-hospital limb ischemia symptom duration, (ii) use of leg revascularization strategies, and (iii) use of risk-reduction pharmacotherapies, as pre-specified factors that may affect amputation-free survival. Sequential patients would be included at an index “vascular specialist-defined” ALI or CLI episode, and patients excluded only for non-vascular etiologies of limb threat. Data including baseline demographics, functional status, co-morbidities, pre-hospital time segments, and use of medical therapies; hospital-based use of revascularization strategies, time segments, and pharmacotherapies; and rates of systemic ischemic events (e.g., myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization, and death) and limb ischemic events (e.g., hospitalization for revascularization or amputation) will be recorded during a minimum of one year follow-up. Discussion The FRIENDS registry is designed to evaluate the potential impact of key factors that may contribute to adverse outcomes for patients with ALI or CLI. Definition of new “health system-based” therapeutic targets could then become the focus of future

  19. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Roh, Young Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m2): no DKD (uACR <30 and eGFR ≥60), non-severe DKD (uACR ≥30 or eGFR <60), and severe DKD (uACR ≥30 and eGFR <60). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and HbA1c variability (standard deviation [SD] of serial HbA1c values or HbA1c-SD) were calculated for the preceding 2 years. Results The prevalence of no DKD, non-severe DKD, and severe DKD was 37.2% (n=118), 37.0% (n=117), and 25.8% (n=82), respectively. HbA1c-SD and the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. Conclusion The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients. PMID:27766790

  20. Serum Vitamin D Levels Are Not Predictive of the Progression of Chronic Liver Disease in Hepatitis C Patients with Advanced Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Kathleen E.; Zheng, Hui; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Delgado-Borrego, Aymin; Dienstag, Jules L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    In animal models and human cross-sectional studies, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with liver disease progression. Vitamin D supplementation has been suggested as a treatment to prevent disease progression. We sought to evaluate the role of vitamin D levels in predicting chronic liver disease development. We conducted a nested case-control study of vitamin D levels in subjects with (cases) and without (controls) liver histologic progression or clinical decompensation over the course of the HALT-C Trial. Vitamin D levels were measured at 4 points over 45 months. 129 cases and 129 aged-matched controls were included. No difference in baseline vitamin D levels were found between cases and controls. (44.8 ng/mL vs. 44.0 ng/mL, P = 0.74). Vitamin D levels declined in cases and controls over time (P = 0.0005), however, there was no difference in the level of decline (P = 0.37). Among study subjects with diabetes mellitius, baseline vitamin D levels were higher in cases, 49.9 ng/mL, than controls, 36.3 ng/mL. (P = 0.03) In addition, baseline vitamin D levels were higher in black case subjects, 32.7 ng/mL, than in black control subjects, 25.2 ng/mL (P = 0.08) No difference in vitamin D levels was found between patients with and without progression of hepatitis C-associated liver disease over 4 years. Our data do not suggest any role for vitamin D supplementation in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C and raise the possibility that higher vitamin D levels may be associated with disease progression. PMID:22359532

  1. Perspectives of patients, family caregivers and physicians about the use of opioids for refractory dyspnea in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rocker, Graeme; Young, Joanne; Donahue, Margaret; Farquhar, Morag; Simpson, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background: A recent national practice guideline recommends the use of opioids for the treatment of refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted two qualitative studies to explore the experiences of patients and family caregivers with opioids for refractory COPD-related dyspnea and the perspectives and attitudes of physicians toward opioids in this context. Methods: Patients (n = 8; 5 men, 3 women), their caregivers (n = 12; 5 men, 7 women) and physicians (n = 28, 17 men, 11 women) in Nova Scotia participated in the studies. Semistructured interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded conceptually and analyzed for emergent themes using interpretive description methodology. Results: Patients reported that opioids provided a sense of calm and relief from severe dyspnea. Family caregivers felt that opioids helped patients to breathe more “normally,” observed improvements in patients’ symptoms of anxiety and depression, and experienced reductions in their own stress. Patients reported substantial improvements in their quality of life. All patients and family caregivers wanted opioid therapy to continue. Most physicians were reluctant to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea, describing a lack of related knowledge and experience, and fears related to the potential adverse effects and legal censure. Interpretation: Discrepancies between the positive experiences of patients and family caregivers with opioids and the reluctance of physicians to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea constitute an important gap in care. Bridging this gap will require initiatives to improve the uptake of practice guidelines and to increase confidence in prescribing opioids for dyspnea refractory to conventional treatment. PMID:22529167

  2. Prevalence and predictors for compensated Advanced Chronic Liver Disease (c-ACLD) in patients with chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Ingrid; Victoria, Marilu; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Rodrigues, Lorena; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Lacerda, Marcus; Victoria, Flamir; Perazzo, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictor factors for compensated advanced chronic liver disease (c-ACLD) in patients with hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) infection. Methods This cross-sectional study included consecutive HDV-infected patients defined by positive anti-HDV. Patients with hepatitis C coinfection, liver transplantation or presence of conditions that limit liver (LSM) or spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) were excluded. Blood tests, abdominal ultrasound, SSM and LSM by transient elastography (FibroScan®) were performed at the same day. Alcohol consumption was quantified using the AUDIT score and c-ACLD was defined by LSM ≥ 15 kPa performed by an experimented operator blinded for clinical and laboratory data. Results 101 patients were eligible and few patients were excluded due to negative anti-HDV (n = 7), hepatitis C coinfection (n = 2), liver transplantation (n = 10) and limitation for LSM or SSM (n = 5). Therefore, 77 patients [61% male, age = 43 (IQR,36–52) years] were included. The prevalence of c-ACLD was 57% (n = 44/77). Patients with c-ACLD had a higher rate of detectable HBV viral load (p = 0.039), higher levels of transaminases, GGT, alkaline phosphatases, total bilirubin and INR (p<0.001 for all), as well as lower platelet count and albumin levels (p>0.001 for both) compared to those without c-ACLD. Patients with c-ACLD had higher SSM [65.2 (IQR,33.8–75.0) vs 21.8 (16.5–32.0) kPa; p<0.001] and higher splenic volume [475 (IQR,311–746) vs 154 (112–283) cm3; p<0.001] compared to those without. Detectable HBV viral load (>10 UI/ml), alkaline phosphatase (per IU/L) and GGT levels (per IU/L) were independently associated with c-ACLD in all multivariate models. Splenic volume [per cm3,OR = 1.01 (95%CI,1.01–1.02);p = 0.002], SSM [per kPa, OR = 1.04 (1.01–1.07);p = 0.012] and splenomegaly [yes vs no,OR = 28.45 (4.42–182.95);p<0.001] were independently associated with c-ACLD. Conclusions The prevalence of c

  3. Investigation of morphometric variability of subthalamic nucleus, red nucleus, and substantia nigra in advanced Parkinson's disease patients using automatic segmentation and PCA-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Jannin, Pierre; D'Albis, Tiziano; Guizard, Nicolas; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Vérin, Marc; Collins, D Louis

    2014-09-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective surgical therapy to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). Conventional methods employ standard atlas coordinates to target the STN, which, along with the adjacent red nucleus (RN) and substantia nigra (SN), are not well visualized on conventional T1w MRIs. However, the positions and sizes of the nuclei may be more variable than the standard atlas, thus making the pre-surgical plans inaccurate. We investigated the morphometric variability of the STN, RN and SN by using label-fusion segmentation results from 3T high resolution T2w MRIs of 33 advanced PD patients. In addition to comparing the size and position measurements of the cohort to the Talairach atlas, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire more intuitive and detailed perspectives of the measured variability. Lastly, the potential correlation between the variability shown by PCA results and the clinical scores was explored.

  4. Prognostic factors for disease progression in advanced Hodgkin's disease: an analysis of patients aged under 60 years showing no progression in the first 6 months after starting primary chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. M.; Radford, J. A.; Ryder, W. D.; Collins, C. D.; Deakin, D. P.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a very high-risk group based on presenting characteristics could be identified in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease who may benefit from high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT). Between 1975 and 1992, 453 previously untreated patients aged under 60 years who did not progress in the first 6 months after the start of standard chemotherapy had their hospital notes reviewed. The outcomes analysed were early disease progression (in the 6- to 18-month window following the start of chemotherapy) and disease progression in the whole of the follow-up period. A Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the combined effects of a number of presenting characteristics on these outcomes. Despite the presence of factors with significant effects on the relative rate of progression, the absolute effects in a group identified as having the poorest prognosis were not especially poor. No group could be defined with a freedom from progression rate of less than 70% over 6-18 months, and the worst prognostic group, which included only 53 patients, had an overall freedom from progression rate of 57% at 5 years. Four other reported prognostic indices were evaluated using our data set, but none of the indices was more successful in identifying a very high-risk group. It has not been possible to define a sufficiently high-risk group of patients with Hodgkin's disease based on presenting characteristics for whom HDCT could be advised as part of primary treatment. The search for more discriminating prognostic factors identifying vulnerable patients with a high risk of relapse must continue before a role can be found for HDCT following conventional chemotherapy in patients without disease progression. PMID:9000607

  5. A multidisciplinary approach for the management of pathologic tooth migration in a patient with moderately advanced periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Myung-Jin; Choi, Jeom-Il; Park, Soo-Byung

    2012-04-01

    The physiologic tooth position is determined by interactions between the periodontal tissue and occlusal, tongue, and lip forces. Bone destruction resulting from chronic periodontal disease disturbs the equilibrium of these interactive balances, leading to pathologic tooth migration, often requiring multidisciplinary treatment approaches. The present case demonstrates a systematic periodontal-orthodontic-prosthetic treatment for achieving the optimal structural, functional, and esthetic outcomes.

  6. Low Recent Protein Intake Predicts Cancer-Related Fatigue and Increased Mortality in Patients with Advanced Tumor Disease Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stobäus, Nicole; Müller, Manfred J; Küpferling, Susanne; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Norman, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients, in general, suffer from anorexia hence diminished nutritional intake. In a prospective observational study, we investigated the impact of recent energy and protein intake on cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Recent protein and energy intake was assessed by 24-h recall in 285 patients. Cancer-related fatigue was determined by Brief Fatigue Inventory, and fat free mass index (FFMI) was assessed with bioelectrical impedance analysis. Symptoms with the validated German version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (30 questions) and 6-month mortality was documented. Risk factors of cancer-related fatigue and predictors of mortality were investigated with logistic regression analysis and stepwise Cox regression analysis, respectively. Low protein intake (<1 g/kg body weight) was found in 66% of patients, who were characterized by higher age, weight, and body mass index. Recent protein intake emerged as the strongest contributor to cancer-related fatigue followed by nausea/vomiting, insomnia, and age. Reduced protein intake, male sex, number of comorbidities, and FFMI were identified as significant predictors for increased 6-month mortality. In conclusion, a low recent protein intake assessed by 24-h recall is associated with a more than twofold higher risk of cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality. Every effort should be taken to assess and guarantee proper nutritional intake in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  7. NASA Bioreactors Advance Disease Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    the body. Experiments conducted by Johnson scientist Dr. Thomas Goodwin proved that the NASA bioreactor could successfully cultivate cells using simulated microgravity, resulting in three-dimensional tissues that more closely approximate those in the body. Further experiments conducted on space shuttle missions and by Wolf as an astronaut on the Mir space station demonstrated that the bioreactor s effects were even further expanded in space, resulting in remarkable levels of tissue formation. While the bioreactor may one day culture red blood cells for injured astronauts or single-celled organisms like algae as food or oxygen producers for a Mars colony, the technology s cell growth capability offers significant opportunities for terrestrial medical research right now. A small Texas company is taking advantage of the NASA technology to advance promising treatment applications for diseases both common and obscure.

  8. Modulation of advanced glycation end products by candesartan in patients with diabetic kidney disease--a dose-response relationship study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sandeep A; LaSalle, Brian K; Clifton, G Dennis; Short, Robert A; Tuttle, Katherine R

    2010-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are proinflammatory mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). In this study, dose-dependent effects of angiotensin receptor blockade on urinary AGEs were evaluated in patients with DKD. Patients with type 2 diabetes and proteinuria ≥500 mg/d (n = 11) were compared with diabetic controls without DKD (n = 10) and normal controls (n = 11). After a 2-week washout period, DKD participants were treated with candesartan doses progressively increasing from 8, 16, 32, to 64 mg/d every 3 weeks for a total of 12 weeks. Other antihypertensive agents were adjusted to maintain stable blood pressure. At baseline and after each dosing period, blood pressure measurements and 24-hour urine collections were obtained. Urinary carboxymethyl lysine, an AGE biomarker, was reduced over the 12-week dose escalation protocol (r = 0.38, P = 0.01) in DKD participants. Creatinine clearance increased slightly, but albuminuria was unaffected by candesartan administration. Baseline urinary transforming growth factor-β₁ excretion was lower in DKD participants than in controls and did not change during the study period. Reducing kidney exposure to AGEs may be a mechanism of protection by angiotensin receptor blockade in DKD. AGEs may also impact the diabetic kidney through mechanisms independent of transforming growth factor-β₁.

  9. Kidney disease in children: latest advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F; Goldstein, Stuart L; Pape, Lars; Schaefer, Franz; Shroff, Rukshana C; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-03-01

    To mark World Kidney Day 2016, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited six leading researchers to highlight the key advances and challenges within their specialist field of paediatric nephrology. Here, advances and remaining challenges in the fields of prenatal patterning, acute kidney injury, renal transplantation, genetics, cardiovascular health, and growth and nutrition, are all discussed within the context of paediatric and neonatal patients with kidney disease. Our global panel of researchers describe areas in which further studies and clinical advances are needed, and suggest ways in which research in these areas should progress to optimize renal care and long-term outcomes for affected patients.

  10. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  11. Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances

    MedlinePlus

    ... on genetic findings, investigators have already developed improved animal models, so essential for our understanding of what causes the disease and for testing new treatments, and have made breakthroughs in cell ...

  12. Intratumoral Epiregulin Is a Marker of Advanced Disease in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients and Confers Invasive Properties on EGFR-Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Iwanaga, Kentaro; Choi, Kuicheon C.; Wislez, Marie; Raso, Maria Gabriela; Wei, Wei; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations have unique biological properties, including high expression of the ErbB ligand epiregulin; however, the biological role of epiregulin in these cells has not been elucidated. To examine its role, we used an immunohistochemical approach to detect epiregulin expression in NSCLC biopsy samples and pharmacologic and genetic approaches to inhibit epiregulin in cultured NSCLC cells. In NSCLC biopsy samples, epiregulin was detected in 237 of 366 (64.7%) tumors, which correlated with nodal metastasis and a shorter duration of survival. In EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell lines, treatment with a small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor diminished mRNA levels of the gene encoding epiregulin (EREG). The ability of EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells to invade through Matrigel in vitro was inhibited by treatment with an anti-epiregulin neutralizing antibody or by transfection with an EREG short hairpin RNA. Collectively, these findings show that epiregulin expression correlated with advanced disease, was EGFR dependent, and conferred invasive properties on NSCLC cells. Additional studies are warranted in NSCLC patients to evaluate whether epiregulin expression predicts the metastatic potential of primary tumors and whether anti-epiregulin treatment strategies are efficacious in the prevention of metastasis. PMID:19138957

  13. Role of serum level and genetic variation of IL-28B in interferon responsiveness and advanced liver disease in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Hashempour, Tayebeh; Moayedi, Javad; Musavi, Zahra; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Merat, Shahin

    2017-04-01

    Interleukin-28B (IL-28B) is suspected to be associated with response to treatment and one of the basic immunological backgrounds in liver transplant candidate (LTC). We aimed to assess whether genotypes of IL-28B can play a role in therapeutic response or advanced stages of liver disease. A total of 364 subjects were genotyped for IL-28B rs12979860 and rs8099917 SNPs using PCR-RFLP assay. Moreover, IL-28 serum level, HCV loads, and genotype were performed. A significant increase was observed in the frequencies of unfavorable rs12979860 genotypes/CT + TT in the chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and LTC groups. In the case of rs8099917, CHC group had a significantly higher frequency of unfavorable genotypes/GT + GG compared to the healthy group. IL-28B serum level was also significantly higher in healthy group compared with the CHC and LTC groups. There were no differences in the distribution of the IL-28B genotypes and haplotypes between responder and non-responder patients. Our results suggest, for the first time, that unfavorable rs12979860 genotypes can be considered one of the important immunological backgrounds in the Iranian LTC population that was confirmed with the lower IL-28 serum level compared to healthy group. Besides, there was a possible association of favorable IL-28B genotypes with lower odds of susceptibility to CHC infection but no support for a positive association between analyzed SNPs and an outcome of therapy. Moreover, non-CT haplotypes may be regarded as a genetic risk factor that can increase the chance of infection with HCV and progression toward end-stage HCV-related liver disease.

  14. Improving management of patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drudge-Coates, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Development of bone metastases in patients with advanced cancer is associated with skeletal-related events (SREs) such as pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, the requirement for surgery or palliative radiotherapy to bone, and hypercalcemia of malignancy. Skeletal morbidity may reduce patient mobility, limit functional independence, and impair quality of life (QOL). Proactive management of new or worsening bone pain or motor impairment is crucial because of the potential for rapid progression of symptoms. Administration of bisphosphonate therapy as a monthly infusion to patients with bone metastases prevents or delays the onset and reduces the frequency of SREs and provides clinically meaningful improvements in bone pain and QOL. In addition to administration of therapy, the monthly infusion visit allows a dedicated team of healthcare professionals to regularly assess SREs, response to therapy, adverse events (AEs), QOL, and adherence to oral medications and supplements. The continuity of care that occurs during the monthly infusion visit provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to educate patients about effective strategies to manage SREs and AEs. In addition, regular interaction provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to recognize and proactively address subtle changes in the patients’ medical condition. Using a multidisciplinary medical team also eliminates barriers between the various healthcare professionals involved in patient management. Consequently, the monthly infusion visit can result in effective patient management and improved clinical outcomes in patients with malignant bone disease. PMID:21206517

  15. [Recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing for rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Tohru

    2004-09-01

    Immunologic laboratory tests serve critical roles in the care of patients with various rheumatic diseases. These tests can provide relevant information of rheumatic diseases based on their immunopathophysiological condition. Although immunologic laboratory tests are quite useful for the determination of diagnosis and the estimation of disease activity, organ involvement and prognosis, they are frequently misused and resulted in an inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests and accurate clinical interpretation of the test results can prevent false diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. In order to improve clinical care of patients with rheumatic diseases, clinicians caring patients with rheumatic disease should recognize meanings, characteristics and limitations of each result of immunologic laboratory testing. This article reviewed recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing such as antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, and introduced guidelines for these testing. These guidelines based on evidences of EBM may contribute to the appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests for rheumatic diseases.

  16. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Federica; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, delineating the structural and functional alterations determined by these conditions. Advanced MRI techniques are of special interest for their potential to characterize the signature of each neurodegenerative condition and aid both the diagnostic process and the monitoring of disease progression. This aspect will become crucial when disease-modifying (personalized) therapies will be established. MRI techniques are very diverse and go from the visual inspection of MRI scans to more complex approaches, such as manual and automatic volume measurements, diffusion tensor MRI, and functional MRI. All these techniques allow us to investigate the different features of neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the use of MRI in some of the most important neurodegenerative conditions, putting an emphasis on the advanced techniques.

  17. Advanced imaging in equine dental disease.

    PubMed

    Selberg, Kurt; Easley, Jeremiah T

    2013-08-01

    Dental and sinus disorders are relatively common and of major clinical importance in equine medicine. Advanced diagnostic imaging has become an integral part of equine veterinary medicine. Advanced imaging has progressed the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of dental- and sinus-related diseases. As a clinician, it is important to realize the value of advanced diagnostic imaging. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are both significantly more expensive compared with other diagnostic tools, the financial cost of inaccurate diagnosis and treatment can often result in higher overall costs.

  18. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them.

  19. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed Central

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them. PMID:27252737

  20. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies.

    PubMed

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R; McLean, Pamela J; Uitti, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization.

  1. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R.; McLean, Pamela J.; Uitti, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization. PMID:26439946

  2. Managing the maxillary partially edentulous patient with extensive anterior tooth loss and advanced periodontal disease using a removable partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ma, Polly S; Brudvik, James S

    2008-10-01

    The treatment modality, a continuous occlusal rest removable partial denture, not only restored missing teeth but also stabilized the remaining dentition in a patient with advanced periodontal attachment loss. By engaging the guiding planes at the mesial surfaces of the abutments anteriorly and also the distal surfaces of the abutments posteriorly, the remaining teeth, with varying amounts of mobility, were splinted together by the framework. This conservative treatment option allows flexibility for easy repair during the life span of the prosthesis.

  3. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease in 2007.

    PubMed

    Bush, Robert K; Peden, David

    2008-06-01

    This review of key articles appearing in the Journal in 2008 represents significant advances in the understanding of the interrelationships between the environment and allergic respiratory diseases. New allergens have been identified and characterized. Improvements in diagnostic techniques and methods to assess environmental allergen exposure have been developed. The novel therapeutics and refinements of allergen avoidance approaches will improve patient care. A fuller appreciation of the complexities of environmental factors in allergic diseases can lead to better preventative measures. Lastly, the increasingly important role of pollutants on inflammatory processes is evolving. The articles discussed will add to our increasing knowledge base and advance the ability to more effectively treat patients with allergic respiratory diseases and expand research opportunities.

  4. Glutathione peroxidase in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, P; Velander, G; Mai, J; Thorling, E B; Dupont, E

    1991-01-01

    A defective antioxidant scavenging system plays a major role in one of the theories of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a general difference in antioxidant activity between early and advanced cases of Parkinson's disease. Twenty five recently diagnosed patients, without any clinical fluctuations (group A), and 25 patients in a late phase of the disease with severe fluctuations in response to levodopa therapy (group B) were included in the study. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase was determined as a measure of antioxidant activity and significantly lower values were found in group B than in group A. Regression analyses in groups A and B showed significant correlation between glutathione peroxidase and duration of disease, but not between glutathione peroxidase and age of patients. Images PMID:1940936

  5. Advances in identifying beryllium sensitization and disease.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Dan; Kowalski, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and 1940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD) typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true "gold standard" for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms.

  6. [Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Belén Arnalich; Pumarega, Irene Cano; Ausiró, Anna Mola; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by poorly reversible, chronic airflow obstruction, from the clinical point of view we must continue to make progress in the diagnosis and management of these patients so that spirometry is not the only technique used. Understanding that COPD is a heterogeneous process and that patient complexity usually increases due to the presence of comorbidities will allow more individualized strategies to be designed, which may improve control of the process. The TORCH and UPLIFT trials have shown that current treatment can improve important aspects of the disease, including mortality. However, the finalizing of these two large trials has generated a current of opinion favoring a more individually-tailored approach that should include all the factors -both pulmonary and extrapulmonary- that can modify the patient's form of presentation. Although we are witnessing a change in the therapeutic approach to COPD, future treatment will probably be based on studies performed in specific patient subgroups and on clarifying the interrelation between COPD and other diseases that are common in these patients. Greater knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease may improve pharmacological treatment but drugs that, by themselves, alter the short- and longterm course of COPD are not on the horizon. However, a more patient-focussed approach may be the main tool available to physicians to increase quality of life -and possibly survival- in these patients.

  7. Alzheimer's disease: research advances and medical reality.

    PubMed

    Seiguer, Erica

    2005-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease was the eighth-leading cause of death in 2001. There is no cure and no effective treatment. Alzheimer's disease presents policy-makers with several challenges, including the level of funding and direction of federally funded research, as well as the cost pressures on Medicare and Medicaid of long-term care. These challenges will increase in intensity as demographic changes, particularly the aging of baby boomers, take hold. Better prevention of Alzheimer's, advances in therapy, and appropriate care modalities will likely require significant investment.

  8. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is a condition of hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. While rare, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which suggests that early and aggressive intervention is required. The primary, definitive therapy for patients with Cushing's disease in the majority of patients is pituitary surgery, generally performed via a transsphenoidal approach. However, many patients will not achieve remission or they will have recurrences. The consequences of persistent hypercortisolism are severe and, as such, early identification of those patients at risk of treatment failure is exigent. Medical management of Cushing's disease patients plays an important role in achieving long-term remission after failed transsphenoidal surgery, while awaiting effects of radiation or before surgery to decrease the hypercortisolemia and potentially reducing perioperative complications and improving outcome. Medical therapies include centrally acting agents, adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors and glucocorticoid receptor blockers. Furthermore, several new agents are in clinical trials. To normalize the devastating disease effects of hypercortisolemia, it is paramount that successful patient disease management includes individualized, multidisciplinary care, with close collaboration between endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and general surgeons. This commentary will focus on recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's, with a focus on newly approved ACTH modulators and glucocorticoid receptor blockers.

  9. Positron emission tomography has a high negative predictive value for progression or early relapse for patients with residual disease after first-line chemotherapy in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, Carsten; Dietlein, Markus; Franklin, Jeremy; Markova, Jana; Lohri, Andreas; Amthauer, Holger; Klutmann, Susanne; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Bockisch, Andreas; Weckesser, Matthias; Lorenz, Reinhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bares, Roland; Eich, Hans T.; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Fuchs, Michael; Borchmann, Peter; Schicha, Harald; Diehl, Volker

    2008-01-01

    In the HD15 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group, the negative predictive value (NPV) of positron emission tomography (PET) using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) was evaluated. A total of 817 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive BEACOPP-based chemotherapy. After completion of chemotherapy, residual disease measuring more than or equal to 2.5 cm in diameter was assessed by PET in 311 patients. The NPV of PET was defined as the proportion of PET− patients without progression, relapse, or irradiation within 12 months after PET review panel. The progression-free survival was 96% for PET− patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 94%-99%) and 86% for PET+ patients (95% CI, 78%-95%, P = .011). The NPV for PET in this analysis was 94% (95% CI, 91%-97%). Thus, consolidation radiotherapy can be omitted in PET− patients with residual disease without increasing the risk for progression or early relapse compared with patients in complete remission. The impact of this finding on the overall survival at 5 years must be awaited. Until then, response adapted therapy guided by PET for HL patients seems to be a promising approach that should be further evaluated in clinical trials. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org study as #ISRCTN32443041. PMID:18757777

  10. Moderate Sustained Virologic Response Rates With 6-Week Combination Directly Acting Anti–Hepatitis C Virus Therapy in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kattakuzhy, Sarah; Wilson, Eleanor; Sidharthan, Sreetha; Sims, Zayani; McLaughlin, Mary; Price, Angie; Silk, Rachel; Gross, Chloe; Akoth, Elizabeth; McManus, Maryellen; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Shrivastava, Shikha; Tang, Lydia; Nelson, Amy; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Chavez, Jose; Lam, Brian; Mo, Hongmei; Osinusi, Anuoluwapo; Polis, Michael A.; Masur, Henry; Kohli, Anita; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment of genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with combination directly acting antivirals (DAA) for 8–24 weeks is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR). We previously demonstrated that adding a third DAA to ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) can result in high SVR rates in patients without cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated whether a similar regimen would yield equivalent rates of cure in patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Methods. Fifty patients were enrolled at the Clinical Research Center of the National Institutes of Health and associated healthcare centers. Enrollment and follow-up data from April 2014 to June 2015 are reported here. Eligible participants were aged ≥18 years, had chronic HCV genotype 1 infection (serum HCV RNA ≥2000 IU/mL), and stage 3–4 liver fibrosis. HCV RNA was measured using a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. Results. Of patients treated with LDV, SOF, and the NS3/4A protease inhibitor GS-9451 for 6 weeks, 76% (38 of 50; 95% confidence interval, 60%–85%) had SVR achieved 12 weeks after the end of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in treatment efficacy between treatment-naive patients (72%, 18 of 25) and those with treatment experience (80%; 20 of 25) (P = .51). Overall, 11 patients (22%) experienced virologic relapse, and 1 (2%) was lost to follow-up at 4 weeks after treatment. No serious adverse events, discontinuations, or deaths were associated with this regimen. Conclusions. Adding a third DAA to LDV/SOF may result in a moderate SVR rate, lower than that observed in patients without cirrhosis. Significant liver fibrosis remains an impediment to achieving SVR with short-duration DAA therapy. Chinese Clinical Trials Registration. CT01805882. PMID:26503379

  11. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed. PMID:26300611

  12. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-08-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed.

  13. Myeloma Today: Disease Definitions and Treatment Advances

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    There have been major advances in the diagnosis, staging, risk-stratification, and management of multiple myeloma (MM). In addition to established CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, and lytic bone lesions) features, new diagnostic criteria include 3 new biomarkers to diagnose the disease: bone marrow clonal plasmacytosis ≥60%, serum involved/uninvolved free light chain ratio ≥100, and >1 focal lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. MM can be classified into several subtypes based on baseline cytogenetics, and prognosis varies according to underlying cytogenetic abnormalities. A Revised International Staging System has been developed which combines markers of tumor burden (albumin, beta-2 microglobulin) with markers of aggressive disease biology (high risk cytogenetics and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase). Although the approach to therapy remains largely the same, the treatment options at every stage of the disease have changed. Carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and panobinostat have been approved for the treatment of the disease. Elotuzumab, daratumumab, and ixazomib are expected to be approved shortly. These drugs combined with older agents such as cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide dramatically increase the repertoire of regimens available for the treatment of MM. This review provides a concise overview of recent advances in MM, including updates to diagnostic criteria, staging, risk-stratification, and management. PMID:26565896

  14. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: advances and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ates, Fehmi; Francis, David O; Vaezi, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    'Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease' is one of the most common misnomers in the area of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The term implies reflux as the underlying etiology despite unresponsiveness to aggressive proton pump inhibitor therapy. The term should be replaced with 'refractory symptoms.' We must acknowledge that in many patients symptoms of reflux often overlap with non-GERD causes such as gastroparesis, dyspepsia, hypersensitive esophagus and functional disorders. Lack of response to aggressive acid suppressive therapy often leads to diagnostic testing. In majority of patients these tests are normal. The role of non-acid reflux in this group is uncertain and patients should not undergo surgical fundoplication based on this parameter. In patients unresponsive to acid suppressive therapy GERD is most commonly not causal and a search for non-GERD causes must ensue.

  15. Advances in celiac disease and gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Mary M

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is becoming an increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten. Once thought to be a rare disease of childhood characterized by diarrhea, celiac disease is actually a multisystemic disorder that occurs as a result of an immune response to ingested gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Screening studies have revealed that celiac disease is most common in asymptomatic adults in the United States. Although considerable scientific progress has been made in understanding celiac disease and in preventing or curing its manifestations, a strict gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease to date. Early diagnosis and treatment, together with regular follow-up visits with a dietitian, are necessary to ensure nutritional adequacy and to prevent malnutrition while adhering to the gluten-free diet for life. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with current updated information about celiac disease, its diverse clinical presentation and increased prevalence, the complex pathophysiology and strong genetic predisposition to celiac disease, and its diagnosis. This review focuses in detail on the gluten-free diet and the importance of intense expert dietary counseling for all patients with celiac disease. Recent advances in the gluten-free diet include food allergen labeling as well as the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed definition of the food-labeling term gluten-free. The gluten-free diet is complex and patients need comprehensive nutrition education from a skilled dietitian.

  16. Improvement with ongoing Enzyme Replacement Therapy in advanced late-onset Pompe disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Mackey, Joanne; Kishnani, Priya S

    2008-12-01

    Benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), anecdotally reported in late-onset Pompe disease, range from motor and pulmonary improvement in less severely affected patients, to stabilization with minimal improvement in those with advanced disease. We report a case of a 63-year-old patient with significant morbidity who made notable motor and pulmonary function gains after two years on therapy. Thus, improvements in those with advanced disease may be possible after long-term treatment.

  17. Recent advance in patient monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent advance in technology has developed a lot of new aspects of clinical monitoring. We can monitor sedation levels during anesthesia using various electroencephalographic (EEG) indices, while it is still not useful for anesthesia depth monitoring. Some attempts are made to monitor the changes in sympathetic nerve activity as one of the indicators of stress, pain/analgesia, or anesthesia. To know the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, heart rate or blood pressure variability is investigated. For trend of cardiac output, low invasive monitors have been investigated. Improvement of ultrasound enables us to see cardiac structure and function continuously and clearer, increases success rate and decreases complication of central venous puncture and various kinds of nerve blocks. Without inserting an arterial catheter, trends of arterial oxygen tension or carbon dioxide tension can be monitored. Indirect visualization of the airway decreases difficult intubation and makes it easier to teach tracheal intubation. The changes in blood volume can be speculated non-invasively. Cerebral perfusion and metabolism are not ordinary monitored yet, but some studies show their usefulness in management of critically ill. This review introduces recent advances in various monitors used in anesthesia and critical care including some studies of the author, especially focused on EEG and cardiac output. However, the most important is that these new monitors are not almighty but should be used adequately in a limited situation where their meaning is confirmed. PMID:20877698

  18. Continuing EGFR-TKI treatment in combination with super-selective arterial infusion chemotherapy beyond disease progression for patients with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Huiwei; Jiang, Sen; Yu, Dong; Ni, Huijuan; Hu, Qiong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Regional therapy has shown promising results in patients with an oligo-metastasis after the occurrence of resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of continuing EGFR-TKI therapy concurrently with arterial infusion chemotherapy in 6 patients (median age 55.9 years) with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had a locally progressive, centrally located lung lesion after EGFR-TKI therapy. The patients received a super-selective arterial infusion of docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)) every 28 days concurrently with EGFR-TKI therapy until further progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable adverse effects (AEs) occurred. Treatment outcomes were assessed via progression-free survival (PFS) times (PFS-1: time to PD after EGFR-TKI therapy; PFS-2: time to further PD after arterial infusion chemotherapy with EGFR-TKI therapy), the occurrence of treatment-related AEs, and patient responses to the QLQ-LC13 quality-of-life questionnaire. Three of the 6 patients achieved partial responses, and three had stable disease. The median PFS-1 was 10.42 months, and the median PFS-2 was 4.1 months (range, 2.1-5.7 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 28.6 months (range, 24.1-32.9 months). All AEs were either grade 1 or grade 2 in severity, and no unexpected AEs were observed. One patient died of lung cancer. The patients reported significant reductions from baseline in symptoms of cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and hemoptysis (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Thus, continuing EGFR-TKI therapy in combination with super-selective arterial infusion chemotherapy beyond PD for patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC is feasible, and this approach warrants further investigation.

  19. Identifying patients at risk for recurrent or advanced BCC.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Omid; Goldenberg, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a common skin cancer and its incidence is on the rise worldwide. Clinical presentation and histologic examination are used for diagnosis and to stratify BCCs as either low- or high-risk for recurrence or development of advanced disease. A number of surgical and nonsurgical options are available for BCC. BCC is most often managed with a surgical approach, but not all tumors and patients are suitable for surgery. Vismodegib is a recently approved first-in-class hedgehog pathway inhibitor that has expanded options for patients who have locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  20. Advanced mast cell disease: an Italian Hematological Multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Caira, Morena; Rondoni, Michela; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Candoni, Anna; Allione, Bernardino; Cattaneo, Chiara; Marbello, Laura; Caramatti, Cecilia; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Iannitto, Emilio; Giona, Fiorina; Ferrara, Felicetto; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Fanci, Rosa; Lunghi, Monia; Fianchi, Luana; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Stefani, Pietro Maria; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Leone, Giuseppe; Musto, Pellegrino

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate clinical features, treatments and outcome of patients with systemic mast cell disease (MCD) who arrived to the attention of hematologists. A retrospective study was conducted over 1995-2006 in patients admitted in 18 Italian hematological divisions. Twenty-four cases of advanced MCD were collected: 12 aggressive SM (50%), 8 mast cell leukemia (33%), 4 SM with associated clonal non-mast cell-lineage hematologic disease (17%). Spleen and liver were the principal extramedullary organ involved. The c-kit point mutation D816V was found in 13/18 patients in which molecular biology studies were performed (72%). Treatments were very heterogeneous: on the whole Imatinib was administered in 17 patients, alpha-Interferon in 8, 2-CdA in 3; 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The overall response rate to Imatinib, the most frequently employed drugs, was of 29%, registering one complete remission and four partial remission; all responsive patients did not present D816V c-kit mutation. Overall three patients (12%) died for progression of disease. We conclude that MCD is characterized by severe mediator-related symptoms but with a moderate mortality rate. D816V c-kit mutation is frequent and associated with resistance against Imatinib. Because of the rarity of these forms, an effective standard of care is lacking. More data are needed to find new and successful therapeutic strategies.

  1. Linear and Curvilinear Trajectories of Cortical Loss with Advancing Age and Disease Duration in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Daniel O; Dobolyi, David G; Isaacs, David A; Roman, Olivia C; Herb, Joshua; Wylie, Scott A; Neimat, Joseph S; Donahue, Manus J; Hedera, Peter; Zald, David H; Landman, Bennett A; Bowman, Aaron B; Dawant, Benoit M; Rane, Swati

    2016-05-01

    Advancing age and disease duration both contribute to cortical thinning in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the pathological interactions between them are poorly described. This study aims to distinguish patterns of cortical decline determined by advancing age and disease duration in PD. A convenience cohort of 177 consecutive PD patients, identified at the Vanderbilt University Movement Disorders Clinic as part of a clinical evaluation for Deep Brain Stimulation (age: M= 62.0, SD 9.3), completed a standardized clinical assessment, along with structural brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan. Age and gender matched controls (n=53) were obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and Progressive Parkinson's Marker Initiative (age: M= 63.4, SD 12.2). Estimated changes in cortical thickness were modeled with advancing age, disease duration, and their interaction. The best-fitting model, linear or curvilinear (2(nd), or 3(rd) order natural spline), was defined using the minimum Akaike Information Criterion, and illustrated on a 3-dimensional brain. Three curvilinear patterns of cortical thinning were identified: early decline, late decline, and early-stable-late. In contrast to healthy controls, the best-fit model for age related changes in PD is curvilinear (early decline), particularly in frontal and precuneus regions. With advancing disease duration, a curvilinear model depicts accelerating decline in the occipital cortex. A significant interaction between advancing age and disease duration is evident in frontal, motor, and posterior parietal areas. Study results support the hypothesis that advancing age and disease duration differentially affect regional cortical thickness and display regional dependent linear and curvilinear patterns of thinning.

  2. Advances in non-dopaminergic treatments for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Vissel, Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960's treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been directed to restore or replace dopamine, with L-Dopa being the gold standard. However, chronic L-Dopa use is associated with debilitating dyskinesias, limiting its effectiveness. This has resulted in extensive efforts to develop new therapies that work in ways other than restoring or replacing dopamine. Here we describe newly emerging non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for PD, including drugs targeting adenosine, glutamate, adrenergic, and serotonin receptors, as well as GLP-1 agonists, calcium channel blockers, iron chelators, anti-inflammatories, neurotrophic factors, and gene therapies. We provide a detailed account of their success in animal models and their translation to human clinical trials. We then consider how advances in understanding the mechanisms of PD, genetics, the possibility that PD may consist of multiple disease states, understanding of the etiology of PD in non-dopaminergic regions as well as advances in clinical trial design will be essential for ongoing advances. We conclude that despite the challenges ahead, patients have much cause for optimism that novel therapeutics that offer better disease management and/or which slow disease progression are inevitable. PMID:24904259

  3. Chemotherapy in advanced malignant diseases in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Talib, Hussein

    1971-01-01

    This work discusses the experience of one surgical team in the Third Surgical Unit at the Republican Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, from 1967 to 1970. 112 patients with advanced malignant lesions in various parts of the body were dealt with. In 84, the intra-arterial route was adopted; in the remaining, systemic administration of cytotoxic agents either singly or in combination was employed. The results are reported in terms of subjective and objective response, and the various complications are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5137574

  4. Advances in the assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, M.; Proano, M. )

    1989-07-01

    Knowledge of the severity and extent of the inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases provides a means of determining rational therapeutic strategies in affected patients. During the past 3 decades, several clinical, laboratory, and combined indices have been proposed for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease; refinements in radiologic methods and the availability of endoscopy and biopsy have facilitated the accurate assessment of the extent and severity of the disease. In relapsing conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, however, the use of such procedures is limited by the radiation exposure or the relatively invasive nature of the technique. In this article, we review the proposed methods and recent advances in assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; we also discuss possible strategies at the time of diagnosis, during recurrence, and in evaluation of the efficacy of drug or dietic therapy. 58 references.

  5. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  6. How I treat patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Akin, Cem

    2010-12-23

    Advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a rare myeloid neoplasm characterized by uncontrolled accumulation of neoplastic mast cells (MCs) in various organs with consecutive impairment of organ function, drug resistance, and a poor prognosis. Advanced SM may present as smoldering or slowly progressing neoplasm but may also present as rapidly progressing aggressive SM or even as MC leukemia. Approximately half of the patients have an associated hematologic non-MC-lineage disease (SM-AHNMD) or develop an AHNMD over time. Drug resistance may not only result from the KIT mutant D816V that is found in most patients, but also from KIT-independent pro-oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in disease evolution. In patients with slow progression, advanced SM can often be kept under control for months with interferon-α or 2CdA. By contrast, in rapidly progressing aggressive SM and MC leukemia, even polychemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may fail, which points to the need to develop new drugs and treatment concepts for these patients. In SM-AHNMD, separate treatment plans should be established for the SM component and the AHNMD component of the disease, with recognition that the AHNMD often has to be managed and treated as a secondary and thus a high-risk neoplasm.

  7. Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C F; Khor, Y

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive airflow limitation in the presence of identifiable risk factors. Inflammation is the central pathological feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition to its pulmonary effects, COPD is associated with significant extrapulmonary manifestations, including ischaemic heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke and diabetes. Anxiety and depression are also common. Spirometry remains the gold standard diagnostic tool. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy can improve symptoms, quality of life and exercise capacity and, through their effects on reducing exacerbations, have the potential to modify disease progression. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, with guidelines recommending a stepwise escalating approach. Smoking cessation is paramount in managing COPD, with promotion of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation being other key factors in management. Comorbidities should be actively sought and managed in their own right. Given the chronicity and progressive nature of COPD, ongoing monitoring and support with timely discussion of advanced-care planning and end-of-life issues are recommended.

  8. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  9. Sustained uremic toxin control improves renal and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with advanced renal dysfunction: post-hoc analysis of the Kremezin Study against renal disease progression in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ran-hui; Kang, Shin Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Cha, Dae Ryong; Na, Ki Young; Kim, Sung Gyun; Yoon, Sun Ae; Kim, Sejoong; Han, Sang Youb; Park, Jung Hwan; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated the long-term effect of AST-120, which has been proposed as a therapeutic option against renal disease progression, in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We performed post-hoc analysis with a per-protocol group of the K-STAR study (Kremezin study against renal disease progression in Korea) that randomized participants into an AST-120 and a control arm. Patients in the AST-120 arm were given 6 g of AST-120 in three divided doses, and those in both arms received standard conventional treatment. Results The two arms did not differ significantly in the occurrence of composite primary outcomes (log-rank P = 0.41). For AST-120 patients with higher compliance, there were fewer composite primary outcomes: intermediate tertile hazard ratio (HR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.01, P = 0.05; highest tertile HR 0.436, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.76, P = 0.003. The estimated glomerular filtration rate level was more stable in the AST-120 arm, especially in diabetic patients. At one year, the AST-120-induced decrease in the serum indoxyl sulfate concentration inversely correlated with the occurrence of composite primary outcomes: second tertile HR 1.59, 95% CI 0.82 to 3.07, P = 0.17; third tertile HR 2.11, 95% CI 1.07 to 4.17, P = 0.031. Furthermore, AST-120 showed a protective effect against the major cardiovascular adverse events (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.99, P = 0.046). Conclusion Long-term use of AST-120 has potential for renal protection, especially in diabetic patients, as well as cardiovascular benefits. Reduction of the serum indoxyl sulfate level may be used to identify patients who would benefit from AST-120 administration. PMID:28392999

  10. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  11. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  12. Insomnia among patients with advanced disease during admission in a Palliative Care Unit: a prospective observational study on its frequency and association with psychological, physical and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were: 1) to assess the frequency of insomnia among patients during admission in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU); 2) to study the association between emotional distress and insomnia, taking physical, environmental and other psychological factors into account. Methods Prospective observational study including patients consecutively admitted to a PCU during eight months, excluding those with severe cognitive problems or too low performance status. Insomnia was assessed by asking a single question and by using the Sleep Disturbance Scale (SDS), and emotional distress using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Physical, environmental and other psychological factors potentially interfering with sleep quality were evaluated. Association between insomnia and the factors evaluated was studied using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results 61 patients were included (mean age 71.5 years; 95% with oncological disease); 38 (62%) answered “yes” to the insomnia single question and 29 (47%) showed moderate to severe insomnia according to the SDS. 65% showed clinically significant emotional distress and 79% had nocturnal rumination. The physical symptoms most often mentioned as interfering with sleep quality were pain (69%) and dyspnoea (36%). 77% reported at least one environmental disturbance. In the univariate analysis, answering “yes” to the insomnia single question was significantly associated with higher HADS score, anxiety, nocturnal rumination, clear knowledge of the diagnosis, higher performance status and dyspnoea; moderate to severe insomnia was significantly associated with nocturnal rumination, higher performance status, environmental disturbances and daytime sleepiness. In the multivariate regression analysis, answering “yes” to the single question was associated with dyspnoea (OR 7.2 [1.65-31.27]; p = 0.009), nocturnal rumination (OR 5.5 [1.05-28.49]; p = 0.04) and higher performance

  13. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  14. Docetaxel as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Carlos T; Machiavelli, Mario R; Pérez, Juan E; Romero, Alberto O; Bologna, Fabrina; Vicente, Hernán; Lacava, Juan A; Ortiz, Eduardo H; Cubero, Alberto; Focaccia, Guillermo; Suttora, Guillermo; Scenna, Mirna; Boughen, José M; Leone, Bernardo A

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel as single-agent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between April 1998 and August 2000, 38 untreated patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IIB to IVA were entered onto this study. The median age was 44 years (range: 25-66 years). Stages: IIB 22 patients, IIIB 15 patients, and IVA 1 pt. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 100 mg/m2 IV infusion during 1 hour. Standard premedication with dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ranitidine was used. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks for three courses, followed by radical surgery when it was judged appropriate, or definitive radiotherapy. Both staging and response assessment were performed by a multidisciplinary team. 106 cycles of therapy were administered; all patients were evaluable for TX, whereas 35 were evaluable for response (3 patients refused further treatment after the first cycle of therapy). Complete response (CR): 1 patient (3%); partial response: 11 patients (31%), for an overall objective response rate of 34% (95% CI: 15-53%); no change (NC): 16 patients (46%); and progressive disease: 7 patients (20%). Six patients (17%) underwent surgery and a pathologic CR was confirmed in 1 of them. The median time to treatment failure and the median survival have not been reached yet. The limiting toxicity was leukopenia in 25 patients (69%) (G1-G2: 14 patients, G3: 10 patients, and G4: 1 patient). Neutropenia: 28 patients (78%) (G1-G2: 10 patients, G3: 8 and G4: 10). Myalgias: 17 patients (47%) (G1-G2: 15 patients and G3: 2 patients). Emesis: 21 patients (55%) (G1-G2: 19 patients and G3: 2 patients). Alopecia G3: 13 patients (36%); rash cutaneous 26 patients (68%) (G1-G2: 22 patients and G3: 4 patients). There were no hypersensitivity reactions or fluid-retention syndrome. The received dose intensity was 91% of that projected. Docetaxel is an active drug against advanced

  15. Working with advanced dementia patients in a day care setting.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Leah

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and most other causes of dementia are regressive by nature. As such one can expect patients with such types of mental impairment to gradually decline in function and ability to participate in day care activities. This paper attempts to show that with the right kind of orientation, staff can "tune into" the more advanced dementia patients, find the key to their personal needs, desires and remaining abilities and design a program that allows them not only to continue to participate in a social and therapeutic framework, but also to gain some meaningful human contact and quality of life despite their cognitive deterioration.

  16. Vandetanib for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Katherine; Kim, Geoffrey; Maher, V Ellen; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Moon, Young Jin; Song, Pengfei; Marathe, Anshu; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Zhu, Hao; Garnett, Christine; Liu, Qi; Booth, Brian; Gehrke, Brenda; Dorsam, Robert; Verbois, Leigh; Ghosh, Debasis; Wilson, Wendy; Duan, John; Sarker, Haripada; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Skarupa, Lisa; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Murgo, Anthony; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-07-15

    On April 6, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved vandetanib (Caprelsa tablets; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP) for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic disease. Vandetanib is the first drug approved for this indication, and this article focuses on the basis of approval. Approval was based on the results of a double-blind trial conducted in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to vandetanib, 300 mg/d orally (n = 231), or to placebo (n = 100). The primary objective was demonstration of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with vandetanib compared with placebo. Other endpoints included evaluation of overall survival and objective response rate. The PFS analysis showed a marked improvement for patients randomized to vandetanib (hazard ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate for the vandetanib arm was 44% compared with 1% for the placebo arm. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities (>5%) were diarrhea and/or colitis, hypertension and hypertensive crisis, fatigue, hypocalcemia, rash, and corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation. This approval was based on a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS. Given the toxicity profile, which includes prolongation of the QT interval and sudden death, only prescribers and pharmacies certified through the vandetanib Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy Program are able to prescribe and dispense vandetanib. Treatment-related risks should be taken into account when considering the use of vandetanib in patients with indolent, asymptomatic, or slowly progressing disease.

  17. [Advances in the researches of lutein and alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianrong; Lin, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Lutein, a kind of oxycarotenoid, can pass the blood brain barrier and preferentially accumulate in the human brain, which is the most abundant carotenoid in human brain. Evidence from multiple studies suggested that lutein was closely related to age-related cognitive decline and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human. Dietary, plasma and brain concentrations of lutein were negatively associated with age-related cognitive decline. Lutein concentrations in plasma and brain were significantly lower in AD patients than those of health control. In human brain, lutein was the sole carotenoid which consistently associated with a range of cognitive function measures. In elderly women, lutein supplement can improve the cognitive function. In this article, we systematically reviewed the literature on the role of lutein in age-related cognitive decline and alzheimer's disease and its possible mechanisms. It may prove some benefit information for the advanced research and prevention of AD.

  18. Advances in Chagas disease drug development: 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Navabi, Nazlee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The need for better drugs to treat patients with Chagas disease remains urgent. This review summarizes the advancements in drug development over the past two years. Recent Findings Drug development efforts are almost exclusively occurring as preclinical research. The exceptions being Phase I safety studies for the cruzain inhibitor, K-777, and potential Phase II studies for the antifungal drug, posaconazole, and a prodrug of ravuconazole. Several recent laboratory investigations demonstrate anti-T. cruzi activity of novel small molecules in animal models. These include nonpeptidic cruzain inhibitors, novel inhibitors of the sterol 14α-demethylase enzyme, new compounds (arylimidamides) related to pentamidine, derivatives of nifurtimox, compounds using ruthenium complexes, and several natural products. The recent implementation of a high-throughput screen of >300,000 compounds against intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes done at the Broad Institute is an important development, yielding ~300 selective inhibitors, many of which may serve as leads for medicinal chemistry efforts. Summary Progress is slow, but recent advancements in both drug development and advocacy for research on neglected diseases are encouraging. Efforts to define a target product profile and to harmonize methodologies for testing drugs for Chagas disease are described herein. PMID:20885320

  19. [Phase-II-study with vindesine (desacetyl-vinblastine-amide-sulfate) in advanced malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Goldhirsch, A; Beer, M; Sonntag, R W; Tschopp, L; Cavalli, F; Ryssel, H J; Brunner, K W

    1980-07-08

    53 patients with advanced and measurable cancerr were treated with vindesine in doses of 3 mg/m2 (pretreated) and 4 mg/m2 (non pretreated) i.v. once weekly. 48 patients are evaluable for response: of 14 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, 1 partial remission (PR), 1 minor response (MR) and 1 no change (NC) were observed. In 5 patients with large cell carcinoma of the lung: 1 NC. In 3 with adenocarcinoma of the lung: 1 MR. One patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma had progressive disease. Stable disease was observed in a patient with carcinoma of the tongue and in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Four patients with colorectal carcinoma had progressive disease. One MR was observed in a patient with breast cancer, while all of the other 3 patients had progressive disease. One carcinoma of the penis was stable. One MR was observed in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. One PR was observed in a case with no-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A patient with acute leukemia had progressive disease. Among 9 patients with malignant melanoma, 3 had an MR and 1 patient had stable disease. A patient with fibrosarcoma had progressive disease. Observed toxicity included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, paresthesias, constipation, jaw pain, nausea, stomatitis, alopecia, loss of taste, pruritus and skin rash, weakness and fatigue.

  20. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  1. Increased circulating VCAM-1 correlates with advanced disease and poor survival in patients with multiple myeloma: reduction by post-bortezomib and lenalidomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Migkou, M; Christoulas, D; Gavriatopoulou, M; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Iakovaki, M; Panagiotidis, I; Ziogas, D C; Fotiou, D; Kastritis, E; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Circulating vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and selectins were prospectively measured in 145 newly-diagnosed patients with symptomatic myeloma (NDMM), 61 patients with asymptomatic/smoldering myeloma (SMM), 47 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 87 multiple myeloma (MM) patients at first relapse who received lenalidomide- or bortezomib-based treatment (RD, n=47; or VD, n=40). Patients with NDMM had increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 compared with MGUS and SMM patients. Elevated VCAM-1 correlated with ISS-3 and was independently associated with inferior overall survival (OS) (45 months for patients with VCAM-1 >median vs 75 months, P=0.001). MM patients at first relapse had increased levels of ICAM-1 and L-selectin, even compared with NDMM patients and had increased levels of VCAM-1 compared with MGUS and SMM. Both VD and RD reduced dramatically serum VCAM-1 after four cycles of therapy, but only VD reduced serum ICAM-1, irrespective of response to therapy. The reduction of VCAM-1 was more pronounced after RD than after VD. Our study provides evidence for the prognostic value of VCAM-1 in myeloma patients, suggesting that VCAM-1 could be a suitable target for the development of anti-myeloma therapies. Furthermore, the reduction of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 by RD and VD supports the inhibitory effect of these drugs on the adhesion of MM cells to stromal cells. PMID:27232930

  2. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    SciTech Connect

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease.

  3. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory diseases in 2009.

    PubMed

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    The year 2009 led to a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational allergic diseases. The role of exposure to environmental pollutants, respiratory viruses, and allergen exposure showed significant advances. New allergens were identified. Occupational asthma and the relationship of complementary and alternative medicine to allergic diseases were extensively reviewed. New approaches to immunotherapy, novel vaccine techniques, and methods to reduce risks for severe allergic disease were addressed.

  4. Glucocerebrosidase and Parkinson disease: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2015-05-01

    Mutations of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are the most important risk factor yet discovered for Parkinson disease (PD). Homozygous GBA mutations result in Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder. Heterozygous mutations have not until recently been thought to be associated with any pathological process. However, it is clear that the presence of a GBA mutation in homozygous or heterozygous form is associated with an approximately 20-fold increase in the risk for PD, with little if any difference in risk burden related to gene dose. Most studies suggest that 5-10% of PD patients have GBA mutations, although this figure is greater in the Ashkenazi population and may be an underestimate overall if the entire exome is not sequenced. GBA-associated PD is clinically indistinguishable from idiopathic PD, except for slightly earlier age of onset and a greater frequency of cognitive impairment. Pathological and imaging features, and response to pharmacotherapy are identical to idiopathic PD. GBA mutations result in reduced enzyme activity and mutant protein may become trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to unfolded protein response and ER associated degradation and stress. Both mechanisms may be relevant in GD and PD pathogenesis and lead to impaired lysosomal function. Of particular relevance to PD is the interaction of glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) with alpha-synuclein (SNCA). There appears to be a bi-directional reciprocal relationship between GCase levels and those of SNCA. Thus reduced GCase in GBA mutation PD brain is associated with increased SNCA, and increased SNCA deposition is associated with reduced GCase even in GBA wild-type PD brains. It is noteworthy that GBA mutations are also associated with an increase in risk for dementia with Lewy bodies, another synucleinopathy. It has been suggested that the relationship between GCase and SNCA may be leveraged to reduce SNCA levels in PD by enhancing GCase levels and activity. This

  5. Successful Advance Directives through Quality Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Parke, Bob; Krajewski, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Recently there has been talk about the benefit of advance care planning. This is an issue which resurfaces from time to time, as is evident in recent New England Journal of Medicine articles and editorials (April 2010). It has also resurfaced in Canada in a recent document titled Advance Care Planning in Canada: National Framework for Consultation (Health Canada 2010). This document acknowledges that many of us believe in the value of advance directives, finding "that most of the general public (60-90%) is supportive of advance care planning. However, only 10-20% of the public in the US, Canada and Australia have completed an advance care plan of any kind" (Health Canada 2010: 6). In Muriel R. Gillick's editorial in the New England Journal Medicine, she strongly makes the point that few people complete advance directives and further states that "directives have been a resounding failure" (Gillick 2010: 1239). These statements, although not exhaustive on the subject, show that we have a problem translating the support for advance directives into actual plans.

  6. The Course of Skin and Serum Biomarkers of Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Its Association with Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Disease Severity, and Mortality during ICU Admission in Critically Ill Patients: Results from a Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meertens, John H.; Nienhuis, Hans L.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Smit, Andries J.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Mulder, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been implicated in multiple organ failure, predominantly via their cellular receptor (RAGE) in preclinical studies. Little is known about the time course and prognostic relevance of AGEs in critically ill human patients, including those with severe sepsis. Objective 1) To explore the reliability of Skin Autofluorescence (AF) as an index of tissue AGEs in ICU patients, 2) to compare its levels to healthy controls, 3) to describe the time course of AGEs and influencing factors during ICU admission, and 4) to explore their association with disease severity, outcome, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods Skin AF, serum N"-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), N"-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) were serially measured for a maximum of 7 days in critically ill ICU patients with multiple organ failure and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Correlations with (changes in) clinical parameters of disease severity, LDL dienes, and CRP were studied and survival analysis for in-hospital mortality was performed. Results Forty-five ICU patients (age: 59±15 years; 60% male), and 37 healthy controls (59±14; 68%) were included. Skin AF measurements in ICU patients were reproducible (CV right-left arm: 13%, day-to-day: 10%), with confounding effects of skin reflectance and plasma bilirubin levels. Skin AF was higher in ICU patients vs healthy controls (2.7±0.7 vs 1.8±0.3 au; p<0.001). Serum CEL (23±10 vs, 16±3 nmol/gr protein; p<0.001), LDL dienes (19 (15–23) vs. 9 (8–11) μmol/mmol cholesterol; <0.001), and sRAGE (1547 (998–2496) vs. 1042 (824–1388) pg/ml; p = 0.003) were significantly higher in ICU patients compared to healthy controls, while CML was not different (27 (20–39) vs 29 (25–33) nmol/gr protein). While CRP and LDL dienes decreased significantly, Skin AF and serum AGEs and sRAGE did not change significantly during the first 7 days of ICU admission. CML and CEL

  7. Interferon-free regimens improve health-related quality of life and fatigue in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with advanced liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Scheiner, Bernhard; Schwabl, Philipp; Steiner, Sebastian; Bucsics, Theresa; Chromy, David; Aichelburg, Maximilian C.; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Trauner, Michael; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Reiberger, Thomas; Mandorfer, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is impaired in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients (HIV/HCV) and further decreased by interferon (IFN)-based therapies. We aimed to investigate the impact of IFN- and ribavirin (RBV)-free therapies on HRQoL and fatigue. Thirty-three HIV/HCV-coinfected patients who underwent HCV therapy with sofosbuvir in combination with daclatasvir or ledipasvir were retrospectively studied and compared to 17 patients who received boceprevir (BOC)/PEGIFN/RBV. HRQoL (mental [MCS] and physical [PCS] component score) and fatigue were assessed using the SF-36 (Short Form 36 Health Survey) and the FSS (Fatigue Severity Scale), respectively. HRQoL/fatigue was evaluated at baseline (BL), midway, and 12 weeks after the end of treatment (FU). At BL, both domains of HRQoL as well as the severity of fatigue were significantly impaired in HIV/HCV, when compared to a healthy population. Already during treatment, IFN/RBV-free therapy improved physical health (PCS: 41.4 ± 9.7 vs. 47.0 ± 11.2; P < 0.01) and reduced fatigue (37.8 ± 14.0 vs. 31.9 ± 15.2; P = 0.01), whereas we observed a substantial worsening of both factors in patients treated with BOC/PEGIFN/RBV. Since these improvements were maintained, patients treated with IFN/RBV-free therapy reported an improvement in physical health (PCS: 41.4 ± 9.7 vs. 45.8 ± 12.7; P < 0.01) and fatigue (37.8 ± 14.0 vs. 30.9 ± 14.8; P = 0.04) at FU. While AIDS-patients had a higher severity of fatigue at BL and showed a reduction of fatigue (42.5 ± 14.0 vs. 31.6 ± 15.7; P = 0.01), mental health only improved in patients without AIDS (MCS: 35.7 ± 5.3 vs.40.7 ± 6.4; P = 0.04). HIV/HCV with severe fatigue at BL (>median BL-FSS) showed most pronounced improvements in severity of fatigue (49.7 ± 7.0 vs. 32.0 ± 16.7; P < 0.01). In contrast to IFN-based regimens, highly effective and well-tolerated IFN-/RBV-free regimens improve

  8. [Palliative care of patients with terminal obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    von Plessen, Christian; Nielsen, Thyge L; Steffensen, Ida E; Larsen, Shuruk Al-Halwai; Taudorf, Ebbe

    2011-10-17

    Terminal chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and advanced cancer have similar prognosis and symptom burden. However, palliative care of patients with terminal COPD has been neglected in Denmark. We describe the symptoms of terminal COPD and suggest criteria for defining the palliative phase of the disease. Furthermore we discuss the prognostic and ethical challenges for patients, their families and their caregivers. Finally, we summarize the current evidence for palliative treatment of dyspnoea and ways to evaluate response to treatment.

  9. [Advances in the diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, U; Wiltfang, J; Peters, N; Benninghoff, J

    2012-05-01

    Due to the demographic developments, diagnosis and treatment, dementia constitutes an increasing medical challenge and is likely to have an increasing socioeconomic impact. Dementia does not reflect a single disease but encompasses a variety of underlying conditions, heterogeneous clinical courses and therapeutic approaches, among which Alzheimer's disease represents the most common cause. Therefore, a thorough differential diagnosis of dementia is of major importance. To date the current diagnosis of dementia according to ICD-10/DMS-IV is based on clinical criteria. In addition, the concept of mild cognitive impairment comprises early cognitive dysfunction without clinically apparent dementia. Alzheimer's disease is more and more conceptualized as a disease continuum with mild cognitive impairment as an early and manifest dementia as the later stage of the disease. This review gives an overview on the current diagnostic approaches and the proposed revisions of diagnostic and research criteria for Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation.

  11. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  12. Reaching Those Most in Need – A Call to Action for Advanced Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shashank; Fleisher, Jori E

    2016-01-01

    Much of the clinical and research attention for Parkinson's Disease (PD) has focused on mild to moderate stages. As the disease advances, it can become difficult for patients to attend clinical visits. These patients are often lost to follow-up, and consequently, vanish from the pool of potential research subjects who could inform our management of this understudied population. We aim to increase awareness about this population and potential interventions to improve continuity of care and foster research in advanced PD. PMID:27708720

  13. Molecular risk stratification in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Lamirault, Guillaume; Meur, Nolwenn Le; Roussel, Jean-Christian; Cunff, Marie-France Le; Baron, Daniel; Bihouée, Audrey; Guisle, Isabelle; Raharijaona, Mahatsangy; Ramstein, Gérard; Teusan, Raluca; Chevalier, Catherine; Gueffet, Jean-Pierre; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Léger, Jean J; Houlgatte, Rémi; Steenman, Marja

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Risk stratification in advanced heart failure (HF) is crucial for the individualization of therapeutic strategy, in particular for heart transplantation and ventricular assist device implantation. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac gene expression profiling can distinguish between HF patients with different disease severity. We obtained tissue samples from both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricle of explanted hearts of 44 patients undergoing cardiac transplantation or ventricular assist device placement. Gene expression profiles were obtained using an in-house microarray containing 4217 muscular organ-relevant genes. Based on their clinical status, patients were classified into three HF-severity groups: deteriorating (n= 12), intermediate (n= 19) and stable (n= 13). Two-class statistical analysis of gene expression profiles of deteriorating and stable patients identified a 170-gene and a 129-gene predictor for LV and RV samples, respectively. The LV molecular predictor identified patients with stable and deteriorating status with a sensitivity of 88% and 92%, and a specificity of 100% and 96%, respectively. The RV molecular predictor identified patients with stable and deteriorating status with a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, and a specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. The molecular prediction was reproducible across biological replicates in LV and RV samples. Gene expression profiling has the potential to reproducibly detect HF patients with highest HF severity with high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, not only LV but also RV samples could be used for molecular risk stratification with similar predictive power. PMID:19793385

  14. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future.

  15. Advances in management of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B

    2003-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is numerically as common as thalassaemia. However, it affects relatively under privileged population i.e. tribal population belonging to economically poor class and having inadequate access to education and modern health facilities. A recent explosion acknowledged in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease has lead to newer dimensions in treatment. Some of these viz. prevention of overwhelming bacterial infection, present indications and controversies regarding blood transfusion, prevention of stroke, acute chest syndrome, hydroxyurea therapy--probably the best disease modifying agent at the moment, stem cell transplantation--a cure and certain promising experimental therapies including gene therapy have been discussed in this review.

  16. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future.

  17. [Care for patients with rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Takkenberg, J J M Hanneke; Bierings, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease usually concerns only a handful of patients, but all patients with a rare disease combined represent a significant health burden. Due to limited knowledge and the absence of treatment guidelines, patients with rare diseases usually experience delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. Historically, rare diseases have never been considered a major health problem. However, rare diseases have recently been receiving increased attention. In the Netherlands, a national plan for rare diseases was published in late 2013, with recommendations on how to improve the organisation of healthcare for people with rare diseases. Using the example of the rare disease Fanconi anemia, this paper describes the challenges and opportunities in organising healthcare for rare diseases. Two critical steps in optimising healthcare for rare diseases are developing multidisciplinary healthcare teams and stimulating patient empowerment. Optimal cooperation between patients, patient organisations, multidisciplinary healthcare teams and scientists is of great importance. In this respect, transition to adult healthcare requires special attention.

  18. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  19. Antiangiogenic Agents in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Susanna V; Brahmer, Julie R

    2011-01-01

    Most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) present with advanced disease requiring systemic chemotherapy. Treatment with the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in combination with standard platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with advanced NSCLC. Several multitargeted antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., sorafenib, sunitinib, cediranib, vandetanib, BIBF 1120, pazopanib, and axitinib) are also being evaluated in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here we review current clinical data with combination therapy involving antiangiogenic agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:21469981

  20. Advances in the genetics of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Joanne; Farrer, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that was long considered the result of environmental factors. In the past 15 years, however, a genetic aetiology for PD has begun to emerge. Here, we review results from linkage and next-generation sequencing studies of familial parkinsonism, as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association findings in sporadic PD. In these studies, many of the genetic findings overlap, despite different designs and study populations, highlighting novel therapeutic targets. The molecular results delineate a sequence of pathological events whereby deficits in synaptic exocytosis and endocytosis, endosomal trafficking, lysosome-mediated autophagy and mitochondrial maintenance increase susceptibility to PD. These discoveries provide the rationale, molecular insight and research tools to develop neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies.

  1. Advances in pleural disease management including updated procedural coding.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andrew R; Sterman, Daniel H

    2014-08-01

    Over 1.5 million pleural effusions occur in the United States every year as a consequence of a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and malignant conditions. Although rarely fatal in isolation, pleural effusions are often a marker of a serious underlying medical condition and contribute to significant patient morbidity, quality-of-life reduction, and mortality. Pleural effusion management centers on pleural fluid drainage to relieve symptoms and to investigate pleural fluid accumulation etiology. Many recent studies have demonstrated important advances in pleural disease management approaches for a variety of pleural fluid etiologies, including malignant pleural effusion, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and chest tube size. The last decade has seen greater implementation of real-time imaging assistance for pleural effusion management and increasing use of smaller bore percutaneous chest tubes. This article will briefly review recent pleural effusion management literature and update the latest changes in common procedural terminology billing codes as reflected in the changing landscape of imaging use and percutaneous approaches to pleural disease management.

  2. Advances in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States. A two- to three-fold rise in the rates of obesity and overweight in children over the last 2 decades is probably responsible for the epidemic of NAFLD. Emerging data suggest that children with NASH progress to cirrhosis which may ultimately increase liver-related mortality. More worrisome is the recognition that cardiovascular risk and morbidity in children and adolescents is associated with fatty liver. Pediatric fatty liver disease often displays a histologic pattern distinct from that found in adults. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of NASH. Non-invasive biomarkers are needed to identify individuals with progressive liver injury. Targeted therapies to improve liver histology and metabolic abnormalities associated with fatty liver are needed. Currently, randomized-controlled trials are underway in the pediatric population to define pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD. Public health awareness and intervention are needed to promote healthy diet, exercise, and lifestyle modifications to prevent and reduce the burden of disease in the community. PMID:19637286

  3. Thromboembolic disease in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Nadia; Cordero, Nazaret; Espinosa, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Thromboembolic events are common among patients with cancer as a consequence of cancer- and treatment-related factors. As these events are the second most frequent cause of death in this population, their prevention and treatment are important. Venous ultrasonography is the technique of choice for diagnosis, with sensitivity and specificity above 95 % in symptomatic thrombosis. Routine prophylaxis is not recommended for ambulatory patients, although it could be useful in selected cases. On the other hand, all inpatients should receive prophylactic therapy unless contraindicated. Therapy of thromboembolic disease is based on anticoagulants. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of low-weight heparins is associated with a lower incidence of bleeding and recurrent thrombosis as compared with non-fractionated heparin or warfarin. Options for recurrent thrombosis include change to another anticoagulant agent, increasing doses of the same agent and cava filters.

  4. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD) is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients. PMID:28251162

  5. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  6. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangialasche, Francesca; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, has reached epidemic proportions, with major social, medical and economical burdens. With no currently available curative treatments, both the World Health Organization and the G8 Dementia Summit recently identified dementia and AD prevention as a major public health priority. Dementia and AD have a wide range of risk factors (genetic, vascular/metabolic and lifestyle-related), which often co-occur and thus interact with each other. Previous intervention efforts aimed at preventing dementia and AD focused on the management of single risk factors, with relatively modest findings. Also, the effect of risk factors depends on age at exposure, indicating that the timing of preventive interventions needs to be carefully considered. In view of the complex multifactorial nature of AD, as well as its long pre-clinical (asymptomatic) phase, interventions simultaneously targeting multiple risk factors and disease mechanisms at an early stage of the disease are most likely to be effective. Three large European multidomain prevention trials have been launched with the goal of preventing cognitive decline, dementia and AD in older adults with different risk profiles. Pharmacological trials are also shifting towards prevention of Alzheimer dementia, by targeting at-risk individuals prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms. The current review will summarize and discuss the evidence on risk and protective factors from observational studies, ongoing lifestyle-related and pharmacological randomized controlled trials (RCTs), as well as future directions for dementia and AD prevention. PMID:26097723

  7. Managing uncertainty in advanced liver disease: a qualitative, multiperspective, serial interview study

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, Barbara; Boyd, Kirsty; Kendall, Marilyn; Iredale, John; Murray, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the experiences and support needs of people with advanced liver disease and those of their lay and professional carers to inform improvements in the supportive and palliative care of this rapidly growing but currently neglected patient group. Design Multiperspective, serial interviews. We conducted up to three qualitative in-depth interviews with each patient and lay carer over 12 months and single interviews with case-linked healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using grounded theory techniques. Participants Patients with advanced liver disease of diverse aetiologies recruited from an inpatient hepatology ward, and their lay carers and case-linked healthcare professionals nominated by the patients. Setting Primary and secondary care in South-East Scotland. Results 37 participants (15 patients, 11 lay and 11 professional carers) completed 51 individual and 13 joint patient-carer interviews. Nine patients died during the study. Uncertainty dominated experiences throughout the course of the illness, across patients’ considerable physical, psychological, social and existential needs and affected patients, lay carers and professionals. This related to the nature of the condition, the unpredictability of physical deterioration and prognosis, poor communication and information-sharing, and complexities of care. The pervasive uncertainty also shaped patients’ and lay carers’ strategies for coping and impeded care planning. While patients’ acute medical care was usually well coordinated, their ongoing care lacked structure and focus. Conclusions Living, dying and caring in advanced liver disease is dominated by pervasive, enduring and universally shared uncertainty. In the face of high levels of multidimensional patient distress, professionals must acknowledge this uncertainty in constructive ways that value its contribution to the person's coping approach. Pervasive uncertainty makes anticipatory care planning in advanced liver

  8. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  9. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  10. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease in 2010.

    PubMed

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2011-03-01

    2010 Found a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease. The role of sensitization and the subsequent production of allergic disease have been explored. New allergens and their T- and B-cell epitopes have been characterized. Novel approaches to the diagnosis and evaluation of food allergy have been described. The role of pollutants as they affect respiratory disease and the effects of age extremes on sensitization and asthma have been addressed. Significant advances in the understanding of inflammatory changes in both the upper and lower respiratory systems occurred. Novel therapeutic approaches have been explored, including the development of hypoallergens from improved molecular biology techniques. New effective approaches to asthma therapy have been identified. Exposure reduction through air filtration and novel immunotherapy approaches, such as sublingual therapy, have made significant advances.

  11. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  12. Advances in MR imaging assessment of adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Nazima N; Higgins, Charles B; Ordovas, Karen G

    2015-02-01

    Many novel cardiac MR sequences can be used for assessment of adult patients with congenital heart disease. Although most of these techniques are still primarily used in the research arena, there are many potential applications in clinical practice. Advanced cardiac MR assessment of myocardial tissue characterization, flow hemodynamics, and myocardial strain are promising tools for diagnostic and prognostic assessment late after repair of congenital heart diseases.

  13. Alzheimer's disease: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ubhi, Kiren; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory deficits and other cognitive disturbances. Neuropathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that innervate the hippocampus and cortex and the abnormal extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β and intracellular tau protein. Current research on AD is focused on the mechanisms underlying the abnormal oligomerization, fibrillation, and accumulation of the amyloid-β and tau proteins, mechanisms that may alter the dynamics of this accumulation and on experimental therapeutics approaches aimed at the clearance of the abnormally folded proteins and other potentially neuroprotective interventions. This review will summarize the main areas of investigation in AD and present ways forward for future work.

  14. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended.

  15. Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Challenges and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Mahmoud; Al Beshir, Mohammad; Al-Judaibi, Bandar; Al-Ameel, Turki; Saleem, Abdulaziz; Bessissow, Talat; Ghosh, Subrata; Almadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, several advances have been made in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from both evaluative and therapeutic perspectives. This review discusses the medical advancements that have recently been made as the standard of care for managing patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) and to identify the challenges associated with implementing their use in clinical practice. A comprehensive literature search of the major databases (PubMed and Embase) was conducted for all recent scientific papers (1990–2013) giving the recent updates on the management of IBD and the data were extracted. The reported advancements in managing IBD range from diagnostic and evaluative tools, such as genetic tests, biochemical surrogate markers of activity, endoscopic techniques, and radiological modalities, to therapeutic advances, which encompass medical, endoscopic, and surgical interventions. There are limited studies addressing the cost-effectiveness and the impact that these advances have had on medical practice. The majority of the advances developed for managing IBD, while considered instrumental by some IBD experts in improving patient care, have questionable applications due to constraints of cost, lack of availability, and most importantly, insufficient evidence that supports their role in improving important long-term health-related outcomes. PMID:24705146

  16. Advances in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease: challenges and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mahmoud; Al Beshir, Mohammad; Al-Judaibi, Bandar; Al-Ameel, Turki; Saleem, Abdulaziz; Bessissow, Talat; Ghosh, Subrata; Almadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, several advances have been made in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from both evaluative and therapeutic perspectives. This review discusses the medical advancements that have recently been made as the standard of care for managing patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) and to identify the challenges associated with implementing their use in clinical practice. A comprehensive literature search of the major databases (PubMed and Embase) was conducted for all recent scientific papers (1990-2013) giving the recent updates on the management of IBD and the data were extracted. The reported advancements in managing IBD range from diagnostic and evaluative tools, such as genetic tests, biochemical surrogate markers of activity, endoscopic techniques, and radiological modalities, to therapeutic advances, which encompass medical, endoscopic, and surgical interventions. There are limited studies addressing the cost-effectiveness and the impact that these advances have had on medical practice. The majority of the advances developed for managing IBD, while considered instrumental by some IBD experts in improving patient care, have questionable applications due to constraints of cost, lack of availability, and most importantly, insufficient evidence that supports their role in improving important long-term health-related outcomes.

  17. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  18. ‘Reality and desire’ in the care of advanced chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marrón, Belén; Craver, Lourdes; Remón, César; Prieto, Mario; Gutiérrez, Josep Mª; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    There is a long distance between the actual worldwide reality in advanced chronic kidney disease care and the desire of how these patients should be managed to decrease cardiovascular and general morbidity and mortality. Implementation of adequate infrastructures may improve clinical outcomes and increase the use of home renal replacement therapies (RRT). Current pitfalls should be addressed to optimise care: inadequate medical training for nephrological referral and RRT selection, late referral to nephrologists, inadequate patient education for choice of RRT modality, lack of multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics and lack of programmed RRT initiation. These deficiencies generate unintended consequences, such as inequality of care and limitations in patient education and selection-choice for RRT technique with limited use of peritoneal dialysis. Multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics may have a direct impact on patient survival, morbidity and quality of life. There is a common need to reduce health care costs and scenarios increasing PD incidence show better efficiency. The following proposals may help to improve the current situation: defining the scope of the problem, disseminating guidelines with specific targets and quality indicators, optimising medical speciality training, providing adequate patient education, specially through the use of general decision making tools that will allow patients to choose the best possible RRT in accordance with their values, preferences and medical advice, increasing planned dialysis starts and involving all stakeholders in the process. PMID:25984045

  19. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  20. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  1. Efficacy of chemotherapy combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhongliang; Chen, Dong; Liu, Aiguo; Fan, Pingsheng; Duan, Qiaohong; Zhang, Tengyue; Fan, Gaofei

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of chemotherapy combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Forty patients were enrolled. Targeted arterial infusion of verapamil was done once a month, 3-5 times per patient, along with chemotherapy. After 2 bouts of combined treatment, the efficacy was evaluated. Primary gastric tumor was confirmed in 38/40 patients, and unconfirmed in 2/40 patients due to adhesion of tumors to surrounding tissue. Combined treatment was administered in 38 patients with defined tumors. Complete response to the treatment was in 5/38 (13.1 %) patients, partial response in 27/38 (71.1 %) patients, stable disease in 4/38 (10.5 %) patients, and progressive disease in 2/38 (5.26 %) patients. The effective rate (i.e., complete + partial response) comprised 84.2 %. There were 31 patients with liver metastases; 10/31 (32.3 %) patients showed complete response, 16/31 (51.6 %) patients showed partial response, 3/31 (9.7 %) patients had stable disease, and 2/31 (6.5 %) patients had progressive disease. The effective rate in these patients was 83.8 %. Thirty-seven patients were followed up, and 27/37 (73.0 %) patients were alive for 6 months or longer, 19/37 (51.3 %) for 12 months, 8 (35.1 %) for 18 months, and 8/37 (21.6 %) for 24 months. In conclusion, in patients with advanced gastric cancer, chemotherapy is more effective when combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil, leading to extended patients' survival and improved quality of life.

  2. Brain metastasis reirradiation in patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhou; Sun, Bing; Shen, Ge; Cha, Lei; Meng, Xiangying; Wang, Junliang; Zhou, Zhenshan; Wu, Shikai

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of recurrent brain metastasis is dismal. This study aims to assess the clinical outcomes and toxicity of reirradiation as a salvage treatment for progressive brain metastasis in patients with advanced breast cancer. Between July 2005 and September 2014, the medical records of 56 patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of these patients, 39 received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) reirradiation (Group 1), and 17 received SRS followed by WBRT reirradiation (Group 2). Overall survival (OS) and brain progression-free survival rates/times were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Change in neurologic function was also assessed. The median OS was 10.8 months (range, 1.3–56.8 months). In Group 1, the median PFS time (PFS-1) was 6.5 months and the OS time was 11.4 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high Karnofsky performance score (KPS) (P = 0.004), controlled extracranial metastasis (P = 0.001) and a good response to reirradiation (P = 0.034). In Group 2, the median PFS time (PFS-2) after reirradiation was 8.5 months and the OS time was 10.8 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high KPS (P = 0.018). The majority of the patients had improved or stable neurological function. Reirradiation is an effective and a safe treatment for patients with brain metastases from breast cancer. It might delay the progression of intracranial disease and improve neurological function. A suitable patient selection for reirradiation was suggested. PMID:27707842

  3. How does uncertainty shape patient experience in advanced illness? A secondary analysis of qualitative data

    PubMed Central

    Etkind, Simon Noah; Bristowe, Katherine; Bailey, Katharine; Selman, Lucy Ellen; Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty is common in advanced illness but is infrequently studied in this context. If poorly addressed, uncertainty can lead to adverse patient outcomes. Aim: We aimed to understand patient experiences of uncertainty in advanced illness and develop a typology of patients’ responses and preferences to inform practice. Design: Secondary analysis of qualitative interview transcripts. Studies were assessed for inclusion and interviews were sampled using maximum-variation sampling. Analysis used a thematic approach with 10% of coding cross-checked to enhance reliability. Setting/participants: Qualitative interviews from six studies including patients with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, cancer and liver failure. Results: A total of 30 transcripts were analysed. Median age was 75 (range, 43–95), 12 patients were women. The impact of uncertainty was frequently discussed: the main related themes were engagement with illness, information needs, patient priorities and the period of time that patients mainly focused their attention on (temporal focus). A typology of patient responses to uncertainty was developed from these themes. Conclusion: Uncertainty influences patient experience in advanced illness through affecting patients’ information needs, preferences and future priorities for care. Our typology aids understanding of how patients with advanced illness respond to uncertainty. Assessment of these three factors may be a useful starting point to guide clinical assessment and shared decision making. PMID:27129679

  4. Infectious diseases in end-stage liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Aneesh K; Lyon, G Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases sustain impairment to immune systems, which worsens over time. These defects in their host defense lead to risks of bacterial infections and increased morbidity. Providers should have heightened surveillance for infectious diseases and suspect one with any acute change in status. Patient history may reveal rare infections and allow initiation of early appropriate therapy. There should be a low threshold for obtaining diagnostic cultures and peritoneal fluid samples and discussing possible causes with an infectious diseases consultant or a microbiology laboratory. These maneuvers will maximize therapy in patients at high risk for death due to infectious disease.

  5. Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a significant burden on public health and economic stability of societies all over the world. They have for centuries been among the leading causes of death and disability and presented growing challenges to health security and human progress. The threat posed by infectious diseases is further deepened by the continued emergence of new, unrecognized, and old infectious disease epidemics of global impact. Over the past three and half decades at least 30 new infectious agents affecting humans have emerged, most of which are zoonotic and their origins have been shown to correlate significantly with socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological factors. As these factors continue to increase, putting people in increased contact with the disease causing pathogens, there is concern that infectious diseases may continue to present a formidable challenge. Constant awareness and pursuance of effective strategies for controlling infectious diseases and disease emergence thus remain crucial. This review presents current updates on emerging and neglected infectious diseases and highlights the scope, dynamics, and advances in infectious disease management with particular focus on WHO top priority emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and neglected tropical infectious diseases. PMID:28286767

  6. ABVD as the treatment option in advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma patients older than 45 years.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Bosko M; Mihaljevic, Biljana S; Jakovic, Ljubomir R

    2012-07-01

    Advanced age is considered an unfavourable prognostic factor for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The optimal treatment for these patients is not yet defined, especially for the advanced stages. We analysed the outcome and prognostic relevance of patient and disease characteristics in 46 advanced stage HL patients who were older than 45 years, treated with ABVD. Elderly patients (>60 year) had a significantly higher rate of comorbidities (p < 0.05). The complete remission rate was significantly lower in elderly patients and in patients with an IPS ≥ 3 (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively). Elderly patients had significantly shorter event-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p < 0.01) compared to patients of 45-60 year. Extranodal disease, an IPS ≥ 3, bulky disease, an ESR > 50 and the presence of a large mediastinal tumour mass didn't have an influence on survival (p > 0.05). The multivariate Cox regression analysis identified the age of >60 year as an independent prognostic factor. The prospective clinical trials seem to be needed for defining the optimal therapeutic approach in elderly patients.

  7. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  8. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  9. What determines duration of palliative care before death for patients with advanced disease? A retrospective cohort study of community and hospital palliative care provision in a large UK city

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael I; Ziegler, Lucy; Allsop, Matthew; Daniel, Sunitha; Hurlow, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Objective For patients with advanced cancer, several randomised controlled trials have shown that access to palliative care at least 6 months before death can improve symptoms, reduce unplanned hospital admissions, minimise aggressive cancer treatments and enable patients to make choices about their end-of-life care, including exercising the choice to die at home. This study determines in a UK population the duration of palliative care before death and explores influencing factors. Design This retrospective cohort study analysed referrals to three specialist palliative care services; a hospital-based inpatient palliative care team, and two community-based services (hospices). For each patient referred to any of the above services we identified the date of first referral to that team and calculated the median interval between first referral and death. We also calculated how referral time varied by age, sex, diagnosis and type of palliative care service. Participants 4650 patients referred to specialist palliative care services in Leeds UK between April 2012 and March 2014. Results Median age of the sample was 75 years. 3903 (84.0%) patients had a diagnosis of cancer. Age, diagnosis and place of referral were significant predictors of duration of palliative care before death. Age was independently associated (J=2 672 078, z=−392046.14, r=0.01) with duration of palliative care regardless of diagnosis. Patients over 75 years have 29 fewer days of palliative care than patients under 50. Patients with non-cancer diagnoses have 13 fewer days of palliative care than patients with cancer. Additionally, patients referred to hospital palliative care receive 24.5 fewer days palliative care than those referred to community palliative care services. Conclusions The current timing of referral to palliative care may limit the benefits to patients in terms of improvements in end-of-life care, particularly for older patients and patients with conditions other than cancer

  10. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  11. Clinical Presentation and Patient Evaluation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaishali; Sanyal, Arun J; Sterling, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a diagnosis of exclusion. Most patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. Most patients remain undiagnosed. A high index of suspicion and serologic work-up to rule out alternative causes of liver disease is required. In NALFD, fibrosis correlates with outcomes, including mortality. To diagnose, assess severity, and monitor fibrosis, 2 noninvasive methods can be used. However, noninvasive tests are more helpful at extremes of fibrosis: excluding it or diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Liver biopsy is usually reserved for cases whereby noninvasive tests fail to accurately determine the degree of fibrosis or the diagnosis is unclear.

  12. Management of Alcohol Dependence in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Mirijello, Antonio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence represents a chronic and relapsing disease affecting nearly 10% of the general population both in the United States and in Europe, with a widespread burden of morbidity and mortality. Alcohol dependence represents the most common cause of liver damage in the Western Countries. Although alcoholic liver disease is associated primarily with heavy drinking, continued alcohol consumption, even in low doses after the onset of liver disease, increases the risk of severe consequences, including mortality. Consequently the ideal treatment of patients affected by alcohol dependence and alcoholic liver disease should aim at achieving long-term total alcohol abstinence and preventing relapse. The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the management of alcohol dependence in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Increasing evidences suggests the usefulness of psychosocial interventions and medications combined in order to reduce alcohol intake, promote abstinence and prevent relapse in alcohol dependent patients. Disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate have been approved for this indication; gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is approved in Italy and Austria. However, these drugs have not been tested in patients with advanced liver disease. Amongst other emerging pharmacotherapies for alcoholism, topiramate, ondansetron, and baclofen seem the most promising ones. Both topiramate and ondansetron hold a safe profile in alcoholic patients; however, none of them has been tested in alcoholic patients with advanced liver disease. To date, baclofen represents the only anti-craving medication formally tested in a randomized clinical trial in alcoholic patients affected by liver cirrhosis, although additional confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:23456576

  13. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  14. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  15. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  16. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology, there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part I of this Editorial Review, seven topics are considered: intestinal development; proliferation and repair; intestinal permeability; microbiotica, infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy. These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician. PMID:22807604

  17. The tolerability and pharmacokinetics of N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin in patients with advanced HIV disease (ACTG 100). The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tierney, M; Pottage, J; Kessler, H; Fischl, M; Richman, D; Merigan, T; Powderly, W; Smith, S; Karim, A; Sherman, J

    1995-12-15

    Twenty-nine patients were enrolled in a phase I dose-escalating tolerance trial of N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin, an alpha-glucosidase I inhibitor that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication by altering glycosylation of gp120. Dosing was begun at 8 mg/kg/day and subsequent doses were 16, 32, 48, and 64 mg/kg/day. The maximum tolerated dose was not achieved because of slow accrual and because the study was stopped after the finding of cataracts in initial long-range rat toxicology studies. These cataracts were later shown to be transient and not found in other animals. The most common side effects were gastrointestinal, with diarrhea and flatulence occurring in most subjects, which seemed to partially improve on a modified diet that excluded complex carbohydrates. Grade III elevations in liver function tests were seen in two patients. Grade III leukopenia and neutropenia were seen in seven patients, but were only severe enough in two to require discontinuation. No significant trends in CD4 cell counts or HIV-1 p24 levels were noted.

  18. Sleep in patients with restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Christine H J; Kryger, Meir

    2014-09-01

    Restrictive lung disease leads to ventilatory defects and diffusion impairments. These changes may contribute to abnormal nocturnal pathophysiology, including sleep architecture disruption and impaired ventilation and oxygenation. Patients with restrictive lung disease may suffer significant daytime fatigue and dysfunction. Hypercarbia and hypoxemia during sleep may impact progression of lung disease and related symptoms. Little is known about the impact of treatment of sleep disruption on sleep quality and overall prognosis in restrictive lung disease. This review discusses the pathophysiology of sleep and comorbid sleep disorders in restrictive lung diseases including interstitial lung disease, neuromuscular disease, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

  19. Disposition of nitrendipine in patients with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Zilly, W; Rämsch, K D; Gothe, M

    1988-01-01

    Metabolism of nitrendipine occurs principally in the liver. Therefore, an alteration of pharmacokinetics has to be discussed in patients with hepatic impairment. To evaluate steady-state plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics, a low dose of nitrendipine (5 mg/day for 3 weeks) was administered orally to patients with different chronic liver diseases (fatty liver, n = 3; chronic hepatitis, n = 2; and cirrhosis of the liver, n = 5). Nitrendipine plasma concentrations were analyzed by using a gas-liquid chromatography procedure. Twenty-two days after beginning the study, steady-state plasma concentrations were lower than 1.0 microgram/L in one patient without liver disease and in seven patients with chronic liver diseases, in contrast to three patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (5.5, 1.3, and 2.9 micrograms/L). The maximum concentration (Cmax) was 2.3 micrograms/L in the patient without liver disease and 8.3 +/- 3.9 micrograms/L in the hepatic patients. The elimination half-life was prolonged in three of five patients with cirrhosis of the liver (35, 67, and 43 h), whereas in the other patients the half-life was in a normal range (4.2-21.3 h). The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was enhanced in three patients with liver cirrhosis (387, 69, and 126 h/micrograms/L); in the other seven hepatic patients, results were normal (35-49 h/micrograms/L). There were no alterations observed in any patient in blood pressure and laboratory data. Oral administration of a low dose of nitrendipine resulted in slightly enhanced steady state plasma concentrations only in patients with advanced cirrhosis of the liver. The half-life, AUC, and bioavailability also seem to be altered only in a more severe state of liver disease.

  20. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  1. Integrating Patient Concerns into Parkinson's Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shen-Yang; Tan, Ai Huey; Fox, Susan H; Evans, Andrew H; Low, Soon Chai

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex motor and non-motor disorder and management is often challenging. In this review, we explore emerging approaches to improve the care of patients, drawing from the literature regarding patient-centred care, patient and caregiver perspectives and priorities, gaps in knowledge among patients and caregivers and the need for accurate information, individual variability in disease manifestations, prognostication of disease course, new developments in health technologies and personalized medicine, specialty care, pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, financial burden, lifestyle and work-related issues, support groups and palliative care.

  2. Neutrophil CD64 expression: a reliable diagnostic marker of infection in advanced cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Comolli, Giuditta; Torchio, Martina; Lenta, Elisa; Franceschetti, Benvenuto; Chiesa, Antonella; Calarota, Sandra A; Baldanti, Fausto; Scudeller, Luigia; Marone, Piero; Danova, Marco; Marco, Danova

    2015-07-01

    Infection and sepsis are major health problems in cancer patients. There is a need for the identification and validation of biomarkers to improve their early diagnosis and treatment. Emerging evidence showed that neutrophil CD64 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for systemic infection and sepsis in critically ill patients with various diseases but data on patients bearing solid tumors are still lacking. Using a dedicated flow cytometric assay we evaluated neutrophil CD64 expression in patients with advanced cancer without active infections to verify if it could be utilized as a reliable biomarker of early infections also in oncologic patients.

  3. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  4. Low Circulating Levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone in Histologically Advanced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Michael; Angulo, Paul; Chalasani, Naga; Merriman, Ralph; Viker, Kimberly; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Sanderson, Schuyler; Gawrieh, Samer; Krishnan, Anuradha; Lindor, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The biological basis of variability in histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) is the most abundant steroid hormone and has been shown to influence sensitivity to oxidative stress, insulin sensitivity, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and procollagen messenger RNA. Our aim was to determine whether more histologically advanced NAFLD is associated with low circulating levels of DHEA. Serum samples were obtained prospectively at the time of liver biopsy in 439 patients with NAFLD (78 in an initial and 361 in validation cohorts) and in controls with cholestatic liver disease (n = 44). NAFLD was characterized as mild [simple steatosis or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis stage 0–2] or advanced (NASH with fibrosis stage 3–4). Serum levels of sulfated DHEA (DHEA-S) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with advanced NAFLD had lower plasma levels of DHEA-S than patients with mild NAFLD in both the initial (0.25 ± 0.07 versus 1.1 ± 0.09 µg/mL, P < 0.001) and validation cohorts (0.47 ± 0.06 versus 0.99 ± 0.04 µg/mL, P < 0.001). A “dose effect” of decreasing DHEA-S and incremental fibrosis stage was observed with a mean DHEA-S of 1.03 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.07, 0.83 ± 0.11, 0.66 ± 0.11, and 0.35 ± 0.06 µg/mL for fibrosis stages 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. All patients in both cohorts in the advanced NAFLD group had low DHEA-S levels, with the majority in the hypoadrenal range. The association between DHEA-S and severity of NAFLD persisted after adjusting for age. A relationship between disease/fibrosis severity and DHEA-S levels was not seen in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Conclusion More advanced NAFLD, as indicated by the presence of NASH with advanced fibrosis stage, is strongly associated with low circulating DHEA-S. These data provide novel evidence for relative DHEA-S deficiency in patients with

  5. Immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a promising treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Lian, Zhouyang; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Luo, Xiaoning; Pei, Shufang; Mo, Xiaokai; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Wenhui; Ouyang, Fusheng; Guo, Baoliang; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). A meta-analysis of single-arm trials is proposed to assess the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy for APC. Eighteen relevant studies involving 527 patients were identified. The pooled disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and 1-year survival rate were estimated as 59.32%, 7.90 months, 4.25 months, and 30.12%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the pooled OS, PFS, and 1-year survival rate were significantly higher for autologous activated lymphocyte therapy compared with peptide-based vaccine therapy (OS: 8.28 months vs. 7.40 months; PFS: 6.04 months vs. 3.86 months; 1-year survival rate: 37.17% vs. 19.74%). Another subgroup analysis demonstrated that the pooled endpoints were estimated as obviously higher for immunotherapy plus chemotherapy compared with immunotherapy alone (DCR: 62.51% vs. 47.63%; OS: 8.67 months vs. 4.91 months; PFS: 4.91 months vs. 3.34 months; 1-year survival rate: 32.32% vs. 21.43%). Of the included trials, seven trials reported no treatment related adverse events , five trials reported (16.6 3.9) % grade 3 adverse events and no grade 4 adverse events. In conclusion, immunotherapy is safe and effective in the treatment of APC. PMID:27992378

  6. Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in Older Patients: an Orphan Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thyss, Antoine; Saada, Esma; Gastaud, Lauris; Peyrade, Frédéric; Re, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin Lymphoma HL can be cured in the large majority of younger patients, but prognosis for older patients, especially those with advanced-stage disease, has not improved substantially. The percentage of HL patients aged over 60 ranges between 15% and 35%. A minority of them is enrolled into clinical trials. HL in the elderly have some specificities: more frequent male sex, B-symptoms, advanced stage, sub diaphragmatic presentation, higher percentage of mixed cellularity, up to 50% of advanced cases associated to EBV. Very old age (>70) and comorbidities are factor of further worsening prognosis. Like in younger patients, ABVD is the most used protocol, but treatment outcome remains much inferior with more frequent, severe and sometimes specific toxicities. Few prospective studies with specific protocols are available. The main data have been published by the Italian Lymphoma Group with the VEPEMB schedule and the German Hodgkin Study Group with the PVAG regimen. Recently, the Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Study Group published the SHIELD program associating a prospective phase 2 trial with VEPEMB and a prospective registration of others patients. Patients over 60y with early-stage disease received three cycles plus radiotherapy and had 81% of 3-year overall survival (OS). Those with advanced-stage disease received six cycles, with 3-year OS of 66%. The role of geriatric and comorbidity assessment in the treatment’s choice for HL in the elderly is a major challenge. The combination of loss of activities of daily living combined with the age stratification more or less 70y has been shown as a simple and effective survival model. Hopes come from promising new agents like brentuximab-vedotin (BV) a novel antibody-drug conjugate. The use of TEP to adapt the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy according to the metabolic response could also be way for prospective studies. PMID:25045458

  7. Advancing digital methods in the fight against communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Seaman, Vincent Y; Wenger, Jay; Moonen, Bruno; Magill, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Important advances are being made in the fight against communicable diseases by using new digital tools. While they can be a challenge to deploy at-scale, GPS-enabled smartphones, electronic dashboards and computer models have multiple benefits. They can facilitate program operations, lead to new insights about the disease transmission and support strategic planning. Today, tools such as these are used to vaccinate more children against polio in Nigeria, reduce the malaria burden in Zambia and help predict the spread of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

  8. Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan Albert; Blanco, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic pulmonary diseases, especially in advanced disease, and is associated with greater mortality and worse clinical course. Patients with symptoms that exceed those expected by their pulmonary disease should be further evaluated by echocardiography. Confirmatory right heart catheterization is indicated in those conditions where the results of the hemodynamic assessment will determine treatment options. The treatment of choice for patients who are hypoxemic and have pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung disease is long-term oxygen therapy. Conventional vasodilators or drugs approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension are not recommended in patients with mild-to-moderate PH because they may impair gas exchange and because there is a lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Patients with severe PH should be considered for referral to a center with expertise in PH and lung diseases. Ideally, these patients should be included in randomized controlled trials to determine which patients are more likely to derive benefit and which therapies are most likely to be successful.

  9. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  10. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  11. Emerging therapies for patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Julio; Briones, Javier; Sierra, Jorge

    2009-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia is a common lymphoid malignancy with a variable clinical course. While some patients never require treatment or can be managed effectively with palliative chemotherapy, others experience early disease progression and death. The development of new prognostic markers has helped in the identification of patients with high risk disease, even among those diagnosed at early stage. Recent prospective trials have established chemo-immunotherapy combinations as the new standard of care for CLL patients requiring therapy. Unfortunately, patients whose tumour cells have certain genomic aberrations, such as a chromosome 17 deletion, have a disease that is frequently refractory to conventional therapy and should have their treatment tailored accordingly. Younger patients with high risk disease should be referred for allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation if they have an appropriate donor. For the remaining high risk patients, a number of new compounds are emerging, which could lead to further improvement in their outcome.

  12. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  13. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  14. Cerebrovascular Disease in Children: Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Karen J.; deVeber, Gabrielle A.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Roach, E. Steve; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease in children manifests in many forms, all of which have devastating and long-lasting effects. Recent advances in diagnostic imaging have revealed that this condition is much more common in the pediatric population than previously believed, affecting as many as 1 in 1500 neonates and 1 in 3000 children. The underlying mechanisms that cause stroke—ischemic stroke, sinovenous thrombosis, and hemorrhagic stroke—are only beginning to be understood; however, progress has been made toward better understanding the mechanisms of disease, particularly in the fields of genetics, inflammation, and thrombus formation. Furthermore, new imaging techniques, and better understanding of how to use imaging in managing stroke, have enabled practitioners to more quickly and accurately identify cerebrovascular disease type in children, which is key to mitigation of negative outcomes. The 2010 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 39th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe clinical issues surrounding childhood stroke, including diagnosis and acute care; (2) discuss recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of childhood stroke; (3) review current management of and therapies for childhood stroke, including controversial therapies; and (4) establish research directions for investigators. This article summarizes the speakers’ presentations and includes an edited transcript of question-and-answer sessions. PMID:21778188

  15. Phase 1 Study of Erlotinib Plus Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, C. Hope; Deep, Nicholas L.; Nabell, Lisle; Carroll, William R.; Desmond, Renee; Clemons, Lisa; Spencer, Sharon; Magnuson, J. Scott; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity profile of erlotinib therapy combined with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, prospective, phase 1 open-label study of erlotinib with radiation therapy to treat 15 patients with advanced cutaneous head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Toxicity data were summarized, and survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients were male (87%) and presented with T4 disease (93%). The most common toxicity attributed to erlotinib was a grade 2-3 dermatologic reaction occurring in 100% of the patients, followed by mucositis (87%). Diarrhea occurred in 20% of the patients. The 2-year recurrence rate was 26.7%, and mean time to cancer recurrence was 10.5 months. Two-year overall survival was 65%, and disease-free survival was 60%. Conclusions: Erlotinib and radiation therapy had an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The disease-free survival in this cohort was comparable to that in historical controls.

  16. Some aspects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders. MDS remains a disease of elderly patients; moreover, the incidence of high risk MDS is proportionally greater in elderly patients, with increased frequency of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, as well as adverse cytogenetic abnormalities. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic approach with known curative potential for patients with MDS that allows the achievement of long-term disease control. Numerous controversies still exist regarding transplantation in MDS: timing of transplantation, disease status at transplantation and comorbidity, conditioning intensity, pretransplant therapy, and stem cell source. Various transplant modalities of different intensities and alternative donor sources are now in use. Current advances in transplant technology are allowing the consideration of older patients. This should result in a greater number of older patients benefiting from this potentially curative treatment modality. Despite advances in transplantation technology, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality associated with this approach. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reduced early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased. Moreover, recent new developments with innovative drugs, including hypomethylating agents, have extended the therapeutic alternatives for MDS patients. Hypomethylating agents allow the delay of allogeneic stem cell transplantation by serving as an effective and well-tolerated means to reduce disease burden.

  17. Chronic disease management for patients with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Elizabeth

    National and international awareness of the heavy burden of chronic disease has led to the development of new strategies for managing care. Elisabeth Bryant explains how self-care, education and support for more patients with complex needs should be built into planned care delivery, and emphasises that the patient is the key member of the care team.

  18. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need.

  19. Eligibility of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer for phase III chemotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence that chemotherapy improves survival and quality of life in patients with stage IIIB & IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is based on large randomized controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine eligibility of patients with advanced NSCLC for major chemotherapy trials. Methods Physicians treating stage IIIB/IV NSCLC at Sydney Cancer Centre assessed patient eligibility for the E1594, SWOG9509 and TAX326 trials for patients presenting from October 2001 to December 2002. A review of the centre's registry was used to obtain missing data. Results 199 patients with advanced NSCLC were registered during the 14-month period. Characteristics of 100 patients were defined prospectively, 85 retrospectively: 77% males, median age 68 (range 32–88), 64% stage IV disease. Only 35% met trial eligibility for E1594 and 28% for SWOG9509 and TAX326. Common reasons for ineligibility were: co-morbidities 75(40%); ECOG Performance Status ≥2 72(39%); symptomatic brain metastasis 15(8%); and previous cancers 21(11%). Many patients were ineligible by more than one criterion. Conclusion The majority of patients with advanced NSCLC were ineligible for the large chemotherapy trials. The applicability of trial results to advanced lung cancer populations may be limited. Future trials should be conducted in a more representative population. PMID:19402889

  20. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  1. Periodontitis and Buerger’s Disease: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Pavlic, Verica; Vujic-Aleksic, Vesna; Zubovic, Nina; Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Buerger’s disease (BD) is a relatively rare thrombotic, occlusive and non-atherosclerotic clinical syndrome of unknown etiology. In recent years, numerous epidemiological studies confirmed the strong association between chronic anaerobic periodontal infection and development of cardiovascular diseases, including BD. Therefore, the aim of this study is to clarify association between periodontal pathogens and Buerger’s disease. Confirmation of presence and identification of periopathogens in patients with BD can be considered crucial in developing novel therapies for BD. Further, periodontal therapy will lead to eventual improvement of BD patients’ condition. PMID:24554799

  2. Lipoprotein redox status evaluation as a marker of cardiovascular disease risk in patients with inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Ungurianu, Anca; Margină, Denisa; Grădinaru, Daniela; Băcanu, Claudia; Ilie, Mihaela; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic inflammatory disorders (ID) have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, and routinely determined parameters do not reveal the real metabolic status of specific subgroups, such as patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, in order to evaluate state of the art markers for the assessment of cardiometabolic risk, abnormalities in lipoprotein levels in patients with a low-grade inflammatory status [diabetes mellitus (DM) subgroup] and in patients with a high systemic inflammatory burden (RA subgroup) was determined. The study group comprised patients with ID [DM (n=20) and RA (n=20)], with an aged-matched control group (n=17). Patient serum was used to determine routine biochemical parameters and to isolate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The heparin-citrate method was used for LDL precipitation and the phosphotungstic acid-MgCl2 technique for the isolation of HDL. Further, Amplex Red and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) assays were applied to determine lipid peroxides and protein oxidation, respectively, while the levels of serum advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were also determined. Although the differences in the routinely determined lipidemic profile were notable between the DM and RA subgroups, markers of lipid peroxidation and of advanced protein oxidation/glycation did not differ significantly, indicating possible similar oxidative damage of serum lipoproteins. On the whole, as alterations in lipoprotein functionality can occur long before any changes in routinely measured biochemical parameters are observed, more sensitive markers for the assessment of cardiovascular risk are required. As AOPPs, AGEs, oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and especially oxidized HDL (oxHDL) are affected during the early stages of inflammatory disease, and due to their known link to coronary artery disease, it would be wise to include these markers in the routine cardiovascular evaluation of

  3. Advanced Patient Data Replication and Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    after IRB approval. 12 Next Steps: EMC will administer a survey to a wide range of clinicians (nurses, doctors, pharmacists , clinical...local loss. 2. Objectives include: A. Lower the risk of clinical patient data loss to clinical staff B. Support clinicians dependence on EMR data...Information Systems support as well as EMC2 technical staff familiar with the Centera storage platform and the 6. Clinician Survey Completed

  4. [Disease management system in patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Humar, Franco; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mazzone, Carmine; Giansante, Carlo; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare managers are more and more interested in the role of general practitioners (GP) in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Continuing adjustments of the health organization are the old/new challenge in improving patient care. The European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend a disease-management program for heart failure (HF); moreover, observational studies and randomized controlled trials have reported better patient outcomes if patients are in charge of cardiologists rather than GPs or other physicians. Patients with chronic HF are often very old and affected by multiple comorbid conditions, by themselves associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, too many patients receive neither a correct diagnosis nor treatment until advanced disease occurs. New treatment approaches, some of them requiring the expertise of well-trained cardiologists, are ongoing to improve the clinical outcomes. The optimal management of patients with HF needs teamwork, i.e. GPs, cardiologists, nurses and caregivers, since a multidisciplinary program, only, can embody the best answer for outpatients with chronic HF. Currently, the Cardiovascular Center in Trieste is performing an experimental trial, so far never attempted before, in treating patients with chronic HF using a thorough approach with the full involvement of local cardiologists, GPs and nurses. Such approach is, at the same time, as well a challenge as an opportunity: a challenge because conventional clinical habits must be changed; an opportunity because patients can benefit from a proper whole care-group, aimed at prolonging life and reducing morbidity and symptoms.

  5. Long-term outcome of enzyme-replacement therapy in advanced Fabry disease: evidence for disease progression towards serious complications

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, F; Niemann, M; Störk, S; Breunig, F; Beer, M; Sommer, C; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Wanner, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective The long-term effects of enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) in Fabry disease are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ERT in patients with advanced Fabry disease affects progression towards ‘hard’ clinical end-points in comparison with the natural course of the disease. Methods A total of 40 patients with genetically proven Fabry disease (mean age 40 ± 9 years; n = 9 women) were treated prospectively with ERT for 6 years. In addition, 40 subjects from the Fabry Registry, matched for age, sex, chronic kidney disease stage and previous transient ischaemic attack (TIA), served as a comparison group. The main outcome was a composite of stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Secondary outcomes included changes in myocardial left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and replacement fibrosis, change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), new TIA and change in neuropathic pain. Results During a median follow-up of 6.0 years (bottom and top quartiles: 5.1, 7.2), 15 events occurred in 13 patients (n = 7 deaths, n = 4 cases of ESRD and n = 4 strokes). Sudden death occurred (n = 6) only in patients with documented ventricular tachycardia and myocardial replacement fibrosis. The annual progression of myocardial LV fibrosis in the entire cohort was 0.6 ± 0.7%. As a result, posterior end-diastolic wall thinning was observed (baseline, 13.2 ± 2.0 mm; follow-up, 11.4 ± 2.1 mm; P < 0.01). GFR decreased by 2.3 ± 4.6 mL min−1 per year. Three patients experienced a TIA. The major clinical symptom was neuropathic pain (n = 37), and this symptom improved in 25 patients. The event rate was not different between the ERT group and the untreated (natural history) group of the Fabry Registry. Conclusion Despite ERT, clinically meaningful events including sudden cardiac death continue to develop in patients with advanced Fabry disease. PMID:23586858

  6. Nursing care of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, E

    1988-01-01

    Nursing interventions for each of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, tremors at rest and postural reflex abnormalities, are designed to increase the patient's quality of life by minimizing symptoms. Nurses are responsible for planning patient medication schedules to maximize drug effectiveness. Dietary implications include a low-protein regimen for the patient during the day, eliminating foods high in Vitamin B6, high caloric foods, and soft-solid foods offered at frequent feedings. Constipation is addressed by increasing the patient's fiber and fluid intake and by increasing the patient's mobility. Patient mobility is increased when the patient is taught purposeful activities and to concentrate on the way he walks. Communication is facilitated if the patient takes deep breaths before speaking and uses diaphragmatic speech. A telephone receiver which amplifies the patient's voice is also available. Interventions are good only if the patient chooses to implement them; he is the head of the health team planning his care.

  7. Survival and failure outcomes in locally advanced esthesioneuroblastoma: a single centre experience of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Khosla, Divya; Bharti, Shreekant; Das, Ashim; Kumar, Narendra; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-05-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) constitutes 3 % of all malignant intranasal tumors. As the tumor is very rare, the number of patients of ENB treated in individual departments is small. We present our institute's experience in combined modality management of 15 successive patients of ENB treated from 2006 to 2010. Clinical characteristics and treatment modality in form of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were noted. Kadish stage C was the most common stage (12 patients) followed by stage B (3 patients). Fourteen patients underwent primary surgery, of which nine had total excision and five had subtotal excision. One patient was treated with combination of chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). Median RT dose delivered was 54 Gy. Twelve patients received CT with cisplatin and etoposide. Overall, eight patients had complete response, five had partial response, while one had static disease and progressive disease each. Two patients had distant metastases. Four-year loco-regional control (LRC) was 25 % and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 45 %. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require adjuvant RT, which helps in significant LRC. Systemic CT benefits in inoperable, advanced and high risk tumors. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  8. Mobile patient applications within diabetes - from few and easy to advanced functionalities.

    PubMed

    Årsand, Eirik; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Hejlesen, Ole; Horsch, Alexander; Godtliebsen, Fred; Grøttland, Astrid; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Patient diaries as apps on mobile phones are becoming increasingly common, and can be a good support tool for patients who need to organize information relevant for their disease. Self-management is important to achieving diabetes treatment goals and can be a tool for lifestyle changes for patients with Type 2 diabetes. The autoimmune disease Type 1 diabetes requires a more intensive management than Type 2 - thus more advanced functionalities is desirable for users. Both simple and easy-to-use and more advanced diaries have their respective benefits, depending on the target user group and intervention. In this poster we summarize main findings and experience from more than a decade of research and development in the diabetes area. Several versions of the mobile health research platform-the Few Touch Application (FTA) are presented to illustrate the different approaches and results.

  9. Advances in understanding and treating liver diseases during pregnancy: A review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kobayashi, Yuji; Nomoto, Minoru; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-05-07

    Liver disease in pregnancy is rare but pregnancy-related liver diseases may cause threat to fetal and maternal survival. It includes pre-eclampsia; eclampsia; haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome; acute fatty liver of pregnancy; hyperemesis gravidarum; and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Recent basic researches have shown the various etiologies involved in this disease entity. With these advances, rapid diagnosis is essential for severe cases since the decision of immediate delivery is important for maternal and fetal survival. The other therapeutic options have also been shown in recent reports based on the clinical trials and cooperation and information sharing between hepatologist and gynecologist is important for timely therapeutic intervention. Therefore, correct understandings of diseases and differential diagnosis from the pre-existing and co-incidental liver diseases during the pregnancy will help to achieve better prognosis. Therefore, here we review and summarized recent advances in understanding the etiologies, clinical courses and management of liver disease in pregnancy. This information will contribute to physicians for diagnosis of disease and optimum management of patients.

  10. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy in patients with borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Michele; Ramella, Sara; Valeri, Sergio; Caputo, Damiano; Floreno, Barnaba; Trecca, Pasquale; Trodella, Luca Eolo; Trodella, Lucio; D’Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Coppola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    There is not a clear consensus regarding the optimal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic disease. There is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy to treat micrometastatic disease with chemotherapy, as well as for the treatment of local disease with radiotherapy. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of induction chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and gemcitabine followed by a high weekly dose of gemcitabine concurrent to radiation therapy in patients with borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. In our study, 41 patients with pancreatic cancer were evaluated. In all cases an accurate pre-treatment staging was performed. Patients with evidence of metastatic disease were excluded, and thus a total of 34 patients were consequently enrolled. Of these, twenty-seven patients (80%) had locally advanced unresectable tumours, seven patients (20%) had borderline resectable disease. This protocol treatment represents a well-tolerated promising approach. Fifteen patients (55.5%) underwent surgical radical resection. With a median follow-up of 20 months, the median PFS and OS were 20 months and 19.2 months, respectively. The median OS for borderline resectable patients was 21.5 months compared with 14 months for unresectable patients (p = 0.3). Continued optimization in multimodality therapy and an accurate patient selection remain crucial points for the appropriate treatment of these patients. PMID:28378800

  11. Perioperative management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Katus, Linn; Shtilbans, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, leading to a wide range of disability and medical complications. Managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting can be particularly challenging. Suboptimal management can lead to medical complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed recovery. This review aims to address the most important issues related to caring for patients with Parkinson's disease perioperatively who are undergoing emergent or planned general surgery. It also intends to help hospitalists, internists, and other health care providers mitigate potential in-hospital morbidity and prevent prolonged recovery. Challenges in managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting include disruption of medication schedules, "nothing by mouth" status, reduced mobility, and medication interactions and their side effects. Patients with Parkinson's disease are more prone to immobility and developing dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, urinary retention, and psychiatric symptoms. These issues lead to higher rates of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, deconditioning, and falls compared with patients without Parkinson's disease, as well as prolonged hospital stays and a greater need for post-hospitalization rehabilitation. Steps can be taken to decrease these complications, including minimizing nothing by mouth status duration, using alternative routes of drugs administration when unable to give medications orally, avoiding drug interactions and medications that can worsen parkinsonism, assessing swallowing ability frequently, encouraging incentive spirometry, performing bladder scans, avoiding Foley catheters, and providing aggressive physical therapy. Knowing and anticipating these potential complications allow hospital physicians to mitigate nosocomial morbidity and shorten recovery times and hospital stays.

  12. Fungal infection in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia mainly among the elderly. This disease is characterized by the presence in the brain of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that provoke neuronal cell death, vascular dysfunction, and inflammatory processes. In the present work, we have analyzed the existence of fungal infection in Alzheimer's disease patients. A proteomic analysis provides compelling evidence for the existence of fungal proteins in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. Furthermore, PCR analysis reveals a variety of fungal species in these samples, dependent on the patient and the tissue tested. DNA sequencing demonstrated that several fungal species can be found in brain samples. Together, these results show that fungal macromolecules can be detected in brain from Alzheimer's disease patients. To our knowledge these findings represent the first evidence that fungal infection is detectable in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. The possibility that this may represent a risk factor or may contribute to the etiological cause of Alzheimer's disease is discussed.

  13. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  14. Results of two different surgical techniques in the treatment of advanced-stage Freiberg's disease

    PubMed Central

    Özkul, Emin; Gem, Mehmet; Alemdar, Celil; Arslan, Hüseyin; Boğatekin, Ferit; Kişin, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Freiberg's disease is an osteochondrosis most commonly seen in adolescent women and characterized by pain, swelling and motion restriction in the second metatarsal. The early stages of this disease can be managed with semirigid orthoses, metatarsal bars and short leg walking cast. Number of operative methods are suggested which can be used depending on the pathophysiology of the disease, including abnormal biomechanics, joint congruence and degenerative process. We evaluated the outcomes of the patients with Freiberg's disease who were treated with dorsal closing-wedge osteotomy and resection of the metatarsal head. Patients and Methods: 16 patients (11 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 24.5 (range 13–49 years) years who underwent dorsal closing wedge osteotomy or resection of the metatarsal head were included in this retrospective study. Second metatarsal was affected in 13 and third metatarsal in three patients. According to the Smillie's classification system, ten patients had type IV osteonecrosis and six patients had type V. The results of the patients were evaluated using the lesser metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal (LMPI) scale. Results: According to the LMPI scale, the postoperative scores for the osteotomy and excision groups were 86 (range 64–100) and 72.6 (range 60–85), respectively. In the osteotomy group, mean passive flexion restriction was 18° (range 0°–35°) and mean passive extension restriction was 12° (range 0°–25°). Mean metatarsal shortening was 2.2 mm (range 2–4 mm) in the osteotomy group as opposed to 9.8 mm (range 7–14 mm) in the excision group. Significant pain relief was obtained in both groups following the surgery. Conclusions: The decision of performing osteotomy or resection arthroplasty in the patients with advanced-stage Freiberg's disease should be based on the joint injury and the patients should be informed about the cosmetic problems like shortening which may arise from resection. PMID:26955180

  15. Dynamic tension EMG to characterize the effects of DBS treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ruonala, V; Pekkonen, E; Rissanen, S; Airaksinen, O; Miroshnichenko, G; Kankaanpää, M; Karjalainen, P

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment method for motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease. DBS-electrode is implanted to subthalamic nucleus to give precisely allocated electrical stimuli to brain. The optimal stimulus type has to be adjusted individually. Disease severity, main symptoms and biological factors play a role in correctly setting up the device. Currently there are no objective methods to assess the efficacy of DBS, hence the adjustment is based solely on clinical assessment. In optimal case an objectively measurable feature would point the right settings of DBS. Surface electromyographic and kinematic measurements have been used in Parkinson's disease research. As Parkinson's disease symptoms are known to change the EMG signal properties, these methods could be helpful aid in the clinical adjustment of DBS. In this study, 13 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who received DBS treatment were measured. The patients were measured with seven different settings of the DBS in clinical range including changes in stimulation amplitude, frequency and pulse width. The EMG analysis was based on parameters that characterize EMG signal morphology. Correlation dimension and recurrence rate made the most significant difference in relation to optimal settings. In conclusion, EMG analysis is able to detect differences between the DBS setups, and can help in finding the correct parameters.

  16. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  17. [Application of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Toth, Adrián; Nagy, Helga; Wacha, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel; Takáts, Annamária

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder around the world. Levodopa has remained the "gold standard" of the therapy even several decades after its introduction. Chronic levodopa treatment is associated with the development of motor complications in most patients. Advanced Parkinson's disease is characterized by these complications: motor and non-motor fluctuation and disturbing dyskinesia. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation might reduce these complications. In advanced Parkinson's disease levodopa is still effective. In the treatment of this stage there are several advanced or device-aided therapies: apomorphine pump, deep brain stimulation and levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel. Levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel is an aqueous gel that can be delivered to the jejunum via a percutaneous gastrojejunostomy tube which is connected to an infusion pump dosing the levodopa gel continuously to the place of absorption. Levodopa/carbidopa gel infusion can be used as monotherapy, can be tested, can be used individually and this therapy is reversible. Several clinical trials demonstrated that levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel therapy is of long-term benefit, improves the quality of life of the patients and can reduce motor fluctuation and dyskinesia.

  18. Management of retinal vascular diseases: a patient-centric approach.

    PubMed

    Brand, C S

    2012-04-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the Western world. Advancement in the clinical management of these diseases has been fast-paced, with new treatments becoming available as well as license extensions of existing treatments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in certain retinal vascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular oedema (DMO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Treatment of wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO with an anti-VEGF on an as needed basis, rather than a fixed schedule, allows an individualised treatment approach; providing treatment when patients are most likely to benefit from it, while minimising the number of unnecessary intravitreal injections. Thus, an individualised treatment regimen reduces the chances of over-treatment and under-treatment, optimising both the risk/benefit profile of the treatment and the efficient use of NHS resource. Streamlining of treatment for patients with wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO, by using one treatment with similar posology across all three diseases, may help to minimise burden of clinic capacity and complexity and hence optimise patient outcomes. Informed treatment decisions and efficient clinic throughput are important for optimal patient outcomes in the fast-changing field of retinal vascular diseases.

  19. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with advanced rhabdomyosarcoma: a retrospective assessment

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, U; Koscielniak, E; Blaeschke, F; Grunewald, T G P; Badoglio, M; Diaz, M A; Paillard, C; Prete, A; Ussowicz, M; Lang, P; Fagioli, F; Lutz, P; Ehninger, G; Schneider, P; Santucci, A; Bader, P; Gruhn, B; Faraci, M; Antunovic, P; Styczynski, J; Krüger, W H; Castagna, L; Rohrlich, P; Ouachée-Chardin, M; Salmon, A; Peters, C; Bregni, M; Burdach, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may provide donor cytotoxic T cell-/NK cell-mediated disease control in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). However, little is known about the prevalence of graft-vs-RMS effects and only a few case experiences have been reported. Methods: We evaluated allo-SCT outcomes of 30 European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT)-registered patients with advanced RMS regarding toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) after allo-SCT. Twenty patients were conditioned with reduced intensity and ten with high-dose chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients were transplanted with HLA-matched and seven with HLA-mismatched grafts. Three patients additionally received donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs). Median follow-up was 9 months. Results: Three-year OS was 20% (s.e.±8%) with a median survival time of 12 months. Cumulative risk of progression was 67% (s.e.±10%) and 11% (s.e.±6%) for death of complications. Thirteen patients developed acute graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) and five developed chronic GvHD. Eighteen patients died of disease and four of complications. Eight patients survived in complete remission (CR) (median: 44 months). No patients with residual disease before allo-SCT were converted to CR. Conclusion: The use of allo-SCT in patients with advanced RMS is currently experimental. In a subset of patients, it may constitute a valuable approach for consolidating CR, but this needs to be validated in prospective trials. PMID:24149176

  20. Vaccinating Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason; Wasan, Sharmeel

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not vaccinated at the same rate as general medical patients. IBD places patients at increased risk for developing vaccine-preventable illnesses, and this risk is further exacerbated by immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, gastroenterologists should familiarize themselves with health maintenance measures pertaining to patients with IBD. This article highlights the vaccinations required for patients with IBD, especially those who are immunosuppressed: influenza; pneumococcal pneumonia; hepatitis A and B viruses; human papilloma virus; meningococcal disease; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis; measles, mumps, and rubella; varicella zoster; and herpes zoster. This article also discusses issues regarding patients with IBD who travel outside of the United States, as well as highlights and provides suggestions for areas of quality improvement that are needed in the field. PMID:27917091

  1. Venous thromboembolic disease in colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    McNally, Michael P; Burns, Christopher J

    2009-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease, which includes deep vein thromboses as well as pulmonary emboli, can be a significant complication in the postoperative patient. In particular, colorectal patients often carry a higher risk for venous thromboembolism when compared with patients undergoing other operative procedures. Features unique to colorectal patients are the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease or malignancy. Typically, these patients will undergo lengthy pelvic procedures, which also contribute to a cumulative risk of venous thrombosis. It is critical that all patients and the proposed operative procedure are appropriately risk stratified. Risk stratification allows for easier implementation of an appropriate prophylactic strategy. There are a wide range of safe and effective mechanical and pharmacologic measures available. The authors provide very specific recommendations, but note that clinical judgment plays a significant role.

  2. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Advanced laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease: NOTES/NOSE or single port?

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Cahill, Ronan A

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease is an evolving, dynamic subject undergoing constant adaptation. Hence there are significant ongoing advances in technique and technology as has been seen with the emergence of single port and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic operations with already considerable ramifications for many aspects of minimal access surgery. Most recently single port technologies and expertise have synergized with Transanal Endoscopic (TEM/TEO) experience to allow their convergence out of their respective niches so that pelvic surgery can be laparoendoscopically performed from both its abdominal and perineal aspects. Distinct from wound-related benefits, such capacity for high resolution and multi-dimensional imaging relates significant benefit to the operating team and patient. This state of the art review demonstrates the crucial perspective that advanced practices and performance capabilities are intrinsically complimentary rather than competitive. All surgeons need therefore to participate in adapting their practice styles to allow technical step-advance across the discipline.

  4. Frequency of Elevated Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Biomarkers in Patients with Advanced Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Richard K.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Seeff, Leonard B.; Hoefs, John C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Lok, Anna S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective studies of serum HCC biomarkers in patients with advanced hepatitis C are lacking. Aims To determine frequencies and performance of elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AFP-L3, and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) levels as HCC biomarkers in advanced hepatitis C. Methods Patients in the HALT-C Trial were tested every 3 months for 42 months. Screening ultrasound was performed every 12 months. Levels of biomarkers were compared in patients in whom HCC did or did not develop. Results 855 patients were evaluated; HCC developed in 46. Among patients without HCC, 73.2% had AFP consistently <20, 24.5% had at least one AFP between 20-199, while 2.3% had at least one AFP value ≥200 ng/mL; 73.7% had DCP consistently <90, 11.6% had at least one DCP between 90-149, and 14.7% had at least one DCP value ≥150 mAU/mL. AFP-L3 ≥10% was present at least once in 9.0% and in 17.1% of those with AFP >20 ng/mL. Among all patients with elevated biomarkers, a diagnosis of HCC was made in 0-31.6% (depending on the biomarker and cutoff) during the subsequent 24 months. AFP ≥200 ng/mL had the highest specificity (99%), but sensitivity was ≤20%. DCP ≥40 mAU/mL had the highest sensitivity (76%), but specificity was ≤58%. Independent predictors of elevated AFP were gender (female), race (Black), more advanced disease, and HCC. Elevated DCP was associated with more advanced disease and HCC. Conclusions Mild-moderate elevations in total AFP and DCP but not AFP-L3 occur frequently in patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis, are related to factors other than HCC, and are poor predictors of HCC. PMID:21931376

  5. Recent advances in treating Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    This article summarizes (1) the recent achievements to further improve symptomatic therapy of motor Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms, (2) the still-few attempts to systematically search for symptomatic therapy of non-motor symptoms in PD, and (3) the advances in the development and clinical testing of compounds which promise to offer disease modification in already-manifest PD. However, prevention (that is, slowing or stopping PD in a prodromal stage) is still a dream and one reason for this is that we have no consensus on primary endpoints for clinical trials which reflect the progression in prodromal stages of PD, such as in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) —a methodological challenge to be met in the future. PMID:28357055

  6. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  7. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  8. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  9. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity.

  10. Dietary patterns of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carla M M; Lieffers, Jessica R; Bergsten, Gabriella; Mourtzakis, Marina; Baracos, Vickie E; Reiman, Tony; Sawyer, Michael B; McCargar, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify dietary patterns among patients with advanced cancer. Differences between cancer groups are described, and food groups contributing higher proportions to overall caloric intake are identified. Patients with advanced cancer (n=51) were recruited from a regional cancer centre and completed a three-day dietary record. Food items were categorized according to macronutrient content. After adjustment for body weight, substantial variation in energy intake was observed (range: 13.7 to 55.4 kcal/kg/day). For 49% of patients, protein intake was below recommendations. Overall, patients consumed the largest proportion of their calories from meat (16%), other foods (11%), dessert (9%), fruit (9%), white bread (7%), and milk (7%). Only 5% of patients consumed meal replacement supplements. The results of this descriptive study provide important insights into the dietary habits of patients with advanced cancer. These insights could be translated into the development of effective recommendations for maintaining or improving health and quality of life.

  11. Advances in vaccine research against economically important viral diseases of food animals: Infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2016-11-22

    Numerous reviews have been published on infectious bursal disease (IBD) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Many high quality vaccines are commercially available for the control of IBD that, when used correctly, provide solid protection against infection and disease caused by IBDV. Viruses are not static however; they continue to evolve and vaccines need to keep pace with them. The evolution of IBDV has resulted in very virulent strains and new antigenic types of the virus. This review will discuss some of the limitations associated with existing vaccines, potential solutions to these problems and advances in new vaccines for the control of IBD.

  12. Clinical activity of sunitinib in patients with advanced desmoplastic round cell tumor: a case series.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Kind, Michèle; Cioffi, Angela; Maki, Robert G; Bui, Binh

    2013-09-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with poor outcome occurring in adolescents and young adults. Therapeutic options for patients with advanced disease are limited. Preclinical studies have shown that VEGFR-2 and VEGFA are overexpressed in DSRCT and that DSRCT xenografts were highly responsive to anti-VEGF agents such as bevacizumab. We report here the clinical activity of sunitinib in eight patients with DSCRT. Our data suggest that sunitinib may be associated with clinical benefit even in heavily pretreated patients.

  13. Advances in the pharmacological management of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Frank, Samuel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2010-03-26

    There is inevitable physical, cognitive and behavioural decline in Huntington's disease (HD), a dominantly inherited progressive neurological disorder. The hallmark of the disease is chorea, an involuntary brief movement that tends to flow between body regions. HD is diagnosed clinically with genetic confirmation. Predictive testing is available; however, it should be undertaken with caution in patients at risk for the disease but without clinical disease expression. Ongoing observational trials have identified not only early subtle motor signs, but also striatal volume, verbal memory and olfaction as possible early manifestations of clinical disease. Multiple areas of the brain degenerate, with dopamine, glutamate and GABA being the predominant neurotransmitters affected in HD. Although many pharmacotherapies have been evaluated targeting these neurotransmitters, few well conducted trials for symptomatic or neuroprotective interventions have yielded positive results. Tetrabenazine is one of the better studied and more effective agents for reducing chorea, although with a risk of potentially serious adverse effects. Newer antipsychotic agents such as olanzapine and aripiprazole may have adequate efficacy with a more favourable adverse-effect profile than older antipsychotics for treating chorea and psychosis. In this review, the pathogenesis, epidemiology and diagnosis of HD are discussed as background for understanding potential pharmacological treatment options. Potential strategies to delay the progression of HD that have been studied and are planned for the future are summarized. Although there is no current method to change the course of this devastating disease, education and symptomatic therapies are effective tools available to clinicians and the families affected by HD.

  14. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  15. Cystathionine Levels in Patients With Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, N.A.; Onkenhout, W.; Kerstens, H.J.; Roos, Raymund A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently a profound depletion of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the principal enzyme involved in the generation of cysteine from cystathionine, was shown in Huntington disease (HD) patients and several transgenic HD mouse models. We therefore hypothesized that blood and urine cystathionine levels may be increased in HD patients and that this increase might correlate with disease progression. Methods: We measured concentrations of cystathionine as well as 22 other amino acids in fasting plasma and 24-h urine samples of nine early-stage HD patients and nine age, sex, and body mass index matched controls. Results: There were no significant differences in the plasma or urine concentrations of cystathionine or any other amino acid between HD patients and controls. Conclusion: We found no evidence for changes in plasma or urine concentrations of cystathionine in early-stage HD patients. Therefore, cystathionine levels are unlikely to be useful as a state biomarker in HD. PMID:26435880

  16. Benefits of early and prolonged fulvestrant treatment in 848 postmenopausal advanced breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Warm, Mathias; Kates, Ronald; Overkamp, Friedrich; Thomas, Anke; Harbeck, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Response to fulvestrant and survival in postmenopausal hormone-sensitive advanced breast cancer was investigated within a non-randomized, In-Practice Evaluation Program, with the aim of optimizing treatment decisions. 848 patients (median age 64 years; 52% co-morbidity; 78% prior palliative therapy; median 4 prior regimens) received monthly fulvestrant injections (250 mg/month) and were followed-up three-monthly for 9 months. Clinical benefit (PFS ≥ 24 weeks) occurred in 532/848 (62.7%); stable disease (SD) in 627/848 patients (74%), including 62 complete and 177 partial responses. Best response was delayed in 115 patients. Estimated 9-month overall survival (OS) was 89%; 9-month event-free survival (EFS) was 71%. Indicators of disease aggressiveness affected response and survival, but number of fulvestrant cycles was the key OS and EFS determinant. The patients with SD at 3 months benefitted from continued fulvestrant. Excluding deaths, 7 serious adverse events occurred (none attributable to fulvestrant). No new or unexpected safety issues arose; 90% of the patients and physicians rated fulvestrant tolerability as "very good" or "good". In the largest prospective, fulvestrant-treated cohort to date, advanced breast cancer patients achieving SD or better after 3 months of treatment gained survival benefit by prolonging fulvestrant therapy-independent of disease and treatment history.

  17. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented PMID:22293471

  18. Parkinson's Disease in a Dish: What Patient Specific-Reprogrammed Somatic Cells Can Tell Us about Parkinson's Disease, If Anything?

    PubMed

    Drouin-Ouellet, J; Barker, R A

    2012-01-01

    Technologies allowing for the derivation of patient-specific neurons from somatic cells are emerging as powerful in vitro tools to investigate the intrinsic cellular pathological behaviours of the diseases that affect these patients. While the use of patient-derived neurons to model Parkinson's disease (PD) has only just begun, these approaches have allowed us to begin investigating disease pathogenesis in a unique way. In this paper, we discuss the advances made in the field of cellular reprogramming to model PD and discuss the pros and cons associated with the use of such cells.

  19. Screening, diagnosis, and management of patients with Fabry disease: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael; Hughes, Derralynn A; Linthorst, Gabor E; Ortiz, Alberto; Svarstad, Einar; Warnock, David G; West, Michael L; Wanner, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) are at a high risk for developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. The availability of specific but costly therapy has elevated the profile of this rare condition. This KDIGO conference addressed controversial areas in the diagnosis, screening, and management of FD, and included enzyme replacement therapy and nonspecific standard-of-care therapy for the various manifestations of FD. Despite marked advances in patient care and improved overall outlook, there is a need to better understand the pathogenesis of this glycosphingolipidosis and to determine the appropriate age to initiate therapy in all types of patients. The need to develop more effective specific therapies was also emphasized.

  20. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  1. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  2. Investigational medications for treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Pamela E

    2010-09-01

    Development of effective treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease has been challenging. Currently approved treatments include acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine hydrochloride. To investigate treatments in development for patients with Alzheimer disease, the author conducted a review of the literature. New approaches for treatment or prevention focus on several general areas, including cholinergic receptor agonists, drugs to decrease β-amyloid and tau levels, antiinflammatory agents, drugs to increase nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels, and substances to reduce cell death or promote cellular regeneration. The author focuses on medications currently in clinical trials. Cholinergic agents include orthostatic and allosteric muscarinic M1 agonists and nicotinic receptor agonists. Investigational agents that target β-amyloid include vaccines, antibodies, and inhibitors of β-amyloid production. Anti-inflammatory agents, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the natural product curcumin, and the tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor etanercept, have also been studied. Some drugs currently approved for other uses may also show promise for treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease. Results of clinical trials with many of these investigational drugs have been disappointing, perhaps because of their use with patients in advanced stages of Alzheimer disease. Effective treatment may need to begin earlier-before neurodegeneration becomes severe enough for symptoms to appear.

  3. Evaluation of Salivary Leptin Levels in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Bayani, Mojtaba; Torabi, Sepehr; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mohammadnejhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Leptin is a hormone-like protein produced by the adipose tissue. It plays an important role in protection of host against inflammation and infection. Some studies have reported changes in leptin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva and blood serum of patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the salivary leptin levels in patients with advanced periodontitis and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the salivary samples of healthy individuals and patients with advanced periodontitis with clinical attachment loss >5mm were obtained using a standardized method and the leptin levels were measured in the salivary samples by means of ELISA. The effects of the periodontal status and sex on the salivary leptin levels of both groups were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Results: The means ± standard deviation (SD) of salivary leptin levels in healthy subjects and patients with advanced periodontitis were 34.27±6.88 and 17.87±5.89 pg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of sex on the salivary leptin levels was not significant (P=0.91), while the effect of advanced periodontitis on the salivary leptin levels was significant compared to healthy individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with advanced periodontitis, the salivary leptin levels were significantly lower compared to healthy individuals. Thus, assessment of salivary leptin can be done as a non-invasive and simple method to determine the susceptibility of patients to advanced periodontitis. PMID:27536322

  4. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities.

  5. Biliary atresia and other cholestatic childhood diseases: Advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Verkade, Henkjan J; Bezerra, Jorge A; Davenport, Mark; Schreiber, Richard A; Mieli-Vergani, Georgina; Hulscher, Jan B; Sokol, Ronald J; Kelly, Deirdre A; Ure, Benno; Whitington, Peter F; Samyn, Marianne; Petersen, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Biliary Atresia and other cholestatic childhood diseases are rare conditions affecting the function and/or anatomy along the canalicular-bile duct continuum, characterised by onset of persistent cholestatic jaundice during the neonatal period. Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common among these, but still has an incidence of only 1 in 10-19,000 in Europe and North America. Other diseases such as the genetic conditions, Alagille syndrome (ALGS) and Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis (PFIC), are less common. Choledochal malformations are amenable to surgical correction and require a high index of suspicion. The low incidence of such diseases hinder patient-based studies that include large cohorts, while the limited numbers of animal models of disease that recapitulate the spectrum of disease phenotypes hinders both basic research and the development of new treatments. Despite their individual rarity, collectively BA and other cholestatic childhood diseases are the commonest indications for liver transplantation during childhood. Here, we review the recent advances in basic research and clinical progress in these diseases, as well as the research needs. For the various diseases, we formulate current key questions and controversies and identify top priorities to guide future research.

  6. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; ZENG, YI; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEYING

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220939

  7. Building a multicenter telehealth network to advance chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Khairat, Saif; Wijesinghe, Namal; Wolfson, Julian; Scott, Rob; Simkus, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The use of telehealth solutions has proved to improve clinical management of chronic diseases, expand access to healthcare services and clinicians, and reduce healthcare-related costs. The project aims at improving Heart Failure (HF) management through the utilization of a Telemedicine and Personal Health Records systems that will assist HF specialist in Colombo, Sri Lanka to monitor and consult with remote HF patients. A telehealth network will be built at an international site that connects five remote telehealth clinics to a central clinic at a major University Hospital in Sri Lanka where HF specialists are located. In this study, 200 HF patients will be recruited for nine months, 100 patients will be randomly selected for the treatment group and the other 100 will be selected for the control group. Pre, mid, and post study surveys will be conducted to assess the efficacy and satisfaction levels of patients with both care models. Moreover, clinical outcomes will be collected to evaluate the impact of the intervention on the treatment patients compared to control patients. The research aims at enhancing Heart Failure management through eliminating current health challenges and healthcare-related financial burdens.

  8. Periodontal management of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Periodontists are often called upon to provide periodontal therapy for patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Safe and effective periodontal treatment requires a general understanding of the underlying cardiovascular diseases, their medical management, and necessary modifications to dental/periodontal therapy that may be required. In this informational paper more common cardiovascular disorders will be discussed and dental management considerations briefly described. This paper is intended for the use of periodontists and members of the dental profession.

  9. [HER2/neu expression in Venezuelan patients with locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Morales, Luisa; Reigosa, Aldo; Caleiras, Eduardo; Mora, Richard; Marrero, Nuria; Payares, Eliécer; Molina, Karla; Sucre, Luis

    2008-03-01

    To know the prognosis of a patient with cancer allows choosing the most appropriate therapeutic. The expression of the oncogen HER2/neu has been related to an unfavourable prognosis in patients with infiltrating breast carcinoma, for this reason, the purpose of this work was to analyze its predictive and prognostic value in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, treated in the Oncological Institute "Dr Miguel Perez Carreño". Information about personal data of 58 patients was compiled, as well as the received treatment, clinical response data of the biopsy report, histological grade, nuclear grade, node status and evolution of the patient. The determination of the HER2/neu expression was made by inmunohistochemistry, using the avidina-estreptavidin-peroxidasa technique. For the interpretation of the HER2/neu, an agreed score from 0 to 3+ was assigned, using the guidelines of interpretation of the Hercep-Test (DAKO). 37.9% of the cases displayed expression of the HER2/neu in the membrane of the tumour cells. The node state and the hormonal receptors state turned out to be significant to predict the disease-free interval. Patients with strong oncoprotein expression seem to have a quimioresistant tendency to the FAC (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) regime. The expression of the HER2/neu receptor is related to a reduction of the disease-free interval and global survival in patients with infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma locally advanced, confirming, in this work, to be a good prognostic factor.

  10. Exercise for older patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Petrella, R J

    1999-10-01

    Coronary artery disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and cognitive disorders become more prevalent as people age. Besides delaying the onset of many of these conditions, regular exercise may improve function and delay disability and morbidity in those who have them. Further, exercise may work synergistically with medication to combat the effects of some chronic diseases. Special adaptations for older patients include lower-intensity exercise (eg, fewer repetitions), low-impact exercise (cycling, exercise while sitting), and modified equipment (smaller weights, special shoes, loose clothing). Unresolved issues include development of optimal strategies for motivating older patients to begin and maintain exercise programs.

  11. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Management of Patients with Radioiodine Nonresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Busaidy, Naifa Lamki; Cabanillas, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary and follicular) has a favorable prognosis with an 85% 10-year survival. The patients that recur often require surgery and further radioactive iodine to render them disease-free. Five percent of thyroid cancer patients, however, will eventually succumb to their disease. Metastatic thyroid cancer is treated with radioactive iodine if the metastases are radioiodine avid. Cytotoxic chemotherapies for advanced or metastatic noniodine avid thyroid cancers show no prolonged responses and in general have fallen out of favor. Novel targeted therapies have recently been discovered that have given rise to clinical trials for thyroid cancer. Newer aberrations in molecular pathways and oncogenic mutations in thyroid cancer together with the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth have been central to these discoveries. This paper will focus on the management and treatment of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers that do not take up radioactive iodine. PMID:22530159

  12. Disseminated Cryptococcal Disease in Non-HIV, Nontransplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Leto, D.; Chagla, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcal infection carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Typical patients include HIV individuals with advanced immunosuppression or solid organ or hematopoietic transplant recipients. We report a case of disseminated cryptococcal disease in a 72-year-old male who was immunocompromised with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and ongoing chemotherapy. The patient presented with a subacute history of constitutional symptoms and headache after he received five cycles of FCR chemotherapy (fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/rituximab). Diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcal disease was made based on fungemia in peripheral blood cultures with subsequent involvement of the brain, lungs, and eyes. Treatment was started with liposomal amphotericin, flucytosine, and fluconazole as induction. He was discharged after 4 weeks of hospitalization on high dose fluconazole for consolidation for 2 months, followed by maintenance therapy. PMID:27957359

  13. The emergence of Parkinson disease among patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Alcalay, Roy; Zimran, Ari

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented that document the clinical manifestations, genetic associations, and sub-cellular mechanisms of the inter-relatedness of β-glucocerebrosidase mutations and the emergence of Parkinson disease among carriers and patients with Gaucher disease. This review is an attempt to apprise the reader of the recent literature with the caveat that this is an area of intensive exploration that is constantly being updated because of the immediate clinical ramifications but also because of the impact on our understanding of Parkinson disease, and finally because of the unexpected inter-reactions between these entities on the molecular level. It has been an unexpected happenstance that it has been discovered that a rare monogenetic disease has an interface at many points with a neurological disorder of the elderly that has both familial and sporadic forms: to date there is no cure for either of these disorders.

  14. [Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-04-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor symptoms and cognitive deficits. Neuropsychological studies have suggested that patients with Parkinson disease exhibit a broad range of cognitive deficits even in the early stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the neuropsychological evidence for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease, outlining the different domains of cognitive disturbance. First, we review previous findings on executive dysfunction, which is associated with a disruption in frontostriatal circuitry mainly driven by dopaminergic dysmodulation. Executive dysfunction is the core symptom in the cognitive deficits in Parkinson disease. Second, we focus on impairment in different domains of memory function, such as short-term and long-term memory. Third, we discuss the pattern of cognitive deficits in visuospatial ability, ranging from basic perceptual processes to rather complex motor skills. Next, we summarize the profile of cognitive deficits in language, although previous findings are mixed and hence this topic is relatively controversial. Finally, we introduce several recent findings on social cognitive deficits, which is a new area of research that has emerged in the past decade. We also discuss the possible neural mechanisms underlying each domain of cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson disease.

  15. Crohn disease and the gynecologic patient.

    PubMed

    Sides, Cleve; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Heitlinger, Leo; Anasti, James

    2013-01-01

    Although Crohn disease (CD) is considered an inflammatory bowel disease, extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations are varied, frequent, and oftentimes difficult to manage. Its predilection for young and reproductive-age women makes it an important disease process for the gynecologist to understand, as its complications can have long-term repercussions on the developmental, sexual, reproductive, and psychological health of affected women. Patients may present with a variety of vulvovaginal, perineal, perianal, and urologic complaints. Perianal involvement from an intestinal fistula is the most common skin manifestation seen in CD. Other gynecologic manifestations include metastatic CD and rectovaginal and urovaginal fistulas. Recognition and accurate diagnosis of extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations, as well as a good understanding of the gynecologic effects of chronic disease, are necessary for optimal management. The article provides an overview of CD and highlights the gynecologic considerations in caring for women affected by this disease.

  16. Advances in Nanotechnology for the Management of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix. PMID:23245913

  17. Nursing staff's understanding expressions of people with advanced dementia disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Thomas; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Norberg, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    People with advanced dementia disease (ADD) are known to have communication difficulties and thus it presents a challenge in understanding the expressions of these people. Because successful communication presupposes cooperation at least between 2 individuals, both individual's actions must be acknowledged. The aim of this study is to describe nursing staff's ways of understanding the expressions of people with ADD when communicating with them. Interviews from 8 nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes were constructed: "Being in communication" and "Doing communication." Being in communication means that nursing staff perceive people with ADD as being capable of communication. Doing communication means that nursing staff attempt different individualized strategies to understand what people with ADD communicate. Good care of people with ADD presupposes nursing staff that are willing and able to relate to other people and to maintain good care for people with ADD continuous education and supervision are needed.

  18. CAP--advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Eric M; Langbaum, Jessica B; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C; Sperling, Reisa A; Aisen, Paul S; Roses, Allen D; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Carrillo, Maria C; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer's Prevention (CAP)-a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact-and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials.

  19. CAP—advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Eric M.; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Aisen, Paul S.; Roses, Allen D.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer’s Prevention (CAP)—a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact—and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials. PMID:26416539

  20. Advances in the genetic mechanisms of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Vladutiu, G D

    1997-12-01

    During the past 16 years since the delineation of the human mitochondrial genome, substantial advances have been made in identifying pathogenic mutations causing mitochondrial disorders. However, just as we have come to accept the unexpected in the nontraditional aspects of Mendelian inheritance with the discovery of trinucleotide expansions, imprinting and uniparental disomy, unusual characteristics of mitochondrial inheritance also have been found that defy existing laws. For example, we now know that the nuclear genetic background of an individual might influence the expression and tissue specificity of mitochondrial mutations. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations contribute to the generation of new mutations by compromising mitochondrial function and increasing free radical production. Evidence for recombination raises new questions about repair mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA. It appears that the more we learn about the bases of mitochondrial disease, the more complex diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling become.

  1. Clinical Benefit Assessment of Vismodegib Therapy in Patients With Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Caro, Ivor; Yue, Huibin; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Vismodegib was approved for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma (aBCC) based on the pivotal ERIVANCE BCC study. The primary endpoint (objective response rate [ORR]) was assessed 9 months after the last patient was enrolled. To confirm the clinical benefit of vismodegib, an additional analysis was performed 12 months after the primary analysis. Materials and Methods. ERIVANCE BCC was a multicenter, nonrandomized, two-cohort study of 104 patients with histologically confirmed aBCC. Patients received 150 mg oral vismodegib daily until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or withdrawal. An independent review panel comprising three expert clinicians reviewed patient photographs individually and as a consensus panel to evaluate baseline disease severity and clinical benefit after vismodegib treatment in 71 patients with locally advanced BCC (laBCC). Results. Sixty-three patients were efficacy evaluable; baseline and postprogression photographs for 61 were available for review. Baseline disease severity was judged as 5 or 4 (very severe or moderately severe) in 71.4%. Clinical benefit was observed in 76.2% (significant: 65.1%; some: 11.1%). Interpanelist agreement (maximum difference ≤1 point among panelists’ scores in 65.1% and 87.3% of patients for clinical benefit and baseline disease severity, respectively) and correlation between individual and panel reviews were strong. Clinical benefit scores showed good concordance with the protocol-specified ORR obtained by an independent review facility and with investigator-assessed response. Conclusion. Clinical benefit assessed by independent review based on expert clinical judgment provides strong evidence that treatment with vismodegib results in clinically meaningful and durable responses in patients with laBCC. PMID:25001266

  2. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  3. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Samantha A; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions. PMID:22235174

  4. Tyrosine Metabolism in Patients with Liver Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert J.; Conn, Harold O.

    1967-01-01

    Plasma levels of tyrosine were assayed in the fasting state and after oral administration of either tyrosine (tyrosine tolerance test) or phenylalanine (phenlyalanine conversion test) in normal subjects and in patients with hepatitis, biliary obstruction, or cirrhosis. Fasting tyrosine levels tended to be slightly increased in patients with hepatitis and biliary obstruction and markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis. Tyrosine tolerance tests in patients with cirrhosis were characterized by larger than normal increments in tyrosine levels and by delayed returns toward fasting levels. The results of phenylalanine conversion tests were abnormal in approximately one-half of patients with either hepatitis or biliary obstruction and four-fifths of patients with cirrhosis. Abnormalities were characterized by elevated fasting plasma tyrosine levels, or small and delayed increments in tyrosine levels, or both. Abnormal phenylalanine conversion test results in patients with cirrhosis did not correlate closely with any clinical feature of cirrhosis or with the results of any standard liver function test; there was positive correlation only with abnormal ammonia tolerance, a test of portalsystemic shunting. Tests of tyrosine metabolism do not appear to be useful for routine clinical assessment of liver function. Tyrosine tolerance tests and phenylalanine conversion tests done for purposes of diagnosis of other diseases may yield misleading results in patients with liver disease. PMID:6074004

  5. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  6. A novel mouse model of advanced diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jean-Francois; Holterman, Chet E; Burger, Dylan; Read, Naomi C; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Kennedy, Christopher R J

    2014-01-01

    Currently available rodent models exhibit characteristics of early diabetic nephropathy (DN) such as hyperfiltration, mesangial expansion, and albuminuria yet features of late DN (hypertension, GFR decline, tubulointerstitial fibrosis) are absent or require a significant time investment for full phenotype development. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of advanced DN with hypertension superimposed (HD mice). Mice transgenic for human renin cDNA under the control of the transthyretin promoter (TTRhRen) were employed as a model of angiotensin-dependent hypertension. Diabetes was induced in TTRhRen mice through low dose streptozotocin (HD-STZ mice) or by intercrossing with OVE26 diabetic mice (HD-OVE mice). Both HD-STZ and HD-OVE mice displayed more pronounced increases in urinary albumin levels as compared with their diabetic littermates. Additionally, HD mice displayed renal hypertrophy, advanced glomerular scarring and evidence of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Both HD-OVE and HD-STZ mice showed evidence of GFR decline as FITC-inulin clearance was decreased compared to hyperfiltering STZ and OVE mice. Taken together our results suggest that HD mice represent a robust model of type I DN that recapitulates key features of human disease which may be significant in studying the pathogenesis of DN and in the assessment of putative therapeutics.

  7. Advanced glycation end products contribute to amyloidosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vitek, M P; Bhattacharya, K; Glendening, J M; Stopa, E; Vlassara, H; Bucala, R; Manogue, K; Cerami, A

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by deposits of an aggregated 42-amino-acid beta-amyloid peptide (beta AP) in the brain and cerebrovasculature. After a concentration-dependent lag period during in vitro incubations, soluble preparations of synthetic beta AP slowly form fibrillar aggregates that resemble natural amyloid and are measurable by sedimentation and thioflavin T-based fluorescence. Aggregation of soluble beta AP in these in vitro assays is enhanced by addition of small amounts of pre-aggregated beta-amyloid "seed" material. We also have prepared these seeds by using a naturally occurring reaction between glucose and protein amino groups resulting in the formation of advanced "glycosylation" end products (AGEs) which chemically crosslink proteins. AGE-modified beta AP-nucleation seeds further accelerated aggregation of soluble beta AP compared to non-modified "seed" material. Over time, nonenzymatic advanced glycation also results in the gradual accumulation of a set of posttranslational covalent adducts on long-lived proteins in vivo. In a standardized competitive ELISA, plaque fractions of AD brains were found to contain about 3-fold more AGE adducts per mg of protein than preparations from healthy, age-matched controls. These results suggest that the in vivo half-life of beta-amyloid is prolonged in AD, resulting in greater accumulation of AGE modifications which in turn may act to promote accumulation of additional amyloid. PMID:8197133

  8. Advances in designs for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development.

  9. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  10. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Izzo, Luciano; Pugliese, Federico; Izzo, Paolo; Bolognese, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes in patients aged 70 and older with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with multimodality approach. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively analysed 20 consecutive elderly patients, with histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma, staged T3-4, and/or node-positive tumour, who received chemoradiotherapy and proceeded to surgical approach. Performance status score and adult comorbidity evaluation-27 score were calculated, and their influence on treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes was analysed. Results. All patients completed programmed chemoradiotherapy treatment. Gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common acute side effects: proctitis in 70% of patients and diarrhoea in 55%, classified as Grade 3 in 3 patients only. Radiation dermatitis was reported in 7 patients (35%) and it was graded G3 in one patient. There was no haematological toxicity. Eighteen patients out of 20 underwent surgery. Sphincter preservation was assured in 13 patients. Comorbidity index was related to higher severe acute toxicity (P = 0.015) but no influenced treatment outcomes. Conclusion. Treatment tolerance with combined modality is good in elderly patients. Due to age, no dose reduction for radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. PMID:24392453

  11. Voluntary Imitation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Ambra; Casteran, Matthieu; Ballay, Yves; Manckoundia, Patrick; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) primarily manifests as cognitive deficits, the implicit sensorimotor processes that underlie social interactions, such as automatic imitation, seem to be preserved in mild and moderate stages of the disease, as is the ability to communicate with other persons. Nevertheless, when AD patients face more challenging tasks, which do not rely on automatic processes but on explicit voluntary mechanisms and require the patient to pay attention to external events, the cognitive deficits resulting from the disease might negatively affect patients' behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary motor imitation, i.e., a volitional mechanism that involves observing another person's action and translating this perception into one's own action, was affected in patients with AD. Further, we tested whether this ability was modulated by the nature of the observed stimulus by comparing the ability to reproduce the kinematic features of a human demonstrator with that of a computerized-stimulus. AD patients showed an intact ability to reproduce the velocity of the observed movements, particularly when the stimulus was a human agent. This result suggests that high-level cognitive processes involved in voluntary imitation might be preserved in mild and moderate stages of AD and that voluntary imitation abilities might benefit from the implicit interpersonal communication established between the patient and the human demonstrator.

  12. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, J E; Judd, D; Crawley, E O; Evans, W D; Evans, C; Church, H A; Reid, E M; Rhodes, J

    1987-01-01

    Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular and peripheral cortical bone was measured in 75 unselected patients with small and/or large intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Osteoporosis, defined as a bone mineral content greater than 2 SD below the age and sex matched normal mean value was present in 23 patients (30.6%). Three amenorrhoeic females aged 34, 38, and 42 years had severe clinical osteoporosis and a further three patients had one or more vertebral crush fractures. Eighteen of the 23 patients with osteoporosis had small intestinal disease with one or more resections and the mean lifetime steroid dose in those with osteoporosis was significantly higher than in those with normal bone mineral content. Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular bone showed significant negative correlations with lifetime steroid dose and serum alkaline phosphatase and a significant positive correlation with serum albumin. Peripheral cortical bone mineral content was positively correlated with body weight, height and body mass index. We conclude that the prevalence of osteoporosis is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, severe clinical osteoporosis developing in some relatively young patients. The pathogenesis of this bone loss is probably multifactorial; steroid therapy is likely to be an important contributory factor. PMID:3583068

  13. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes.

  14. Reduced-intensity unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with advanced malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yuji, Koichiro; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kato, Daisuke; Miura, Yuji; Myojo, Tomohiro; Murashige, Naoko; Kishi, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Kusumi, Eiji; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Hamaki, Tamae; Matsumura, Tomoko; Kami, Masahiro; Fukuda, Takahiro; Masuo, Shigeru; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Ueyama, Junichi; Yoneyama, Akiko; Miyamoto, Ko; Nagoshi, Haruhisa; Matsuzaki, Michio; Morinaga, Shinichi; Muto, Yoshitomo; Takeue, Yoichi; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2005-04-01

    We report the results of reduced-intensity unrelated cord blood transplantation (RI-UCBT) in patients with advanced malignant lymphoma. Twenty patients (median age, 46.5 years; range, 27-66 years) underwent RI-UCBT with a preparative regimen consisting of fludarabine 125 mg/m2 , melphalan 80 mg/m 2 , and 4 Gy of total body irradiation. The median infused total cell dose was 2.75 x 10(7)/kg (range, 2.3-3.4 x 10(7)/kg). Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was composed of cyclosporine or tacrolimus alone. Fifteen patients achieved primary neutrophil engraftment after a median of 20 days. Eight patients developed grade II to IV acute GVHD, and 2 developed chronic GVHD. Of the 16 patients with evaluable disease, 10 achieved a complete response. Primary disease recurred in 1 patient, and transplant-related mortality within 100 days occurred in 8 of 20 patients. The estimated 1-year probability of progression-free survival was 50%. These data suggest that RI-UCBT is a feasible option for patients with refractory lymphoma who lack an HLA-matched donor.

  15. A retrospective evaluation of associations between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, and efficacy of chemotherapy and selected laboratory parameters in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Dariusz; Janiak, Anna; Włodarczyk, Anna; Sarniak, Agata; Krakowska, Magdalena; Potemski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To was to determine the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and active smoking on the efficacy of chemotherapy and complete blood count (CBC) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods The retrospective evaluation included 50 patients with stage IIIB–IV NSCLC, who started cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Peripheral blood CBC values were collected for testing before chemotherapy and after the first and third cycles. Results COPD was diagnosed in 49% of patients, while 42% of those enrolled were current smokers. Current smoking (p = 0.92) and COPD (p = 0.91) status did not affect the response to treatment. The non-COPD population presented a significantly higher pretreatment absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) than the COPD population (2.31 vs. 1.81 × 109/l; p = 0.0374). Also, only the non-COPD group demonstrated an elevated absolute monocyte count (AMC) following the first and third cycles of chemotherapy (p = 0.004). In current smokers, pretreatment values for white blood cells (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and platelets (PLT) were higher than in the ex-smoker population (WBC 9.94 vs. 8.7 (× 109/l); p = 0.01; ANC 6.47 vs. 5.61 (× 109/l); p = 0.037; PLT 316 vs. 266 (× 109/l); p = 0.049). Ex-smokers demonstrated AMC level elevation after the first cycle of chemotherapy and PLT level elevation after the third cycle, while current smokers also demonstrated an early decrease in LMR. Conclusions COPD and smoking induce chronic systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, which influence the results of standard laboratory tests, but do not change the response rate of lung cancer on chemotherapy. PMID:28373824

  16. Reducing salt intake for prevention of cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients by advanced health education intervention (RESIP-CVD study), Northern Thailand: study protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Decreasing salt consumption can prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Practically, it is difficult to promote people’s awareness of daily salt intake and to change their eating habits in terms of reducing salt intake for better cardiovascular health. Health education programs visualizing daily dietary salt content and intake may promote lifestyle changes in patients at high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Methods/Design This is a cluster randomized trial. A total of 800 high-CVD-risk patients attending diabetes and hypertension clinics at health centers in Muang District, Chiang Rai province, Thailand, will be studied with informed consent. A health center recruiting 100 participants is a cluster, the unit of randomization. Eight clusters will be randomized into intervention and control arms and followed up for 1 year. Within the intervention clusters the following will be undertaken: (1) salt content in the daily diet will be measured and shown to study participants; (2) 24-hour salt intake will be estimated in overnight-collected urine and the results shown to the participants; (3) a dietician will assist small group health education classes in cooking meals with less salt. The primary outcome is blood pressure change at the 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes at the 1-year follow-up are estimated 24-hoursalt intake, incidence of CVD events and CVD death. The intention-to-treat analysis will be followed. Blood pressure and estimated 24-hour salt intake will be compared between intervention and control groups at the cluster and individual level at the 1-year follow-up. Clinical CVD events and deaths will be analyzed by time-event analysis. Retinal blood vessel calibers of CVD-risk patients will be assessed cross-sectionally. Behavioral change to reduce salt intake and the influencing factors will be determined by structured equation model (SEM). Multilevel regression analyses will be applied. Finally, the cost effectiveness of the intervention

  17. Recent Advances in Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetes Mellitus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a widespread metabolic disease with a progressive incidence of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite extensive research, treatment options for diabetic patients remains limited. Although significant challenges remain, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any cell type, including insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, highlighting its potential as a treatment option for DM. Several iPSC lines have recently been derived from both diabetic and healthy donors. Using different reprogramming techniques, iPSCs were differentiated into insulin-secreting pancreatic βcells. Furthermore, diabetes patient-derived iPSCs (DiPSCs) are increasingly being used as a platform to perform cell-based drug screening in order to develop DiPSC-based cell therapies against DM. Toxicity and teratogenicity assays based on iPSC-derived cells can also provide additional information on safety before advancing drugs to clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of techniques for differentiation of iPSCs or DiPSCs into insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, their applications in drug screening, and their role in complementing and replacing animal testing in clinical use. Advances in iPSC technologies will provide new knowledge needed to develop patient-specific iPSC-based diabetic therapies. PMID:26907255

  18. Recent Advances in Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetes Mellitus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-02-19

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a widespread metabolic disease with a progressive incidence of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite extensive research, treatment options for diabetic patients remains limited. Although significant challenges remain, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any cell type, including insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, highlighting its potential as a treatment option for DM. Several iPSC lines have recently been derived from both diabetic and healthy donors. Using different reprogramming techniques, iPSCs were differentiated into insulin-secreting pancreatic βcells. Furthermore, diabetes patient-derived iPSCs (DiPSCs) are increasingly being used as a platform to perform cell-based drug screening in order to develop DiPSC-based cell therapies against DM. Toxicity and teratogenicity assays based on iPSC-derived cells can also provide additional information on safety before advancing drugs to clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of techniques for differentiation of iPSCs or DiPSCs into insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, their applications in drug screening, and their role in complementing and replacing animal testing in clinical use. Advances in iPSC technologies will provide new knowledge needed to develop patient-specific iPSC-based diabetic therapies.

  19. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery. PMID:27679552

  20. Clinical response of advanced cancer patients to cellular immunotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hasumi, Kenichiro; Aoki, Yukimasa; Wantanabe, Ryuko; Mann, Dean L

    2013-01-01

    Patients afflicted with advanced cancers were treated with the intratumoral injection of autologous immature dendritic cells (iDCs) followed by activated T-cell infusion and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A second round of iDCs and activated T cells was then administered to patients after the last radiation cycle. This complete regimen was repeated for new and recurring lesions after 6 weeks of follow-up. One year post therapy, outcome analyses were performed to evaluate treatment efficacy. Patients were grouped according to both the number and size of tumors and clinical parameters at treatment initiation, including recurrent disease after standard cancer therapy, Stage IV disease, and no prior therapy. Irrespective of prior treatment status, 23/37 patients with ≤ 5 neoplastic lesions that were ≤ 3 cm in diameter achieved complete responses (CRs), and 5/37 exhibited partial responses (PRs). Among 130 individuals harboring larger and more numerous lesions, CRs were observed in 7/74 patients that had received prior SCT and in 2/56 previously untreated patients. Some patients manifested immune responses including an increase in CD8+CD56+ lymphocytes among circulating mononuclear cells in the course of treatment. To prospectively explore the therapeutic use of these cells, CD8+ cells were isolated from patients that had been treated with cellular immunotherapy and IMRT, expanded in vitro, and injected into recurrent metastatic sites in 13 individuals who underwent the same immunoradiotherapeutic regimens but failed to respond. CRs were achieved in 34 of 58 of such recurrent lesions while PRs in 17 of 58. These data support the expanded use of immunoradiotherapy in advanced cancer patients exhibiting progressive disease. PMID:24349874

  1. CE: Improving Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Norton, Jenna M; Newman, Eileen P; Romancito, Gayle; Mahooty, Stephanie; Kuracina, Theresa; Narva, Andrew S

    2017-03-01

    : Coping with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is challenging for many people, since symptoms often don't appear until the disease is advanced and the patient is close to requiring dialysis. This two-part article aims to provide nurses with the basic information necessary to assess and manage patients with CKD. Part 1, which appeared last month, offered an overview of the disease, described identification and etiology, and discussed ways to slow disease progression. Part 2 addresses disease complications and treatment for kidney failure.

  2. Cardiac complications of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Sandhu, Paul; Boobes, Khlaed; Hatahet, Kamel; Raza, Farhan; Boobes, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of the death in dialysis patients. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are associated with lower mortality and are viewed as the desired access option in most patients with advanced kidney disease needing dialysis. However, AVFs have significant and potentially deleterious effects on cardiac functions particularly in the setting of preexisting heart disease. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review to what is known about the impact of AVFs on: congestive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease.

  3. Long-term clinical results and MRI changes after tendon ball arthroplasty for advanced Kienbock's disease.

    PubMed

    Mariconda, M; Soscia, E; Sirignano, C; Smeraglia, F; Soldati, A; Balato, G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term clinical results and morphological changes after tendon ball arthroplasty for advanced Kienböck's disease. Twenty-six patients were reviewed, with a mean follow-up interval of 125 months (range 50-226). At follow-up, mean score on the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire was 7.7 and mean visual analogue scale score for pain was 1. Mean carpal height ratio was significantly reduced with respect to the pre-operative value. On magnetic resonance imaging scans, cartilage damage, synovitis, and erosive or oedematous changes in the bones were detected in most patients. Calcification in the defect filled by the tendon ball was seen in all patients. Narrowing of the radioscaphoid joint and the presence of intercarpal synovitis were negatively associated with clinical outcome. Tendon ball arthroplasty in advanced Kienböck's disease results in long-term satisfactory clinical outcomes, despite widespread changes in the bones and joints within the wrist.

  4. Proteinuria as a Therapeutic Target in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: a Retrospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hsu; Wu, Hon-Yen; Wang, Chieh-Li; Yang, Feng-Jung; Wu, Pei-Chen; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kan, Wei-Chih; Yang, Chung-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence of proteinuria reduction as a surrogate target in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete due to lack of patient-pooled database. We retrospectively studied a multicenter cohort of 1891 patients who were enrolled in the nationwide multidisciplinary pre-end stage renal disease care program with a baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and followed longitudinally to investigate the effect of the change in proteinuria on renal death (defined as composite of dialysis and death occurring before initiation of dialysis). The group with a change in proteinuria ≤0.30 g/g (n = 1261) had lower cumulative probabilities of renal death (p < 0.001). In a linear regression model, a higher baseline proteinuria and a greater increase in proteinuria were associated with faster annual GFR decline. Cox’s analysis showed that every 1 unit increase in natural log(baseline proteinuria, 10 g/g) and every 0.1 g/g increase in the change in proteinuria resulted in 67% (HR = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.46–1.91) and 1% (HR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.01–1.01) greater risk of renal death respectively after adjusting for the effects of the other covariates. Our study provided a patient-based evidence to support proteinuria as a therapeutic target in advanced CKD. PMID:27198863

  5. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment.

  6. Subsequent leukaemia in autoimmune disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients diagnosed with some autoimmune (AI) diseases are at an increased risk of leukaemia but limited data are available on survival. We systematically analysed the risks (standardized incidence ratio, SIR) and survival (hazard ratio, HR) in nine types of leukaemia among 402 462 patients hospitalized for any of 33 AI diseases and compared to persons not hospitalized for AI diseases. Risk for all leukaemia was increased after 13 AI diseases and survival was decreased after six AI diseases. SIRs were increased after all AI diseases for seven types of leukaemia, including SIR 1·69 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1·29-2·19) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 1·85 (95% CI: 1·65-2·07) for acute myeloid leukaemia, 1·68 (95% CI: 1·37-2·04) for chronic myeloid leukaemia, 2·20 (95% CI: 1·69-2·81) for 'other myeloid leukaemia', 2·45 (95% 1·99-2·98) for 'other and unspecified leukaemia', 1·81 (95% CI: 1·11-2·81) for monocytic leukaemia, and 1·36 (95% CI: 1·08-1·69) for myelofibrosis. The HRs were increased for four types of leukaemia, most for myelofibrosis (1·74, 95% CI: 1·33-2·29) and ALL (1·42, 95% CI: 1·03-1·95). Some AI diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, were associated with increased SIRs and HRs in many types of leukaemia. The present data showed increases in risk and decreases in survival for many types of leukaemia after various AI diseases. Leukaemia is a rare complication in AI disease but findings about this comorbidity at the time of leukaemia diagnosis may help to optimize the treatment and improve survival.

  7. Drosophila models of Alzheimer's disease: advances, limits, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bouleau, Sylvina; Tricoire, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) are the two key players involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles respectively, two key hallmarks of the disease. Besides vertebrate models, Drosophila models have been widely used to understand the complex events leading to AD in relation to aging. Drosophila benefits from the low redundancy of the genome which greatly simplifies the analysis of single gene disruption, sophisticated molecular genetic tools, and reduced cost compared to mammals. The aim of this review is to describe the recent advances in modeling AD using fly and to emphasize some limits of these models. Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed some key aspects of the normal function of Appl and Tau, the fly homologues of AβPP and MAPT that may be disrupted during AD. Drosophila models have also been useful to uncover or validate several pathological pathways or susceptibility genes, and have been readily implemented in drug screening pipelines. We discuss some limitations of the current models that may arise from differences in structure of Appl and Tau compared to their human counterparts or from missing AβPP or MAPT protein interactors in flies. The advent of new genome modification technologies should allow the development of more realistic fly models and to better understand the relationship between AD and aging, taking advantage of the fly's short lifespan.

  8. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymer Materials for Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengting; Qiu, Tian; Liu, Libing; Ying, Jianming; Wang, Shu

    2016-02-10

    The extraordinary optical amplification and light-harvesting properties of conjugated polymers impart sensing systems with higher sensitivity, which meets the primary demands of early cancer diagnosis. Recent advances in the detection of DNA methylation and mutation with polyfluorene derivatives based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a means to modulate fluorescent responses attest to the great promise of conjugated polymers as powerful tools for the clinical diagnosis of diseases. To facilitate the ever-changing needs of diagnosis, the development of detection approaches and FRET signal analysis are highlighted in this review. Due to their exceptional brightness, excellent photostability, and low or absent toxicity, conjugated polymers are verified as superior materials for in-vivo imaging, and provide feasibility for future clinical molecular-imaging applications. The integration of conjugated polymers with clinical research has shown profound effects on diagnosis for the early detection of disease-related biomarkers, as well as in-vivo imaging, which leads to a multidisciplinary scientific field with perspectives in both basic research and application issues.

  9. Advance in the pathogenesis and treatment of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Diagnosis depends primarily on clinical features, biochemical parameters and the presence of the Kayser-Fleischer ring. Genetic analysis for mutations within ATP7B is a convincing diagnostic tool. The traditional treatment for WD includes chelation of excessive copper accumulation and reduction of copper intake. Medical therapy is effective but WD is not yet curable. Liver transplantation is especially helpful for patients who fail to respond to medical therapy or present with fulminant liver failure, although evaluation of its long-term effect are still in need. PMID:23210912

  10. Advances in non-invasive imaging of intracranial vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, H. R.; Grieve, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Intra-arterial catheter angiography has, in the past, been the mainstay for the investigation of intracranial vascular disease. It is, however, invasive, usually requires in-patients admission, and is associated with a rate of neurological complications between 1% and 3%. In recent years, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and CT angiography (CTA) have emerged as non-invasive alternatives for imaging blood vessels and have made a significant impact on neuroradiological investigations. It is the purpose of this article to explain the basic technical principles of these two methods and to give an overview of their current clinical applications. PMID:10700757

  11. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  12. Extending palliative care to patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sarah K

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have an illness which shortens their life and involves a heavy symptom burden for patient and carer. This article discusses some common palliative care issues pertinent to patients with Parkinson's disease.

  13. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease FOR ... 263-9000 Bethesda, Maryland (January 21, 2014) – Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with ...

  14. Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Recent Advances in Biologic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disorder with an unknown etiology. IBD is composed of two different disease entities: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD has been thought to be idiopathic but has two main attributable causes that include genetic and environmental factors. The gastrointestinal tract in which this disease occurs is central to the immune system, and the innate and the adaptive immune systems are balanced in complex interactions with intestinal microbes under homeostatic conditions. However, in IBD, this homeostasis is disrupted and uncontrolled intestinal inflammation is perpetuated. Recently, the pathogenesis of IBD has become better understood owing to advances in genetic and immunologic technology. Moreover, new therapeutic strategies are now being implemented that accurately target the pathogenesis of IBD. Beyond conventional immunesuppressive therapy, the development of biological agents that target specific disease mechanisms has resulted in more frequent and deeper remission in IBD patients, with mucosal healing as a treatment goal of therapy. Future novel biologics should overcome the limitations of current therapies and ensure that individual patients can be treated with optimal drugs that are safe and precisely target IBD. PMID:28261018

  15. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  16. Rethinking autonomy: decision making between patient and surgeon in advanced illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced illness such as advanced stage cancer presenting with the need for possible surgical intervention can be some of the most challenging cases for a surgeon. Often there are multiple factors influencing the decisions made. For patients they are facing not just the effects of the disease on their body, but the stark realization that the disease will also limit their life. Not only are these factors a consideration when patients are making decisions, but also the desire to make the decision that is best for themselves, the autonomous decision. Also included in this process for the patient facing the possible need for an intervention is the surgeon. While patient autonomy remains one of the main principles within medicine, guiding treatment decisions, there is also the surgeon’s autonomy to be considered. Surgeons determine if there is even a possible intervention to be offered to patients, a decision making process that respects surgeons’ autonomous choices and includes elements of paternalism as surgeons utilize their expertise to make decisions. Included in the treatment decisions that are made and the care of the patient is the impact patients’ outcomes have on the surgeon, the inherent drive to be the best for the patient and desire for good outcomes for the patient. While both the patient’s and surgeon’s autonomy are a dynamic interface influencing decision making, the main goal for the patient facing a palliative procedure is that of making treatment decisions based on the concept of shared decision making, always giving primary consideration to the patient’s goals and values. Lastly, regardless of the decision made, it is the responsibility of surgeons to their patients to be a source of support through this challenging time. PMID:27004224

  17. Latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS.

    PubMed

    España-Gregori, E; Montés-Micó, R; Bueno-Gimeno, I; Díaz-Llopi, M; Menezo-Rozalén, J L

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine horizontal latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS (CD4+ count <0.050 x 10(9)/l) and to compare with normal values by means of the von Graefe technique. Twenty patients aged between 17 and 44 years with AIDS and aged-matched control groups were submitted to study. The AC/A ratio was also measured in both groups using the Gradient test. The AIDS patients showed a horizontal latent deviation value of 0.28+/-1.07delta exo at near (40 cm.) and 2.12+/-1.37delta eso at distance (6 m). The AC/A ratio obtained was 2.03+/-0.65. Statistically significant differences were obtained in relation to aged-matched control group at near and at distance (p<0.01). The horizontal latent ocular deviation at near and at distance in advanced AIDS patients showed lower values than the expected. The AC/A relationship also was lower. The results obtained in this study indicate that AIDS patients suffer a divergence insufficiency, which could add to other visual complaints such as blurred vision, photophobia, nyctalopia and reading difficulty.

  18. Nonmotor symptoms in patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tie-mei; Yu, Shu-yang; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Hu, Yang; Piao, Ying-shan; Zuo, Li-jun; Lian, Teng-hong; Wang, Rui-dan; Yu, Qiu-jin; Jin, Zhao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson disease (PD) is usually accompanied by numerous nonmotor symptoms (NMS), such as neuropsychiatric symptoms, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and sensory disturbances. However, it is not clear that the factors influencing the occurrence of NMS and its sequence with motor symptoms (MS). We conducted comprehensive assessments of NMS by using 13 scales in 1119 PD patients. A total of 70.8% PD patients present NMS. Olfactory dysfunction tends to occur in PD patients with older age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Older patients are more likely to have olfactory dysfunction before MS than younger patients. Rapid eye movement behavior disorder is more prone to happen in patients with older age, older onset age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Patients with rapid eye movement behavior disorder before MS are older in onset age than after group. Olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behavior disorder, and depression, as early warning NMSs of PD, connected to each other. There is a clinical heterogeneity that older patients are more likely to have NMS before MS, while younger patients are opposite. PMID:27977578

  19. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  20. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  1. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with Neuromuscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    In neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with progressive muscle weakness, respiratory muscles are also affected and hypercapnia can increase gradually as the disease progresses. The fundamental respiratory problems NMD patients experience are decreased alveolar ventilation and coughing ability. For these reasons, it is necessary to precisely evaluate pulmonary function to provide the proper inspiratory and expiratory muscle aids in order to maintain adequate respiratory function. As inspiratory muscle weakening progresses, NMD patients experience hypoventilation. At this point, respiratory support by mechanical ventilator should be initiated to relieve respiratory distress symptoms. Patients with adequate bulbar muscle strength and cognitive function who use a non-invasive ventilation aid, via a mouthpiece or a nasal mask, may have their hypercapnia and associated symptoms resolved. For a proper cough assist, it is necessary to provide additional insufflation to patients with inspiratory muscle weakness before using abdominal thrust. Another effective method for managing airway secretions is a device that performs mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. In conclusion, application of non-invasive respiratory aids, taking into consideration characterization of respiratory pathophysiology, have made it possible to maintain a better quality of life in addition to prolonging the life span of patients with NMD. PMID:16807978

  2. Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saheb Sharif-Askari, Fatemeh; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Saheb Sharif-Askari, Narjes

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for both thrombotic events and bleeding. The early stages of CKD are mainly associated with prothrombotic tendency, whereas in its more advanced stages, beside the prothrombotic state, platelets can become dysfunctional due to uremic-related toxin exposure leading to an increased bleeding tendency. Patients with CKD usually require anticoagulation therapy for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. However, this benefit could easily be offset by the risk of anticoagulant-induced bleeding. Treatment of patients with CKD should be based on evidence from randomized clinical trials, but usually CKD patients are excluded from these trials. In the past, unfractionated heparins were the anticoagulant of choice for patients with CKD because of its independence of kidney elimination. However, currently low-molecular-weight heparins have largely replaced the use of unfractionated heparins owing to fewer incidences of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and bleeding. We undertook this review in order to explain the practical considerations for the management of anticoagulation in these high risk population.

  3. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Cheol; Mofarrahi, Mahroo; Hussain, Sabah NA

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating disease characterized by inflammation-induced airflow limitation and parenchymal destruction. In addition to pulmonary manifestations, patients with COPD develop systemic problems, including skeletal muscle and other organ-specific dysfunctions, nutritional abnormalities, weight loss, and adverse psychological responses. Patients with COPD often complain of dyspnea on exertion, reduced exercise capacity, and develop a progressive decline in lung function with increasing age. These symptoms have been attributed to increases in the work of breathing and in impairments in gas exchange that result from airflow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. However, there is mounting evidence to suggest that skeletal muscle dysfunction, independent of lung function, contributes significantly to reduced exercise capacity and poor quality of life in these patients. Limb and ventilatory skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients has been attributed to a myriad of factors, including the presence of low grade systemic inflammatory processes, nutritional depletion, corticosteroid medications, chronic inactivity, age, hypoxemia, smoking, oxidative and nitrosative stresses, protein degradation and changes in vascular density. This review briefly summarizes the contribution of these factors to overall skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with COPD, with particular attention paid to the latest advances in the field. PMID:19281080

  4. Pramipexole, a nonergot dopamine agonist, is effective against rest tremor in intermediate to advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Künig, G; Pogarell, O; Möller, J C; Delf, M; Oertel, W H

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the nonergot dopamine receptor agonist pramipexole in 16 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and marked rest tremor during an "on" period. The patients were drawn from a larger placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, which was not originally designed to investigate the effect of pramipexole on tremor. Eleven patients received pramipexole. The first effects were seen with a pramipexole dose of 0.75 mg/d with a reduction of the tremor item A of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III, "on" state) by 25% and of rigidity and akinesia by 22%. Under the highest dose, 4.5 mg/d, the tremor score was improved by 61% over baseline (p < 0.0056, Wilcoxon signed rank) and the sum of rigidity and akinesia items by 66% (p < 0.0038, Wilcoxon signed rank). Five patients received placebo and did not improve. Based on this sample of patients, the nonergot dopamine receptor agonist pramipexole appears to have a potent anti-rest tremor action while being effective against akinesia and rigidity.

  5. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P < 0.001). Our results highlighted the persistence of a weak rate of medical record documentation for advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  6. [Vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients: a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Teresa; Gonçalves, Edna

    2013-01-01

    Prognostication is a critical medical task for the adequacy of treatment and management of priorities and expectations of patients and families. In 2005, the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) published recommendations on the formulation of vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this study is to analyze the literature subsequent to this review and to update the presented recommendations. Using the same strategy of the EAPC group, we performed a systematic literature search in the electronic databases PubMed and Scopus, which included original studies in adults with advanced cancer, without tumor-directed treatment, with a median survival of less than 90 days. The articles were analyzed and classified according to the level of evidence by two independent reviewers. The 41 articles analyzed allowed to keep grade A recommendations for clinical estimation of survival and Palliative Prognostic score and now also for Palliative Prognostic Index, performance status, dyspnea, lymphopenia and lactate dehydrogenase. Recommendations regarding the use of C-reactive protein, leukocytosis, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia and male gender as predictors reached grade B. To formulate the vital prognosis and to communicate it properly to the patient and family are core competencies of physicians, particularly of those who deal with end of life patients. The clinical impression combined with scientific evidence allows us to estimate more accurately the survival, allowing prioritizing and managing more appropriately the existing resources.

  7. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  8. Shear wave elastography imaging for assessing the chronic pathologic changes in advanced diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kamal; Loberant, Norman; Abbas, Nur; Fadi, Hassan; Shadia, Hassan; Khazim, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective The assessment of the grade of renal fibrosis in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) requires renal biopsy, which may be associated with certain risks. To assess the severity of chronic pathologic changes in DKD, we performed a quantitative analysis of renal parenchymal stiffness in advanced DKD, using shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Patients and methods Twenty-nine diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) grades 3–4 due to DKD, and 23 healthy subjects were enrolled. Combined conventional ultrasound and SWE imaging were performed on all participants. The length, width, and cortical thickness and stiffness were recorded for each kidney. Results Cortical thickness was lower in patients with DKD than in healthy subjects (13.8±2.2 vs 14.8±1.6 mm; P=0.002) and in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (13.0±3.5 vs 14.7±2.1 mm; P<0.001). Cortical stiffness was greater in patients with DKD than in healthy subjects (23.72±14.33 vs 9.02±2.42 kPa; P<0.001), in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (30.4±16.2 vs 14.6±8.1 kPa; P<0.001), and in DKD patients with CKD grade 3b, than in those with CKD grade 3a (15.7±6.7 vs 11.0±4.2 kPa; P=0.03). Daily proteinuria was higher in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (5.52±0.96 vs 1.13±0.72; P=0.001), and in DKD patients with CKD grade 3b, than in those with CKD grade 3a (1.59±0.59 vs 0.77±0.48; P<0.001). Cortical stiffness was inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=−0.65, P<0.001) and with cortical thickness (r=−0.43, P<0.001) in patients with DKD. Conclusions In patients with advanced DKD, SWE imaging may be utilized as a simple and practical method for quantitative evaluation of the chronic morphological changes and for the differentiation between CKD grades. PMID:27853373

  9. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome: current advanced management strategies.

    PubMed

    D'Alto, Michele; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-09-01

    The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) increases morbidity and reduces survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition, depending on the type of the underlying defect and previous repair strategies. There is growing evidence of the benefits of PAH-specific therapy in the PAH-CHD population, but despite recent advances mortality rates remain relatively high. In the last years, an increasing focus has been placed on patients with PAH-CHD and net left-to-right shunt. Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of these patients and uncertainty on the cut-off values for eventual defect closure. Pregnancy conveys significant risks in PAH-CHD patients: appropriate counselling and care, including psychological support and a multidisciplinary team, should be part of the routine management of women with PAH-CHD of reproductive age. Some subgroups, such as patients with Down's syndrome, Fontan circulation and 'segmental' pulmonary hypertension, present particular challenges in terms of management and therapy. The current review focuses on contemporary treatment strategies in PAH-CHD patients with particular emphasis on challenging patient groups and conditions.

  11. Patient Disease Perceptions and Coping Strategies for Arthritis in a Developing Nation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is little prior research on the burden of arthritis in the developing world. We sought to document how patients with advanced arthritis living in the Dominican Republic are affected by and cope with their disease. Methods We conducted semi-structured, one-to-one interviews with economically disadvantaged Dominican patients with advanced knee and/or hip arthritis in the Dominican Republic. The interviews, conducted in Spanish, followed a moderator's guide that included topics such as the patients' understanding of disease etiology, their support networks, and their coping mechanisms. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim in Spanish, and systematically analyzed using content analysis. We assessed agreement in coding between two investigators. Results 18 patients were interviewed (mean age 60 years, median age 62 years, 72% women, 100% response rate). Patients invoked religious and environmental theories of disease etiology, stating that their illness had been caused by God's will or through contact with water. While all patients experienced pain and functional limitation, the social effects of arthritis were gender-specific: women noted interference with homemaking and churchgoing activities, while men experienced disruption with occupational roles. The coping strategies used by patients appeared to reflect their beliefs about disease causation and included prayer and avoidance of water. Conclusions Patients' explanatory models of arthritis influenced the psychosocial effects of the disease and coping mechanisms used. Given the increasing reach of global health programs, understanding these culturally influenced perceptions of disease will be crucial in successfully treating chronic diseases in the developing world. PMID:21985605

  12. Caring for Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer: The Experiences of Zambian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Johanna Elizabeth; Mulonda, Jennipher Kombe

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the experiences of Zambian nurses caring for women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: We used a qualitative descriptive design and purposive sampling. Seventeen in-depth interviews were conducted with registered nurses practicing in the Cancer Diseases Hospital and the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, and analyzed using thematic analyses. Results: Two themes emerged from the data - caring for women with advanced breast cancer is challenging and the good outweighs the bad. The majority of the participants agreed that caring for women with advanced breast cancer and witnessing their suffering were challenging. Not having formal education and training in oncology nursing was disempowering, and one of the various frustrations participants experienced. The work environment, learning opportunities, positive patient outcomes, and the opportunity to establish good nurse–patient experiences were positive experiences. Conclusions: Although negative experiences seemed to be overwhelming, participants reported some meaningful experiences while caring for women with advanced breast cancer. The lack of formal oncology nursing education and training was a major factor contributing to their negative experiences and perceived as the key to rendering the quality of care patients deserved. Ways to fulfill the educational needs of nurses should be explored and instituted, and nurses should be remunerated according to their levels of practice. PMID:28217726

  13. Immune blood biomarkers of Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Hripsime; Goldenson, Ben; Tse, Eric; Masoumi, Ava; Porter, Verna; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sayre, James; Ong, Reno; Mahanian, Michelle; Koo, Patrick; Bae, Susan; Micic, Miodrag; Liu, Philip T; Rosenthal, Mark J; Fiala, Milan

    2009-05-29

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients have an impairment of anti-amyloid-beta (Abeta) innate immunity and a defect in immune gene transcription [Fiala, M., Liu, P.T., Espinosa-Jeffrey, A., Rosenthal, M.J., Bernard, G., Ringman, J.M., Sayre, J., Zhang, L., Zaghi, J., Dejbakhsh, S., Chiang, B., Hui, J., Mahanian, M., Baghaee, A., Hong, P., Cashman, J., 2007b. Innate immunity and transcription of MGAT-III and Toll-like receptors in Alzheimer's disease patients are improved by bisdemethoxycurcumin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104, 12849-12854]. Early diagnosis is a cornerstone of preventive approaches to AD. Phospho-tau and Abeta CSF levels are useful markers of neurodegeneration but not of a process leading to neurodegeneration. To detect an early biomarker of AD, we developed a flow cytometric test of Abeta phagocytosis, which was 94% positive (<400 MFI units) in AD patients (mean age+/-SEM 77+2.2 years; mean score+/-SEM 198.6+/-25.5 MFI units) and 60% positive in MCI patients (77+/-5.6 years; 301+/-106 MFI units). Control subjects, active senior university professors, were 100% negative (74.2+/-4.2 years; 1348+/-174 MFI units). The test had a low specificity in older caregivers and older amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We also tested transcriptional regulation of the genes MGAT-III and Toll-like receptor-3 in macrophages. Macrophages of "Type I" patients (a majority of patients) showed gene down regulation at baseline and up regulation by curcuminoids; macrophages of "Type II" patients showed opposite responses. The results of flow cytometric testing suggest that normal Abeta phagocytosis is associated with healthy cognition and lesser risk of AD. The significance of abnormal results in aged persons should be investigated by prospective studies to determine the risk of AD.

  14. Consequences of Advanced Glycation End Products Accumulation in Chronic Kidney Disease and Clinical Usefulness of Their Assessment Using a Non-invasive Technique - Skin Autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Oleniuc, Mihaela; Secara, Irina; Onofriescu, Mihai; Hogas, Simona; Voroneanu, Luminita; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Accelerated formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products occur under circumstances of increased supply of substrates such as hyperglycaemic or oxidative stress and in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, neurodegenerative diseases, osteoarthritis and also non-diabetic atherosclerosis and chronic heart failure. Advanced glycation end-products accumulation occurs especially on long-lived proteins such as collagen in the skin and in vascular basement membranes leading to vascular damage. Adequate renal clearance capacity is an important factor in the effective removal of advanced glycation end-products. The Autofluorescence Reader was developed as a marker, representative for tissue advanced glycation end-products accumulation, easily applicable in a clinical setting, initially for predicting diabetes related complications. Studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as well as its predictive value for total and cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. Moreover skin autofluorescence was demonstrated to be superior to Haemoglobin A1c and other conventional risk factors. Advanced glycation end-products have been proposed as a novel factor involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure. Assessment of advanced glycation end-products accumulation in end-stage renal disease and undergoing renal replacement therapies patients has become of great importance. Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease, and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products is significantly increased in these patients. Mortality is markedly increased in patients with decreased kidney function, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. Skin advanced glycation end-products levels are strong predictors of survival in haemodialysis patients independent of other established risk factors

  15. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes.

  16. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future.

  17. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; de Bono, J. S.; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P. S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M. R.; Soule, H. R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T. M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A. M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I. D.; De Santis, M.; Drake, C. G.; Eeles, R. A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M. E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N. D.; Lecouvet, F. E.; Logothetis, C. J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W. K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A. R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M. A.; Schalken, J. A.; Scher, H. I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N. D.; Small, E. J.; Sternberg, C. N.; Suzuki, H.; Sweeney, C. J.; Tannock, I. F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged. PMID:26041764

  18. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer: a qualitative feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Adamsen, L; Stage, M; Laursen, J; Rørth, M; Quist, M

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home-based exercise program. An explorative study using individual semi-structured interviews (n=15) and one focus group interview (n=8) was conducted among the participants. Throughout the intervention the patients experienced increased muscle strength, improvement in wellbeing, breathlessness and energy. The group exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer patients with advanced stages of disease, during treatment. The patients experienced physical, functional and emotional benefits. This study confirmed that supervised training in peer-groups was beneficial, even in a cancer population with full-blown symptom burden and poor prognosis.

  19. What we learned from difficult hepatectomies in patients with advanced hepatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bo Hyun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Sang Yeup; Song, Dae Keun; Hwang, Ji Woong; Hwang, Dae Wook; Lee, Young-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims By reviewing difficult resections for advanced hepatic malignancies, we discuss the effectiveness and extended indications for hepatectomy in such patients. Methods We reviewed 7 patients who underwent extensive surgery between July 2008 and March 2011 for advanced hepatic malignancies. They had stage IV disease, except for in one case that was a stage IIIC (T4N0M0) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results Patient 1 with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) underwent right hemihepatectomy and resection of the bile duct and left portal vein. At 39 months after surgery, she had no recurrence or metastasis. Patient 2 with HCC underwent palliative right trisectionectomy. At 38 months after surgery, he is alive despite residual pulmonary metastases. Patient 3 with HCC invading the hepatic vein and diaphragm underwent right trisectionectomy and caval venoplasty. At 12 months after surgery, he had no recurrence or metastasis. Patient 4, who had 2 large HCCs and pulmonary thromboembolism, underwent a right trisectionectomy. At 7 months after surgery, he had no evidence of recurred HCC. Patient 5, who had IHCC invading her inferior vena cava and main portal vein, underwent preoperative radiotherapy, left hemihepatectomy, and caval resection. At 20 months after surgery, she is well despite a caval thrombus. Patient 6 and 7 underwent repeated surgery due to a recurred IHCC and metastatic colon cancer, respectively. In addition, they are alive during each 20 and 17 months after surgery. Conclusions Despite macroscopic extrahepatic metastases or major vessel involvement, extensive surgery for advanced hepatic malignancy may result in relatively favorable outcomes and be important modality for improving of survival in such patients. PMID:26421042

  20. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor-1 expression on survival of advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bendardaf, Riyad; El-Serafi, Ahmed; Syrjänen, Kari; Collan, Yrjö; Pyrhönen, Seppo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colorectal cancer is third leading cause of cancer mortality. About 60% of patients had already developed metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is crucial for the development of neovascularization and hence metastasis. This study aimed at investigating the relation between the expression of VEGF in biopsies from surgically dissected colon cancer and the survival of those patients. Biopsies were collected from 86 patients with advanced colon cancer and sections were stained by immunohistochemistry for VEGF. Patients received chemotherapy after the operation and were followed up for disease progression and survival. The clinical data were statistically analyzed with respect to the immunohistochemistry results. The survival of the patients was significantly longer in the patients for whom biopsies showed negative or weak expression of VEGF in comparison to those with moderate to high expression (p-value = 0.04). The expression of VEGF was more frequent in the patients who died as a consequence of the disease in comparison to the 10-year survivors. In conclusion, VEGF could be related to the survival of the patients with colorectal carcinoma and should be considered as a predictor of the prognosis. PMID:28245709

  1. [Meglumine acridonacetate and complex therapy of patients with newly identified advanced pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Pravada, N S; Budritskiĭ, A M; Sukhanov, D S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and immunological efficacy of meglumine acridonacetate (cycloferon) tablets was evaluated in complex treatment of patients with newly diagnosed advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. It was shown that the use of cycloferon according to our scheme increased the efficacy of the therapy (earlier disappearance of the disease symptoms and bacteria isolation, shorter-terms of cavern healing, more pronounced positive radiographic dynamics vs. the patients under the etiotropic therapy). The use of cycloferon normalized the number of gamma interferon receptors, increased the gamma interferon serum levels, reduced the incidence of the side effects (liver damage) due to the use of TB drugs. Such a use of cycloferon was cost effective. The use of sycloferon is possible in the complex treatment of outpatients with advanced pulmonary tuberculosis.

  2. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D'Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-11-21

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial "fingerprint", characterized by the reduced ratio of "good" to "potentially pathogenic" bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease.

  3. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D’Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial “fingerprint”, characterized by the reduced ratio of “good” to “potentially pathogenic” bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  4. An integrated psychological strategy for advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Patrizia; Perrone, Maria; Nisi, Enrica; Garufi, Carlo; Giannarelli, Diana; Bottomley, Andrew; Terzoli, Edmondo

    2006-01-01

    Background There is evidence regarding the usefulness of psychosocial intervention to improve health related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult cancer patients. The aim of this report is to describe an integrated approach and to evaluate its feasibility in routine clinical practice in 98 advanced colorectal cancer (ACC) patients during chronomodulated chemotherapy. Methods A prospective non-randomised design was developed and applied in a cancer out-patient setting. The intervention consisted of an integrated approach, whereby the psycho-oncologist had an active role in the health care team with the physician and routinely included psychological understanding in the medical treatment program. The psychological evaluation assessed: a) adaptation, awareness, psychopathological disorders through a psychodynamic interview; b) anxiety and depression using the HAD scale; c) subjective perception of care quality through a structured interview and d) HRQOL evaluation assessment with the EORTC QLQ C30. Outcomes data were collected before and after 18 weeks of chemotherapy. Results After 18 weeks of chemotherapy a significant improvement of adaptation and awareness was observed. The HADs results showed a significant decrease in anxiety when compared to pre-treatment. The structured interview showed a significant increase of patients who positively experienced the impact of medical treatment on HRQOL, anxiety, depression, interpersonal relationships, free-time and who positively experienced the care quality. Indeed, a majority of patients positively experienced the team relationship modality during the whole treatment. All scales on the EORTC questionnaire remained unchanged during the entire treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that it is feasible to carry out an integrated approach during chemotherapy. These results seem to support the integrated approach as a tool in aiding advanced colorectal cancer patients' ability to cope with their diagnosis and treatment although

  5. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  6. Aquatic therapy for patients with rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    McNeal, R L

    1990-11-01

    Aquatic therapy is justifiably a rapidly expanding, beneficial form of patient treatment. The goals established at the initial and subsequent evaluations usually are met as quickly and as sensibly as possible. Understanding the theory of water techniques is essential in implementing an aquatic therapy program. The success of the program, however, will always depend on the pleasure and benefits achieved by the patients. Remember, rheumatic patients most likely will need to modify their previous daily functioning. Patients need to be aware of the long-term ramifications of the disease process and understand how treatment and care may be altered during various stages of exacerbation and remission. Patient education is critical in ensuring individual responsibility for the changes that must be made when not supervised by a professional. Aquatic therapy is a step in molding a positive lifestyle change for the patient. The patient can be encouraged to be fitness oriented and, at the same time, exercise in a manner that is safe, effective, and biomechanically and physiologically sound. The environment, hopefully, also will be conductive to family and social interaction that ultimately encourages the compliance of long-term exercise programs.

  7. [Immunomodulator Intensification of Etioropic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, V M; Abramov, A V; Rachina, N V; Rubleva, N V

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at possible increase of the therapy efficacy in patients with advanced tuberculosis by including immunomodulators to the treatment schemes. The data concerning 6034 patients with advanced tuberculosis, mainly fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lungs, were analysed. Four groups of the patients were randomized. In group 1 the management of the patients included etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures with the use of Cycloferon. The group 2 patients in addition to the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures were given Omega-3. In group 3 the management included the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures. In group 4 the etioropic therapy was used alone. The analysis showed that 3419 patients had primary pulmonary tuberculosis, 340 patients had relapsing tuberculosis and 2275 patients had long-term process. The etiotropic therapy efficacy was estimated after an intensive phase of not more than 3 months. In the cases with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance and some other unfavourable factors it was estimated after a 5-month intensive phase. The results confirmed that inclusion of immunomodulators to the treatment schemes allowed to increase the therapy efficacy and the patients' adherence to the treatment, as well as to shorten the period of the bacteria carriage. Thus, the use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the treatment of the patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis allowed to shorten the period of the pathogen carriage (as well as the drug resistant forms) in 94.1 ± 3.33% of the patients in spite of concomitant diseases. The effect of Cycloferon in such cases was likely due to both its direct immunoprotective action and the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment.

  8. Recent advances in biomarkers for Parkinson's disease focusing on biochemicals, omics and neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rutong; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Pu, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, involving progressive loss of the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons. Cardinal symptoms including tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooping, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons have already been destroyed. Hence, reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis to measure disease progression and response to therapy. We review the current status of protein and small molecule biomarkers involved in oxidative stress, protein aggregation and inflammation etc. which are present in cerebrospinal fluid, human blood, urine or saliva. In recent years, advances in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and functional brain imaging techniques have led to new insights into the pathoetiology of PD. Further studies in the novel discovery of PD biomarkers will provide avenues to treat PD patients more effectively with few or no side effects.

  9. Advances in imaging-genetic relationships for Alzheimer's disease: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Sorbi, Sandro; Nacmias, Benedetta

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and represents a major public health problem. From a clinical perspective, AD is devastating to patients and their families. The genetic approach to the study of dementia undoubtedly continues to provide a significant contribution to understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic perspectives, but also raises important ethical implications. With advances in new technology, including genetics and PET/MRI scanning, the role of genetic studies and neuroimaging is being redefined as an aid in the clinical diagnosis of AD, and also in presymptomatic evaluation. Here, we review some of the issues related to the neuroimaging-genetic relationship in AD with a possible clinical implication as a preclinical biomarker for dementia and also for tracking disease progression.

  10. End-of-life care in patients with advanced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Richard B L

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the detection, pathological diagnosis and therapeutics of lung cancer, many patients still develop advanced, incurable and progressively fatal disease. As physicians, the duties to cure sometimes, relieve often and comfort always should be a constant reminder to us of the needs that must be met when caring for a patient with lung cancer. Four key areas of end-of-life care in advanced lung cancer begin with first recognizing 'when a patient is approaching the end of life'. The clinician should be able to recognize when the focus of care needs to shift from an aggressive life-sustaining approach to an approach that helps prepare and support a patient and family members through a period of progressive, inevitable decline. Once the needs are recognized, the second key area is appropriate communication, where the clinician should assist patients and family members in understanding where they are in the disease trajectory and what to expect. This involves developing rapport, breaking bad news, managing expectations and navigating care plans. Subsequently, the third key area is symptom management that focuses on the goals to first and foremost provide comfort and dignity. Symptoms that are common towards the end of life in lung cancer include pain, dyspnoea, delirium and respiratory secretions. Such symptoms need to be anticipated and addressed promptly with appropriate medications and explanations to the patient and family. Lastly, in order for physicians to provide quality end-of-life care, it is necessary to understand the ethical principles applied to end-of-life-care interventions. Misconceptions about euthanasia versus withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatments may lead to physician distress and inappropriate decision making.

  11. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Schuchmann, Marcus; Zimmermann, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Many posttransplant lymphomas develop from the uncontrolled proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B-cells, whereas EBV-negative PTLDs were increasingly recognized within the past decade. Major risk factors for the development of PTLDs after liver transplantation are immunosuppressive therapy and the type of underlying disease: viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, or alcoholic liver cirrhosis contribute to an increased risk for PTLD. Therapeutic regimens include reduction of immunosuppression, the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, and chemotherapy, as well as new approaches using interferon-α and anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. Despite the different therapeutic regimens, mortality from PTLD remains high. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify patients at risk at an early stage of the disease. In this review, risk factors for PTLD development after liver transplantation, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed.

  12. [Satisfaction with immunotherapy in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Fumika; Kotani, Junko; Ohnishi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Toru

    2015-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with cancer immunotherapy, which is not covered by health insurance in Japan, was evaluated among 65 patients with advanced cancer who had received immunotherapy in our hospital for 2 years. Satisfaction measures were based on patients' expectations for medical care, cost, and staff services, and involved a questionnaire consisting of 25 items. Results of the questionnaire analysis showed that most patients, who expected much of antigen-specific vaccination such as dendritic cells (DC) pulsed tumor-associated antigens, were dissatisfied with the high cost of private immunotherapy(i. e., not covered by medical insurance), and were unable to perceive the effectiveness of the treatment because there was no quantitative analysis of killer T cells induced by immunotherapy. Therefore, it is critically important for us to confirm the safety and efficiency of cancer immunotherapy, before introducing medical insurance for cancer patients in Japan. In addition, the quantitative measurement of killer T cells induced by DC peptide vaccines should be considered, to meet patients' expectations.

  13. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected.

  14. Recent advances in transplantation for primary immune deficiency diseases: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Nelson, Robert P

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapeutic option for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of diseases which otherwise carry life expectancies that are of limited duration and quality. Survival following HCT for SCID has improved from approximately 23 to 91 % over the last 40 years. Success with SCID prompted efforts to apply HCT to the therapeutic challenge of well over 20 molecularly defined primary immune deficiency diseases (PID). Such success is due to both early recognition of PIDs and advances in the field of transplantation. Such advances include high-resolution HLA DNA donor-recipient matching, expansion of donor sources, better tolerated conditioning, new antibiotics, and wider availability. International collaborative efforts have provided patients and caregivers information that permit better treatment decisions now, and direct clinicians and investigators to ensure progress in the future. Pioneers in screening for SCID have taken steps to correct the fundamental challenge to successful treatment, which is the rapid discovery and characterization of cases and offering the transplant option to an affected child early in life; blood spot testing for T and B cell receptor quantification is now available to a growing fraction of newborns. Organizations including the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium in the USA, The European Society for Primary Immunodeficiency, the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, the United States Immunodeficiency Network, the Immune Deficiency Foundation, and the Jeffrey Modell Foundation are contributing mightily to increase awareness and standardize optimal utilization to the benefit of patients. This review will update the allergist-immunologist concerning disease presentations, indications for transplantation, methodologies, conditioning regimens, and clinical outcomes for patients with PID for which timely HCT is

  15. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  16. Clinical significance of systematic retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy during interval debulking surgery in advanced ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Toshio; Iitsuka, Chiaki; Nomura, Hidetaka; Abe, Akiko; Taniguchi, Tomoko; Takizawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical significance of systematic retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy during interval debulking surgery (IDS) in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 124 advanced EOC patients and analyzed the details of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), IDS, postoperative treatment, and prognoses. Results Following IDS, 98 patients had no gross residual disease (NGRD), 15 had residual disease sized <1 cm (optimal), and 11 had residual disease sized ≥1 cm (suboptimal). Two-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 88.8% and 39.8% in the NGRD group, 40.0% and 13.3% in the optimal group (p<0.001 vs. NGRD for both), and 36.3% and 0% in the suboptimal group, respectively. Five-year OS and 2-year PFS rates were 62% and 56.1% in the lymph node-negative (LN-) group and 26.2% and 24.5% in the lymph node-positive (LN+) group (p=0.0033 and p=0.0024 vs. LN-, respectively). Furthermore, survival in the LN+ group, despite surgical removal of positive nodes, was the same as that in the unknown LN status group, in which lymphadenectomy was not performed (p=0.616 and p=0.895, respectively). Multivariate analysis identified gross residual tumor during IDS (hazard ratio, 3.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.31 to 10.33 vs. NGRD) as the only independent predictor of poor OS. Conclusion NGRD after IDS improved prognosis in advanced EOC patients treated with NACT-IDS. However, while systematic retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy during IDS may predict outcome, it does not confer therapeutic benefits. PMID:26197771

  17. Trabectedin Followed by Irinotecan Can Stabilize Disease in Advanced Translocation-Positive Sarcomas with Acceptable Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    von Klot-Heydenfeldt, F.; Jabar, S.; Ranft, A.; Rossig, C.; Dirksen, U.; Van den Brande, J.; D'Incalci, M.; von Luettichau, I.; Grohar, P. J.; Berdel, W. E.; Burdach, St.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preclinical data indicate that trabectedin followed by irinotecan has strong synergistic effects on Ewing sarcoma. This is presumably due to hypersensitization of the tumor cells to the camptothecin as an effect of trabectedin in addition to synergistic suppression of EWS-FLI1 downstream targets. A strong effect was also reported in a human rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft. Procedure. Twelve patients with end-stage refractory translocation-positive sarcomas were treated with trabectedin followed by irinotecan within a compassionate use program. Eight patients had Ewing sarcoma and four patients had other translocation-positive sarcomas. Results. Three-month survival rate was 0.75 after the start of this therapy. One patient achieved a partial response according to RECIST criteria, five had stable disease, and the remaining six progressed through therapy. The majority of patients experienced significant hematological toxicity (grades 3 and 4). Reversible liver toxicity and diarrhea also occurred. Conclusions. Our experience with the combination of trabectedin followed with irinotecan in patients with advanced sarcomas showed promising results in controlling refractory solid tumors. While the hematological toxicity was significant, it was reversible. Quality of life during therapy was maintained. These observations encourage a larger clinical trial. PMID:27843394

  18. Recent Advances in Kawasaki Disease - Proceedings of the 3rd Kawasaki Disease Summit, Chandigarh, 2014.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surjit; Sharma, Dhrubajyoti; Bhattad, Sagar; Phillip, Saji

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in Japan, North America and Europe. It is now being increasingly recognized from the developing countries as well. If not diagnosed and treated in time, KD can result in coronary artery abnormalities in approximately 15-25% cases. The long-term consequences of these abnormalities may manifest in adults as myocardial ischemia and congestive heart failure. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) remains the drug of choice for treatment of KD, but several new agents like infliximab, cyclosporine, glucocorticoids and statins are now being increasingly used in these patients. While echocardiography has been the preferred imaging modality hitherto, CT coronary angiography has emerged as an exciting new supplementary option and provides an entirely new dimension to this disease. The incidence of KD has shown a progressive increase in several countries and it is likely that this disease would impact public health programmes in the near future even in the developing countries.

  19. 'Hitting you over the head': oncologists' disclosure of prognosis to advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elisa J; Daugherty, Christopher K

    2003-04-01

    The disclosure of prognosis to terminally ill patients has emerged as a recent concern given greater demands for patient involvement in medical decision-making in the United States. As part of the informed consent process, American physicians are legally and ethically obligated to provide information to such patients about risks, benefits, and alternatives of all available treatment options including the use of experimental therapies. Although not legally required, the disclosure of terminal prognosis is ethically justified because it upholds the principle of self-determination and enables patients to make treatment decisions consistent with their life goals. To understand oncologists' attitudes about disclosing prognostic information to cancer patients with advanced disease, we interviewed fourteen oncologists and conducted one focus group of medical fellows. Although oncologists reported to disclose prognosis in terms of cancer not being curable, they tend to avoid using percentages to convey prognosis. Oncologists' reported reluctance to disclosing prognosis was conveyed through the use of metaphors depicting the perceived violent impact of such information on patients. Oncologists' reluctance to disclose prognosis and preserve patient hope are held in check by their need to ensure that patients have 'realistic expectations' about therapy. We discuss these data in light of the cultural, ethical, and legal dimensions of prognosis disclosure, patient hope and the doctor-patient relationship, and recommend ways to enhance the communication process.

  20. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients During Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębski, D; Maksymiak, M; Kostorz, S; Bezubka, B; Osmanska, I; Młynczak, T; Rutkowska, A; Baczek, Z; Ziora, D; Kozielski, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of pulmonary rehabilitation for improving of exercises efficiency, dyspnea, and quality of life of patients with lung cancer during chemotherapy. After the enrollment selection, the study included 20 patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer and performance status 0-2. There were 12 patients randomly allocated to the pulmonary rehabilitation group and another 8 constituted the control group that did not undergo physical rehabilitation. Both groups of patients had continual cycles of chemotherapy. Data were analyzed before and after 8 weeks of physical rehabilitation, and before and after 8 weeks of observation without rehabilitation in controls. The inpatient rehabilitation program was based on exercise training with ski poles and respiratory muscle training. We found a tendency for enhanced mobility (6 Minute Walk Test: 527.3 ± 107.4 vs. 563.9 ±64.6 m; p > 0.05) and a significant increase in forced expired volume in 1 s (66.9 ± 13.2 vs. 78.4 ± 17.7 %predicted; p = 0.016), less dyspnea (p = 0.05), and a tendency for improvement in the general quality of life questionnaire after completion of pulmonary rehabilitation as compared with the control group. This report suggests that pulmonary rehabilitation in advanced lung cancer patients during chemotherapy is a beneficial intervention to reduce dyspnea and enhance the quality of life and mobility.

  1. Tremor reduction by subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Grips, Eva; Weigel, Ralf; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K

    2007-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has proved to be effective for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the recent studies used only clinical data to analyse tremor reduction. The objective of our study was to quantify tremor reduction by STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication in elderly PD patients using an objective measuring system. Amplitude and frequency of resting tremor and re-emergent resting tremor during postural tasks were analysed using an ultrasound-based measuring system and surface electromyography. In a prospective study design nine patients with advanced PD were examined preoperatively off and on medication, and twice postoperatively during four treatment conditions: off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. While both STN DBS and medication reduced tremor amplitude, STN DBS alone and the combination of medication and STN DBS were significantly superior to pre- and postoperative medication. STN DBS but not medication increased tremor frequency, and off treatment tremor frequency was significantly reduced postoperatively compared to baseline. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS is highly effective in elderly patients with advanced PD and moderate preoperative tremor reduction by medication. Thus, with regard to the advanced impact on the other parkinsonian symptoms, STN DBS can replace thalamic stimulation in this cohort of patients. Nevertheless, medication was still effective postoperatively and may act synergistically. The significantly superior efficacy of STN DBS on tremor amplitude and its impact on tremor frequency in contrast to medication might be explained by the influence of STN DBS on additional neural circuits independent from dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  2. Modeling Huntington׳s disease with patient-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Mattis, Virginia B; Svendsen, Clive N

    2017-02-01

    Huntington׳s Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. While the gene was identified over two decades ago, it remains poorly understood why mutant HTT (mtHTT) is initially toxic to striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Models of HD using non-neuronal human patient cells and rodents exhibit some characteristic HD phenotypes. While these current models have contributed to the field, they are limited in disease manifestation and may vary in their response to treatments. As such, human HD patient MSNs for disease modeling could greatly expand the current understanding of HD and facilitate the search for a successful treatment. It is now possible to use pluripotent stem cells, which can generate any tissue type in the body, to study and potentially treat HD. This review covers disease modeling in vitro and, via chimeric animal generation, in vivo using human HD patient MSNs differentiated from embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. This includes an overview of the differentiation of pluripotent cells into MSNs, the established phenotypes found in cell-based models and transplantation studies using these cells. This review not only outlines the advancements in the rapidly progressing field of HD modeling using neurons derived from human pluripotent cells, but also it highlights several remaining controversial issues such as the 'ideal' series of pluripotent lines, the optimal cell types to use and the study of a primarily adult-onset disease in a developmental model. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Exploiting human neurons.

  3. Needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients: a survey in Shanghai of China.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Song, L J; Zhou, L J; Meng, H; Zhao, J J

    2014-07-01

    It is important to understand the unmet needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients for developing and refining services to address the identified gaps in cancer care. To explore their needs in Chinese mainland and the possible factors associated with their needs, a self-developed questionnaire was used to survey a sample of 649 participants in 15 hospitals of Shanghai. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Fishers least significant difference t-test. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 13.0. Seven dimensions of needs (maintaining health, support from healthcare professionals, knowledge about the disease and treatment, support on funeral, information on hospice care, psychological support for patients and symptoms control for patients) were extracted from the results by factor analysis. The dimension with the highest score was 'knowledge about the disease and treatment' (4.37), and that with the lowest score named 'support on funeral' (2.85). The results showed that the factors including burden of payment for treatment, former caregiving experience of family caregivers and length of caregiving time were associated with their needs. Cancer services need to consider how to tailor resources and interventions to meet these needs of family caregivers of advanced cancer patients.

  4. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  5. [Psychopharmacotherapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordes, J; Lange-Asschenfeldt, C; Hiemke, C; Kahl, K G

    2012-11-01

    Increased cardiometabolic morbidity and increased overall mortality has been observed in patients with severe mental disorders. Therefore, cardiometabolic safety is an important issue in the treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders, in particular in patients with comorbid cardiometabolic diseases. Frequent adverse side effects include disturbances of lipid and glucose metabolism, body weight changes and alterations of the QTc interval. Dependent on the particular substance used and on factors concerning individual vulnerability, these side effects vary in relative frequency. Therefore, regular monitoring is recommended including ECG. Furthermore, interactions between different medicaments may occur, either leading to enhanced or decreased drug concentrations. Prior to psychopharmacological treatment, proper cardiological treatment is recommended. The management of cardiovascular risks under psychopharmacology requires interdisciplinary cooperation between the cardiologist, general practitioner and psychiatrist.

  6. Fertility preservation in patients receiving cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Radha; Miller, Steven D; Meyers, Kevin E; Ginsberg, Jill P

    2015-07-01

    Cyclophosphamide continues to have an important role in the treatment of renal disease, including nephrotic syndrome and lupus nephritis, despite known complications of gonadotoxicity and potential infertility in both male and female patients. It is important that the physician recommending this therapy mitigates the effect of the drug on fertility by adhering to recommendations on dosing limits and offering fertility-preserving strategies. In addition to well-established methods, such as sperm banking and embryo cryopreservation, advances in reproductive technology have yielded strategies such as oocyte cryopreservation, resulting in more fertility-preserving options for the pediatric patient. Despite these advances, there continues to be a significant barrier to referral and access to sperm banks and fertility specialists. These issues are further complicated by ethical issues associated with the treatment of pediatric patients. In this review we explore the development of recommended dosing limits and include a discussion of the available fertility-preserving methods, strategies for increasing access to fertility specialists, and the ethical considerations facing the pediatric healthcare provider.

  7. Clinical Implementation of Integrated Genomic Profiling in Patients with Advanced Cancers.

    PubMed

    Borad, Mitesh J; Egan, Jan B; Condjella, Rachel M; Liang, Winnie S; Fonseca, Rafael; Ritacca, Nicole R; McCullough, Ann E; Barrett, Michael T; Hunt, Katherine S; Champion, Mia D; Patel, Maitray D; Young, Scott W; Silva, Alvin C; Ho, Thai H; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; McWilliams, Robert R; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Baker, Angela; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Izatt, Tyler; Christoforides, Alexis; Cherni, Irene; Nasser, Sara; Reiman, Rebecca; Cuyugan, Lori; McDonald, Jacquelyn; Adkins, Jonathan; Mastrian, Stephen D; Valdez, Riccardo; Jaroszewski, Dawn E; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Craig, David W; Stewart, A Keith; Carpten, John D; Bryce, Alan H

    2016-12-01

    DNA focused panel sequencing has been rapidly adopted to assess therapeutic targets in advanced/refractory cancer. Integrated Genomic Profiling (IGP) utilising DNA/RNA with tumour/normal comparisons in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) compliant setting enables a single assay to provide: therapeutic target prioritisation, novel target discovery/application and comprehensive germline assessment. A prospective study in 35 advanced/refractory cancer patients was conducted using CLIA-compliant IGP. Feasibility was assessed by estimating time to results (TTR), prioritising/assigning putative therapeutic targets, assessing drug access, ascertaining germline alterations, and assessing patient preferences/perspectives on data use/reporting. Therapeutic targets were identified using biointelligence/pathway analyses and interpreted by a Genomic Tumour Board. Seventy-five percent of cases harboured 1-3 therapeutically targetable mutations/case (median 79 mutations of potential functional significance/case). Median time to CLIA-validated results was 116 days with CLIA-validation of targets achieved in 21/22 patients. IGP directed treatment was instituted in 13 patients utilising on/off label FDA approved drugs (n = 9), clinical trials (n = 3) and single patient IND (n = 1). Preliminary clinical efficacy was noted in five patients (two partial response, three stable disease). Although barriers to broader application exist, including the need for wider availability of therapies, IGP in a CLIA-framework is feasible and valuable in selection/prioritisation of anti-cancer therapeutic targets.

  8. Clinical and Genetic Advances in Paget's Disease of Bone: a Review.

    PubMed

    Alonso, N; Calero-Paniagua, I; Del Pino-Montes, J

    2017-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is the second most common metabolic bone disorder, after osteoporosis. It is characterised by focal areas of increased and disorganised bone turnover, coupled with increased bone formation. This disease usually appears in the late stages of life, being slightly more frequent in men than in women. It has been reported worldwide, but primarily affects individuals of British descent. Majority of PDB patients are asymptomatic, but clinical manifestations include pain, bone deformity and complications, like pathological fractures and deafness. The causes of the disease are poorly understood and it is considered as a complex trait, combining genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Linkage analysis identified SQSTM1, at chromosome 5q35, as directly related to the disease. A number of mutations in this gene have been reported, pP392L being the most common variant among different populations. Most of these variants affect the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the protein, which is involved in autophagy processes. Genome-wide association studies enlarged the number of loci associated with PDB, and further fine-mapping studies, combined with functional analysis, identified OPTN and RIN3 as causal genes for Paget's disease. A combination of risk alleles identified by genome-wide association studies led to the development of a score to predict disease severity, which could improve the management of the disease. Further studies need to be conducted to elucidate other important aspects of the trait, such as its focal nature and the epidemiological changes found in some populations. In this review, we summarize the clinical characteristics of the disease and the latest genetic advances to identify susceptibility genes. We also list current available treatments and prospective options.

  9. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

  10. Skin Globotriaosylceramide 3 Load Is Increased in Men with Advanced Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Schröter, Nils; Kafke, Waldemar; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background The X-chromosomally linked life-limiting Fabry disease (FD) is associated with deposits of the sphingolipid globotriaosylceramide 3 (Gb3) in various tissues. Skin is easily accessible and may be used as an additional diagnostic and follow-up medium. Our aims were to visualize skin Gb3 deposits in FD patients applying immunofluorescence and to determine if cutaneous Gb3 load correlates with disease severity. Methods At our Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy we enrolled 84 patients with FD and 27 healthy controls. All subjects underwent 5-mm skin punch biopsy at the lateral lower leg and the back. Skin samples were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD77 (i.e. Gb3). Cutaneous Gb3 deposition was quantified in a blinded manner and correlated to clinical data. Results We found that Gb3 load was higher in distal skin of male FD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Men (p<0.01) and women (p<0.05) with a classic FD phenotype had higher distal skin Gb3 load than healthy controls. Men with advanced disease as reflected by impaired renal function, and men and women with small fiber neuropathy had more Gb3 deposits in distal skin samples than males with normal renal function (p<0.05) and without small fiber neuropathy. Gb3 deposits were not different between patients with and without enzyme replacement therapy. Conclusions Immunofluorescence on minimally invasive skin punch biopsies may be useful as a tool for assessment and follow-up in FD patients. PMID:27851774

  11. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. Case report: A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV1-to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m3. In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Conclusions: Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option. PMID:27488043

  12. Fabry disease: experience of screening dialysis patients for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Eiji; Saito, Osamu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Asano, Yasushi

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence rate for Fabry disease is conventionally considered to be 1 case in 40,000; however, due to increased screening accuracy, reports now suggest that prevalence is 1 case in 1,500 among male children, and it is likely that the clinical importance of the condition will increase in the future. In dialysis patients to date, prevalence rates are between 0.16 and 1.2 %. Globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-GL-3), which is a substrate of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A), has surfaced as a new biomarker, and is also effective in the determination and monitoring of the effects of enzyme replacement therapy. In terms of genetic abnormalities, the E66Q mutation has recently become a topic of discussion, and although doubts have been expressed over whether or not it is the gene responsible for Fabry disease, there is still a strong possibility that it is a functional genetic polymorphism. At present, the standard treatment for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy, and in order to overcome the problems involved with this, a method of producing recombinant human α-Gal A using methanol-assimilating yeast, and chemical or medicinal chaperone treatment are of current interest. Migalastat hydrochloride is known as a pharmacological chaperone, but is currently in Phase III global clinical trials. Adding saposin B to modified α-N-acetyl galactosaminidase is also under consideration as a treatment method.

  13. Oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and methotrexate plus fulvestrant in advanced breast cancer patients: a mono-institutional case-cohort report.

    PubMed

    Aurilio, Gaetano; Munzone, Elisabetta; Botteri, Edoardo; Sciandivasci, Angela; Adamoli, Laura; Minchella, Ida; Esposito, Angela; Cullurà, Daniela; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Colleoni, Marco; Goldhirsch, Aron; Nolè, Franco

    2012-09-01

    Fulvestrant is effective in postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive advanced breast cancer (ABC). So far, no published data exist on fulvestrant combined with chemotherapy. We retrospectively assessed the role of combining oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and methotrexate (CM) to fulvestrant in two cohorts (A and B) of heavily pre-treated estrogen receptor-positive advanced ABC patients. From October 2006 to September 2009, 33 postmenopausal patients received fulvestrant 250 mg via i.m. injection q28 days. In A, 20 patients added metronomic cyclophosphamide (50 mg p.o. daily) and methotrexate (2.5 mg p.o. twice daily on day 1 and day 4 weekly) after disease progression, continuing fulvestrant at the same dose. In B, 13 patients started fulvestrant plus metronomic CM upfront. Thirty-two patients were evaluable for response. Clinical benefit (partial response + stable disease >24 months) for A + B was 56% (95% CI 38-74%). The addition of metronomic CM did not determine relevant toxicities. Treatment with fulvestrant plus metronomic CM was effective in advanced ABC and was minimally toxic providing long-term disease control in a high proportion of patients. The prolonged clinical benefit, often desirable in such patients, supports this regimen as an additional and useful therapeutic tool.

  14. Quality-of-life assessment in advanced lung cancer: considerations for evaluation in patients receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gralla, Richard J; Thatcher, Nick

    2004-12-01

    There is increasing awareness of the need for accurate assessment of quality of life in patients with lung cancer who are on clinical trials and in patient management. Self-reported multidimensional, validated, quality-of-life instruments assess physical, functional, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions associated with lung cancer and its treatment. Such validated instruments are now available and are being utilized more frequently in clinical trials assessing the value of particular anticancer therapies. Such findings may influence the treatment of choice for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly in the advanced-disease setting where survival benefits from current treatments are modest, and the majority of patients present with three or more symptoms. Recently, a number of studies assessing quality of life in NSCLC have been published providing more insight into the effects of the disease and its treatment on the patient's perspective. Quality-of-life instruments that include patient reported outcomes ("PROS") and quality-of-life and symptom assessment are the only way to evaluate this crucial aspect of cancer care. As an example, Fossella and colleagues reported notable findings from the largest prospective evaluation (the TAX 326 trial) of quality of life using validated instruments in patients with NSCLC who received chemotherapy. Patients who received a docetaxel plus platinum combination regimen reported modest benefits in both quality of life and in disease-related parameters, such as pain control, weight loss, and performance status, compared to patients randomly assigned to the combination of vinorelbine and cisplatin. Compliance with the PRO assessment was high, supporting the feasibility of prospective quality-of-life evaluations in NSCLC. Important goals include building on these results by including quality-of-life assessment in all major clinical trials, and demonstrating feasible ways to incorporate this evaluation

  15. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  16. Mirror movements in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Donatella; Tiple, Dorina; Suppa, Antonio; Colosimo, Carlo; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Defazio, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2008-01-30

    Mirror movements (MM) refer to ipsilateral involuntary movements that appear during voluntary activity in contralateral homologous body regions. This study aimed to compare the frequency and distribution of MM in an unselected sample of 274 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 100 healthy subjects, and to check a possible relationship between MM and parkinsonian features. MM of the hand were scored according to the Woods and Teuber scale. The frequency of MM was lower in PD patients than in healthy subjects (29% vs. 71%, P < 0.0001). The distribution of MM also differed in the two groups being often bilateral in healthy subjects, invariably unilateral in PD patients. When parkinsonian signs were unilateral, MM always manifested on the unaffected side; when parkinsonian signs were bilateral, MM manifested on the less affected side. PD patients manifesting MM scored significantly lower on Hohen and Yahr staging than patients without MM. Likewise, there was a significant inverse correlation between the intensity of MM as rated by the Woods and Teuber score and HY staging (r = -0.16, P < 0.01). The low frequency of MM in PD probably relates to the complex interactions between the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to parkinsonian signs and the mechanisms responsible for movement lateralization.

  17. Ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Raza, Anoshia; Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic associate with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Although there were major advances in pharmacologic and device based therapies for the management of HF, mortality of this condition remains high. Accurate monitoring of HF patients for exacerbations is very important to reduce recurrent hospitalizations and its associated complications. With the failure of clinical signs, tele-monitoring, and laboratory bio-markers to function as early markers of HF exacerbations, more sophisticated techniques were sought to accurately predict the circulatory status in HF patients in order to execute timely pharmacological intervention to reduce frequent hospitalizations. CardioMEMSTM (St. Jude Medical, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota) is an implantable, wireless pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) monitoring system which transmits the patient’s continuous PAPs to the treating health care provider in the ambulatory setting. PAP-guided medical therapy modification has been shown to significantly reduce HF-related hospitalization and overall mortality. In advanced stages of HF, wireless access to hemodynamic information correlated with earlier left ventricular assist device implantation and shorter time to heart transplantation. PMID:28163833

  18. Role of spleen elastography in patients with chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Mariangela; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    The development of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PH), one of its major complications, are structural and functional alterations of the liver, occurring in many patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Actually the progressive deposition of hepatic fibrosis has a key role in the prognosis of CLD patients. The subsequent development of PH leads to its major complications, such as ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and decompensation. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis, whereas the measurement of hepatic vein pressure gradient is the standard to ascertain the presence of PH and upper endoscopy is the method of choice to detect the presence of oesophageal varices. However, several non-invasive tests, including elastographic techniques, are currently used to evaluate the severity of liver disease and predict its prognosis. More recently, the measurement of the spleen stiffness has become particularly attractive to assess, considering the relevant role accomplished by the spleen in splanchnic circulation in the course of liver cirrhosis and in the PH. Moreover, spleen stiffness as compared with liver stiffness better represents the dynamic changes occurring in the advanced stages of cirrhosis and shows higher diagnostic performance in detecting esophageal varices. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive overview of the actual role of spleen stiffness measurement as assessed by several elastographic techniques in evaluating both liver disease severity and the development of cirrhosis complications, such as PH and to highlight its potential and possible limitations. PMID:27672283

  19. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease.

  20. Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Brivanib in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Eric; Fischer, Bruce S.; Gong, Jiachang; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Gan, Jinping; Pursley, Janice; Patricia, Daniel; Williams, Daphne; Ganapathi, Ram

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, mass balance, metabolism, routes and extent of elimination, and safety of a single oral dose of 14C-labeled brivanib alaninate and the safety and tolerability of brivanib after multiple doses in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. This was a two-part, single-center, open-label, single oral-dose (part A) followed by multiple-dose (part B) study in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. In part A, patients received a single dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate and in part B patients received 800 mg of nonradiolabeled brivanib alaninate every day. Four patients (two white, two black: two with non–small-cell lung cancer, one with ovarian cancer, and one with renal cell carcinoma) were treated in both parts. The median time to reach the maximal plasma concentration of brivanib was 1 h, geometric mean maximal plasma concentration was 6146 ng/ml, mean terminal half-life was 13.8 h, and geometric mean apparent oral clearance was 14.7 l/h. After a single oral dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate, 12.2 and 81.5% of administered radioactivity was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. Brivanib alaninate was completely converted to the active moiety, brivanib, and the predominant route of elimination was fecal. Renal excretion of unchanged brivanib was minimal. Brivanib was well tolerated; fatigue was the most frequent adverse event occurring in all patients and the most frequent treatment-related adverse event in three (75%). The best clinical response in one patient was stable disease; the other three had progressive disease. Brivanib alaninate was rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized after a single 800-mg oral dose; the majority of drug-related radioactivity was excreted in feces. PMID:20671097

  1. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  2. Fostering innovation, advancing patient safety: the kidney health initiative.

    PubMed

    Archdeacon, Patrick; Shaffer, Rachel N; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Falk, Ronald J; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2013-09-01

    To respond to the serious and underrecognized epidemic of kidney disease in the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration and the American Society of Nephrology have founded the Kidney Health Initiative-a public-private partnership designed to create a collaborative environment in which the US Food and Drug Administration and the greater kidney community can interact to optimize the evaluation of drugs, devices, biologics, and food products. The Kidney Health Initiative will bring together all the necessary stakeholders, including patients, regulators, industry, health care providers, academics, and other governmental agencies, to improve patient safety and foster innovation. This initiative is intended to enable the kidney community as a whole to provide the right drug, device, or biologic for administration to the right patient at the right time by fostering partnerships that will facilitate development and delivery of those products and addressing challenges that currently impede these goals.

  3. [Characteristics and aims of patient advance directive laws].

    PubMed

    Kletecka-Pulker, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The advanced directive law (PatVG), which regulates the conditions and effectiveness of living wills, has been in force since 1 June 2006. A living will is a declaration of will with which a patient refuses certain medical treatment for the case that he is no longer able to understand the situation, make ajudgement or to express himself. In contrast to the non-anticipatory rejection of treatment, the legislator demands, in the case of anticipatory rejection, the fulfilment of certain conditions. The law provides for two forms of living will 1. the non-binding living will and 2. the binding living will. In the case of a binding will, if the patient is no longer able to understand the situation or to make a judgement and/or is unable to express himself, the doctor has to respect the living will and under no circumstances is allowed to carry out the measures which the patient has refused. If one conditions for a binding living will is not fulfilled, the will is then non-binding. However, the greater the number of conditions which are fulfilled, the more likely it is that a doctor will consider it binding. In all cases, the binding living will serves as an aid for the doctor to indicate the will of the patient.

  4. Engaging Patients with Advance Directives using an Information Visualization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Woollen, Janet; Bakken, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits of advance directives (AD) to both patients and care providers, they are often not completed due to lack of patient awareness. The purpose of this paper is to advocate for creation and use of an innovative information visualization (infovisual) as a health communication tool aimed at improving AD dissemination and engagement. The infovisual would promote AD awareness by engaging patients to learn about their options and inspire contemplation and conversation regarding patients’ end-of-life (EOL) journey. An infovisual may be able to communicate insights that are often communicated in words, but are much more powerfully communicated by example. Furthermore, an infovisual could facilitate vivid understanding of options and inspire the beginning of often-difficult conversations between care providers, patients and loved ones. It may also save clinicians’ time, as care providers may be able to spend less time explaining details of EOL care options. Use of an infovisual could assist in ensuring a well-planned EOL. PMID:26273950

  5. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  6. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  7. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed.

  8. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed. PMID:26120276

  9. Advances in the Evaluation of Respiratory Pathophysiology during Exercise in Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Denis E.; Elbehairy, Amany F.; Berton, Danilo C.; Domnik, Nicolle J.; Neder, J. Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea and exercise limitation are among the most common symptoms experienced by patients with various chronic lung diseases and are linked to poor quality of life. Our understanding of the source and nature of perceived respiratory discomfort and exercise intolerance in chronic lung diseases has increased substantially in recent years. These new mechanistic insights are the primary focus of the current review. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides a unique opportunity to objectively evaluate the ability of the respiratory system to respond to imposed incremental physiological stress. In addition to measuring aerobic capacity and quantifying an individual's cardiac and ventilatory reserves, we have expanded the role of CPET to include evaluation of symptom intensity, together with a simple “non-invasive” assessment of relevant ventilatory control parameters and dynamic respiratory mechanics during standardized incremental tests to tolerance. This review explores the application of the new advances in the clinical evaluation of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic asthma, interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hope to demonstrate how this novel approach to CPET interpretation, which includes a quantification of activity-related dyspnea and evaluation of its underlying mechanisms, enhances our ability to meaningfully intervene to improve quality of life in these pathologically-distinct conditions. PMID:28275353

  10. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2007.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2008-06-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects that were reported primarily in the Journal in 2007. Advances in diagnosis include possible biomarkers for anaphylaxis, improved understanding of the relevance of food-specific serum IgE tests, identification of possibly discriminatory T-cell responses for drug allergy, and an elucidation of irritant responses for vaccine allergy diagnostic skin tests. Mechanistic studies are discerning T-cell and cytokine responses central to eosinophilic gastroenteropathies and food allergy, including the identification of multiple potential therapeutic targets. Regarding treatment, clinical studies of oral immunotherapy and allergen vaccination strategies show promise, whereas several clinical studies raise questions about whether oral allergen avoidance reduces atopic risks and whether probiotics can prevent or treat atopic disease. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD), particularly as it relates to allergen sensitization and eczema severity. Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to have viral and bacterial infections. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported, including use of sublingual immunotherapy, anti-IgE, and a kallikrein inhibitor.

  11. Advancing research with Alzheimer disease subjects: investigators' perceptions and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    High, D M

    1993-01-01

    Advancement of Alzheimer disease (AD) research will not only depend on increased participation of patients with AD as subjects, but researchers will likely face increasingly difficult ethical issues. Presented are the results of a survey of researchers at the 15 federally funded Alzheimer Disease Research Centers concerning the ethical issues for subjects with AD participating in research. Experiences from 99 projects are assessed. Major findings include a significant lack of uniformity on the assessment of competency of subjects to consent to research, proxy informed consent overwhelmingly provided informally by family members, no wide use of durable powers of attorney and guardians, perception by the investigators that most projects present only minimal risks to the subjects, and Institutional Review Boards not being viewed by the investigators as preventing or inhibiting the advancement of AD research. It is recommended that research is needed to develop greater clarity in assessment of capacity of subjects to provide informed consent, that ethical and legal empowerment of family members to provide proxy consent be sustained, and that the issue of risk/benefit ratios for AD participants in research be reevaluated in the light of potentially greater risks to subjects.

  12. NATIVE VALVE ENDOCARDITIS CAUSED BY METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS EPIDERMIDIS IN A PATIENT WITH ADVANCED LIVER CIRRHOSIS.

    PubMed

    Cavrić, Gordana; Ilić, Diana; Njers, Kristina; Prkacin, Ingrid; Hamp, Dubravka Bartolek

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 50-year-old man with advanced liver cirrhosis and native valve infective endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. Bacterial infections are one of the most common complications of liver cirrhosis, but reports of infective endocarditis in patients with liver cirrhosis are relatively rare. Because of vulnerability of patients with advanced cirrhosis for developing infections, it is necessary to pay attention to the pathogens that are sometimes considered contamination and actively seek for the seat of infection, even in less expected areas (e.g., native heart valves without a history of heart disease).

  13. Recent advances in understanding and managing Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Stange, Eduard F.; Wehkamp, Jan

    2016-01-01

    There is consensus that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are the result of “dysregulated” immune reactivity towards commensal microorganisms in the intestine. This gut microbiome is clearly altered in IBD, but its primary or secondary role is still debated. The focus has shifted from adaptive to innate immunity, with its multitude of receptor molecules (Toll-like and NOD receptors) and antibacterial effector molecules (defensins, cathelicidin, and others). The latter appear to be at least partly deficient at different intestinal locations. Host genetics also support the notion that microbe–host interaction at the mucosa is the prime site of pathogenesis. In contrast, even the latest therapeutic antibodies are directed against secondary targets like cytokines and integrins identified decades ago. These so-called “biologicals” have disappointing long-term results, with the majority of patients not achieving remission in the long run. A promising approach is the development of novel drugs like defensin-derived molecules that substitute for the missing endogenous antibacterials. PMID:28163902

  14. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains.

  15. Sexual Advances by Patients in Dental Practice: Implications for the Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiodo, Gary T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Oregon dentists (n=248) and dental hygienists (n=235) investigated frequency of patient-initiated sexual advances and methods of dealing with them. Up to 44 percent experienced 1 or more patient verbal advances, and 23 percent experienced physical advances during a 5-year period. Inclusion of related issues in professional curricula is…

  16. Proactive nurse management guidelines for managing intensive chemotherapy regimens in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, J; Ajani, J A

    2008-07-01

    Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Intensive chemotherapy regimens may be effective for the treatment of this disease but may be associated with a significant number of severe adverse events. Optimal management of these adverse events can improve outcome for the patient. Currently, there is little information in the literature about the nursing management of this particular group of patients. This American study involved the nursing management of all patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer enrolled in clinical trials at a single center. Patients had close contact with research nurses and received education about adverse events and how to deal with them. Patients completed a detailed treatment diary for each cycle of treatment. Protocols were established for the management of emergent adverse events. The guidelines developed during this study could help to underpin the role of the specialist oncology nurse and improve the management of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, with the potential of improving outcome, or at least quality of life, for the patients. The nurses' role should be pivotal in the management of intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer.

  17. Genetic Determinants of Cisplatin Resistance in Patients With Advanced Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bagrodia, Aditya; Lee, Byron H; Lee, William; Cha, Eugene K; Sfakianos, John P; Iyer, Gopa; Pietzak, Eugene J; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Zabor, Emily C; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Syed, Aijazuddin; Arcila, Maria E; Chaganti, Raju S; Kundra, Ritika; Eng, Jana; Hreiki, Joseph; Vacic, Vladimir; Arora, Kanika; Oschwald, Dayna M; Berger, Michael F; Bajorin, Dean F; Bains, Manjit S; Schultz, Nikolaus; Reuter, Victor E; Sheinfeld, Joel; Bosl, George J; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Solit, David B; Feldman, Darren R

    2016-11-20

    Purpose Owing to its exquisite chemotherapy sensitivity, most patients with metastatic germ cell tumors (GCTs) are cured with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, up to 30% of patients with advanced GCT exhibit cisplatin resistance, which requires intensive salvage treatment, and have a 50% risk of cancer-related death. To identify a genetic basis for cisplatin resistance, we performed whole-exome and targeted sequencing of cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant GCTs. Methods Men with GCT who received a cisplatin-containing chemotherapy regimen and had available tumor tissue were eligible to participate in this study. Whole-exome sequencing or targeted exon-capture-based sequencing was performed on 180 tumors. Patients were categorized as cisplatin sensitive or cisplatin resistant by using a combination of postchemotherapy parameters, including serum tumor marker levels, radiology, and pathology at surgical resection of residual disease. Results TP53 alterations were present exclusively in cisplatin-resistant tumors and were particularly prevalent among primary mediastinal nonseminomas (72%). TP53 pathway alterations including MDM2 amplifications were more common among patients with adverse clinical features, categorized as poor risk according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) model. Despite this association, TP53 and MDM2 alterations predicted adverse prognosis independent of the IGCCCG model. Actionable alterations, including novel RAC1 mutations, were detected in 55% of cisplatin-resistant GCTs. Conclusion In GCT, TP53 and MDM2 alterations were associated with cisplatin resistance and inferior outcomes, independent of the IGCCCG model. The finding of frequent TP53 alterations among mediastinal primary nonseminomas may explain the more frequent chemoresistance observed with this tumor subtype. A substantial portion of cisplatin-resistant GCTs harbor actionable alterations, which might respond to targeted therapies. Genomic

  18. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  19. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... peanut oil canola oil Why is knowing about sodium important for someone with advanced CKD? Too much ... who have high blood pressure. High- and Low-sodium Foods High-sodium Foods Low-sodium Alternatives Salt ...

  20. New MS Drug Shows 'Breakthrough' Promise for Advanced Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- A new drug slows the progress of multiple sclerosis, including an advanced form of the degenerative nerve ... also proved superior in treating people with relapsing multiple sclerosis, the most common form of MS, compared with ...

  1. Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suita...

  2. Validity and Responsiveness of At-Home Touch Screen Assessments in Advanced Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Memedi, Mevludin; Nyholm, Dag; Johansson, Anders; Pålhagen, Sven; Willows, Thomas; Widner, Håkan; Linder, Jan; Westin, Jerker

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a telemetry test battery can be used to measure effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment intervention and disease progression in patients with fluctuations. Sixty-five patients diagnosed with advanced PD were recruited in an open longitudinal 36-month study; 35 treated with levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) and 30 were candidates for switching from oral PD treatment to LCIG. They utilized a test battery, consisting of self-assessments of symptoms and fine motor tests (tapping and spiral drawings), four times per day in their homes during week-long test periods. The repeated measurements were summarized into an overall test score (OTS) to represent the global condition of the patient during a test period. Clinical assessments included ratings on unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) and 39-item PD questionnaire (PDQ-39) scales. In LCIG-naïve patients, the mean OTS compared to baseline was significantly improved from the first test period on LCIG treatment until month 24. In LCIG-nonnaïve patients, there were no significant changes in the mean OTS until month 36. The OTS correlated adequately with total UPDRS (rho = 0.59) and total PDQ-39 (0.59). Responsiveness measured as effect size was 0.696 and 0.536 for OTS and UPDRS, respectively. The trends of the test scores were similar to the trends of clinical rating scores but the dropout rate was high. Correlations between OTS and clinical rating scales were adequate indicating that the test battery contains important elements of the information of well-established scales. The responsiveness and reproducibility were better for OTS than for total UPDRS.

  3. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  4. 77 FR 7167 - Global Rare Diseases Patient Registry and Data Repository (GRDR) Notice and Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... organizational component of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institutes... through the patient organizations. Direct contact with the prospective participants would occur only after... community, ORDR believes that an open-science community for rare diseases is needed. Such a community...

  5. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  6. Low-frequency subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for axial symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; Walsh, Richard; Meaney, Christopher; Poon, Y Y; Fallis, Melanie; Moro, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Axial symptoms such as freezing of gait and falls are common manifestations of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and are partially responsive to medical treatment. High-frequency (≥130 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is highly efficacious in ameliorating appendicular symptoms in PD. However, it is typically less effective in improving axial symptomatology, especially in the long term. We have studied the effects of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) (≤80 Hz) for improving speech, gait and balance dysfunction in the largest patient population to date. PD patients with bilateral STN-DBS and resistant axial symptoms were switched from chronic 130 Hz stimulation to LFS and followed up to 4 years. Primary outcome measures were total motor UPDRS scores, and axial and gait subscores before and after LFS. Bivariate analyses and correlation coefficients were calculated for the different conditions. Potential predictors of therapeutic response were also investigated. Forty-five advanced PD patients who had high frequency stimulation (HFS) for 39.5 ± 27.8 consecutive months were switched to LFS. LFS was kept on for a median period of 111.5 days before the assessment. There was no significant improvement in any of the primary outcomes between HFS and LFS, although a minority of patients preferred to be maintained on LFS for longer periods of time. No predictive factors of response could be identified. There was overall no improvement from LFS in axial symptoms. This could be partly due to some study limitations. Larger prospective trials are warranted to better clarify the impact of stimulation frequency on axial signs.

  7. Effect of bicarbonate supplementation on renal function and nutritional indices in predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m(2)) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m(2)) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m(2), p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m(2)).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition.

  8. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  9. Systemic treatment and targeted therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, El Mehdi; Essadi, Ismail; M’rabti, Hind; Touyar, Anass; Errihani, PR Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignancy of global importance: it is the sixth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite decades of efforts by many investigators, systemic chemotherapy or hormone therapy has failed to demonstrate improved survival in patients with HCC.. Ongoing studies are evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of combining Sorafenib with erlotinib and other targeted agents or chemotherapy. Aims: On the basis of placebo-controlled, randomized phase III trials, Sorafenib has shown improved survival benefits in advanced HCC and has set a new standard for future clinical trials. The successful clinical development of Sorafenib in HCC has ushered in the era of molecularly targeted agents in this disease, which is discussed in this educational review. Material and Methods: Many molecularly targeted agents that inhibit angiogenesis, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mammalian target of rapamycin are at different stages of clinical development in advanced HCC. Future research should continue to unravel the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis and to identify key relevant molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Identification and validation of potential surrogate and predictive biomarkers hold promise to individualize patients’ treatment to maximize clinical benefit and minimize the toxicity and cost of targeted agents. Results: Systemic therapy with various classes of agents, including hormone and cytotoxic agents, has provided no or marginal benefits. Improved understanding of the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis, coupled with the arrival of many newly developed molecularly targeted agents, has provided the unique opportunity to study some of these novel agents in advanced HCC. Conclusions: The demonstration of improved survival benefits by Sorafenib in advanced HCC has ushered in the era of molecular-targeted therapy in this disease, with many agents

  10. Drug nanocarrier, the future of atopic diseases: Advanced drug delivery systems and smart management of disease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mei; Hussain, Zahid; Thu, Hnin Ei; Khan, Shahzeb; Katas, Haliza; Ahmed, Tarek A; Tripathy, Minaketan; Leng, Jing; Qin, Hua-Li; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing skin inflammatory disorder characterized by perivascular infiltration of immunoglobulin-E (IgE), T-lymphocytes and mast cells. The key pathophysiological factors causing this disease are immunological disorders and the compromised epidermal barrier integrity. Pruritus, intense itching, psychological stress, deprived physical and mental performance and sleep disturbance are the hallmark features of this dermatological complication. Preventive interventions which include educational programs, avoidance of allergens, exclusive care towards skin, and the rational selection of therapeutic regimen play key roles in the treatment of dermatosis. In last two decades, it is evident from a plethora of studies that scientific focus is being driven from conventional therapies to the advanced nanocarrier-based regimen for an effective management of AD. These nanocarriers which include polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), hydrogel NPs, liposomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanoemulsion, provide efficient roles for the target specific delivery of the therapeutic payload. The success of these targeted therapies is due to their pharmaceutical versatility, longer retention time at the target site, avoiding off-target effects and preventing premature degradation of the incorporated drugs. The present review was therefore aimed to summarise convincing evidence for the therapeutic superiority of advanced nanocarrier-mediated strategies over the conventional therapies used in the treatment of AD.

  11. Advances in surveillance of periodontitis: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention periodontal disease surveillance project.

    PubMed

    Eke, Paul I; Thornton-Evans, Gina; Dye, Bruce; Genco, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has as one of its strategic goals to support and improve surveillance of periodontal disease. In 2003, the CDC initiated the CDC Periodontal Disease Surveillance Project in collaboration with the American Academy of Periodontology to address population-based surveillance of periodontal disease at the local, state, and national levels. This initiative has made significant advancements toward the goal of improved surveillance, including developing valid self-reported measures that can be obtained from interview-based surveys to predict prevalence of periodontitis in populations. This will allow surveillance of periodontitis at the state and local levels and in countries where clinical resources for surveillance are scarce. This work has produced standard case definitions for surveillance of periodontitis that are now widely recognized and applied in population studies and research. At the national level, this initiative has evaluated the validity of previous clinical examination protocols and tested new protocols on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), recommending and supporting funding for the gold-standard full-mouth periodontal examination in NHANES 2009 to 2012. These examinations will generate accurate estimates of the prevalence of periodontitis in the US adult population and provide a superior dataset for surveillance and research. Also, this data will be used to generate the necessary coefficients for our self-report questions for use in subsets of the total US population. The impact of these findings on population-based surveillance of periodontitis and future directions of the project are discussed along with plans for dissemination and translation efforts for broader public health use.

  12. Expression of periodontal interleukin-6 protein is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jonathan H.; Hardy, Douglas Crane; Schuyler, Corinne A.; Slate, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Epidemiological studies have established that patients with diabetes have an increased prevalence and severity of periodontal disease. Interleukin (IL)-6, a multifunctional cytokine, plays a role in the tissue inflammation that characterizes periodontal disease. Our recent study has shown a trend of increase in periodontal IL-6 expression at the mRNA level across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases. However, the periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level in these patients has not been investigated. Material and Methods Periodontal tissue specimens were collected from eight patients without periodontal disease and diabetes (group 1), from 17 patients with periodontal disease alone (group 2) and from 10 patients with both periodontal disease and diabetes (group 3). The frozen sections were prepared from these tissue specimens and IL-6 protein expression was detected and quantified. Results The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test showed that differences in IL-6 protein levels among the three groups were statistically significant (p = 0.035). Nonparametric analysis using Jonckheere-Terpstra test showed a tendency of increase in periodontal IL-6 protein levels across group 1 to group 2 to group 3 (p = 0.006). Parametric analysis of variance (ANOVA) on IL-6 protein levels showed that neither age nor gender significantly affected the difference of IL-6 levels among the groups. Conclusion Periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone, and patients with both diseases. PMID:20682019

  13. The conjoint use of music therapy and reflexology with hospitalized advanced stage cancer patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Magill, Lucanne; Berenson, Susan

    2008-09-01

    Advanced stage cancer patients experience debilitating physical symptoms as well as profound emotional and spiritual struggles. Advanced disease is accompanied by multiple changes and losses for the patient and the family. Palliative care focuses on the relief of overall suffering of patients and families, including symptom control, psychosocial support, and the meeting of spiritual needs. Music therapy and reflexology are complementary therapies that can soothe and provide comfort. When used conjointly, they provide a multifaceted experience that can aid in the reduction of anxiety, pain, and isolation; facilitate communication between patients, family members, and staff; and provide the potential for a more peaceful dying experience for all involved. This article addresses the benefits of the combined use of music therapy and reflexology. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the application and benefits of this dual approach for patients and their families regarding adjustment to the end of life in the presence of anxiety and cognitive impairment.

  14. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Angmo, Dewang; Sharma, Reetika; Temkar, Shreyas; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-05-01

    ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD) has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs) not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medications) was achieved in eight cases (66.7%) and qualified success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with additional glaucoma medications) in two cases (16.7%) at 1-year after surgery. Early intervention was needed in 4 patients; two underwent anterior chamber reformation while the other two required needling. Two patients required resurgery. There was no significant change in the best corrected visual acuity postoperatively (P = 0.37). ExPress GFD does not seem to offer a benefit over standard trabeculectomy in patients with advanced glaucomatous disease in terms of IOP control or complication rate. However, due to the small sample size with a heterogeneous mixture of primary and secondary glaucoma's, we await further studies with a larger sample size and long-term follow-up, to see how the device performs.

  15. Usefulness of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Risk Stratification of Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Benites-Zapata, Vicente A.; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Nagarajan, Vijaiganesh; Cauthen, Clay A.; Starling, Randall C.; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) has been associated with increased mortality in patients with acute heart failure (HF) as well as in neoplastic diseases. We investigated the association between NLR and mortality or cardiac transplantation in a retrospective cohort of 527 patients presented to the Cleveland Clinic for evaluation of advanced HF therapy options between 2007 and 2010. Patients were divided according to low, intermediate, and high tertiles of NLR, and were followed longitudinally for time to all-causes mortality or heart transplantation (primary outcome). The median NLR was 3.9 (IQR 2.5, 6.5). In univariate analysis, intermediate and highest tertiles of NLR had a higher risk than the lowest tertile for the primary outcome and all-causes mortality. Compared to the lowest tertile, there was no difference in the risk of heart transplantation for intermediate and high tertiles. In multivariate analysis, when compared to the lowest tertile, the intermediate and high NLR tertiles remained significantly associated with the primary outcome (HR=1.61 [95%CI 1.10 to 2.37] and HR=1.55 [95%CI 1.02 to 2.36], respectively), and all-causes mortality (HR=1.83 [95%CI 1.07 to 3.14] and HR=2.16 [95%CI 1.21 to 3.83], respectively). In conclusion, elevated NLR is associated with increased mortality or heart transplantation risk in patients with advanced HF. PMID:25456873

  16. Usefulness of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in risk stratification of patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Benites-Zapata, Vicente A; Hernandez, Adrian V; Nagarajan, Vijaiganesh; Cauthen, Clay A; Starling, Randall C; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been associated with increased mortality in patients with acute heart failure (HF) and neoplastic diseases. We investigated the association between NLR and mortality or cardiac transplantation in a retrospective cohort of 527 patients presented to the Cleveland Clinic for evaluation of advanced HF therapy options from 2007 to 2010. Patients were divided according to low, intermediate, and high tertiles of NLR and were followed longitudinally for time to all-cause mortality or heart transplantation (primary outcome). The median NLR was 3.9 (interquartile range 2.5 to 6.5). In univariate analysis, intermediate and highest tertiles of NLR had a higher risk than the lowest tertile for the primary outcome and all-causes mortality. Compared with the lowest tertile, there was no difference in the risk of heart transplantation for intermediate and high tertiles. In multivariate analysis, compared with the lowest tertile, the intermediate and high NLR tertiles remained significantly associated with the primary outcome (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10 to 2.37 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.36, respectively) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.83, 95% CI 1.07 to 3.14 and HR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.21 to 3.83, respectively). In conclusion, elevated NLR is associated with increased mortality or heart transplantation risk in patients with advanced HF.

  17. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  18. [The current status of home palliative care for patients with advanced cancer at the Jikei University School of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Eijiro; Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Hayashi, Kazumi; Sakaji, Yukie; Aoki, Masako; Naito, Yasuko; Arakawa, Yasuhiro; Uwagawa, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Aiba, Keisuke

    2014-12-01

    Medical oncologists are involved in cancer chemotherapy as well as end-of-life care. Recently, an increased number of patients with advanced cancer have expressed their preference to receive palliative care at their home during the end-of-life period, and several home medical care providers have aimed to provide such a service. The number of cancer patients who wish to receive home palliative care has also increased at our institution. We reviewed the characteristics of advanced cancer patients who received chemotherapy and who eventually received homecare from 2012 to 2014. The total number of patients was 22. Of these, 9 had breast cancer(40.9%)and 8 had colorectal cancer(36.4%). The median age was 68(range 36-90) years. Half of these patients died at home. The median duration of homecare to death was 64.5(range 12-252)days. Approximately 70% of patients were able to remain at home for over a month, but 3 patients died within 2 weeks at home and 1 patient returned to the hospital after 10 days of homecare due to disease progression. While palliative care in the home setting is valued by many cancer patients in the end-of-life period, close monitoring is needed for patients with rapidly progressing disease.

  19. Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Locally Advanced Synchronous Esophageal and Head/Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Receiving Curative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Hao; Lu, Hung-I.; Chien, Chih-Yen; Lo, Chien-Ming; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chou, Shang-Yu; Su, Yan-Ye; Shih, Li-Hsueh; Li, Shau-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated clinical outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with locally advanced synchronous esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and head/neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and determined whether synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients had worse prognosis compared to isolated ESCC patients. Using propensity score matching method, we compared 60 locally advanced synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients with 60 matched isolated ESCC patients. Compared to 60 matched isolated ESCC patients, synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients had significantly worse prognosis (13.5 months versus 17.2 months, P = 0.01), more grade 3–4 CCRT toxicity, and higher percentage of CCRT interruption. For synchronous ESCC/HNSCC group, the 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 52% and 13%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that early ESCC stage, non-T4b disease, and salvage operations were significantly associated with superior survival. In multivariate analysis, ESCC stage represented an independent prognosticator. For chemotherapy regimen during CCRT, cisplatin/5-fluorouracil had significantly more grade 3–4 mucositis/esophagitis and neutropenia than weekly cisplatin. In conclusion, synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients receiving curative CCRT have worse prognosis and poorer compliance of CCRT compared to isolated ESCC patients. For these patients, ESCC stage and T4b disease were significantly associated with clinical outcomes, and salvage operation may improve overall survival. PMID:28134308

  20. Challenges in Facing the Lung Cancer Epidemic and Treating Advanced Disease in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Raez, Luis E; Santos, Edgardo S; Rolfo, Christian; Lopes, Gilberto; Barrios, Carlos; Cardona, Andres; Mas, Luis A; Arrieta, Oscar; Richardet, Eduardo; Vallejos S, Carlos; Wistuba, Ignacio; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest cancer worldwide, is of particular concern in Latin America. The rising incidence poses a myriad of challenges for the region, which struggles with limited resources to meet the health care needs of its low- and middle-income populations. In this environment, we are concerned that governments are relatively unaware of the pressing need to implement effective strategies for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of lung cancer. The region has also been slow in adopting molecularly-based therapies in the treatment of advanced disease: testing for epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements are not routine, and access to targeted agents such as monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors is problematic. In this paper, we review the current situation in the management of lung cancer in Latin America, hoping that this initiative will help physicians, patient associations, industry, governments, and other stakeholders better face this epidemic in the near future.

  1. Liver transplantation for chronic liver disease: advances and controversies in an era of organ shortages

    PubMed Central

    Prince, M; Hudson, M

    2002-01-01

    Since liver transplantation was first performed in 1968 by Starzl et al, advances in case selection, liver surgery, anaesthetics, and immunotherapy have significantly increased the indications for and success of this operation. Liver transplantation is now a standard therapy for many end stage liver disorders as well as acute liver failure. However, while demand for cadaveric organ grafts has increased, in recent years the supply of organs has fallen. This review addresses current controversies resulting from this mismatch. In particular, methods for increasing graft availability and difficulties arising from transplantation in the context of alcohol related cirrhosis, primary liver tumours, and hepatitis C are reviewed. Together these three indications accounted for 42% of liver transplants performed for chronic liver disease in the UK in 2000. Ethical frameworks for making decisions on patients' suitability for liver transplantation have been developed in both the USA and the UK and these are also reviewed. PMID:11884694

  2. A phase I trial of chlorambucil administered in short pulses in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Blumenreich, M S; Woodcock, T M; Sherrill, E J; Richman, S P; Gentile, P S; Epremian, B E; Kubota, T T; Allegra, J C

    1988-01-01

    We carried out a phase I trial with chlorambucil. Thirty patients with advanced cancer were entered in six dose levels: 36, 48, 60, 84, 108, and 144 mg/m2. The drug was given in six divided oral doses every 6 hours and the regimen was repeated every 3 weeks. The median age was 62 years (31-84), median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) 60 (40-90). All patients but one had received prior radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both. Central nervous system toxicity was dose limiting, occurring in 5 of 6 patients at 144 mg/m2. It was characterized by transient seizures, hallucinations, lethargy, stupor, and coma. Metoclopramide was successful in controlling nausea and vomiting, which was severe if the antiemetic was not used. Leukopenia (3 patients) and thrombocytopenia (2 patients) were mild. One patient with colorectal carcinoma had a minor response, and two patients with non-small cell lung cancer had stable disease. A safe dose for phase II trials is 108 mg/m2 in six 6-hourly oral doses.

  3. Second-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer: who may benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, V; Graziano, F; Santini, D; D'Emidio, S; Baldelli, A M; Rossi, D; Vincenzi, B; Giordani, P; Alessandroni, P; Testa, E; Tonini, G; Catalano, G

    2008-01-01

    No established second-line chemotherapy is available for patients with advanced gastric cancer failing to respond or progressing to first-line chemotherapy. However, 20–40% of these patients commonly receive second-line chemotherapy. We evaluated the influence of clinico-pathologic factors on the survival of 175 advanced gastric cancer patients, who received second-line chemotherapy at three oncology departments. Univariate and multivariate analyses found five factors which were independently associated with poor overall survival: performance status 2 (hazard ratio (HR), 1.79; 95% CI, 1.16–2.77; P=0.008), haemoglobin ⩽11.5 g l−1 (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.06–2.05; P=0.019), CEA level >50 ng ml−1 (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.21–2.88; P=0.004), the presence of greater than or equal to three metastatic sites of disease (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.16–2.53; P=0.006), and time-to-progression under first-line chemotherapy ⩽6 months (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.39–2.80; P<0.0001). A prognostic index was constructed dividing patients into low- (no risk factor), intermediate- (one to two risk factors), or high- (three to five risk factors) risk groups, and median survival times for each group were 12.7 months, 7.1 months, and 3.3 months, respectively (P<0.001). In the absence of data deriving from randomised trials, this analysis suggests that some easily available clinical factors may help to select patients with advanced gastric cancer who could derive more benefit from second-line chemotherapy. PMID:18971936

  4. Levodopa-carbidopa enteral suspension in advanced Parkinson’s disease: clinical evidence and experience

    PubMed Central

    Virhammar, Johan; Nyholm, Dag

    2016-01-01

    The duration of action of oral levodopa becomes shorter as Parkinson’s disease (PD) progresses. Patients with advanced PD may develop potentially disabling motor fluctuations and abnormal involuntary movement (dyskinesia), which cannot be managed with optimized oral or transdermal PD medications. The progressively worsening symptoms can have a substantial impact on the patient quality of life (QoL). Levodopa–carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is delivered continuously via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with a jejunal extension (PEG-J). LCIG is licensed for the treatment of levodopa-responsive advanced PD in individuals experiencing severe motor fluctuations and dyskinesia when available combinations of antiparkinsonian medications have not given satisfactory results. Initial evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of LCIG came from a number of small-scale studies, but recently, three prospective studies have provided higher quality evidence. A 12-week double-blind comparison of LCIG with standard levodopa therapy, a 52-week open-label study extension of the double-blind study, and a 54-week open-label safety study, demonstrated significant improvements in ‘off’ time and ‘on’ time without troublesome dyskinesia, and QoL measures that were maintained in the longer term. There are also observations that LCIG may be effective treatment for nonmotor symptoms (NMS) although the evidence is limited. There is a need for further research on the efficacy of LCIG in reducing NMS, dyskinesia and improving QoL. This review surveys the clinical evidence for the effectiveness and tolerability of LCIG in the management of advanced PD and highlights some practical considerations to help optimize treatment. PMID:28344656

  5. Depression in patients with Parkinson's disease: impact on functioning.

    PubMed

    Stella, Florindo; Banzato, Claudio E M; Barasnevicius Quagliato, Elizabeth M A; Viana, Maura Aparecida

    2008-09-15

    Depression is a frequently observed neuropsychiatric phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it has been lately considered as a manifestation of such disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between depression and clinical aspects of PD and to assess the impact of the co-occurrence of such condition on the burden imposed by PD. Fifty outpatients diagnosed with idiopathic PD according to the London Brain Bank criteria were examined. PD was evaluated using Hoehn & Yahr staging (H&Y), United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Schwab & England (S&E) functional capacity evaluation. A semi-structured clinical interview was used. The diagnosis of PD was made by neurologist experts on movement disorders, and the diagnosis of depression was made by a psychiatrist, according to the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Depressive symptoms were additionally measured using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale. The analysis of quantitative data was performed using descriptive statistics, univariate linear regression, T-Student Test and ANOVA. Seventeen (34%) patients were diagnosed as clinically depressed and, when compared to the non-depressed ones, presented the following results: H&Y: 3.2 vs. 2.8; UPDRS total: 75.7 vs. 65.3; S&E: 53.5% vs. 65.8% and PD duration: 114.4 months vs. 125.8 months. Depressed patients showed more advanced staging (H&Y), a more severe global clinical condition (UPDRS) and also a greater decrease in their functional capacity (S&E). These data reinforce the hypothesis that depression is associated to poorer functioning in patients with PD.

  6. Clinical impact of extensive molecular profiling in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Sophie; Grellety, Thomas; Toulmonde, Maud; Auzanneau, Céline; Khalifa, Emmanuel; Laizet, Yec'han; Tran, Kevin; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Floquet, Anne; Garbay, Delphine; Robert, Jacques; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-02-08

    Previous precision medicine studies have investigated conventional molecular techniques and/or limited sets of gene alterations. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of the next-generation sequencing of the largest panel of genes used to date in tumour tissue and blood in the context of institutional molecular screening programmes. DNA analysis was performed by next-generation sequencing using a panel of 426 cancer-related genes and by comparative genomic hybridization from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archived tumour samples when available or from fresh tumour samples. Five hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. The median number of prior lines of treatment was 2 (range 0-9). The most common primary tumour types were lung (16.9%), colorectal (14.4%), breast (10.6%), ovarian (10.2%) and sarcoma (10.2%). The median patient age was 63 years (range 19-88). A total of 292 patients (51.4%) presented with at least one actionable genetic alteration. The 20 genes most frequently altered were TP53, CDKN2A, KRAS, PTEN, PI3KCA, RB1, APC, ERBB2, MYC, EGFR, CDKN2B, ARID1A, SMAD4, FGFR1, MDM2, BRAF, ATM, CCNE1, FGFR3 and FRS2. One hundred fifty-nine patients (28%) were included in early phase trials. The treatment was matched with a tumour profile in 86 cases (15%). The two main reasons for non-inclusion were non-progressive disease (31.5%) and general status deterioration (25%). Twenty-eight percent of patients presented with a growth modulation index (time to progression under the early phase trial treatment/time to progression of the previous line of treatment) >1.3.Extensive molecular profiling using high-throughput techniques allows for the identification of actionable mutations in the majority of cases and is associated with substantial clinical benefit in up to one in four patients.

  7. Oral cancer treatment costs in Greece and the effect of advanced disease